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Carolina M. Valladares

M. ARC, M. BCN, University of Florida Graduate and Undergraduate Architectural Portfolio 3


Selected Works 2008-2012 Carolina M. Valladares E-mail: valladar@ufl.edu

Osceola Parkway Station Grad.1, Orlando, FL Pg. 06

Orlando Aquarium Grad. 1, Orlando, FL Pg.08

Exhibiting Orlando, Community Center Grad. 2, Orlando, FL Pg. 14

Gardenscape Hotel and Apartments Grad. 3, College Park, Gainesville, FL Pg.20

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Feather Chair Design 8 Pg.26

Transformed Materials, Chair Co-op Design 8, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Pg. 28

Hybrid Dwelling

Design 7, Manhattan, New York Pg. 34

Shadow Lamp

Design 8, Environmental Technology 2 Pg. 38

Reformulating Public Domain Design 7, Manhattan, New York Pg. 42

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Osceola Parkway Station

Carolina M. Valladares, Grad.1, Orlando, FL Prof. William Tilson

The Osceola Parkway Station is an aquatic experience. It is a place where travelers are able to take a glimpse into another world. For those just passing through, the station serves as a marker of remembrance and measure of distance. The station entices one to linger and explore. Integration of water and station starts with the ground plain morphing in relation to the water. In reaction to this aquatic world, the ground sinks to cradle it. From this shift, the roof emerges. The roof extends, creating a cool shade that encompasses the station, and serves as a rain water harvesting system. The collected rain water travels down a water wall and folds into the ground. Ripples are projected into the station, seeming to envelope the train as it enters. The train’s concentration of passengers is defused into a space where two worlds combine.

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roof structure

louver system

water volume

platform / circulation

Osceola Parkway


rip•ple 1. (of a liquid surface) to form small waves or undulations, as water agitated by a breeze. 2. to flow with a light rise and fall or ruffling of the surface. 3. (of a solid surface) to form or have small undulations, ruffles, or folds. 4. (of sound) to undulate or rise and fall in tone, inflection, or magnitude.

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Orlando Aquarium

Carolina M. Valladares, Grad. 1, Orlando, FL Prof. William Tilson

The Orlando aquarium is a volume that holds vessels. The vessels are occupied with sea life, people, light rails station, and garden. As one progresses through the different levels of the aquarium, one seems to be fully engulfed in an aquatic life. One has to continue upward to break that atmosphere and find oneself in a tropical garden. The building roof serves as a rain water harvesting system. The collected rain water travels down a water wall, folds into the ground and reappears at the splash park. The Orlando aquarium serves as destination where people can come and learn about freshwater and sea life, the cycle of water or just spend a day with the family at the park or park.

Church Street

Orlando Church Street

Green Space

Parking

Arteries

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Section A

13 2

14

7 6

3

Section B

Section B

5

9

11

8 4

1 10

Section A

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5 6

1

2

2 4

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Ground Floor Plan Legend 1. Information Desk 2. Exhibit 3. Aquarium 4. Rail Station, Ticket Booth 5. Splash Park 6. Hologram Tank 7. Fish Bowl Room 8. Computer Searching 9. Hearing Room 10. Shop 11. Office 12. Storage 13. Rest Rooms

3rd Floor Plan Legend 1. Exhibit 2. Aquarium 3. Interactive Pool 4. Tank Maintenance 5. Storage 6. Rest Rooms

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Section B

Section A

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Exhibiting Orlando, Community Center Carolina M. Valladares, Grad. 2, Orlando, FL Prof. Frank Bosworth

Orlando is proposing a Creative Village to attract, retain, and inspire the creative class. The Exhibiting Orlando Community Building is located on the corner of Livingston Street and Terry Ave. One site negative is the nonexistent dialog between the buildings the public realm. The buildings are separated from the public. I propose to push the educational building back and way from the site and insert /create a public, interactive community building. This was done by blurring the line between the exterior and the interior. The building circulation moves linearly along with the public realm. People can filter into the building by slipping thought the glass entry wall. Interior spaces continue to the exterior by the creation of small, green, shaded, garden areas. In some moments these areas extend beyond the road making imprints on the surrounding buildings as well as, forming and linking the garden areas.

Site

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Once inside the building, one finds themselves in the main gathering and cafĂŠ area, and is drawn to the glowing exhibition space. The exhibit space punches up and through the overhead filtering in natural light allowing the exhibition space to glow. The buildings long overhead serves to shade the building and public as well as act as a water harvesting system, sloping water to the south side of the building where it is collected and stored.


Section C

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Section A

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Livingston Street B

C

D

1 6

A

Terry Ave.

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8

10 2

7

11

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15

13 14

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5

A

3

16 B

C

Plan Key Public Space 1. Lobby 2. Cafe 3. Auditorium 4. Exhibit 5. Community Room 6. Creative Village Advisory Board Office 7. Serving Kitchen 8. Toilet Room 9. Storage

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D

Private Space 10. Manager Office 11. Marketing Office 12. Administrative Work Room 13. Conference Room 14. Curatorial Office 15. Reading/Work Room 16. Service

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Section D

Section B

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Gardenscape Hotel and Apartments

Carolina M. Valladares, Grad. 3, College Park, Gainesville, FL Prof. Tom Smith

Partner: Casey Nash

The main drivers for this project are natural light, garden space, and shifting volumes. Every unit has natural light penetrating into the master bed rooms; green space interacts with the buildings on many different scales, on both the private and public level. The shifting volumes of the buildings allow both the gardens and natural light to interplay with daily living. The larger scale green space, on the ground floor serves as a multi-use space. It is a public space where one may relax to read a book during the week and it is also a space where the local farmers, or craft markets can set up for a weekend. Visually connected to the large public garden are two smaller private gardens to the North and South. These gardens are accessed only by the apartment dwellers. The gardens are raised up on a different level allowing for privacy. Their visual connection to each other allows for the three gardens to read

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as one. This illusion allows one the ownership of a larger garden experience. From these horizontal plains, the gardens move vertically onto the apartments and hotel, allowing a vine system to clothe it. This vine system acts also as a skin, working with the building to minimizing heat gain. At some points, on the apartments, the vines pull away from the building and act as a screening system for the individual unit balconies. This vertical vine system creates a unique garden experience. Allowing the natural light to penetrate deeper into the apartment units; creates an opportunity for the gardens to enter the living spaces. At this individual scale, the gardens become an experience one lives with and not just passes in view.


North Apartment Elevations

Hotel Elevations

West

East

South

North

East

West

North

South

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Section 1

5

2

2

2 2

8

9

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1

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8 Section 2

Section 2

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4 4

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Ground Floor Plan Key 11

10

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Section 1

22

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1 Hotel Lobby 2 Hotel Office Space 3 Garden 4 Retail 5 Parking 6 Club House 7 Gym 8 Leasing Office 9 Pool 10 1 Bedroom Apartment 11 2 Bedroom Apartment


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6

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4 3

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3 3 5

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2nd Floor Plan

3nd Floor Plan

Key

Key

1 2 3 4 5 6

1 2 3 4 5

Hotel Office Space Pool Mechanical Room Conference Room/Ballroom Apartment Garden Space 1 Bedroom Apartment 2 Bedroom Apartment

Hotel Room Pool Pool Rest rooms 1 Bedroom Apartment 2 Bedroom Apartment

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1st Level 2 Bedroom Apartment Approximately 1300 sq. ft. Total

2nd Level 2 Bedroom Apartment Approximately 1300 sq. ft. Total

1 Bedroom Apartment Approximately 800 sq. ft.

View from apartment to central courtyard.

Section 1

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Section 2

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Feather Chair

Carolina M. Valladares, Design 8 Prof. Donna Cohen

The feather chair plays with the phrase “light as a feather�. The dark heavy frame contrasts the light, airy, netted lace that surrounds it. With simple crochet, the feather chair plays the game of Op Art with the eye. The chair has a PVC structure which is enlaced with turquoise colored cotton thread. The material of the chair allows the structure to appear heavy yet remain light, allowing it to be easily transported. The materials work together in tension and compression to uphold an occupant and give one the experience of floating on air.

Discover

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Explore

Play


Place

Sit

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Transformed Materials, Chair Co-op

Carolina M. Valladares, Design 8, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Prof. Donna Cohen

The Chair Co-op is a sliver of light in the informal urban fabric of Ethiopia’s Marcato. The market entry is largely open to continue with the market language and trade. The rest of the Chair Co-op is more private and interacts with the Marcato through material cleaning and transformation. Plastics and cloths may come in as broken bags but that material is cleaned, braided or woven on to chair frames. A back alley type of road runs along the east side of the building. Here, secondary entrances occur. There is a more private entry for the people who work at the Co-op, and materials are gathered and passed into the Co-op to be altered.

The Co-op is composed of a series of volumes differentiated by function and grouped around a central courtyard. The courtyard is an extension of both the dying and weaving workshop. The weaving workshop has a wide overhanging roof that provides shade and is open to allow the maximum amount of ventilation. The Dying workshop is a covered open space where fabrics and other crafts are made. It is open to allow poisonous gasses from the dying process to dissipate into the air.

Site

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Mapping analysis is translated into overhead condition.

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Section A

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The Chair Co-op is enclosed by a multi media wall. The wall keeps the language of the informal Marcato and allows privacy for the people working in the Chair Co-op. The wall is a composition of staked stone, brick, bottles and the most readily available materials to make it structural and sound The building is sensitive to site and materials. The construction of the overhead condition is created out of low cost, local materials, mostly recycled and easily obtained. The ventilated roof is a web of recycled steel and reed bar that holds corrugated sheet metal and allow for different light conditions. The line between private and public is clear but flexible.

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Section B

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Hybrid Dwelling

Carolina M. Valladares, Design 7, Manhattan, New York Prof. Albertus Wang Partner: Mylene Anayas

The idea of the Hybrid Dwelling Hotel is to address the three temporary urban living quarters in Manhattan, New York: long stay, daily living, and temporary living. These three forms of dwelling are bound together into one unified living tower. It is bound together by the towers skin and the semipublic spaces such as the lobby, restaurant, the gardens and atrium. The gardens are not natural elements of the city. However, with careful placement within the structure, it brings elegant growth skin that fuses to the structure and creates a filtered view of the city. The Hybrid Dwelling Hotel is also merged into the urban context of Manhattan, New York. The hotel holds the urban context and intermixes with the neighboring space. On the other hand, the Hybrid Dwelling Hotel invites the urban context within its living quarters and creates a space that forms connections between the sociology of Manhattan, New York and the living quarters.

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Site

Structure

Shift

Anchor

The existing rigid grid of Manhattan creates a structural foundation for the Hotel’s skin system. The grid is shifted and broken. Anchors are formed and the grid is translated.

Primary entrance: Metal perforation and skin system are layered and shifted from the building to create a filtered entrance. Perforation comes down and folds into the ground to provide public seating.

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Shadow Lamp

Carolina M. Valladares, Environmental Technology 2 Prof. Tom Smith, Thomas Paterson

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The pendent’s task is to provide intimate lighting. The pendent disperses and diffuses light up and out to reflect off the walls and ceiling. The pendent light also gives the walls the illusion of depth and texture. The pendent contains three Bulbrite halogen lamps at 25 watts each. In order to achieve the earlier stated task, three materials are layered. The materials are wire, beads, and feathers. The wires serve as a frame and body of the luminaire. The beads serve to catch the light and glow. The feathers serve to mask and diffuse the light at different places. 39


The halogen lamps let off heat and the feathers form a breathing insulation. The feathers are hollow and cool and prevent the heat of the halogen lamps from transferring into the room. The materials provide layers of shadows that give texture to the walls. 40


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Reformulating Public Domain

Carolina M. Valladares, Design 7, Manhattan, New York Prof. Albertus Wang

Partner: Mylene Anayas

The proposal is to bring the community together for learning purposes and exchanging of knowledge through several educational facilities and to have artists with diverse traits to educate the community in exchange for lower cost of living. These living quarters are divided into three types of dwellings: daily living, short term dwelling, and long term dwelling. The dwellings are folded and anchored onto a platform that activates the public realm. It is through a procession of filtering and slipping into a semi public threshold and containments such as restaurants, exhibitions, and public gardens. These gardens form connections to the De Witt Clinton Park and neighboring context such as galleries and educational studios.

Site

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Districts

Parks

Transit

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2

9 8

6

Section

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1

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3

10

5

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Section


Key

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1. Wellness Center 2. Public Garden 3. Temporary Gallery 4. Lecture Hall 5. Library 6. Outdoor Theater 7. Managers Office 8. Market Shops 9. Studio supplies 10. Retail 11. Restaurant 12. Temporary Stay 13. Permanent Stay

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Section

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Carolina Valladares Portfolio 2008-2012 UF  

Work representing the last few years of my design career at UF.

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