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Markers XXVII

George Allen Jr.’s unique lettering and shows no signs of another hand, it can also, with reasonable assurance, be attributed to him. The Jonadab Moor stone falls in this group. There are sixteen stones altogether. A few others show such sloppy work or are so badly worn that they can only be conditionally attributed to him. They may, in fact, be the design work of someone else. Here is the single-edged, round-eyed skull series of Allen Jr. in its entirety: 1723 John Guild, Wrentham (backdated, see John Guild, 1762) 1750 Jonathan Bacon, Sutton (backdated) 1753 Aaron Dresser, Sterling (Figure 10, backdated) 1754 Jane Haws, Franklin 1759 Elizabeth Barber, Millis 1759 Jonah Holland, Boylston 1760 Jonadab Moor, Bolton (Figure 2) 1760 Melatiah Rayno, Wrentham 1761 Joseph Richards, Dedham 1761 Margreat Bacon, Providence 1761 Jacob Bacon, Providence 1761? Isaac Coolidge, Sherborn 1762 Patience Ellis, Medfield 1762 Elizabeth Davenport, Boylston 1762 John Guild, Wrentham 1763 Daniel Haws, Franklin (Figure 11, note grinning mouth mark) A few others in this category that deserve very reserved, conditional attribution due to wear include these: 174? Jeremian Lealand, Sherburn (very bad wear) 1758 Eliakim Morse, Boylston 1760 Elisha Maynard, Boylston (Fig. 12) 1762 Phebe Archer, Franklin Fortunately, although it may seem capricious to attribute other generic round-eyed skull stones to George Allen Jr., there is weighty support in particular for one of these uncertain, worn stones. The stone for Elisha Maynard, 1760, Boylston, north of Worcester, is in only fair condition and hardly worth a glance (Fig. 12). The skull is the generic round-eyed design with an undercut jaw, and the wings, rendered rather unskillfully, are rather scratchy, perhaps the effect of stone type and weathering. However, the lettering is representative of George Allen Jr. despite the wear. What is most striking about the stone is the borders. It is a unique design never employed by Fisher, Farrington, New, Metcalf or anyone else. In fact, only one other instance of this design border is extant: a stone for Mary Cole (1738), in

Profile for Chris Davis

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Profile for cvdavis
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