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Markers XXVII

The exemplary Thomas Fisher skull stone, 1760, Wrentham (Figure 5), has lettering identical to that of the Dexter stone but is accompanied by a skillful skull like that for Jonadab Moor. However, in this instance the wing rib articulation creates a double outlining. The single outlining of the 1760 Moor stone is the more commonly found type. Therefore, a mix of the two outline types makes up this body of work.

Fig. 5. Thomas Fisher, 1760. Wrentham, Massachusetts.

Fig. 6. David Day, 1753, Wrentham, Massachusetts. Rebekah Stearns, 1756, South Attleboro, Massachusetts.

Borders George Allen Jr.’s border designs were taken from the work of his father, George Sr. Compare, for example, the Patience Read border by George Sr. with that of the Margreat Bacon stone by George Jr. Another stylistically comparable pair would be the inset flower bud by George Sr. and the same element in the Margreat Bacon border by George Jr. John New of Wrentham in the 1750s also took these designs from George Allen Sr. as well, possibly even tracing them from stones placed in Wrentham by the elder carver. George Allen’s David Day stone (1753) in Wrentham shows significant similarities to the Rebekah Stearns monument (1756), in Attleboro, by John New, but the exquisite workmanship of the Allen shop is missing in the New copy (Figure 6). The relationship of all these stones to the workshop of George Allen Sr. becomes dramatically evident in the panels of the skull stone for Margreat (sic) Bacon, 1761, Cranston, Rhode Island (see Borders Chart), which are perfectly elegant copies of a design innovation frequently found on documented stones of George Allen Sr.19 As these examples indicate, carvers learned and borrowed from each other as they learned and refined their craft.

Profile for Chris Davis

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Markers XXVII  

Annual Journal of the Association for Gravestone Studies

Profile for cvdavis
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