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COUNTY OF BEXAR

PROPOSED ANNUAL BUDGET

FISCAL YEAR 2016-17 OCTOBER 1, 2016 – SEPTEMBER 30, 2017 COMMISSIONERS COURT NELSON W. WOLFF County Judge SERGIO “CHICO” RODRIGUEZ Commissioner, Pct 1

KEVIN WOLFF Commissioner, Pct 3

PAUL ELIZONDO Commissioner, Pct 2

TOMMY CALVERT Commissioner, Pct 4

PREPARED BY THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY MANAGERBUDGET DEPARTMENT DAVID SMITH, COUNTY MANAGER/BUDGET OFFICER ANTONIO ANGUIANO HEDEI ARIAS ANA BERNAL JOHN BOWNDS KRISTINA BRUNNER ALLEN CASTRO AUDREY CAVAZOS SYLVIA DIAZ ALEJANDRO FABELA

LAURON FISCHER TANYA GAITAN JIM GONZALEZ MANUEL GONZALEZ PATRICK GRABIEC CATHERINE GRUENBURG JANET GUADARRAMA VALERIE GUERRA THOMAS GUEVARA PEARL JAUREGUI

LAURA JESSE MANUEL LEAL GERARD LOBOSCO RYAN MARTINEZ IAN MAURER-STOTHERT SETH MCCABE JAMES MCCLELLAND STEPHANIE MORALES ADRIENNE NUNEZ MONICA RAMOS

REVENUES PREPARED BY THE AUDITOR’S OFFICE SUSAN YEATTS, COUNTY AUDITOR

AIMEE REYES ROBERTA ROCHA NANCY SOTO PEGGY SCOTT TINA SMITH-DEAN NELDA TANAKA JOSE TOSCANO KATHRYN WHITCOMB


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BEXAR COUNTY FY 2016-17 PROPOSED ANNUAL BUDGET This budget will raise more revenue from property taxes than last year's budget by an amount of $22,773,771, which is a 6.3 percent increase from last year’s budget, and of that amount $10,975,490 is tax revenue to be raised from new property added to the tax roll this year.


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INDEX OF DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES GENERAL FUND Agrilife Bail Bond Board Bexar Heritage and Parks Administration County Parks and Grounds BiblioTech Budget Central Magistration Criminal District Courts District Clerk Civil District Courts Community Resources Administration Community Programs Veterans Services Child Welfare Board Community Supervision and Corrections Department Constable Precinct 1 Constable Precinct 2 Constable Precinct 3 Constable Precinct 4 County Auditor County Clerk County Courts at Law County Manager Criminal District Attorney Criminal District Courts District Clerk DPS - Highway Patrol Economic Development Elections Emergency Management Office Facilities Management Administration Adult Detention Center County Buildings Energy Forensic Science Center Juvenile Institutions Fire Marshal Human Resources Information Technology Judge/Commissioners Court - Administration Judicial Services Pre-Trial

Page 1-1 2-1 3-1 4-1 5-1 6-1 7-1 8-1 9-1 10-1 11-1 12-1 13-1 14-1 15-1 16-1 17-1 18-1 19-1 20-1 21-1 22-1 23-1 24-1 25-1 26-1 27-1 28-1 29-1 30-1 31-1 32-1 33-1 34-1 35-1 36-1 37-1 38-1 39-1 40-1


INDEX OF DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES (Continued) Crime Lab Department of Behavioral and Mental Health Medical Examiner Medical Examiner Mental Health Initiative Jury Operations Justice of the Peace Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace Precinct 2 Justice of the Peace Precinct 3 Justice of the Peace Precinct 4 Juvenile Child Support Probation Institutions Probation Juvenile District Courts Management and Finance Non-Departmental Probate Courts Public Defenders Office Public Works Animal Control Services Environmental Services Purchasing Sheriff’s Office Adult Detention Center Law Enforcement Support Services Small, Minority, and Women Owned Business Enterprise Tax Assessor – Collector Trial Expense 4th Court of Appeals

41-1 42-1 43-1 44-1 45-1 46-1 47-1 48-1 49-1 50-1 51-1 52-1 53-1 54-1 55-1 56-1 57-1 58-1 59-1 60-1 61-1 62-1 63-1 64-1 65-1 66-1 67-1

OTHER FUNDS Road Funds Public Works Division - County Road and Bridge Fund Public Works Division - County Road and Bridge Fund Multi-Year Projects TxDOT and Advanced Transportation District Multi-Year Projects

68-1 69-1 70-1

Other Operating Funds Justice of the Peace Security Family Protection Account Records Management - County Clerk Records Management - Countywide Records Management - District Clerk Courthouse Security District Clerk Technology Parking Facilities

71-1 72-1 73-1 74-1 75-1 76-1 77-1 78-1


INDEX OF DEPARTMENTAL SUMMARIES (Continued) Environmental Services – Storm Water Mitigation Law Library Drug Court Fire Code Juvenile Case Manager Fund Dispute Resolution Domestic Relations Office Justice of the Peace Technology District and County Court Technology Fund Court Facilities Improvement DA M.I.L.E.S Program Fund DA Pre-Trial Diversion Fund Fleet Maintenance Technology Improvement Capital Lease Projects Fleet Acquisition Fund Community Infrastructure and Economic Development Fund

79-1 80-1 81-1 82-1 83-1 84-1 85-1 86-1 87-1 88-1 89-1 90-1 91-1 92-1 93-1 94-1 95-1

Grant Funds Grants-in-Aid HOME Investment Partnership Program Community Development Block Grant

96-1 97-1 98-1

Capital Improvement Funds November 2003 Bond Referendum Flood Control Projects – M&O Flood Control Projects – Capital County Buildings Capital Improvement

99-1 100-1 101-1 102-1

Debt Service Funds Debt Service

103-1

Venue Project Fund Community Venue Program

104-1

Enterprise Funds Self-Insurance Fund - Health and Life Self-Insurance Fund - Workers Compensation Records Management Center Other Post Employee Benefit Facilities and Parks Management - Firing Range

105-1 106-1 107-1 108-1 109-1


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Office of the County Manager Paul Elizondo Tower, Suite 1021 101 West Nueva San Antonio, Texas 78205

To the Honorable Commissioners Court Bexar County, Texas

BUDGET MESSAGE INTRODUCTION I am pleased to submit for your consideration the Bexar County FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget. Based on certified appraised property values reported by the Bexar Appraisal District, values will increase by nearly 9 percent, or $12.2 billion. Property values on existing properties are projected to increase by $8.4 billion, and new construction will generate $3.8 billion in additional value. Given the growth in property values over the past two years, I am proposing that the Commissioners Court adopt a lower tax rate this year of $0.30895 per $100 valuation. This rate represents 6 percent growth in property tax revenues for FY 2016-17. Although the Court may adopt a higher tax rate, capping property tax revenue growth at 6 percent lessens the burden on the taxpayer while at the same time providing funding to meet service demands. The Proposed Budget totals $1.828 billion for all funds, including $555.8 million in Operating Appropriations, $814.5 million in Capital Projects, $134.4 million for Debt Service, and $323.5 million for contingencies and reserves, most of which is carry forward funding for multi-year capital projects. The FY 2016-17 Proposed General Fund operating budget totals $426.7 million compared to last year’s operating budget of $412.6 million, or an increase of $14.1 million.

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MAINTAINING A STRONG FINANCIAL POSITION The County continues to maintain triple-A bond ratings from all three major rating agencies, which has resulted in estimated savings of $46 million in debt service payments for the County. Communication with bond rating agencies is key to ensure the County continues to meet the high standards necessary to maintain our triple-A bond ratings. One of the most significant factors is the healthy cash reserve balance Commissioners Court has approved over the last several budgets. This year’s Proposed Budget includes a General Fund Balance of $65 million, or 15 percent of expenditures, which is a level consistent with rating agency guidance. In addition to achieving savings associated with triple-A bond ratings, this year Bexar County took advantage of low borrowing costs and refunded $360 million in outstanding bonds. This refunding resulted in a savings of just over $40 million in debt service payments over the life of the refunded bonds. EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS Based on available revenues and rapid growth in healthcare costs, nominal across-the-board salary increases are proposed for employees in FY 2016-17. Health Insurance Health insurance costs increased significantly in FY 2015-16, going up by $7.2 million when compared to FY 2014-15 expenditures. The increase is attributable to several factors, including an increase in the number and cost of high-cost claims (those claims over $50,000), the addition of almost 500 new plan members and increases in prescription drug costs. If this trend continues, the additional cost to the County to maintain our current plan structure would be over $9 million in FY 2016-17 alone. The increase in health care costs is not financially sustainable therefore, the FY 2016-17 Proposed includes $7 million in savings to the Health Insurance Fund.

Options to achieve the $7 million in savings will be presented to Commissioners Court during budget deliberations prior to adoption of the budget. Options will include changes to premiums (for both employees and retirees under the age of 65, out-of-pocket expenses, and plan design and coverage. These recommended changes will unfortunately come in a year when employee compensation will not rise as robustly as in previous years; however it is important to note that there have been no plan changes to our health insurance for employees in four years. For future years, I would recommend that Commissioners Court consider making plan changes annually to lessen the year-to-year impact to covered employees. Also, I would recommend that the County use the next 12 months to explore partnering II


opportunities with other public sector entities, in particular the University Health System. With the County’s close working relationship with UHS, we should investigate pooling our work forces under a single set of shared plans, or even having the County utilize UHS as a plan provider for County employees. I hope to be able to report back to the Court on the potential partnering opportunities during or before next year’s budget process. Livable Wage Initiative In FY 2014-15, Commissioners Court began implementation of a multi-year plan to increase the County’s livable wage. At the time, Bexar County’s minimum wage was $11.66 per hour for County employees. The FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget included funding to raise the minimum wage to $13.00 per hour, as well as address issues of wage compression. Funding in the amount of $1.6 million is proposed to raise the minimum wage to $13.50 per hour in FY 2016-17. This will result in an average pay increase of 1.54 percent for 2,108 employees. Cost of Living Allowance Funding in the amount of $1.4 million is proposed to fund a one percent cost of living allowance for employees on the Exempt and Executive Pay Tables, as well as for those employees on the Non-Exempt Pay Table who will not receive at least a one percent increase as a result of raising the minimum wage to $13.50 per hour. Collective Bargaining The collective bargaining agreement between Bexar County, the Sheriff and the Deputy Sheriff’s Association of Bexar County (DSABC) expired on September 30, 2015. Negotiations for a new contract began in April 2015 and have continued through FY 2015-16. In FY 2015-16, funding in the amount of $3 million was adopted for the collective bargaining agreement under the assumption that an agreement would be executed in January 2016, providing for an 5.5 percent increase in base wages for all DSABC members. Funding in the amount of $5 million is included in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget, representing the full year’s cost of a 5.5 percent increase in base wages, as well as other negotiated allowances and incentives included in the County’s current wages and benefits proposal. BEXAR COUNTY INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY STRATEGIC PLAN In late FY 2015-16, Bexar County contracted with IBM to conduct a thorough review of the Bexar County Information Technology (BCIT) Department and to develop a 5-year Strategic Plan. The study included a review of the physical safety of the County’s IT infrastructure, the County’s potential migration of software and hardware services to the “Cloud”, IT policies, procedures, and management practices, as well as recommended resource and staffing allocations. IBM presented and Commissioners Court approved a Strategic Plan in January 2016. IBM’s study focused on key elements of BCIT, including people, processes and technology. Specifically, the study recommended an organizational structure to improve collaboration, communication and service results. The first phase of this recommendation was implemented in FY 2015-16 and included the creation of the Chief Information and Technology Officer (CITO). The new CITO was hired in July 2016 and will spearhead implementation of IBM’s recommendations. The CITO has already initiated his initial reorganizing effort to implement the IBM study recommendations, including the creation of Project Management, Enterprise Strategic Services, IT Infrastructure Services, and Enterprise Business Solutions divisions. The cost of this reorganization is offset by a reduction in currently funded, vacant positions, for a net cost of $492,717. Another key finding of the IBM study was that the County’s Enterprise Data Center (EDC) needed to be moved to a more secure site and facility. Next fiscal year, the CITO will work with a consultant to III


develop an action plan, risk assessment analysis, and master plan for the EDC move. As part of this process, the County should reduce dependency on mainframe and on-site server based solutions and instead move appropriate workloads to hosted “cloud” solutions. Cloud-based technology offers increase flexibility, reduces risk and optimizes delivery of IT services. The Proposed Budget includes $20 million in capital funds to accomplish the data center relocation and modernization. The IBM study also recommended an operational budget of approximately $4.8 million for the first year of the five year transition plan. These operational appropriations provide funding to allow for hiring and reorganizing to an optimal departmental structure, while continuing to staff and operate our current BCIT systems. IBM also recommended this funding to help the County move from a capital-based I.T. strategy (i.e. County-owned and operated servers and software) to a “cloud” based, out-sourced solution. Because of budgetary constraints, I am only able to recommend funding about half that amount, or $2.4 million, in General Fund contingencies. Should additional funds become available, I would recommend that Commissioners Court consider restoring the contingency funding to the full amount recommended by IBM to allow faster implementation of the needed reorganizing and “cloud-sourcing” solutions identified in the study. CHILD ABUSE AND NEGLECT Over the past few years, several initiatives have been implemented to help improve outcomes for children in Bexar County who are victims of abuse and neglect. In FY 2014-15, Bexar County created the Child and Family Court Division of the Civil District Courts. The objective of this Division is to decrease the time to disposition of child abuse and neglect cases through active management of the court dockets. This redesign of the case management process decreased the time to disposition of these cases, enabling these children to reach a safe environment more quickly. Also in FY 2014-15, a Family Based Safety Services (FBSS) pilot program was implemented. As part of the pilot program, a new screening tool is being utilized to identify families most at risk of revictimization, repeat participation in FBSS and moving on to the legal system for removal of the children. Families identified are given Family Service Plans tailored specifically to their family, rehabilitative services, including substance abuse treatment, and other support services. Currently, Bexar County contracts with the Texas Department of Family Protective Services (TDFPS) for child abuse and neglect case management and adoption services for children in Bexar County. The total cost associated with these contracts is $2.6 million. Commissioners Court is currently working with the TDFPS, the Civil District courts, the Criminal District Attorney, the Child Welfare Board, the Community Resources department, and others to identify alternative methods of providing these services that will result in better outcomes for the children being served. Therefore, this funding is proposed in the Non-Departmental contingency budget for FY 2016-17. Once a new strategy is identified, funding will be allocated to the appropriate budget(s). JUSTICE OF THE PEACE AND CONSTABLE REDISTRICTING In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace (JP) and Constable Precinct lines were redistricted to mirror Commissioner Precinct lines. The population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance, causing County-wide inefficiencies amongst the Justice of the Peace and Constable Offices. Based upon the new population in each Precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each Precinct and personnel were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to establish the new Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all truancy cases to the City. The transfer of

IV


these cases to the City has resulted in a decrease in the overall number of cases that are filed with the Justice of the Peace Courts. Since redistricting and the Uniform Truancy Case Management Program were implemented, total workload for the Justices of the Peace has decreased and workload distribution has changed. As the Constable’s workload is heavily driven by Justice of the Peace workload, the same is true of workload in the Constables’ Offices. Based on this change in workload, the Proposed Budget includes program changes in the JP and Constable staffing, namely the reduction of 10 clerk positions in the Justice of the Peace courts, and 17 deputy constable positions, as well as the deletion of 3 part-time Justices of the Peace, for a net savings to the County of $1.39 million. A budget worksession will be scheduled before adoption of the budget on September 13, 2016 to allow for Commissioners Court deliberation and direction on this issue. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT San Antonio for Technical Economic Competitiveness (SA-TEC) is a taskforce created to address industry-driven and focused mitigation strategies to address a deficit in middle skills jobs in San Antonio. Middle-skills jobs are jobs with qualifications requiring more than a high school diploma, but less than a Bachelors degree. SA Works is an initiative focused on connecting private sector employers with youth, high school and college graduates and other special populations to clarify and emphasize career pathways that are the most valued by employers, and of greater interest to the student. In addition to these two initiatives, the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation (EDF) had been collaboratively implementing its own strategic plan, which included a prominent workforce development element. As all three initiatives progressed in establishing their mission, goals and objectives, it became clear that the three organizations were largely seeking to solve the same problem, so SA-TEC, SA Works and the EDF have merged their efforts, retaining the SA Works name. This merger will result in a single, holistic home for the community’s strategic workforce development initiatives. BIBLIOTECH BiblioTech, the world’s first all-digital public library, continues to enhance services for visitors across Bexar County. In May 2016 BiblioTech and the Alamo Colleges partnered to offer (Network+) I-BEST courses that will help students 18 years or older develop the skills and knowledge base needed to apply to Rackspace’s Open Cloud Academy and/or seek employment opportunities. BiblioTech will also have a presence in the recently opened Bexar County Reentry Service Center, a one-stop resource center for inmates being released from the Adult Detention Center and other detention facilities. BiblioTech’s success has also resulted in several grant opportunities, including a $25,000 grant from Google Fiber to provide digital education to residents at several San Antonio Housing Authority projects and a $100,000 grant from the Kronkosky Charitable Foundation to expand the library’s digital collection. In February 2016, Commissioners Court approved a lease agreement with Wheatley Family I, Ltd, a housing project on the east side of San Antonio, and is located within the City’s eastside Promise zone area. A new BiblioTech branch will be housed at 1203 North Walters Street. Once completed, the 4,200 square foot storefront location will include a reading room and lounge area, group study rooms and other amenities for visitors to access digital resources and learn. Finally, as a way to attract and serve transit system patrons, BiblioTech and the VIA Metropolitan Transit Authority will launch a new partnership, “Ride and Read”, in the summer of 2016. BiblioTech will provide freestanding, branded library kiosks at six VIA transit centers while VIA provides Wi-Fi access

V


for patrons to connect to the library’s digital collection and resources. Plans for potential expansion to additional transit centers will be looked at in 2017. MAJOR LEAGUE SOCCER This year Bexar County, the City of San Antonio, in conjunction with Spurs Sports and Entertainment (SSE), created a partnership to pursue bringing a Major League Soccer franchise to our community. Major League Soccer is currently looking at expanding the league, potentially creating 3 to 4 new MLS teams. Both the County and the City contributed $9 million to purchase Toyota Field Soccer Stadium, the new home of the SSE owned and operated San Antonio Football Club, which currently plays in the United Soccer League. San Antonio FC leases Toyota Field from the County and City, and is now conducting a study to determine how the stadium can be expanded and improved to accommodate a MLS franchise. SS&E will also build the case to illustrate that the San Antonio area has the fan base to support a MLS team. Once these efforts are complete, the County plans to bring forward a bond referendum requesting voter approval of funding to pay for modifications to the stadium needed for a MLS team. BEXAR COUNTY HISTORY AND CULTURE Nuestra Historia and Presidio Gallery In 2016, Bexar County hosted a new exhibit titled "Nuestra Historia, Our History: Spain in Bexar County." This exhibit features documents from the General Archive of the Indies in Seville, Spain, which was the launching point of Spain’s exploration and expansion of the northern frontier of their new territory. In 2017, Bexar County will open “Presidio Gallery,” an exhibit of Spanish colonial maps and documents prepared by the explorers and settlers who tell the story of the beginnings of Bexar County. Daughters of the Republic of Texas Alamo Archives Also in 2016, Bexar County executed an agreement with the Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT) and Texas A&M-San Antonio to house and safeguard a historical library collection that was previously housed in the Alamo. The collection consists of 17,000 book titles, all written about Texas history, genealogy, politics and government, art, natural history and science, religion, folklore, and fiction. The collection will be curated in a climate controlled archival vault in the County’s Courthouse South Annex building (formerly the Federal Reserve San Antonio Branch building) with office spaces, meeting spaces, and a museum quality showcase area on the first-floor gallery. Bexar County Spanish Archives In March 2006, Bexar County opened a small exhibit on the first floor of the County Courthouse. The exhibit includes artifacts dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries when the County was under Spanish and Mexican rule, with records from the 18th and 19th centuries. It is a valuable resource used by people seeking a better understanding of Texas early life. The most valuable document in the collection is a marriage contract with the father of Ursula Beramendi, signed by James Bowie in 1831. Other items include original Spanish and Mexican land grants, jail records, and voting records. The Spanish Archives will move from the Courthouse to be co-located the Daughters of the Republic collection next year. Bexar County Tricentennial Celebration On May 19, 2015, Bexar County Commissioners Court passed a resolution recognizing the enduring significance of the Heritage of Bexar County and its citizens and descendants, and the 300th Anniversary of its Spanish Colonial founding in 2018.

Additionally, the Court authorized several special events to recognize and celebrate this historic anniversary. A citizen Commission, appointed by Commissioners Court, was joined together with a group appointed by the City of San Antonio to develop programs and celebratory events, activities

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and projects that will be organized and sanctioned to mark the occasion. Activities will take place through the year in 2018. CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS Adult Detention Center Campus In FY 2015-16, Commissioners Court adopted a plan to improve the Adult Detention Center Campus. Due to historically low jail population and concentrated re-entry and non-recidivism programs, the plan includes the re-allocation of currently empty bed capacity for other use, renovation of the existing Adult Detention Center Annex, construction of one additional main jail tower and creating a 140 unit Work Release Center. Major benefits of these capital projects include enhanced security, more efficient inmate management and in the long term, reduce recidivism and therefore, jail population. Funding in the amount of $32.4 million was approved in FY 2015-16 to implement the plan. Patrol Substations Work continues on design and construction of two new Sheriff Patrol Substations. The substations will be located in the east and west sides of Bexar County in areas determined to be high call Response Areas. Both facilities will be 12,000-14,000 square feet in size and will house patrol and investigations functions. These projects are anticipated to be complete in July 2017. San Pedro Creek Over the past 12 months, the County’s engineering and design team has continued to work towards completion of the 100 percent design documents. As part of that effort, the County hired Grupo Deseno Urbano, a world reknowned landscape architectural firm based in Mexico City, to enhance the creek design, particulary in the northern most phase of the project. Incorporation of these changes has delayed the completion of the 100 percent design documents, but the design team is working with our Construction Manager-at-Risk to identify construction strategies to make up for some or all of this lost time. The goal of the County is to have Phase 1 of the project open for the public in time for the County’s Tricentennial celebration in May 2018. Associated with the San Pedro Creek project, the County has commissioned a tricentennial commorative art installation. An international call to artists to submit their qualifications for this project was met with over 100 responses from artists all over the world, and from these responses a shortlist of three or four artists will be recommended to Commissioners Court this month. When complete, this tricentennial artwork will be permanently installed along San Pedro Creek, near the original founding site of Bexar County and San Antonio. During FY 2015-16, the County was approached by the Opera Piccola founder Mark Richter and historian John Phillip Santos, who had an idea to write and peform a short operatic work themed around the founding of Bexar County along the banks of San Pedro Creek. This summer, Commissioners Court approved the funding for the first part of a three part opera, titled Las Fundaciones de Bejar. The score is being written by acclaimed composer Joseph Julian Gonzalez (composer of Misa Azteca), and will feature performances by the San Antonio Symphony Orchestra, the Opera Piccola, the San Antonio Opera, the San Antonio Ballet, and others. Las Fundaciones de Bejar will hold its world premier as part of the San Pedro Creek project groundbreaking in September of this year. New Capital projects New funding in the amount of $94.4 million is proposed for capital projects. Major projects include a County/Center for Health Care Services Mental Health Facility ($22 million), Adult Detention Center Systems Replacement ($14.4 million), Enterprise Data Center Relocation ($20 milion) and a Public Works Headquarters Facility. Funding is also proposed for $14.2 million in smaller facility

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improvements and equipment purchases, $4.67 million for new technology and $2.5 million for park improvements. ROAD PROJECTS New funding in the amount of $12.75 million is proposed for roads in FY 2016-17. Projects included in FY 2016-17 are: Grosenbacher Schematic/ROW Strip Map ($3,000,000), Candlewood Phase II ($3,000,000), Traffic Safety Improvements ($2,000,000), Drainage Improvements ($1,000,000), and Rehabilitation Improvements ($1,500,000). Also included is $700,000 to design street improvements in the Highland Oaks subdivision. In addition to the projects budgeted in the County’s budget, it should be noted that the Alamo Area Regional Mobility Authority (AARMA), in conjunction with Bexar County, began the design process for $179 million in roads projects countywide. This road program is not reflected in the County’s budget, however, the AARMA, with Commissioners Court approval, is undertaking $100 million in major new road projects, funded through a $10 per year fee on annual vehicle registrations in Bexar County. Planned within the $179 million include Fischer Road – Phase II ($4.1 million), Old FM 471/Talley Road ($10.5 million), Talley Road Phase I ($13.5 million), Watson Road Phase II ($3.8 million), West Military Drive ($3 million), Blanco Road Phase II ($7.3 million), Evans Road Phase I ($10.1 million), Evans Road Phase II ($9.7 million), Candlemeadow ($4.9 million), Foster Road Phase III ($10 million), Loop 1604 South ($10 million), FM 471 ($10.5 million), FM 1516 ($11.75 million) and Loop 1604 West ($70 million). PROPOSED PROGRAM CHANGES Based on available revenues and significant growth in health care costs, for many offices and department the Proposed Budget will be a maintenance of effort budget. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget recommends program changes in all funds, which include 18.5 net new positions, 73 reclassified positions, for an overall cost of approximately $2.4 million. The program changes in the General Fund include a net of 11.5 new positions and 67 reclassified positions. The annualized cost of these recommendations is $1.96 million. The program changes in Other Funds include a net addition of 7 positions and 6 reclassified positions for an annualized cost of about $435,000. CONCLUSION The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget provides a realistic financial and operating plan for the County, and will allow Bexar County to provide services to our growing community. I want to thank Commissioners, Elected Officials, Department Heads and especially my staff for working with me to develop this Proposed Budget. I would especially like to thank the staff of the Budget, Finance and Human Resources Departments for their dedication and commitment. Respectfully,

David L. Smith County Manager/Budget Officer

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BUDGET HIGHLIGHTS The Proposed Budget totals $1.828 billion for all funds, including $555.8 million in Operating Appropriations, $814.5 million in Capital Projects, $134.4 million for Debt Service, and $323.4 million for contingencies and reserves, most of which is carry forward funding for multi-year capital projects. The FY 2016-17 Proposed General Fund operating budget totals $426.7 million compared to last year’s operating budget of $412.6 million, or an increase of $14.1 million. EMPLOYEE COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS Based on available revenues and rapid growth in healthcare costs, nominal across-the-board salary increases are proposed for employees in FY 2016-17. Health Insurance Health insurance costs increased significantly in FY 2015-16, going up by $7.2 million when compared to FY 2014-15 expenditures. Options to achieve the $7 million in savings will be presented to Commissioners Court during budget deliberations prior to adoption of the budget. Options will include changes to premiums (for both employees and retirees under the age of 65, out-of-pocket expenses, and plan design and coverage. These recommended changes will unfortunately come in a year when employee compensation will not rise as robustly as in previous years; however it is important to note that there have been no plan changes to our health insurance for employees in four years. Livable Wage Initiative In FY 2014-15, Commissioners Court began implementation of a multi-year plan to increase the County’s livable wage. At the time, Bexar County’s minimum wage was $11.66 per hour for County employees. The FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget included funding to raise the minimum wage to $13.00 per hour, as well as address issues of wage compression. Funding in the amount of $1.6 million is proposed to raise the minimum wage to $13.50 per hour in FY 2016-17. This will result in an average pay increase of 1.54 percent for 2,108 employees. Cost of Living Allowance Funding in the amount of $1.4 million is proposed to fund a one percent cost of living allowance for employees on the Exempt and Executive Pay Tables, as well as for those employees on the Non-Exempt Pay Table who will not receive at least a one percent increase as a result of raising the minimum wage to $13.50 per hour. PROGRAM CHANGE SUMMARY Based on available revenues and significant growth in health care costs, for many offices and department the Proposed Budget will be a maintenance of effort budget. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget recommends program changes in all funds, which include 18.5 net new positions, 73 reclassified positions, for an overall cost of approximately $2.4 million. The program changes in the General Fund include a net of 11.5 new positions and 67 reclassified positions. The annualized cost of these recommendations is $1.96 million. The program changes in Other Funds include a net addition of 7 positions and 6 reclassified positions for an annualized cost of about $435,000.


Based upon the new population in each Precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each Precinct and personnel were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to establish the new Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Based on this change in workload, the Proposed Budget includes program changes in the JP and Constable staffing, namely the reduction of 10 clerk positions in the Justice of the Peace courts, and 17 deputy constable positions, as well as the deletion of 3 part-time Justices of the Peace, for a net savings to the County of $1.39 million. A budget worksession will be scheduled before adoption of the budget on September 13, 2016 to allow for Commissioners Court deliberation and direction on this issue. GENERAL GOVERNMENT The General Government service area includes BiblioTech, County Auditor, County Clerk, Elections, Facilities Management – County Buildings, Information Technology, Purchasing, and the Tax Assessor – Collector. General Government Change New Amount Positions $158,552 4.5

BiblioTech County Auditor

• •

• •

Reclassified Positions 0

$64,810

1

0

0

County Clerk

($23,826)

7

-8

0

Elections Facilities Management – County Buildings Information Technology

($7,352)

1

-1

1

$129,918

2

0

0

$492,718

0.5

0

0

Purchasing

$49,147

1

0

1

Tax Assessor – Collector

$178,188

5

0

0

$1,042,155

22

-9

2

TOTAL •

Deleted Positions 0

BiblioTech – Funding is provided for an addition of a Technical Support Specialist II, BiblioTech Branch Manager, BiblioTech Assistant Branch Manager, a Technical Center Assistant, and the converts a part-time Technical Center Assistant to a full-time Technical Center Assistant. County Auditor – Funding is provided for the addition of an Accountant II. County Clerk – Funding is provided for the addition of an Office Assistant IV, salary adjustment and title change for two Court Services Supervisor to Court Services Coordinator, the addition of a Government Relations Advisor, the deletion of County Courts Manager, the addition of five Data Clerks, and the deletion of six Indexing & Verification Clerk, and the deletion of one Lead Indexing & Verification Clerk. Elections – Funding is provided for the addition of a Program Analyst, reclassification of one Operations Coordinator to Supervisor of Operations, and the deletion of one E-Government Developer. Facilities Management – Funding is provided for the addition of a Lead Maintenance Technician and the additional of a Lead Life and Safety Technician.


• •

Information Technology – Funding is provided for the addition of Director of Enterprise Strategic Services, the addition of Program Manager, the addition of Enterprise Architect, the addition of Process Excellence Manager, the addition of Director of PMO, the addition of two IT Program Manager, the addition Director of IT Infrastructure, the addition of Solution Architect, the addition of Director of Enterprise Business Solutions, the addition of Solutions Architect, the deletion of a Director of Technology Innovations, deletion of Analyst Programmer, deletion of Analyst Programmer II, deletion of CHRIS Support Specialist, deletion of Communications Technician, deletion of Computer Operator, deletion of Database Analyst, deletion of two Systems Programmers, deletion of Systems Programming Administrator, and the deletion of Technical Support Specialist III. Purchasing – Funding is provided for the addition of a Receptionist and reclassification of one Lead Fixed Asset Specialist to Fixed Asset Supervisor. Tax Assessor-Collector – Funding is provided for the addition of four part-time Title and Registration Processor I, the addition of a Lead Title and Registration Processor, the additional of a Property Tax Supervisor, and the additional of an Account Clerk.

JUDICIAL The Judicial service area includes the County Courts at Law, Criminal District Attorney, District Clerk, Judicial Services, Jury Operations, Justice of the Peace Courts, Probate Courts, and Public Defenders Office.

County Courts at Law

Judicial Change New Amount Positions $36,938 1

Criminal District Attorney

$792,506

7

-1

45

District Clerk Judicial Services – Pre-Trial

$13,698 $109,021

2 2

-2 0

11 0

Jury Operations

$47,221

1

0

0

Justice of the Peace, Pct. 1

$49,898

1

0

0

Justice of the Peace, Pct. 2

($184,038)

0

-3.5

0

Justice of the Peace, Pct. 3

($154,930)

0

-4.5

0

Justice of the Peace, Pct. 4

($110,293)

0

-3.5

0

Probate Courts

$13,200

1

-1

0

Public Defender’s Office

$3,449

0

0

1

$616,670

15

-16.5

57

TOTAL • •

Deleted Positions -1

Reclassified Positions 0

County Courts at Law – Funding is provided for the addition of Court Coordinator and the deletion of County Court Administration Clerk. Criminal District Attorney – Funding is provided for the reclassification of forty-five Misdemeanor Prosecutors, the addition of two Prosecutor IV, the addition of four Investigators, the addition of an Office Assistant II, and the deletion of a Word Processing Specialist.


• • • • • • • • •

District Clerk – Funding is provided for the reclassification of three Court Order Clerks to Records Clerk, the reclassification of eight Criminal Assignment Clerk II to Criminal Operations Clerks, the addition of two Lead Criminal Court Clerks, and the deletion of two Criminal Court Clerks. Judicial Services – Funding is provided for the addition of a Pre-Trial Supervisor and a Receptionist. Jury Operations – Funding is provided for the addition of an Assistant Jury Bailiff. Justice of the Peace, Pct. 1 – Funding is provided for the addition of a Court Clerk. Justice of the Peace, Pct. 2 – Savings includes the deletion of three Assistant Court Clerks, and the deletion of a part-time Justice of the Peace. Justice of the Peace, Pct. 3 – Savings includes the deletion of two Assistant Court Clerks, the deletion of two Court Clerks, and the deletion of a part-time Justice of the Peace. Justice of the Peace, Pct. 4 – Savings includes the deletion of three Assistant Court Clerks and the deletion of a part-time Justice of the Peace. Probate Courts – Funding is provided for the addition of an Associate Judge for mental health services and the deletion of an Associate Judge. Public Defender’s Office – Funding is provided for the reclassification of an Office Supervisor to Administrative Assistant.

PUBLIC SAFETY The Public Safety service area includes the Constables, Facilities Management – Adult Detention Center Maintenance, Facilities Management – Juvenile Detention, Judicial Services – Crime Lab, Judicial Services – Medical Examiner, Office of the County Manager – Fire Marshal, and the Sheriff’s – Law Enforcement. Public Safety Change New Amount Positions $47,193 1

Constable, Pct. 1

• • •

Deleted Positions 0

Reclassified Positions 0

Constable, Pct. 2

($347,337)

0

-6

0

Constable, Pct. 3

($317,196)

0

-6

0

Constable, Pct. 4

($275,842)

0

-5

0

Facilities – ADC Facilities – Juvenile Detention Judicial Services – Crime Laboratory Judicial Services – Medical Examiner Office of the County Manager – Fire Marshal Sheriff-Law Enforcement

($82,502) $65,109

5 1

-6 0

0 0

$51,240

1

0

0

$76,459

1

0

0

$3,666

0

0

1

$996,085

15

-2

5

TOTAL

$216,874

24

-25

6

Constable, Pct. 1 – Savings includes the addition of an Administrative Clerk II. Constable, Pct. 2 – Savings includes the deletion of six Deputy Constables. Constable, Pct. 3 – Savings includes the deletion of six Deputy Constables.


• •

• • • • •

Constable, Pct. 4 – Savings includes the deletion of five Deputy Constables. Facilities – ADC – Funding is provided for the addition of a Lead Maintenance Technician, the addition of Lead Life and Safety Technician, the deletion of Life Safety Supervisor, the deletion of Jail Superintendent, the addition of three Maintenance Mechanic II, and the deletion of four Maintenance Mechanic I. Facilities – Juvenile Detention – Funding is provided for the addition of Lead Maintenance Technician. Judicial Services – Crime Laboratory – Funding is provided for the addition of a Forensic Scientist I. Judicial Services – Medical Examiner – Funding is provided for the addition of a Senior Medical Investigator. Office of the County Manager – Fire Marshal – Funding is provided for the reclassification of a Public Safety Communications Supervisor. Sheriff – Law Enforcement – Funding is provided for the addition of a three Deputy Sheriff – Law Enforcement Sergeant, the addition of two Extradition Coordinators, the additional of a Deputy Sheriff – Law Enforcement Lieutenant Special Projects, the addition of five Deputy Sheriff – Law Enforcement Officers, the addition of two Public Safety Communications Supervisors, the addition of a Terminal Agency Coordinator, the deletion of a Public Safety Operator, the addition of an Office Assistant III, the deletion of a Office Assistant II, the reclassification of four Public Safety Communications Supervisors, and the reclassification of a Public Safety Communications Assistant Manager.

EDUCATION AND RECREATION The Education and Recreation service area includes Bexar Heritage and Parks – Administration, and Office of the County Manager – AgriLife Extension. Education and Recreation Change New Amount Positions Bexar Heritage and Parks Administration Office of the County Manager – AgriLife Extension TOTAL • •

Deleted Positions

Reclassified Positions

$0

0

0

1

($20,078)

1

-1

0

($20,078)

1

-1

1

Bexar Heritage and Parks – Administration – Funding includes the reclassification of the Parks Section Chief. Office of the County Manager – AgriLife Extension – Funding includes the addition of a Health and Wellness Educator and the deletion of a Health and Wellness Program Specialist.

FACILITIES MAINTENANCE The Facilities Maintenance service area includes Facilities Maintenance – Administration.


Facilities Maintenance Change New Amount Positions Facilities - Administration TOTAL •

$143,829 $143,829

1 1

Deleted Positions

Reclassified Positions

0 0

0 0

Facilities Administration – Funding is provided for the addition of a Division Chief.

HEALTH AND PUBLIC WELFARE The Health and Public Welfare area includes Public Works – Animal Control Services. Health and Public Welfare Change New Amount Positions Public Works – Animal Control Services TOTAL •

Deleted Positions

Reclassified Positions

$72,768

1

0

0

$72,768

1

0

0

Public Works Animal Control Services – Funding is provided for the addition of an Animal Shelter Manager.

OTHER FUNDS The Other Funds with program changes includes DA Pre-Trial Diversion Fund, Public Works – Storm Water Fund, Facilities – Capital Projects, Fire Code Fund, Road and Bridge Fund and Sheriff’s Office – Capital Projects. Other Funds Change New Amount Positions DA Pre-Trial Fund Public Works – Storm Water Fund Facilities – Capital Projects Fire Code Fund (positions counted in Fire Marshal GF) Road and Bridge Fund Sheriff’s Office – Capital Projects TOTAL • •

Deleted Positions

$160,803 $316,259 ($170,140)

3 6 1

0 0 -2

Reclassified Positions 0 6 0

$87,261

1

0

0

($128,333) $62,197 $328,047

0 0 11

-3 0 -5

0 1 7

DA Pre-Trail Fund – Funding includes the addition of three Pre-Trial Bond Officer I. Public Works - Storm Water Fund – Funding includes the reclassification of six Equipment Operator II to Pesticide Operator.


• • • •

Facilities – Capital Projects – Funding is provided for the addition of Project Manager, the deletion of Senior Construction Coordinator, and the deletion of County Architect. Fire Code Fund – Funding includes the addition of two part-time Deputy Fire Marshal and the reclassification of a Public Safety Communications Supervisor. Road and Bridge Fund – Funding includes the addition of three Mechanic II, the addition of three Office Assistant III, and the deletion of three Administrative Clerk II. Sheriff’s Office – Capital Projects – Funding is provided for the reclassification of a Public Safety Analyst Programmer II.

ROADS New funding in the amount of $12.75 million is proposed for roads in FY 2016-17. Projects included in FY 2016-17 are: • • • • • •

Grosenbacher Schematic/ROW Strip Map – $3,000,000 Candlewood Phase II – $3,000,000 Traffic Safety Improvements – $2,000,000 Drainage Improvements – $1,000,000 Rehabilitation Improvements – $1,500,000 Also included is $700,000 to design street improvements in the Highland Oaks subdivision

CONTRIBUTIONS TO OUTSIDE AGENCIES Bexar County Commissioners Court partners with various non-profit organizations (also known as Outside Agencies) to help address gaps in services these agencies can provide to the citizens of Bexar County. Funding these agencies provide important social and environmental services, education programs, economic development initiatives, and other services for Bexar County citizens. Outside Agencies Beat AIDS Bexar County Arts Internship Program Boysville Catholic Charities Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio ChildSafe Christian Senior Services Chrysalis Ministries City/County Seniors Communities in School Family Service Association Health Collaborative Jefferson Outreach for Older People JOVEN Madonna Neighborhood Center

$27,600 38,500 30,000 25,000 32,000 30,000 62,572 59,430 6,500 26,460 30,000 20,000 10,000 15,000 25,000


Outside Agencies MLK March Musical Bridges Around the World National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Northeast Senior Assistance Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Peace Initiative Project MEND Project Quest Public Concert Series San Antonio Cultural Arts San Antonio Fighting Back San Antonio Food Bank San Antonio Metropolitan Ministry San Antonio OASIS Seton Home Southeast Community Outreach for Older People Southwest Community Outreach for Older People St. Vincent de Paul The Fund The Magik Theatre The SA Clubhouse The Winds and Words of War Exhibit Urban 15 YMCA of Greater San Antonio Youth Orchestras of SA YWCA of San Antonio TOTAL

$5,000 5,000 20,000 10,000 25,000 50,000 40,000 80,750 50,000 15,000 20,000 60,000 25,000 15,000 10,000 10,000 10,000 6,000 35,000 10,000 17,574 75,000 11,000 25,000 6,000 22,000 $1,096,386


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 All Funds FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$

911,248,789

$

1,003,289,691

$

911,497,965

$

911,248,789

$

1,003,289,691

$

911,497,965

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

346,869,799 39,277,472 26,142,792 2,088,854 84,111,096 42,596,428 6,676,103 23,489,660 11,677,816 973,366 433,829,002 11,570,918 43,273,406 1,072,576,712

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

387,944,672 40,909,417 26,214,968 2,490,466 44,311,858 42,754,662 6,790,689 23,245,486 11,757,506 1,293,577 496,297,132 11,466,306 45,053,917 1,140,530,656

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

411,455,450 40,907,160 25,500,000 2,231,000 54,663,005 42,276,525 5,968,500 21,717,418 11,470,000 955,570 207,086,965 9,143,769 45,898,085 879,273,447

$ $

24,180,770 1,096,757,482

$ $

117,648,385 1,258,179,041

$ $

37,428,850 916,702,297

$

2,008,006,271

$

2,261,468,731

$

1,828,200,262

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

145,288,297 92,238,328 183,927,869 3,048,691 668,906 92,652,806 28,021,526 104,685,559 328,619,522 979,151,504 25,565,076

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

168,293,408 96,511,261 188,714,297 4,129,988 2,544,842 32,441,403 18,055,649 60,919,967 132,268,270 102,080 527,690,250 1,231,671,415 117,667,513

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

166,126,186 97,563,680 189,106,152 4,525,899 1,589,054 134,833,452 23,470,132 39,080,033 83,055,166 22,759,854 134,416,833 896,526,441 35,886,763

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$

1,004,716,580

$

1,349,338,928

$

932,413,204

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

1,003,289,691

$

912,129,804

$

895,787,057

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$

2,008,006,271

$

2,261,468,731

$

1,828,200,262

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 General Fund FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$

80,957,049

$

77,989,285

$

76,959,524

$

80,957,049

$

77,989,285

$

76,959,524

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

269,268,262 23,598,853 1,954,189 23,672,626 26,889,808 6,676,103 4,383,706 11,316,908 588,612 5,686,049 374,035,116

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

294,698,459 25,385,569 2,270,249 22,777,182 26,517,945 6,790,689 4,633,830 11,405,538 866,453 4,848,992 400,194,906

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

312,655,000 25,547,160 2,026,000 22,471,389 26,076,525 5,968,500 4,689,993 11,120,000 752,000 3,813,950 415,120,517

$ $

- $ 374,035,116 $

- $ 400,194,906 $

415,120,517

$

454,992,165

$

478,184,191

$

492,080,041

$ $ $ $

82,544,704 87,411,494 179,582,335 3,048,030

$ $ $ $

90,009,147 92,220,621 186,132,982 4,129,988

$ $ $ $

88,958,131 92,566,843 185,867,349 4,525,899

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

6,634,349 7,285,558 366,506,470 10,496,410

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

7,501,215 7,697,984 387,691,938 13,532,729

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

8,423,453 5,656,390 22,672,593 408,670,657 18,086,174

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$

377,002,880

$

401,224,667

$

426,756,831

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

77,989,285

$

76,959,524

$

65,323,210

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$

454,992,165

$

478,184,191

$

492,080,041

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

Special Revenue Funds FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Estimate Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$

36,203,527

$

44,435,450

$

36,323,310

$ 36,203,527

$ 44,435,450

$ 36,323,310

$ $ $ $ $ 27,615,175 $ $ $ 14,822,746 $ 360,487 $ 3,852 $ $ 515,438 $ $ 43,317,698

$ $ $ $ 78,150 $ 8,415,035 $ $ $ 14,833,434 $ 351,968 $ $ $ 474,053 $ $ 24,152,640

$ $ $ $ 75,000 $ 20,971,616 $ $ $ 13,747,150 $ 350,000 $ $ $ 361,150 $ $ 35,504,916

$ 1,035,001 $ 44,352,699

$ 864,047 $ 25,016,687

$ 722,981 $ 36,227,897

$ 80,556,226

$ 69,452,137

$ 72,551,207

$ 6,279,626 $ 4,826,834 $ 3,519,684 $ $ 234,157 $ $ 19,855,875 $ $ 424,240 $ $ $ 35,140,416 $ 980,360

$ 13,309,138 $ 4,290,639 $ 2,581,315 $ $ 1,233,377 $ $ 10,357,665 $ $ 92,968 $ 102,080 $ $ 31,967,183 $ 1,161,644

$ 15,151,773 $ 4,996,837 $ 3,238,803 $ $ 371,784 $ $ 17,813,743 $ $ 182,100 $ 87,261 $ $ 41,842,301 $ 2,493,110

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$ 36,120,776

$ 33,128,827

$ 44,335,411

Appropriated Fund Balance

$ 44,435,450

$ 36,323,310

$ 28,215,796

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$ 80,556,226

$ 69,452,137

$ 72,551,207

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

Capital Projects Funds FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Estimate Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$

626,402,799

$

671,045,295

$

601,672,644

$

626,402,799

$

671,045,295

$

601,672,644

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

11,636,403 15,678,619 134,665 18,816,920 15,706,620 893,743 339,146 150,983,945 97,793 214,287,854

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

127,455 15,523,848 142,067 10,203,943 16,236,717 549,829 15,904 101,128,577 452,941 144,381,281

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

80,450 15,360,000 130,000 5,220,000 16,200,000 400,000 3,570 207,086,965 175,500 244,656,485

$ $

- $ 214,287,854 $

89,374,440 233,755,721

$ $

1,500,000 246,156,485

$

840,690,653

$

904,801,016

$

847,829,129

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,261,550 778,650 661 434,749 86,018,457 880,093 65,182,892 155,557,052 14,088,306

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,354,763 1,311,465 24,940,188 60,919,967 111,628,850 200,155,232 102,973,140

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,632,361 1,217,270 126,409,999 39,080,033 69,108,149 237,447,812 15,307,479

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$

169,645,358

$

303,128,372

$

252,755,291

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

671,045,295

$

601,672,644

$

595,073,838

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$

840,690,653

$

904,801,016

$

847,829,129

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 Debt Service Funds FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Estimate Proposed

FY 2014-15 Actuals

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$

50,695,263

$

31,967,770

$

39,246,730

$

50,695,263

$

31,967,770

$

39,246,730

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

65,965,134 150,000 10,875 207,635,057 5,157,857 278,918,923

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

93,118,758 395,168,555 5,064,047 493,351,360

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

98,720,000 4,758,149 103,478,149

$ $

9,852,329 288,771,252

$ $

15,304,334 508,655,694

$ $

17,313,910 120,792,059

$

339,466,515

$

540,623,464

$

160,038,789

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

307,498,745 307,498,745 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

501,376,734 501,376,734 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

108,878,852 108,878,852 -

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$

307,498,745

$

501,376,734

$

108,878,852

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

31,967,770

$

39,246,730

$

51,159,937

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$

339,466,515

$

540,623,464

$

160,038,789

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

Internal Service Funds FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Estimate Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$

3,825,754

$

7,656,827

$

1,376,636

$

3,825,754

$

7,656,827

$

1,376,636

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 2,089,465 $ 421 $ 30,881 $ $ 53,573 $ 43,273,406 $ 45,447,746

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,928,393 $ $ 411,220 $ $ 292,437 $ 45,053,917 $ 47,685,967

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1,580,275 $ $ 200,000 $ $ 10,020 $ 45,898,085 $ 47,688,380

$ 13,293,440 $ 58,741,186

$ 12,105,564 $ 59,791,531

$ 17,891,959 $ 65,580,339

$ 62,566,940

$ 67,448,358

$ 66,956,975

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers

$ 53,241,690 $ 61,465,703 $ 58,387,906 $ - $ - $ $ 47,200 $ - $ $ - $ - $ $ - $ - $ $ - $ - $ $ - $ - $ $ - $ - $ $ 1,621,223 $ 3,974,180 $ 3,764,917 $ - $ - $ $ - $ - $ $ 54,910,113 $ 65,439,883 $ 62,152,823 $ - $ - $ -

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$ 54,910,113

$ 65,439,883

$ 62,152,823

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

$

$

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$ 62,566,940

7,656,827

2,008,475

$ 67,448,358

4,804,152

$ 66,956,975


Bexar County, Texas Consolidated Fund Balance Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 Community Venue Project Fund FY 2014-15 FY 2015-16 FY 2016-17 Actuals Estimate Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$

113,164,397

$

170,195,064

$

155,919,121

$

113,164,397

$

170,195,064

$

155,919,121

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

26,142,792 13,856,375 1,300,000 75,210,000 60,208 116,569,375

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

26,214,968 2,915,698 1,300,000 333,836 30,764,502

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

25,500,000 6,000,000 1,300,000 25,000 32,825,000

$ $

- $ 116,569,375 $

- $ 30,764,502 $

32,825,000

$

229,733,772

$

200,959,566

$

188,744,121

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

960,727 37,457,204 21,120,777 59,538,708 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,154,657 16,572,272 26,313,516 45,040,445 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,996,016 10,000,000 25,537,981 37,533,997 -

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$

59,538,708

$

45,040,445

$

37,533,997

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

170,195,064

$

155,919,121

$

151,210,125

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$

229,733,772

$

200,959,566

$

188,744,121

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Venue Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Service Fees Fines and Forfeitures Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfer Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Capital Projects Highways Health and Public Welfare Intergovernmental Expenditures Capital Expenditures Contingencies Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers


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GENERAL FUND


Bexar County, Texas General Fund Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 ACTUAL

FY 2015-16 BUDGET

FY 2015-16 ESTIMATE

FY 2016-17 PROPOSED

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance

$ $

80,957,049 80,957,049

$ $

71,327,822 71,327,822

$ $

77,989,285 77,989,285

$ $

76,959,524 76,959,524

Revenue Ad Valorem Taxes Other Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Service Fees Fees on Motor Vehicles Commission on Ad Valorem Taxes Fines and Forfeitures Revenue From Use of Assets Other Revenue

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

269,268,262 23,598,853 1,954,189 23,672,626 26,889,808 6,676,103 4,383,706 11,316,908 588,612 5,686,049

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

296,520,000 24,237,160 2,044,000 23,483,086 27,180,075 6,507,000 4,689,993 11,195,000 1,092,700 4,507,550

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

294,698,459 25,385,569 2,270,249 22,777,182 26,517,945 6,790,689 4,633,830 11,405,538 866,453 4,848,992

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

312,655,000 25,547,160 2,026,000 22,471,389 26,076,525 5,968,500 4,689,993 11,120,000 752,000 3,813,950

$

374,035,116

$

401,456,564

$

400,194,906

$

415,120,517

$

454,992,165

$

472,784,386

$

478,184,191

$

492,080,041

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

82,544,704 87,411,494 179,582,335 3,048,030 6,634,349 7,285,558 366,506,470 10,496,410

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

88,494,265 89,853,297 183,977,871 4,033,899 7,446,264 8,158,311 17,075,469 399,039,376 13,607,052

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

90,009,147 92,220,621 186,132,982 4,129,988 7,501,215 7,697,984 387,691,938 13,532,729

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

88,958,131 92,566,843 185,867,349 4,525,899 8,423,453 5,656,390 22,672,593 408,670,657 18,086,174

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$

377,002,880

$

412,646,428

$

401,224,667

$

426,756,831

Appropriated Fund Balance

$

77,989,285

$

60,137,958

$

76,959,524

$

65,323,210

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS Target Fund Balance Difference

$ $ $

454,992,165 37,700,288 40,288,997

$ $ $

472,784,386 41,264,643 18,873,315

$ $ $

478,184,191 40,122,467 36,837,057

$ $ $

492,080,041 42,675,683 22,647,527

Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Education and Recreation Facilities Maintenance Health and Public Welfare Contingencies Subtotal Interfund Transfers


Bexar County, Texas General Fund - Departmental Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017

FY 2014-15 ACTUAL

FY 2015-16 BUDGET

FY 2015-16 ESTIMATE

FY 2016-17 PROPOSED

General Government Judge/Commissioners County Clerk County Auditor Economic Development Elections Information Technology Tax Assessor - Collector Purchasing Facilities Management - County Building Maintenance Office of the County Manager Budget Management and Finance Human Resources BiblioTech Total General Government

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,838,368 7,271,905 4,620,593 650,563 3,134,493 14,930,249 10,945,260 1,233,104 4,130,706 1,181,390 604,094 693,939 1,024,016 1,527,806

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,855,006 7,421,574 4,642,563 676,594 3,489,387 18,646,475 11,383,663 1,297,694 4,295,112 1,162,836 736,019 677,864 1,109,186 2,019,865

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,887,226 8,042,805 4,673,519 672,918 3,403,469 19,418,106 11,803,958 1,229,995 4,242,493 1,057,242 725,245 679,071 1,107,484 1,929,689

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,900,703 7,842,967 4,825,451 706,768 3,475,074 18,631,452 11,931,048 1,300,315 4,418,837 1,103,557 782,730 648,076 1,205,209 2,118,698

$

53,786,486

$

59,413,838

$

60,873,220

$

60,890,886

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

28,814,990 1,528,208 8,136,566 1,622,437 9,304,223 2,672,949 1,196,310 1,943,333 1,005,162 1,442,228 1,222,153 1,295,768 10,911,038 2,893,148 7,090,541 5,346,703 60,041 88,848 101,609 735,239

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

30,482,104 1,468,166 8,205,914 1,626,466 9,257,480 2,842,060 1,212,872 1,765,678 1,124,146 1,404,342 1,154,607 1,293,768 10,832,470 2,989,894 7,459,408 5,517,400 62,698 84,301 93,925 975,598

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

31,586,178 1,718,228 8,837,415 1,723,800 9,146,309 2,886,677 1,228,486 1,793,328 1,163,098 1,471,037 1,200,436 1,340,706 11,369,259 2,916,387 6,966,662 5,639,504 65,217 83,663 98,331 985,903

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

32,143,964 1,722,802 8,802,574 1,742,912 9,314,427 2,313,878 1,271,142 1,675,976 1,274,672 1,299,575 1,103,430 1,272,357 11,243,462 3,020,218 7,085,910 5,895,404 63,619 84,326 99,783 1,136,412

$

87,411,494

$

89,853,297

$

92,220,621

$

92,566,843

Judicial Criminal District Attorney Trial Expense District Clerk Jury Operations County Courts at Law Central Magistration - Criminal District Courts Central Magistration - District Clerk Probate Courts Justice of the Peace - Precinct 1 Justice of the Peace - Precinct 2 Justice of the Peace - Precinct 3 Justice of the Peace - Precinct 4 Criminal District Courts Juvenile District Courts Civil District Courts Judicial Services Bail Bond Board 4th Court of Appeals DPS - Highway Patrol Public Defender's Office Total Judicial


Bexar County, Texas General Fund - Departmental Summary Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017

FY 2014-15 ACTUAL

FY 2015-16 BUDGET

FY 2015-16 ESTIMATE

FY 2016-17 PROPOSED

Public Safety Sheriff - Law Enforcement Sheriff - Adult Detention Sheriff - Support Services Facilities Management Facilities Management - Adult Detention Facilities Management - Juvenile Institutions Facilities Management - FSC Operations Juvenile Office Juvenile Probation Juvenile Institutions Child Support Probation Judicial Services Medical Examiner Criminal Investigation Laboratory Community Supervision/Corrections Fire Marshal Office of Emergency Management Constable - Precinct 1 Constable - Precinct 2 Constable - Precinct 3 Constable - Precinct 4 Total Public Safety

$ $ $

60,338,937 61,116,754 2,284,341

$ $ $

62,346,439 61,316,406 2,297,677

$ $ $

63,358,513 61,334,009 2,439,135

$ $ $

63,812,541 60,746,417 2,465,572

$ $ $

2,872,139 1,729,833 430,663

$ $ $

3,151,767 1,788,115 508,510

$ $ $

2,846,913 1,796,482 464,141

$ $ $

3,083,366 1,957,626 469,865

$ $ $

13,740,454 17,620,863 601,819

$ $ $

14,734,753 17,538,475 608,461

$ $ $

16,378,677 16,960,717 492,453

$ $ $

15,950,547 17,500,354 546,660

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,156,364 2,509,076 859,291 1,194,387 882,211 1,821,031 2,189,612 2,032,420 2,202,140

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,421,099 2,660,545 1,052,866 1,252,607 942,289 1,817,288 2,266,416 2,007,236 2,266,922

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,589,083 2,621,634 1,084,148 1,263,184 945,707 1,893,712 2,182,726 2,137,950 2,343,799

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,692,718 2,754,679 1,266,437 1,267,949 905,211 1,908,997 1,907,100 1,672,238 1,959,072

$

179,582,335

$

183,977,871

$

186,132,982

$

185,867,349

$ $ $

2,291,736 756,294 -

$ $ $

2,295,261 837,082 901,556

$ $ $

2,436,596 789,619 903,773

$ $ $

2,915,312 789,184 821,402

$

3,048,030

$

4,033,899

$

4,129,988

$

4,525,899

$ $

458,407 6,175,942

$ $

1,053,940 6,392,324

$ $

936,460 6,564,755

$ $

2,169,772 6,253,681

$

6,634,349

$

7,446,264

$

7,501,215

$

8,423,453

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

478,397 530,878 385,492 509,482 459,701 372,739 2,675,298 306,518 1,567,053

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

494,272 578,746 429,145 657,369 735,899 406,635 2,823,974 294,021 1,738,250

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

416,584 494,518 434,314 632,947 541,223 313,385 2,823,974 302,210 1,738,832

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

489,231 572,951 459,842 633,810 681,821 730,002 328,417 1,760,315

$

7,285,558

$

8,158,311

$

7,697,984

$

5,656,390

$ $ $ $ $

39,254,628 28,758,218 10,496,410 377,002,880

$ $ $ $ $

59,762,948 29,080,427 13,607,052 17,075,469 412,646,428

$ $ $ $ $

42,668,656 29,135,927 13,532,729 401,224,667

$ $ $ $ $

68,826,011 28,067,244 18,086,174 22,672,593 426,756,831

Education and Recreation Bexar Heritage - County Parks & Grounds AgriLife Extension Services Bexar County Heritage Total Education and Recreation Facilities Management Facilities Management - Administration Facilities Management - Energy Total Facilities Management Health and Public Welfare Community Resources - Administration Community Resources - Community Programs Judicial Services - Mental Health Initiative Small Business & Entrepreneurship Public Works - Environmental Services Public Works - Animal Control Services Community Resources - Child Welfare Board Community Resources - Veterans Services Judicial Services - Behavioral & Mental Health Total Health and Public Welfare

Non-Departmental General Government Interfund Transfers Contingencies TOTAL


Fund: 100

APPROPRIATED FUND BALANCE Program Description:

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes $59,555,279 as an appropriated fund balance for the General Fund. This amount will be held as an operating reserve. Because the County can only spend funds that are actually appropriated in the adopted budget, it is in the County’s best interest to appropriate all of the anticipated fund balance. This makes these funds available for use if some extraordinary event would require the expenditure of these funds. The County has a policy not to use the Appropriated Fund Balance except for some unforeseen, catastrophic event.

Appropriations:

Appropriated Fund Balance Total

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$77,989,285

$76,959,524

$65,323,210

$77,989,285

$76,959,524

$65,323,210

Program Justification and Analysis: Commissioners Court has set a policy to maintain a General Fund operating reserve equal to one-tenth of annual operating expenses. This represents Bexar County’s commitment to maintain strong financial reserves. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Appropriated Fund Balance decreases by 15.1 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is a difference of about $11.6 million when compared to the FY 2015-16 estimated Appropriated Fund Balance, which is due to an increase in expenditures. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes an ending fund balance of $65,323,210 that meets the requirement to protect the County’s excellent bond rating and maintain financial stability.


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5102

AGRILIFE EXTENSION SERVICES Mission:

Improve the lives of people, businesses, and communities across Texas and beyond through high‐quality, relevant education.

Vision:

To be the premier provider of relevant continuing education developed through grassroots issue identification, with stakeholder involvement in planning and delivery.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Feeding Our World  Ensure a sustainable, profitable, and competitive food, fiber, and green industry in Texas. Protecting Our Environment.  Protect and conserve the natural resources of the State through educational programs for consumer groups. Improving Our Health  Improve the health, nutrition, and economic security of Texas families. Enriching Our Youth  Prepare Texas youth to be productive, positive, and equipped with life skills for the future. Growing Our Economy  Support community resources and economic development through educational programs for community leaders, businesses, the workforce, and tourism industry.

Program Description:

The Texas AgriLife Extension Service Division offers the knowledge resources of the land-grant university system to educate Bexar County residents for self-improvement, individual action and community problem solving. The Texas AgriLife Extension Service Division is a statewide educational agency and a member of the Texas A&M University System (TAMUS), linked in a unique partnership with the nationwide Cooperative Extension System and Texas County governments. The Texas AgriLife Extension Service Division values and promotes principles of citizen and community involvement, scientifically-based education, lifelong learning and volunteerism. It provides access to all citizens and works cooperatively with other TAMUS parts, County departments and external agencies and organizations to achieve its goals.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of people (adults & youth) reached by group educational programs Number of youth reached by educational group programs Educational programs conducted by staff 1-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

308,825

374,046

430,153

191,937

184,232

211,867

2,569

2,638

3,034


FY 2014-15 Actual Efficiency Indicators: Average attendance per educational program Average hours of work accomplished per volunteer Percent of master volunteers fulfilling commitment of volunteer service Effectiveness Indicators: Value of information and program provided by the extension (5.0 = extremely valuable) Overall satisfaction with extension activities (5.0 = completely satisfied) Percent who would recommend the extension activity to others

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

119 51 79%

141 56 83%

141 56 87%

4.63

4.68

4.78

4.67

4.72

4.77

98%

98%

99%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$575,596 18,024 151,451 11,223

$622,112 23,500 178,538 12,932

$608,835 18,333 152,553 9,898

$615,871 26,000 155,609 11,782

$756,294

$837,082

$789,619

$809,262

Program Change

($20,078) Total

$756,294

$837,082

$789,619

$789,184

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 1.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 estimates due to an increase in the County’s retirement contribution rate as determined by the Texas County and District Retirement System.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for staff to attend additional district 4-H events, livestock shows, and conferences. 1-2


The Operational Expenses group increases by 2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for the purchase of curriculum guides and an anticipated increase in the cost of the alarm services contract.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 19 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed in the Vehicle Fuel and Oil account to be used gas costs associated with travel by staff to provide additional nutritional and conservational educational programs to schools, businesses, and communities.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a cost savings of $20,078. •

One program change proposes to delete one Health and Wellness Program Specialist (E07) and add one Health and Wellness Educator (E-02). The purpose of this program change is to better align the job description with the duties required by the Department. This new position will focus on educating families, individuals, and youths instead of developing and coordinating educational activities and events.

Authorized Positions:

Department Head/County Extension Director Agricultural Program Technician County Extension Associate - 4-H County Extension Associate - Agriculture County Extension Associate - Family & Consumer Science County Extension Associate - Water and Natural Resources County Extension Associate - Horticulturist Health and Wellness Educator Health and Wellness Program Specialist Office Assistant IV Office Supervisor Receptionist Youth Gardens Coordinator Youth Outreach Educator Total – AgriLife

1-3

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 3 1 0 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 3 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 3 1 1 1 1

14

15

15


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5201

BAIL BOND BOARD Mission:

To provide regulation of bail bond companies within the appropriate State statutes and local bail bond rules and ensure the citizens of Bexar County receive fair and equitable service, protection, and treatment.

Vision:

To ensure the citizens of Bexar County are receiving credible and honest service and that the citizens have a government office that is accountable and responds to their needs and concerns.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

Ensure compliance by bail bond sureties with State statutes and local rules. Provide an accessible government office to citizens needing information. Provide cooperative relationships between bail bond sureties and interested persons. Be proactive in practicing prevention and early intervention on any complaints or problems regarding bail bond sureties.

Program Description:

The Bail Bond Board exists in all counties with a population of 110,000 or more as directed by Texas State Statute, Chapter 1704, Occupations Code, Regulation of Bail Bond Sureties. The Board is composed of ten members who are elected officials or appointed persons representing the elected official. The Board administers the Code, supervises, and regulates all phases of the commercial bonding business and enforces the Code. The Bail Bond Board also conducts hearings, investigates, and makes determinations with respect to the issuance, refusal, suspension, or revocation of licenses to bondsman. The Board requires applicants and licensees to appear before the Board, examines witnesses, and compels the production of pertinent books, accounts, records, documents, and testimony by the licensee and others. The Board employs a Bail Bond Administrator who performs all functions directed by the Board and the Code.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Applications for New License Applications for Renewal of License Employee Verifications Efficiency Indicators: Number of Bail Bond Sureties Monitored per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Bail Bonds Licenses Submitted on Time

2-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3 11 140

2 22 155

3 16 160

41

41

41

100%

100%

100%


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$56,653 991 1314 1,083

$56,794 1,300 1,429 3,175

$60,057 716 1,405 3,039

$60,189 1,350 1,405 675

Subtotal

$60,041

$62,698

$65,217

$63,619

Program Changes

$0 Total

$60,041

$62,698

$65,217

$63,619

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 2.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. All positions are fully funded for FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. In FY 2015-16, the Bail Bond Board was subject to an audit, which did not allow the Bail Bond Administrator to travel as often. Funding is provided for mileage to and from bail bond companies for random audits and continuing education for the Bail Bond Administrator.

The Operational Expenses group remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for telephone and internet service, and the annual purchase of toners.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to funding of a one-time purchase for office furniture in FY 2015-16.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Bail Bond Administrator Total – Bail Bond Board

2-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1

1

1

1

1

1


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 7300

BEXAR HERITAGE DEPARTMENT – ADMINISTRATION Mission: The Bexar Heritage Department – Administration Division is a community-driven approach and set of programs that identifies the unique natural, cultural, and historical heritage and values of Bexar County, Texas. The program will develop tools to conserve and be good stewards of these resources and maximize the economic benefits of them, through public-private partnerships and develop and implement strategies to educate the public regarding the County’s heritage.

Vision: All generations of the County’s citizens will have knowledge of and appreciate their heritage and use this to inform decisions that determine the County’s future.

Goals and Objectives: • • •

• • •

Establish and open the Bexar County History Center and all of its initial programs Establish a 5-year program of public events that celebrate the history of Bexar County Organize a partnership group to complete a feasibility study required to establish a National Heritage Area Apply for heritage project grants Operate and develop uses and programs to optimize the public ability to use the historic Double Height Courtroom Formulate a public outreach and education/marketing program that conveys and interprets Bexar Heritage and supports local efforts to impact the economy positively

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Special Projects Planned Capital Improvement Projects Planned

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

N/A 10

4 6

6 25

Efficiency Measures: Special Projects Managed Capital Improvement Projects Managed

N/A 10

4 6

6 15

Effectiveness Measures: Special Projects Completed Capital Improvement Projects Completed

N/A 4

4 6

6 10

3-1


Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$0 0 0 0 0

$707,918 15,000 155,788 22,850 0

$695,980 15,051 171,467 21,275 0

$696,177 8,950 186,244 15,100 0

$ 0

$901,556

$903,773

$906,471 0

Program Change

($85,069) 0

Total

$ 0

$901,556

$903,773

$821,402

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 9.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. All positions are fully funded in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases significantly when compared to FY 201516 Estimates. This is due to one-time funding for the Bexar Heritage Director to attend the World Heritage conference in Spain. Funding is provided for staff to attend the UNESCO - World Heritage conference and the National Parks Service Conference.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 8.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping of historical landmarks throughout Bexar County, which will record and display locations of historical buildings, landmarks, and event locations associated with the founding of Bexar County.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to one-time funding for furniture purchased in FY 2015-16.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total savings of $85,069 to the Bexar Heritage Budget. The net cost of the program change is $0, as the position will be transferred to the Parks Budget. •

The first program change transfers one Parks Section Chief (E-07) to the County Parks and Grounds Department. The transfer of this position will allow for more transparency, as the County Parks and Grounds Budget will reflect the true cost of operating the County’s Parks program.

3-2


Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Bexar Heritage Program Coordinator Building Use & Permit Coordinator Construction Coordinator Curator Director of Cultural & Historic County Assets Maintenance Section Chief Office Assistant IV Parks Section Chief Project Manager Project Finance & Department Administrative Lead Total - Bexar Heritage Department Administration

3-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 1 0 1 1 2 0 0 1

1 0 0 1 1 0 2 1 1 1

1 0 0 1 1 0 2 0 1 1

7

8

7


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5023

BEXAR HERITAGE DEPARTMENTCOUNTY PARKS AND GROUNDS Mission:

The mission of the County Parks and Grounds Department is to provide for the health and welfare of the County’s citizens through passive outdoor recreational opportunities and community gathering places that are representative of the natural scenic and cultural heritage of Bexar County for an annual visitation of 2.2 million citizens.

The County’s recreational system consists of eleven parks and three civic centers. The County Parks and Grounds Division is responsible for the operation and maintenance of County parks and grounds around County-owned facilities. The division is responsible for landscaping, construction, maintenance, and repair of park structures and building grounds. Furthermore, park staff is responsible for arranging services for events in all parks, including handling citizen inquiries and coordinating security services.

Vision: County Parks and Grounds Department is a community-driven approach and set of programs that

identifies the unique natural, cultural, and historical heritage and values of Bexar County, Texas. The program will develop tools to conserve and be good stewards of these resources and maximize the economic benefits of them, through public-private partnerships. This project will engage consultants to execute a feasibility study on the creation of a Bexar County Regional or National Heritage Area and provide an economic impact study for the Bexar region. It will establish the geographic boundaries, coordinate efforts by historians and preservationists, and provide a plan for gaining the desired designation.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Become involved with parks and recreational professional industry groups such as the National Recreation and Park Association Certify staff as Certified Playground Safety Inspectors Bring awareness to our cultural and heritage landmarks Streamline fees and rents charged to Bexar County Citizens Provide updated Parks for all to enjoy

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Number of Reservations Total Number of Acres Maintained Number of Park Visitors Efficiency Measures: Acres of Maintenance Coverage per FTE Reservations per FTE 4-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2,987 481 2,157,028

3,011 481 2,200,000

3,200 481 2,300,000

10.93 67.9

10.93 68.4

10.93 72.7


Average Yearly Hours Spent Maintaining Building Grounds per FTE Average Yearly Hours Spent Hosting Events per FTE Effectiveness Measures: Revenue from Park Reservations & Filing Fee Percentage Increase/Decrease of Park Visitors Percentage Increase/Decrease of Park Reservations Percentage of Inspections Completed within 7 Days

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1,515 544

1,515 544

1,515 544

$363,102 2% 0% 98%

$388,036 4% 2% 98%

$370,000 1% 1% 100%

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,876,763 3,007 189,522 222,444 0

$1,861,952 6,200 204,505 222,604 0

$1,972,917 2,588 237,908 223,183 0

$2,042,848 4,000 289,700 227,445 266,250

$2,291,736

$2,295,261

$2,436,596

$2,830,243 0

Program Change

$85,069 0

Total

$2,291,736

$2,295,261

$2,436,596

$2,915,312

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for the County Parks and Grounds Department increases by 19.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 3.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to employee turnover that occurred in FY 2015-16, which is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 201516 Estimates. This is due to a one-time expense for the Parks Section Chief to travel to Canada during FY 20616-17 to verify the specifications for a portable stage the County will be purchasing. Funding is also provided for membership dues for the National Recreation and Parks Association.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 21.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to additional funding for Pest Control and Garbage Disposal Services. An increase in park reservations has increased garbage disposal expenses and County Parks will contract pest control services to eradicate pests. Additionally, funding exists for various repairs on

4-2


fences, HVAC units, kitchen vents and picnic tables. Funding for the maintenance of oak tree wilt and tree removal services is under Contracted Services in the amount of $50,000. •

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 1.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for the purchase of minor equipment related to the upkeep of the parks and grounds.

The Capital Expenditures group provides funding to replace two compact tractors used for maintaining walking trails and transporting materials within the parks and grounds in the amount of $43,500. Funding is also proposed for renovations to Raymond Russell Park #2 and #3 in the amount of $78,000, renovations to Comanche Park #2 in the amount of $66,500, the installation of County Wide Park area lighting in the amount of $41,750, and renovations for an existing pump house and to provide a tool shop in the amount of $36,500.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a net cost to the General Fund of $0. •

The program change transfers the Parks Section Chief (E-07) and funding in the amount of $85,069 from the Bexar Heritage – Administration to the County Parks and Grounds Budget. This transfer is being proposed to ensure that the County Parks and Grounds Budget reflects the true cost associated with management and maintenance of Bexar County’s parks. Additionally, the Parks Section Chief is being reclassified from an E-07 to an E-08 at no cost.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Parks Section Chief Assistant Park Foreman Field Maintenance Worker Gardener Maintenance Mechanic I Parks and Ground Foreman Supply Clerk I Utility Foreman Total – County Parks and Ground Department

4-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 29 1 4 9 1 1

0 1 30 1 5 9 0 1

1 1 30 1 5 9 0 1

46

47

48


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 6900, 6901, 6902, TBD

BIBLIOTECH Mission: Provide all Bexar County residents the opportunity to access technology and its applications for the purposes of enhancing education and literacy, promoting reading as recreation and equipping residents of our community with the necessary tools to thrive as citizens of the 21st century.

Vision: BiblioTech will serve as a driving force for the advancement of traditional and digital literacy in Bexar County.

Goals and Objectives: •

Provide public library services delivered in digital format, including a quality collection of recreational reading materials, resource materials and databases

Provide educational programs for all ages designed to meet the growing technology needs of our residents

Actively pursue community engagement through partnerships with various public and private organizations in fulfillment of its mission

Support local schools through the provision of digital resources and electronic devices

Serve as a bridge for the digital divide that exists in Bexar County

Program Description: At its anchor locations at 3505 Pleasanton Road (BiblioTech South), 2003 S.

Zarzamora (BiblioTech West) and satellite branch in the Central Jury Room of the Bexar County Courthouse, BiblioTech provides full digital library services, including e-reader circulation. BiblioTech digital library maintains an extensive collection of e-books, audio books, magazines, graphic novels, movies, and music, all in digital downloadable format. In addition to these materials, BiblioTech also makes available to patrons educational databases, software education, genealogy and language learning systems. At our anchor locations, extensive technology in the form of desktop computers, tablets and laptops is available for on-site patrons. Additional adaptive technology is available for visually impaired patrons, including braille display hardware and magnification and scanning software. E-readers for adults and children are available for external circulation. Trained staff is engaged in direct interaction with patrons for technology, research, and reading instruction. Programming, including digital journalism, classes, children’s robotics teams, and tutoring are provided by community partners. BiblioTech staff conducts regular classes onsite, including Tiny Techolotes (children’s story time), and technology classes in both English and Spanish. Future BiblioTech expansion includes a new anchor facility, BiblioTech East, in the Wheatley Courts in the federally designated Promise Zone.

5-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of E-books Checked Out Number of E-readers Circulated Number of Computer Hours Logged Number of On-Site Patrons (Foot Traffic) Efficiency Indicators: Number of Waitlisted Books Number of Wish Listed Books Average Computer Wait Time Effectiveness Indicators: Number of Total Patrons Registered (Cumulative)

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

116,882 5,087 49,410 124,620

116,829 4,920 52,505 153,769

185,010 5,936 81,328 222,598

27,115 2,463 < 10 mins

28,155 2,532 < 10 mins

29,205 2,685 < 10 mins

74,281

97,855

127,212

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$794,980 12,944 663,873 56,009 0

$1,139,285 20,572 719,660 125,348 15,000

$1,118,886 24,490 656,511 114,802 15,000

$1,165,258 19,200 661,788 111,400 2,500

Subtotal

$1,527,806

$2,019,865

$1,929,689

Total

$1,527,806

$2,019,865

$1,929,689

$1,960,147 0 $158,552 0 $2,118,698

Program Changes

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x20AC;˘

The BiblioTech FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 9.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x20AC;˘

The Personnel Services group increases by 4.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to fully funding all authorized positions for the fiscal year. In addition, continuing funding is provided for twenty-two temporary Technical Center Assistants (NE-04) to be hired throughout the fiscal year to address seasonal adjustments in the use of multiple facilities by the public. Funding is also provided for four months for eight temporary Technical Center Assistants to assist in the new BiblioTech East facility. 5-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases by 21.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding has been provided for travel and training for technology innovation exposure, national exposure of BiblioTech, and mileage for employees. Continuing education is required to obtain accreditation from the Texas Library Association.

The Operational Expenses group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for four months for the operations of the new BiblioTech East location. Funding is proposed for additional e-readers, marketing, and digital content. Funding is also provided for the replacement of inventory of loaned e-readers, as well as replacement of faulty or destroyed hardware, as necessary.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to the transfer of funding for marketing materials to the Operational Expenses group.

The Capital Expenditures group includes funding in the amount of $2,500, for the installation of parking signage and a bicycle rack at BiblioTech, Precinct 2.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes five program changes for a total cost of $158,552, as described below. •

The first program change adds one Technical Support Specialist II (NE-08) to BibliotechAdministration for a total cost of $61,964, which includes salary and benefits, and $690 for technology. This position will assist the Network Architect I with programming and troubleshooting Bibliotech-related software and hardware throughout the County.

The second program change converts one part-time Technical Center Assistant (NE-04) to a full-time Technical Center Assistant (NE-04) in Bibliotech, Precinct 1 for a total cost of $18,448, which includes salary and benefits, and $299 for technology. During FY 2015-16, the Department transferred one part-time Technical Center Assistant from BiblioTech, Precinct 1 to BiblioTech, Precinct 2. The reclassification of this position will allow the department to have the same number of full-time Technical Center Assistants in both locations.

The third program change adds one BiblioTech Branch Manager (E-08) for the BiblioTech – East Branch for a total cost of $31,026, which includes salary and benefits, and $690 for technology. Funding is provided for the last four months of FY 2016-17, when the new location is scheduled to open. This position will manage the day-to-day operations of BiblioTech East and organize a program of services for the constituents.

The fourth program change adds one BiblioTech Assistant Branch Manager (E-06) for the BiblioTech- East Branch for a total cost of $25,648 which includes salary and benefits, and $690 for technology. Funding is provided for the last four months of FY 2016-17, when the new location is scheduled to open. This position assists in managing day-to-day operations, execution of programs and services, and enforces the center’s policies and procedures.

5-3


The fifth program change adds one Full Time Technical Center Assistant (NE-04) for the BiblioTech- East Branch for a cost of $21,465, which includes salary benefits, and $299 for technology. Funding is provided for the last four months of FY 2016-17, when the new location is scheduled to open. This position will act as a staff lead for the temporary Technical Center Assistants and provide a management succession solution for BiblioTech’s daily operations.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Administration Administrative Supervisor BiblioTech Administrator BiblioTech Head Librarian BiblioTech Community Relations Coordinator* Network Architect I Technical Support Specialist II Total – Administration

1 1 1 1 1 0 5

1 1 1 1 1 0 5

1 1 1 1 1 1 6

Precinct 1 BiblioTech Branch Manager BiblioTech Assistant Branch Manager Technical Center Assistant ** Total – Precinct 1

1 1 1.5 3.5

1 1 1 3

1 1 1.5 3.5

Precinct 2 BiblioTech Branch Manager BiblioTech Assistant Branch Manager Technical Center Assistant** Total – Precinct 2

1 1 1 3

1 1 1.5 3.5

1 1 1.5 3.5

East Branch BiblioTech Branch Manager BiblioTech Assistant Branch Manager Technical Center Assistant Total – Precinct 3

0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0

1 1 1 3

Grand Total

11.5

11.5

16

*On December 10, 2015, the Department requested for a position to be re-titled from BiblioTech Community Relations Liaison to BiblioTech Community Relations Coordinator. **One part-time Technical Center Assistant was transferred from Precinct 1 to Precinct 2 on March 9, 2016.

5-4


- FUND: 100

ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4903

BUDGET DEPARTMENT Mission: Serving Bexar County, adding value, delivering results. Vision: Our customers will see the Budget Department as a valued partner in making Bexar County the government of choice. We will be leaders in providing budget monitoring and financial analysis.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Create and support an environment focused on planning, strategic and innovative thinking, practical solutions, and accountability. Strengthen Bexar County’s financial position. Continuously improve business practices. Attract, develop, motivate, and retain a productive and diversified workforce. Accomplish goals in the most cost-effective manner for Bexar County citizens.

Program Description:

The Budget Department’s functions include preparing and presenting the annual County operating budget for approval by Commissioners Court. It has responsibility for monitoring offices and departmental appropriations and expenditures and preparing fiscal assessments/notes and budgetary transfers as required. The Budget Department is responsible for monitoring the performance measures submitted by County Offices and Departments to evaluate effectiveness and efficiency of programs. The budget staff ensures that its recommendations are based on accurate information and analyses by maintaining a strong emphasis on validation of data between the County Financial Management System, the County Human Resources Information System, and data generated by County Offices and Departments. The Budget Department is also responsible for coordinating the development of the County’s Long Range Financial Forecast and providing quarterly updates to Commissioners Court regarding current year expenditures, as needed.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload Indicators: Number of Fiscal Notes Written Number of Budgets Monitored Special Budget Projects Completed Number of Budget Transfers Efficiency Indicators: Budgetary Dollars Monitored per Analyst Average Number of Budgets Monitored per Analyst Budget Transfers Prepared per Analyst Fiscal Notes Written per Analyst

6-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

57 105 10 142

51 105 10 84

50 105 10 80

$142,449,037 18 24 10

$113,381,136 18 13 9

$116,782,570 18 13 9


FY 2014-15 Actual

Effectiveness Indicators: Percent Change of General Fund Budget Percent Change of Total County Budget Percentage Difference of Actuals versus Estimates

4.5% 16.6% 1.0%

FY 2015-16 Estimate 6.4% -2.7% -1.4%

FY 2016-17 Proposed 8.5% -4.2% -1.0%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$580,587 9,123 6,641 7,743

$704,611 13,000 8,408 10,000

$697,329 10,226 8,495 9,195

$751,322 13,000 8,408 10,000

$604,094

$736,019

$725,245

$782,730

Program Change

$0 Total

$604,094

$736,019

$725,245

$782,730

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 7.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 7.7 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. All authorized positions will be fully funded for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. Although this appropriation increased, the proposed amount remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Budget amount.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 1 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates due to one-time expenses within the Copier Usage account in FY 2015-16.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 8.8 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. Although this appropriation increased, the proposed amount remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Budget amount.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

6-2


Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Analyst* Assistant County Manager Data Analyst - Compliance Data Programs Administrator Budget Coordinator Budget Director Budget Manager Senior Analyst

4 0.25 1 1 1 1 0 2

FY 2015-16 Estimate 3 0.25 1 0 0 1 1 4

FY 2016-17 Proposed 2 0.25 1 0 0 1 1 4

Total 10.25 10.25 9.25 *This position was reported in the Budget Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authorized position list and will now be reported in the Management and Finance Department.

6-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3210

CENTRAL MAGISTRATION – CRIMINAL DISTRICT COURTS Mission:

Central Magistration envisions itself as implementing the procedures and processes necessary to facilitate the timely and orderly magistration of individuals arrested and charged with misdemeanor or felony offenses and the protection of the community that we serve. Central Magistration strives to work closely with the District and County Courts, the other County Departments and the City of San Antonio, while insuring that justice is carried out in the most efficient and effective manner.

Vision: To provide the most efficient and effective magistration process, to provide support to the District and County Court Judges and to provide assistance to the citizens of our community.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • •

Provide 24 hour magistration. Provide efficient procedures for the magistration and release of arrested individuals. Provide efficient and effective procedures for the dissemination of information to the public. Handle the administrative duties for Central Magistration. Provide information to the magistrates concerning legal and administrative changes that impact central magistration. Provide information to other departments and agencies integral to the effective performance of central magistration. Provide efficient and effective processes that affect interaction and cooperation between departments, agencies and personnel.

Program Description:

On November 1, 2007, Bexar County assumed responsibilities associated with the magistration of County arrestees. All County arrestees are first brought to Central Magistration where they are magistrated and also go through the commercial and personal bonding process. If an arrestee does not bond out from the Central Magistration facility within a reasonable amount of time, they are then transferred to Bexar County Adult Detention Center. The Central Magistration facility is shared with the City of San Antonio and located at the Frank Wing Municipal Court Building. Each year, the County is responsible for paying to the City half of the operational costs for the Central Magistration facility.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Total Number of Persons Magistrated Number of Offenses Magistrated Number of Misdemeanor Offenses Magistrated Number of Felony Offenses Magistrated

67,786 80,509 52,355 28,154 7-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

57,770 69,372 42,532 26,840

FY 2016-17 Proposed

57,192 68,678 42,106 26,572


FY 2014-15 Actuals Efficiency Indicators: Number of persons Magistrated by: Full-Time Magistrates Part-Time Magistrates Effectiveness Indicators: Percent of Misdemeanor/Felony Offenses Magistrated Misdemeanors Felonies Percent of Individuals Magistrated and Released from CMAG

FY 2015-16 Estimates

FY 2016-17 Proposed

36,976 30,810

29,614 28,156

29,318 27,824

65.0% 35.0%

61.3% 38.7%

65.6% 34.4%

36.2%

37.6%

45.7%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$627,794 0 2,043,706 1,449 0

$649,758 3,600 2,160,420 28,282 0

$677,845 0 2,180,550 14,969 13,313

$666,187 3,600 1,642,591 1,500 0

Subtotal

$2,672,949

$2,842,060

$2,886,677

$2,313,878

Program Change

$0 Total

$2,672,949

$2,842,060

$2,886,677

$2,313,878

Program Justification and Analysis: •

FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 20 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to a decrease in the Operational Costs group as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is due employee changes in health insurance plans selected during FY 2015-16. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016-17.

Funding is proposed within the Travel, Training and Remunerations group at the same levels 7-2


allocated in FY 2015-16. Funding is provided for staff to attend annual Judicial Continuing Legal Education Training. •

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 24.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Half of the cost of the contract associated with the County’s share of CMAG Operational costs is budgeted in the Non-Departmental Contingencies General Fund Proposed Budget for FY 2016-17 pursuant to the Policy Consideration below.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is due to the one-time expense of replacing the video conference system in FY 2015-16.

No funding is proposed for the Capital Appropriation group for FY 2016-17.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Policy Consideration:

The County’s magistration process is conducted in the Frank Wing Municipal Court Building. The facility is owned by the City of San Antonio; however, the County occupies approximately half of the building. Facility improvements, with the end goal of creating a more efficient process, are funded within the Capital Improvement Budget. As the City of San Antonio owns the facility, discussions regarding facility improvements have evolved into bigger discussions between the City and the County regarding ownership, operations, staffing and responsibilities. The end result of these discussions may result in a significant change to the current magistration process. Therefore, half of the cost of the contract associated with the County’s share of CMAG Operational costs is proposed in Contingencies.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Magistrate Magistrate (Part-time ) Presiding Magistrate Total – CMAG Criminal District Courts

7-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 4.5 1

2 4.5 1

2 4.5 1

7.5

7.5

7.5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3201

CENTRAL MAGISTRATION – DISTRICT CLERK Mission:

The District Clerk’s mission is to fulfill statutory duties as records custodians for the Magistration Office by providing the County Magistrate Court and the public with information and support using the most technologically advanced methods possible at a reasonable cost.

Vision: The District Clerk envisions the Magistrate Office setting an example of a collaborative effort

between the City of San Antonio and Bexar County by working together to streamline the magistration process.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • •

To perform functions and duties as mandated by law. To incorporate record management principles in imaging information and technology sources. To provide the support and resources for the County Magistrate for Bexar County. To provide the support and resources necessary for employees to perform their duties and responsibilities. To be customer-friendly and responsive to the customers need for service and information. To work cooperatively with the City of San Antonio to facilitate the magistrate process.

Program Description:

The Magistrate Court operates in a cooperative effort with the City of San Antonio to magistrate arrested persons. The office operates out of the City facility, the Frank Wing Municipal Court Building. The District Clerk’s responsibilities include: • • • •

Provide support services to the County Magistrate. Serve as clerk of the court for the County Magistrate. Serve as custodian of records for records pertaining to a person arrested and brought to the Magistrate facility on Class B offenses and above. Provide legally authorized information to the public concerning arrested persons brought to the facility to be magistrated.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Workload Indicators: Number of Persons Magistrated Number of Phone Calls Number of Records Maintained

67,786 108,040 10,791

57,770 115,772 10,712

57,192 119,268 10,504

Efficiency Indicators: Number of Persons Magistrated (Intake) per FTE Number of Phone Calls per FTE

4,027 108,040

3,470 115,772

3,441 119,268

8-1


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Indicators: Average Amount of Time to Intake an Arrested Person (minutes) Average Response Time to Deal with a Difficult Situation (hours)

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

14

14

14

3

2.5

2.5

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,152,179 12,097 32,034

$1,170,026 16,846 26,000

$1,184,397 16,001 28,088

$1,229,774 15,868 25,500

$1,196,310

$1,212,872

$1,228,486

$1,271,142

Program Change

$0 Total

$1,196,310

$1,212,872

$1,228,486

$1,271,142

Program Justification and Analysis: •

FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 3.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 3.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to changes in the type of health care plans selected by employees and employee turnover experienced in FY 2015-16 that is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Operational Costs group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for the purchase of three laser printers for FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 9.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to the one-time purchase of a timestamp machine that occurred in FY 2015-16 within the Repairs and Maintenance – Office Equipment and Furniture account.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

8-2


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Central Magistrate Court Clerk Central Magistrate Operations Clerk CMAG – Supervisor Criminal Assignment Clerk III Division Chief – CMAG Lead Central Magistrate Clerk Office Assistant IV Supervisor – Central Magistrate Total – CMAG District Clerk

8-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

9 0 3 6 1 0 5 0

9 6 0 0 1 3 0 5

9 6 0 0 1 3 0 5

24

24

24


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNITS: 3700, 3903, 3910

CIVIL DISTRICT COURTS Mission:

The Civil District Court Administration’s mission is to provide Judges and staff with the support necessary to most efficiently conduct Court business.

Vision: The Civil District Court’s vision is to provide user-friendly and prompt information about the Civil District Courts to participants in the Court process and the general public.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

Conduct courts that are open to every person injured in their lands, goods, person or reputation so they will have a remedy by due course of law. Grant to all parties due process and a fair opportunity to be heard at a meaningful time, place and manner. Correctly apply the rules, statutes, common law, and Constitutions of Texas and the United States. Duly and fairly administer the administrative duties of the District Courts.

Program Description:

Civil District Courts Administration provides administrative and liaison support to the fourteen Civil District Courts, two Child Support Associate Judges (Title IV-D), and two Children’s Court Associate Judges. Administration assists with the functions of the Presiding Court, Jury Monitoring Court and the Alternative Dispute Resolution Court and assists in overseeing the official court reporters for the Civil District Courts and Associate Judges. Administration also assists the Local District Court Administrative Judge and Civil District Judges on the Juvenile Board with legal and administrative tasks and is responsible for case flow management, research, budget preparation and oversight, advisory services, and dispute resolution, as well as supporting the Children’s Court and the Family Drug Court Treatment Program, and providing ancillary assistance to the Domestic Relations Office.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators (Civil & Family Law): Number of Cases Pending at Beginning of Year New Cases Filed During the Year Other Cases Reaching the Docket Disposition of Cases Number of Cases Pending at the End of the Year Efficiency Indicators: Court Appointed Attorney Expense per Hearing

9-1

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

42,874 43,190 1,182 42,435 44,039

44,428 36,410 936 34,622 47,081

47,081 39,799 1,058 38,528 45,740

$307

$310

$301


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Indicators: Clearance Rate All Cases Civil and Family Clearance Rate Civil Cases other than Family Clearance Rate Family Cases

96.8% 98.3% 95.3%

FY 2015-16 Budget 94.7% 94.6% 94.8%

FY 2015-16 Estimate 95.1% 96.2% 94.3%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Administration (3700) Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Court-Appointed Attorney Costs

$4,059,541 23,148 331,715 53,208 2,622,929

$3,708,023 27,000 326,554 61,575 0

$3,793,873 22,295 276,078 56,387 (150)

$3,834,386 28,825 271,226 56,200 0

Total

$7,090,541

$4,123,152

$4,148,483

$4,190,637

Family Drug Court (3903) Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$0 0 0

$6,000 41,981 8,100

$6,000 41,981 8,300

$7,050 35,323 8,100

Total

$0

$56,081

$56,281

$50,473

Children's Court Division (3910) Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Court-Appointed Attorney Costs

$0 0 0 0 0

$389,951 6,000 23,724 10,500 2,850,000

$384,688 6,000 21,158 9,458 2,340,594

$402,323 7,000 27,477 8,000 2,400,000

Total

$0

$3,280,175

$2,761,898

$2,844,800

9-2


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Civil District Courts Total Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Court-Appointed Attorney Costs

$4,059,541 23,148 331,715 53,208 2,622,929

$4,097,974 39,000 392,259 80,175 2,850,000

$4,178,561 34,295 339,217 74,145 2,340,444

$4,236,709 42,875 334,026 72,300 2,400,000

Subtotal

$7,090,541

$7,459,408

$6,966,662

$7,085,910

Program Changes Grand Total – Civil District Courts

$0 $7,090,541

$7,459,408

$6,966,662

$7,085,910

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group increases by 1.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due primarily to changes in employees' selections of health insurance, which impact the county's contribution to the health plan. All authorized positions are fully funded in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 25 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for judges and their staff to attend various legislative seminars, professional training, and continuing judicial/legal education. Increased travel is anticipated due to the 85th Legislative Session, which will occur in FY 2016-17.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 1.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due mostly to one-time technology funding in FY 2015-16 for the Civil District Courts staff.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 2.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due mostly to one-time furniture expenses that occurred in FY 2015-16.

The Court-Appointed Attorney Costs group is flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The recent Children's Court reorganization has resulted in savings on court-appointed attorney costs. Therefore, the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget was adjusted to align more closely with recent actual expenditures.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget. 9-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Judge Alternative Dispute Resolution Attorney Associate Judge Chief Trial Assignment Clerk Civil District Court Manager Civil District Court Staff Attorney Court Reporter Court Support Specialist District Court Coordinator District Court Staff Attorney General Administrative Counsel Senior Court Support Specialist

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

14 1 2 1 1 1 16 1 1 2 1 1

14 1 2 1 1 1 16 1 1 2 1 1

14 1 2 1 1 1 16 1 1 2 1 1

42

42

42

1 1 2 1

1 1 2 1

1 1 2 1

Total – Children's Court Division

5

5

5

Grand Total – Civil District Courts

47

47

47

Total – Administration District Court Coordinator Family Court Administrator Family Court Manager Senior Data Analyst

9-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4710

COMMUNITY RESOURCES – ADMINISTRATION Mission:

To facilitate significant change in Bexar County through the investment of appropriate

resources.

Vision:

To change lives and communities through the careful, deliberate use of appropriate tools and resources. Our mission will be accomplished by: • • • • • • •

Developing and implementing comprehensive planning, quality program administration, and the efficient coordination of projects/activities to effect change for the citizens of Bexar County through a comprehensive array of services. Identifying and maximizing resources in the community that will support the needs of our targeted populations including, but not limited to, the elderly, disabled, mentally ill, persons living with HIV/AIDS, children of all ages and the impoverished. Developing comprehensive strategies based on analysis and evaluation of community and program data Refining program designs to improve and expand the delivery of services. Reviewing, analyzing and evaluating program and community data to measure the impact of the County, local, State and Federal financial contributions to programs that serve our targeted populations. Consistent monitoring of agencies and programs funded by grants or general fund to ensure compliance and attainment of contractual goals. Developing and maintaining strong partnerships with other governmental agencies, educational institutions, healthcare systems and community based organizations.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • •

To design and implement programs based on sound public policies that improve the quality of life for County residents. To form productive partnerships internally and with other governmental and non-governmental entities that will expand services to County residents. To ensure that quality services are being provided to Bexar County residents through effective program evaluation, monitoring and outcome measurement. To conduct resource development that will lead to service expansion. To coordinate community outreach and education events on issues that affect our targeted populations. To support Commissioners Court through the implementation of their mandates and initiatives.

Program Description:

The Administration Division of the Department of Community Resources (DCR) identifies community needs and priority/target populations and coordinates the delivery of service, while ensuring compliance with funding regulations. The Administration Division also manages the day to day operations of the department. Additionally, the Division develops working partnerships with other County departments and external agencies that impact the County at a service level. Identifying opportunities to share resources that could impact issues of interest to Bexar County is a 10-1


-

priority for this Division. The Division participates in several executive committees and taskforces developed to address County issues in order to ensure that the public and service delivery partners are fully informed about available services and eligibility requirements. Identification of qualified and capable community partners so that the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ability to meet the basic needs of County residents is important to the Division. Finally, the Division prepares plans and negotiates agreements for service delivery of assistance programs ensuring that eligibility criteria is fair, equitable and complies with funding regulations of public agencies and community partners.

Performance Indicators: Workload Indicators: Dollar Amount of General Fund, and Grant Funds administered Number of program plans, designs, grant applications

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

$23,139,908

$29,967,486 $31,379,901

Efficiency Indicators: Number of external monitoring to be completed by Community Programs, CDH & Ryan White Programs Number of agency contracts executed by Community programs, CDH and Ryan White Programs Effectiveness Indicators: Number of programs in compliance with funding regulations Number of audit findings during monitoring

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2016-17 Proposed

8

8

8

0

2

50

3

5

122

6

6

6

0

0

0

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$430,888 11,236 30,383 5,890

$444,882 11,840 31,400 6,150

$368,786 12,176 26,950 8,672

$442,251 11,535 29,195 6,250

Subtotal

$478,397

$494,272

$416,584

$489,231

Program Changes

$0 Grand Total

$478,397

10-2

$494,272

$416,584

$489,231


-

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 17.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group increases by 20 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to employee turnover, including the Executive Director of Community Resources, during FY 2015-16.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group decreases by 5.3 percent when compared to FY 201516 Estimates. Funding is provided at a level that is consistent with previous budgeted amounts.

The Operational Costs group increases by 8.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to lower expenditures in Copier Rental & Expense and Telephone and Internet Service in FY 2015-16.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 28 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to a one-time expenditure in Computer Supplies provided for the new Executive Director of Community Resources hired in FY 2015-16.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Executive Director Client Services Manager* Special Projects Coordinator Intake Worker** Office/Contract Supervisor Office Assistant IV Total – Administration

FY 2015-16 Estimate

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1

6

6

6

*The Client Services Manager is 50 percent General Fund and 50 percent CEAP Grant Fund. **The Intake Worker is 50 percent General Fund and 50 percent CEAP Grant Fund.

10-3

FY 2016-17 Proposed


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4704

COMMUNITY RESOURCES – COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Mission:

To facilitate significant change in Bexar County through the investment of appropriate

resources.

Vision:

To change lives and communities through the careful and deliberate use of appropriate tools and resources. We will: • •

Identify and maximize all available resources in the community. Work cooperatively with other governmental agencies, organizations, and institutions to provide planned, comprehensive services for our customers and avoid duplication of services. Refine program and service delivery designs to identify additional opportunities for effective and efficient delivery of services. The development and implementation of a comprehensive plan, administration of the program and coordination of projects/activities to effect change for the citizens of Bexar County with a comprehensive array of services and improvements.

• •

Goals and Objectives: •

To design and implement programs, based on sound public policies, that meet the basic needs of County residents. To form productive operational partnerships with other governmental and non-governmental entities that expands services to County residents. To ensure that quality services are being provided to Bexar County residents through effective program evaluation and outcome measurement. To provide resource development to enhance and/or expand the services provided by the division, County boards, commissions, and community partners. To coordinate community events that educate citizens on issues related to children, seniors, economically disadvantaged populations, and County program services. To promote community involvement and development activities.

• • • • •

Program Description:

The Community Programs Division is responsible for providing operational/administrative support, coordination, monitoring, preparation of reports, and oversight of diverse constituent services, and functions delivered by internal departments and external agencies that include the following: • • • • • • •

Bexar County Child Welfare Board Child Death Review Team Friends of the Child Welfare Board – Heart Gallery Joint City/County Commission on Elderly Affairs Elder Domestic Violence Taskforce South Alamo Regional Alliance for the Homeless (SARAH) United Way Emergency Food and Shelter Program Board 11-1


â&#x20AC;˘

2016 Ending Veteran Homelessness

The Community Programs Division staff supports the Executive Director of Community Resources by making policy and service delivery program recommendations for constituent services. The Community Programs Division also negotiates contracts and has monitoring responsibilities for several outside agencies that receive funding from the County to meet specific needs of citizens.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Dollar Amount of Contracts Administered # of Agencies Receiving an on-site Monitoring Visit Number of Board & Commission Meeting Facilitated Efficiency Indicators: Percentage of Monitoring Visits Conducted per Risk Assessment Percentage of Contracts Monitored via Desk top Percentage of Invoices Processed and Sent to Auditor within Two Weeks of Receiving Invoice Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Invoices Returned for Questioned Costs Contracts Executed within 90 days of the Fiscal Year Board Satisfaction Rating

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$5,800,000 23 115

$6,200,000 19 70

$6,200,000 35 75

80%

50%

80%

20%

35%

20%

90%

85%

90%

1% 80% 80%

.05% 20% 85%

.05% 95% 85%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$512,697 6,528 8,984 2,669

560,746 8,655 6,395 2,950

$477,332 6,273 7,963 2,950

$554,262 6,643 9,096 2,950

$530,878

$578,746

$494,518

$572,951

Program Changes

$0

Grand Total

$530,878

11-2

$578,746

$494,518

$572,951


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 15.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 16.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Employee turnover was experienced during FY 2015-16, which is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Travel and Remunerations group increases by 5.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for training and conference fees for the Community Programs staff.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 14.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to costs associated with a new online grant management system that will allow Community Programs to improve the annual Outside Agency funding request process.

The Supplies and Materials group remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for Office Supplies and Postage needs.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Child and Family Support Liaison Community Programs Director Community Programs Management Analyst Forensic Interview Specialist Data Analyst Office Assistant IV Total – Community Programs

11-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 2 2 1 1

1 1 2 2 1 1

1 1 2 2 1 1

8

8

8


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4706

COMMUNITY RESOURCES – VETERANS SERVICES Mission:

To serve as an advocate agency that assists Veterans, their dependents, and survivors in obtaining local, state and federal benefits earned through service to their country. Through strong partnerships, responsible stewardship and proactive engagement with the community, the Bexar County VSO will work towards ensuring the needs of those who have served are met.

Vision:

To ensure all Bexar County Veterans and their dependents are aware of and have access to benefits and services earned through service in the United States Armed Forces.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

• • •

To provide top quality customer service to Bexar County Veterans and their families. Form productive, operational partnerships with other governmental and nongovernmental entities that will expand services to community residents. To identify and maximize use of all available resources to the Veteran community. To work cooperatively and in collaboration with other recognized service organizations, governmental agencies, and institutions to provide planned, comprehensive services for our Veterans and eligible dependents. To refine program and service delivery designs to identify opportunities for delivering the best services with available resources. Expand capacity of service through strong partnerships with the public, private, military and non- profit sector. Educate and empower Veterans through effective use of technology, outreach and advocacy.

Program Description:

Veterans Services staff provides assistance to veterans, dependents and survivors in filing claims for U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (DVA) compensation, pensions, death benefits, educational assistance, home loans, insurance, hospitalization, and outpatient care. They also provide assistance with applying for military discharge upgrades, requesting military records, and other documents required to complete claims for benefits. They maintain and store military discharge documents (Department of Defense Form 214) for veterans that have a Bexar County mailing address upon discharge. Veterans Services staff also maintains benefit claim files for veterans, their dependents, and survivors.

12-1


Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload Indicators: Number of Interviews Conducted Claims & Support Statements Issued Number of Community Outreach Events Home Visits

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3,331 1,775 96 47

3,350 2,000 24 83

3,960 3,100 48 156

29 4 12

39 4 15

39 4 18

3,556 N/A N/A

4,312 N/A $2,528,672

4,822 862 $3,557,556

Efficiency Indicators: Number of Calls Taken Per Day Resource/Referral Services Provided Per Day Number of Interviews Conducted Per Day Effectiveness Indicators: Number of Veterans Receiving Assistance Number of Veterans Referred to External Agencies Total in VA Payments Awarded to Claimants

FY 2015-16 Estimate

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials

$248,004 9,619 23,196 25,699

$268,699 9,871 11,451 4,000

$275,301 9,871 13,084 3,954

$296,538 10,217 17,962 3,700

Subtotal

$306,518

$294,021

$302,210

$328,417 0

Program Changes Grand Total

$306,518

$294,021

$302,210

$328,417

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x20AC;˘

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 8.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x20AC;˘

The Personnel Services group increases by 7.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to fully funding a part-time Assistant Veterans Service Officer, which was approved during FY 2015-16.

12-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 3.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This increase fully funds training and travel expenses for the Veteran Services Officers who are required to complete annual certification training conducted by the Texas Veterans Commission.

The Operational Costs group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to an increase in Contracted Services to allow the Veterans Services Office to host an annual event that is designed to be a "one stop shop," allowing for on the spot submission of applications for Veterans and Survivor benefits and services.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 6.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to a decrease in Postage funds needed in FY 2016-17 as requested by the Department.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Veterans Service Officer Assistant Veterans Service Officer* Office Assistant IV Total – Veterans Services Office

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 3 1

1 3.5 1

1 3.5 1

5

5.5

5.5

*In FY 2015-16, an out-of-cycle request was authorized for a part-time Assistant Veterans Services Officer position.

12-3


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4714

COMMUNITY RESOURCES – CHILD WELFARE BOARD Mission: The

Bexar County Child Welfare Board ensures that appropriate services are provided to abused, neglected, and at-risk children in Bexar County.

Vision: The Bexar County Child Welfare Board is a proactive voice for abused, neglected, and at-risk children and families in Bexar County.

Goals and Objectives: •

• • • •

Interpret the services of the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services to the community and the Commissioners Court. Coordinate the use of federal, state, and local funds for foster care and treatment and the expansion of the full range of Children’s Protective Services (CPS). Communicate needs and priorities of the community to the Commissioners Court and Children’s Protective Services staff. Review the quality of services being rendered by the CPS units. Prepare and present an annual budget to the Commissioners Court and authorize spending County funds for appropriated purposes.

Program Description:

The Bexar County Child Welfare Board is composed of Bexar County Commissioners Court appointees. The Board advocates for the protection of children from abuse and neglect. The Board serves as a conduit between the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (TDFPS) and the community to increase public awareness of child welfare program polices and needs. TDFPS contracts with Bexar County and the Child Welfare Board to facilitate implementation and administration of the Children’s Protective Services Program. The Board develops policies involving payment to non-custody foster care providers, clothing for foster children, funds for in-home services (Family Based Safety Services) and adoption services. The Board also promotes fund raising activities. Through these policies and the Board’s role in the community, the effectiveness of TDFPS programs for child protection is increased.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: CPS Cases/Custody Legal Cases New Cases Filed Number of Children FBSS Cases/Non-Custody FBSS Families Served FBSS Children Served 13-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

798 1,506

898 1,632

898 1,632

1,334 3,335

2,414 3,965

1,586 3,965


FY 2014-15 Actual Adoptions Number of Project Swift Adoptions Efficiency Indicators: CPS Cases/Custody Number of Clothing Requests Processed FBSS Cases/Non-Custody Number of FBSS Family Contacts per FTE Number of FBSS Caseworker Adoptions Average Number of Months from Termination of Parental Rights to Consummation (Project Swift) Effectiveness Indicators: CPS Cases/Custody Number of Children Dismissed from Conservatorship Number of Adoptions Consummated FBSS Cases/Non-Custody Percent of Children Remaining at Home as a Result of FBSS Services

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

854

718

725

407

407

407

286 39

163 33

163 33

11

10

10

1,855 900

1,495 703

1,495 703

98%

98%

99%

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$0 2,603,398 71,900

$200 2,751,789 71,985

$200 2,751,789 71,985

$0 0 0

$2,675,298

$2,823,974

$2,823,974

$0

Program Changes

$0 Total

$2,675,298

Policy Consideration:

$2,823,974

$2,823,974

$0

Funding associated with Bexar Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contracts with the Texas Department of Family Protective Services (TDFPS) is proposed in the Non-Departmental contingency budget for FY 2016-17. Bexar County is currently working with the TDFPS and other agencies to identify alternative methods of providing child abuse and neglect and adoption services that will result in better outcomes for the children being served. Once this process is complete, funding will be allocated to the appropriate budget(s).

13-2


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4401

COMMUNITY SUPERVISION/CORRECTIONS (ADULT PROBATION) Mission:

To achieve the rehabilitation and social reintegration of offenders by utilizing communitybased sanctions and/or services at all times through the partnerships with professional resources and services within our community.

Vision:

To promote safety and provide protection throughout the community at all times by reducing the incidence of criminal activity of the offenders placed under community supervision.

Goals and Objectives: •

• • • • • • • •

Develop professional working relationships with community organizations and agencies to promote continued effective dialogue with the Bexar County Community Supervision and Corrections Department (CSCD) in order to maximize the quality and quantity of services offered to the offender. Develop regional offices within the Bexar County CSCD boundaries for closer proximity to the offender's home environment which will enable ease of supervision and accessibility for offenders. Increase community involvement in establishing quality intervention programs that will meet the objective of reducing recidivism and make neighborhoods safer. Develop quality sentencing alternatives for County and District Courts, which satisfies both the community and the needs of the specialized offender. Evaluate the efficacy of programs by utilizing data collection methods and to continuously analyze results for the validation of program design. To pursue an increase in restitution collection for victims by encouraging compliance with courtordered victim restitution through the use of available incentives. Maintain the misdemeanor and felony revocation rate below the statewide benchmark. Maintain the technical revocation rate for felony and misdemeanor cases below the statewide benchmark. Maintain accountability for case management and fiscal accountability low audit risk score.

Program Description:

The 10 Regionalized Regular Supervision units are comprised of 10 probation officers for each unit who each supervise 100 or more misdemeanor and felony offenders. The caseloads are divided into Driving While Intoxicated (DWI) offenders, High Risk Offenders, and Regular Probation. The offenders are supervised under standards based on the individual risk level. Officers work to address the criminogenic need of offenders to assist them to become law abiding individuals. The three geographical units include the West, Northeast, and Central Regional Units. The Mentally Impaired Offender Facility (MIOF) provides treatment for mentally ill offenders who have been court ordered to participate as a result of a Motion to Revoke Probation or as a result of a new offense. Mentally impaired offenders will first be stabilized in the jail and then released to the Bexar County Mentally Impaired Offender Facility. The maximum capacity is 60 offenders and the average length of stay will be 60 to 90 days. The most salient program feature is the establishment of a 14-1


continuum of care beginning with mental health treatment while incarcerated, transitioning to the Facility and then to the Mentally Impaired Caseload unit after release. Substance Abuse Treatment Facility (SATF) provides substance abuse education/rehabilitation. It has the capacity to house up to 200 male and female offenders at a time. The SATF uses cognitive behavioral therapy to help offenders recognize situations, and how to cope more effectively with the problematic negative behaviors. Intermediate Sanction Facility II is a residential treatment facility that diverts nonviolent youthful offenders from the overcrowded jail and prison system and provides adequate and sufficient supervision to promote community safety and reduce crime and/or violations of community supervision conditions through the swift certainty of sanctions. Intermediate Sanction Facility II is designed as a 40-bed maleonly facility. Mental Impairment Caseload provides funding for Case Managers to serve felony offenders described under the mental impairments priority population which is defined as individuals diagnosed with (1) schizophrenia, (2) major depression or (3) bipolar disorder or (4) who are seriously impaired in their functioning due to a mental condition and a Global Assessment Functioning level of 50 or below. Sex Offender Management Unit supervises all sex offenders who meet the definition of a sex offender under Article 62.01(5) Code of Criminal Procedure. The program addresses the criminogenic needs of the offenders with a maximum caseload of 45 cases. The unit monitors treatment compliance and conducts field visits on all assigned offender. High Risk Gang Caseload targets high risk/high needs felony offenders who have been identified as gang members. The program encompasses an intensive supervision plan that addresses criminogenic needs of each offender in the program. The Intermediate Sanctions Program serves offenders who are in risk of revocation for technical noncompliance with the conditions of probation. The program is a phased plan to intensively supervise these offenders with the goal of sending into regular supervision. Felony and Misdemeanor Drug Courts were implemented to target high risk/high needs felony or misdemeanor offenders who are referred to the Drug Courts. They integrate substance abuse treatment with the justice system through a continuum of treatment, rehabilitation and related services. Other specialized treatment Courts include the following Courts with assigned specialized probation officers: Mental Health Court, Prostitution Court, Veterans Court, and DWI Court. High/Medium Reduction Caseload was established with the goal of reducing probation revocation. The program utilizes a combination of progressive sanctions, incentives, increased supervision and monitoring. The Substance Abuse Aftercare Caseload program is designed to reduce the number of violators going to prison due to substance abuse. Offenders exiting substance abuse facilities are placed in a caseload that is capped at 60 probationers. Treatment Alternatives to Incarceration Program (TAIP) provides screening, assessment, evaluation, and referral services to the courts for individuals committing felony and misdemeanor crimes who have drug 14-2


or alcohol problems. The TAIP provides referral to residential treatment facilities or to outpatient drug and alcohol treatment program provided within the department. The Pre-Sentence Investigation unit completes a presentence report for all felony offenders prior to sentencing. The unit utilizes evidence-based assessment tools to provide recommendations to the Courts for conditions of community supervision. The Court Liaison Officer Unit provides an assigned Probation Officer to each Court in Bexar County. The Officer processes offenders into probation, prepares court documents, and represents the Department in judicial proceedings. The Intake unit provides initial in-processing to all offenders. The unit ensures each offender is presented with their conditions of probation, conducts evidence-based assessments, collects DNA samples as required by law, and enters all legal and financial information into the Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s databases. The Field Unit conducts visits in the offenderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s residence or place of employment. The Field Officers ensure that offenders are compliant with ignition interlock requirements, GPS/electronic monitoring units, curfews, and not in possession of firearms.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of Defendants Directly Supervised Felony Misdemeanor Number of Cases in Specialized Units Number of Cashiering Transactions Residential Beds Available Misdemeanor Placements Annually Felony Placements Annually Efficiency Indicators: Average Caseload per Officer Regular Supervision Specialized Supervision PSI Completed per Officer Effectiveness Indicators: Total Offenders Revoked Monthly Felony Misdemeanor

14-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

19,541 11,634 7,906 2,469 505,000 300 9,192 4,573

20,157 11,434 8,723 2,500 495,000 300 10,044 4,517

20,500 11,500 9,000 2,500 475,000 300 10,500 4,600

132 45 180

129 45 165

120 45 140

1.1% 1.7%

1.2% 2.1%

1.1% 2%


FY 2014-15 Actual Percentage of Early Termination Felony Misdemeanor Technical Revocations as a Percentage of Total Revocations Felony Misdemeanor

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

12.4% 9.2%

11.6% 8.3%

12% 9%

42.3% 69.7%

47.6% 73.6%

42% 70%

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$555,350 55,031 248,910

$871,003 35,000 146,863

$886,032 51,253 146,863

$1,164,988 44,184 57,265

$859,291

$1,052,866

$1,084,148

$1,266,437

Program Changes

$0 Total

$859,291

$1,052,866

$1,084,148

$1,266,437

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 16.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Operational Expenses group increases by 31.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to a full year funding of Rental Expenses to be used for the southeast satellite office, which is expected to begin operations in FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 13.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to one-time expenditures for Office Supplies and Office Furniture related to the move into new satellite offices during FY 2015-16. Similar expenses will be incurred when Adult Probation moves into the fourth and final satellite office. Funds for those expenditures are proposed in Non-Department Contingencies Budget.

There are no Capital Expenditures budgeted in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget. One-time capital expenditures related to the move into additional satellite offices (including Machinery & Equipment, Communication & Security Equipment, etc.) was budgeted during FY 2015-16. Similar expenses will be incurred when Adult Probation expands into the fourth and final satellite office. Funds for those expenditures are proposed in Non-Departmental Contingencies Budget. 14-4


â&#x20AC;˘

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Policy Consideration:

During FY 2014-15, Adult Probation expanded its operations (which previously were only downtown) to two satellite offices, one located in the northwest area of the County and one located in the northeast area of the County. The purpose of this expansion was and continues to be to move the majority of Adult Probationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s operations into four satellite offices that are strategically located throughout the County to be more convenient for probationers to meet their reporting requirements. Adult Probation plans to continue moving its remaining operations into two additional satellite offices in the southeast and southwest area of the County during FY 2016-17. Funding related to the continued expansion into the fourth and final satellite office, southwest satellite office, is placed in Non-Departmental Contingencies in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget pending the approval of their plans and finalization of the associated costs. Adult Probationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s FY 2016-17 General Fund Proposed Budget is comprised of funding to support their current operations only, including the two existing satellite locations and the southeast satellite location, which is expected to begin operations in November 2016.

14-5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3001

CONSTABLE, PRECINCT 1 Mission:

To provide a safe living and working environment for the citizens of Precinct 1 and to effectively serve and protect the community in a professional manner that promotes an environment that is safe for citizens at home and work.

Vision:

To serve the Precinct 1 community by providing a model neighborhood law enforcement department with properly trained and equipped Deputy Constables who serve the community in a professional and sensitive manner.

Goals and Objectives: • • •

Provide the Justice of the Peace Court with trained officers to ensure the safety and security of all court personnel, and all those having business with the Justice Court. Increase the efficient delivery of civil process papers in a timely manner. Actively improve the execution of criminal warrants, while minimizing any adverse effects for those persons we serve including those arrested.

Program Description:

Bexar County has four Constables elected to four-year terms by the residents of their respective precincts. Under Texas law, Constables and their Deputies must execute and return any process, civil or criminal, issued to them by a lawful official. This includes any warrant, citation, notice, subpoena, or writ in Bexar County, or in certain cases, contiguous counties. Locally, Constables serve civil and criminal process originating in the Justice of the Peace Courts, District Courts and County Courts-at-Law. By State statute, Constables are mandated to attend to the Justice of the Peace Courts in their respective precincts, to include providing security services, transporting prisoners, and summoning jurors.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Warrants Received Civil Process Issued Total Papers Issued Efficiency Indicators: Warrants Served per FTE Civil Process Served per FTE Total Papers Served per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Served Civil Process Served Total Papers Served 15-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

11,466 7,374 18,840

40,561 8,049 48,610

40,000 8,000 48,000

799 354 1,153

908 344 1,251

908 344 1,251

15,975 7,085 23,060

19,059 7,215 26,273

19,059 7,215 26,273


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$1,616,170 3,759 88,853 79,072 33,177

$1,641,466 3,000 86,668 83,979 2,175

$1,728,078 2,092 87,318 74,546 1,678

$1,688,048 2,405 80,901 90,450 0

Subtotal

$1,821,031

$1,817,288

$1,893,712

$1,861,804

Program Changes

$47,193 Total

$1,821,031

$1,817,288

$1,893,712

$1,908,997

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group decreases by 2.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due an increase in temporary salary expenses in FY 2015-16, as well as unbudgeted payouts to Deputy Constables who accrued overtime hours in excess of the maximum balance allowed by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). There is not funding proposed for temporary salary expenses in FY 2016-17 in accordance with the program change described below.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 15 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to an increase in funds provided for the Constable and Deputy Constables to attend various trainings and law enforcement seminars.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 7.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to the purchase of technology equipment in FY 2015-16.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 21.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to increases in funding for vehicle fuel and body armor for deputies and office furniture for administrative staff in FY 2016-17.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. Funding for training room audio and visual upgrades was expensed in FY 2015-16.

15-2


The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $47,193 as described below. ●

The program change adds one Administrative Clerk II (NE-02), for a total cost of $47,193, including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Constable precincts, and Precinct 1 has a higher workload relative to the other precincts. Increased full-time administrative staff will help maximize efficiency. As a result of this program change, funding for one part-time, temporary Administrative Clerk II position is removed from FY 2016-17 proposed budget, in the amount of $19,005.

Policy Consideration: In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines

were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. The workload impacts of both redistricting and the truancy agreement have been significant. However, under Commissioners Court direction, the Budget Department refrained from making any workloadrelated personnel changes in Constable Offices in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget until the full effects of these recent changes could be realized and it could confidently be determined that the new workload distribution has largely stabilized. Workload impacts were reviewed for Constables and Justices of the Peace during FY 2015-16 and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Constable Administrative Clerk I (Part-time) Administrative Clerk II Chief Deputy Constable Criminal Warrants Processor Deputy Constable Office Assistant IV Senior Deputy Constable Total – Constable, Precinct 1

15-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 0.5 2 1 0 18 1 2

1 0.5 2 1 1 18 1 2

1 0.5 3 1 1 18 1 2

25.5

26.5

27.5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3002

CONSTABLE, PRECINCT 2 Mission:

The mission of the Constable’s Office, Precinct 2, of Bexar County is to promote a safe and responsible local community by enforcing Court orders, supporting and practicing prevention and early intervention, working in complement with other law enforcement agencies while avoiding duplication of services and reducing the number of traffic accidents in Precinct 2.

Vision:

The vision of the Constable’s Office, Precinct 2, is to collaborate with all law enforcement agencies and communities, to maintain safety for the citizens of Bexar County, while adapting to challenging times and new technology.

Goals and Objectives: • • •

Provide the Justice of the Peace Court with trained officers to ensure the safety and security of all court personnel, and all those having business with the Justice Court. Increase the efficient delivery of civil process papers in a timely manner. Actively improve the execution of criminal warrants, while minimizing any adverse effects for those persons we serve including those arrested.

Program Description:

Bexar County has four Constables elected to four-year terms by the residents of their respective precincts. Under Texas law, Constables and their Deputies must execute and return any process, civil or criminal, issued to them by a lawful official. This includes any warrant, citation, notice, subpoena, or writ in Bexar County, or in certain cases, contiguous counties. Locally, Constables serve civil and criminal process originating in the Justice of the Peace Courts, District Courts and County Courts-at-Law. By State statute, Constables are mandated to attend to the Justice of the Peace Courts in their respective precincts, to include providing security services, transporting prisoners, and summoning jurors.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Warrants Received Civil Process Issued Total Papers Issued Efficiency Indicators: Warrants Served per FTE Civil Process Served per FTE Total Papers Served per FTE

16-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

18,085 9,463 27,548

13,519 10,825 24,344

8,953 12,187 21,140

838 408 1,246

814 442 1,256

908 344 1,251


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Served Civil Process Served Total Papers Served

19,277 9,379 28,656

FY 2015-16 Estimate 18,725 10,160 28,885

FY 2016-17 Proposed 15,428 5,840 21,269

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$1,777,021 9,054 300,062 103,475 0

$1,813,027 10,000 305,804 119,626 17,959

$1,769,527 9,605 289,840 95,881 17,873

$1,881,195 10,560 266,382 96,300 0

Subtotal

$2,189,612

$2,266,416

$2,182,726

$2,254,437

Program Changes

($347,337) Total

$2,189,612

$2,266,416

$2,182,726

$1,907,100

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 12.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group increases by 6.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to turnover experienced during FY 2015-16, which is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 9.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided at the FY 2015-16 budget level for various law enforcement seminars and training for the Constable and his staff.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 8.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due mostly to a decrease in lease expenses for the facility occupied by the Constable.

16-2


The Supplies and Materials group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The budgeted amounts for vehicle fuel and various other supplies line items are adjusted to more closely align with estimated expenditures.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. The FY 201516 budget included the purchase of Tasers.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total savings of $347,337 as described below. ●

This program change deletes six Deputy Constables for a total savings of $347,337, including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Constable precincts, and Precinct 2 has a lower workload per deputy compared to the countywide benchmark. Average workload per deputy is expected to be more evenly distributed amongst the precincts following this program change.

Policy Consideration:

In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. The workload impacts of both redistricting and the truancy agreement have been significant. However, under Commissioners Court direction, the Budget Department refrained from making any workloadrelated personnel changes in Constable Offices in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget until the full effects of these recent changes could be realized and it could confidently be determined that the new workload distribution has largely stabilized. Workload impacts were reviewed for Constables and Justices of the Peace during FY 2015-16 and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

16-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Constable Chief Deputy Constable Criminal Warrants Processor Deputy Constable Office Assistant I Senior Deputy Constable Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Constable, Precinct 2

16-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 17 2 5

1 1 1 17 3 5

1 1 1 11 3 5

27

28

22


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3003

CONSTABLE, PRECINCT 3 Mission:

It is the mission of Bexar County Constable, Precinct 3 Office to serve the citizens of this precinct and Bexar County in a professional, courteous, educated, and respectful manner. This office will execute all legal documents delivered to this office in an efficient, timely, and professional manner, as well as make all returns promptly and accurately. Included in this mission is a mandate to show respect to all persons that this office contacts and to have compassion for those in need of our aid and services. To accomplish the mission of Bexar County Constable, Precinct 3 Office, we will strive to educate ourselves in all areas of law enforcement, cultural diversity and sensitivity, racial profiling, use of force, and protection for all citizens.

Vision:

The vision for the Constable’s Office encompasses working with the Justice of the Peace Courts to: improve efficiency, ensure that civil process is efficient and cost-effective for the taxpayers, vigorously enforce traffic laws to minimize deaths and injuries, and maximize the safety level of the motoring public in Bexar County.

Goals and Objectives: • • •

Provide the Justice of the Peace Court with trained officers to ensure the safety and security of all court personnel, and all those having business with the Justice Court. Increase the efficient delivery of civil process papers in a timely manner. Actively improve the execution of criminal warrants, while minimizing any adverse effects for those persons we serve including those arrested.

Program Description:

Bexar County has four Constables elected to four-year terms by the residents of their respective precincts. Under Texas law, Constables and their Deputies must execute and return any process, civil or criminal, issued to them by a lawful official. This includes any warrant, citation, notice, subpoena, or writ in Bexar County, or in certain cases, contiguous counties. Locally, Constables serve civil and criminal process originating in the Justice of the Peace Courts, District Courts and County Courts-at-Law. By State statute, Constables are mandated to attend to the Justice of the Peace Courts in their respective precincts, to include providing security services, transporting prisoners, and summoning jurors.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Warrants Received Civil Process Issued Total Papers Issued Efficiency Indicators: Warrants Served per FTE

17-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

11,232 7,062 18,294

11,601 7,768 19,369

11,970 8,474 20,444

486

387

908


Civil Process Served per FTE Total Papers Served per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Served Civil Process Served Total Papers Served

FY 2014-15 Actual 304 790

FY 2015-16 Estimate 327 714

FY 2016-17 Proposed 344 1,251

10,200 6,391 16,591

8,124 6,877 15,001

13,613 5,153 18,767

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$1,634,511 3,419 231,460 163,030 0

$1,638,202 8,840 214,966 135,514 9,714

$1,780,878 4,652 227,817 114,889 9,714

$1,709,711 7,800 179,023 92,900 0

Subtotal

$2,032,420

$2,007,236

$2,137,950

$1,989,434

Program Changes

($317,196) Total

$2,032,420

$2,007,236

$2,137,950

$1,672,238

Program Justification & Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 21.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group decreases by 4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to unbudgeted payouts in FY 2015-16 to Deputy Constables, an Administrative Clerk, and an Office Assistant who accrued overtime hours in excess of the maximum balance allowed by the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA). These costs are not budgeted in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various law enforcement trainings and seminars.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 21.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due mostly to a decrease in rental expenses, in accordance with the lease agreement.

17-2


The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 19.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due mostly to a decrease in funding for vehicle fuel. All Constable offices are budgeted the same amount of fuel per uniformed officer in FY 2016-17.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. Funding was provided in FY 2015-16 to replace internet wiring in the facility.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total savings of $317,196 as described below. ●

This program change deletes six Deputy Constables for a total savings of $317,196, including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Constable precincts, and Precinct 3 has a lower workload per deputy compared to the countywide benchmark. Average workload per deputy is expected to be more evenly distributed amongst the precincts following this program change.

Policy Consideration:

In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. The workload impacts of both redistricting and the truancy agreement have been significant. However, under Commissioners Court direction, the Budget Department refrained from making any workloadrelated personnel changes in Constable Offices in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget until the full effects of these recent changes could be realized and it could confidently be determined that the new workload distribution has largely stabilized. Workload impacts were reviewed for Constables and Justices of the Peace during FY 2015-16 and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

17-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Constable Administrative Clerk I Administrative Clerk II Criminal Warrants Processor Deputy Constable Office Assistant III Senior Deputy Constable Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Constable, Precinct 3

17-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 2 1 1 16 1 5

1 2 1 1 16 1 5

1 2 1 1 10 1 5

27

27

21


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3004

CONSTABLE, PRECINCT 4 Mission: • • •

To enforce all court orders. To support and practice crime prevention and early intervention activities. To work in complement with other law enforcement agencies and local school districts while avoiding duplication of service.

Vision: • • • • •

To continue to provide cost effective civil process service for our customers and the taxpayers. To have fewer school age children on the streets during school hours, resulting in less juvenile crime and fewer dropouts. To develop a close working relationship with the Justice of the Peace and Juvenile Court systems to increase efficiency. To promote less crime in neighborhoods through the use of prevention and early intervention programs identified and supported by the community. To continue to work with all law enforcement agencies in an effort to be a viable force to solve community problems and avoid duplication of services.

Goals and Objectives: • • •

Provide the Justice of the Peace Court with trained officers to ensure the safety and security of all court personnel, and all those having business with the Justice Court. Increase the efficient delivery of civil process papers in a timely manner. Actively improve the execution of criminal warrants, while minimizing any adverse effects for those persons we serve including those arrested.

Program Description:

Bexar County has four Constables elected to four-year terms by the residents of their respective precincts. Under Texas law, Constables and their Deputies must execute and return any process, civil or criminal, issued to them by a lawful official. This includes any warrant, citation, notice, subpoena, or writ in Bexar County, or in certain cases, contiguous counties. Locally, Constables serve civil and criminal process originating in the Justice of the Peace Courts, District Courts and County Courts-at-Law. By State statute, Constables are mandated to attend to the Justice of the Peace Courts in their respective precincts, to include providing security services, transporting prisoners, and summoning jurors.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Warrants Received Civil Process Issued Total Papers Issued

19,575 12,824 32,399

18-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate 11,729 12,529 24,258

FY 2016-17 Proposed 12,000 12,234 24,234


FY 2014-15 Actual Warrants Served per FTE Civil Process Served per FTE Total Papers Served per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Served Civil Process Served Total Papers Served

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

373 468 840

326 498 824

908 344 1,251

7,826 9,819 17,645

6,851 10,456 17,307

14,521 5,497 20,018

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$1,711,593 3,781 324,592 94,446 67,728

$1,756,443 5,100 332,503 108,689 64,187

$1,853,566 4,802 323,751 97,523 64,157

$1,829,064 5,740 318,210 81,900 0

Subtotal

$2,202,140

$2,266,922

$2,343,799

$2,234,914

Program Changes

($275,842) Total

$2,202,140

$2,266,922

$2,343,799

$1,959,072

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 16.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group decreases by 1.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. During FY 2015-16, one Deputy Constable position was transferred from the Grant Fund to the General Fund as the grant expired. Full funding is provided for positions on the authorized position list in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 19.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is provided for the Constable and his staff to attend various law enforcement training and seminars.

18-2


The Operational Expenses group decreases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to a decrease in rental expenses in accordance with the lease agreement, as well as a decrease in funding for one-time technology purchases.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 16 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to unbudgeted and unanticipated expenditures for safety supplies during FY 2015-16.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. Funding was provided in FY 2015-16 to purchase an X-ray machine to be used for building security, as well as Tasers for deputies.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total savings of $275,842 as described below. ●

This program change deletes five Deputy Constables for a total savings of $275,842, including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Constable precincts, and Precinct 4 has a lower workload per deputy compared to the countywide benchmark. Average workload per deputy is expected to be more evenly distributed amongst the precincts following this program change.

Policy Consideration: In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines

were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. The workload impacts of both redistricting and the truancy agreement have been significant. However, under Commissioners Court direction, the Budget Department refrained from making any workloadrelated personnel changes in Constable Offices in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget until the full effects of these recent changes could be realized and it could confidently be determined that the new workload distribution has largely stabilized. Workload impacts were reviewed for Constables and Justices of the Peace during FY 2015-16 and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

18-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Constable Administrative Clerk II Chief Deputy Constable Criminal Warrants Processor Deputy Constable* Office Assistant III Senior Deputy Constable* Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Constable, Precinct 4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 2 18 1 3

1 1 1 2 19 1 3

1 1 1 2 14 1 2

27

28

22

*One Deputy Constable was added without authorization in November 2015. As a result, one vacant Senior Deputy Constable position is deleted in the FY 2016-17 budget. Note: Correction was made to authorized position list to exclude three Deputy Constables who were grant-funded.

18-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4001

COUNTY AUDITOR Mission: To be an independent and progressive organization recognized for professionalism in carrying out the County Auditor’s duties and responsibilities. To provide timely, accurate and meaningful financial information on the fiscal affairs of County government and to provide ancillary support to the Commissioners Court, other elected officials, department heads and the general public.

Vision: Create and maintain an environment of sound fiscal management and efficient

financial operations at all levels of county government, through aggressive support, increased interactive collaboration and communication to assure efficient collection and reporting of revenues and legal compliance with budget expenditures.

Goals and Objectives: • • •

PROFESSIONALISM – To set and meet quality professional standards in carrying out the duties and responsibilities of the County Auditor’s Office. INDEPENDENCE – To maintain an appropriate level of independence in order that the Auditor’s Office may freely question and investigate County programs and issues. INNOVATION/PRODUCTIVITY – To encourage and promote innovative and productive

approaches to current programs and processes both in the Auditor’s Office as well as other Bexar County Offices and Departments.

PERSONAL GROWTH AND ENRICHMENT – To provide quality training as well as open communications to develop job skills, personal growth, professionalism, and an environment which encourages innovation and positive attitudes.

Program Description:

The Auditor’s Office is organized into three divisions: Administrative Division, Accounting Division, and Internal Audit Division.

The Administrative Division is headed by the First Assistant County Auditor and includes the Executive Administrative Assistant to the County Auditor, contract monitoring, retirement counseling, and Payroll sections. Reporting to the Executive Assistant is the receptionist, and the accounting aides (interns). The division is responsible for ensuring that support is available for the County Auditor as needed, that departmental operations function smoothly, that all contracts are read and approved as appropriate, that all county personnel requiring retirement assistance and counseling receive the proper information, and that all county personnel are paid properly and timely. In addition, this division fields and responds to internal and public open record requests for County financial information. The Accounting Division is under the direction of the Director of Accounting and is comprised of the following functions: financial accounting and reporting, grant accounting and reporting, banking services, revenue accounting, revenue forecasting, accounts receivable, accounts 19-1


payable, and capital project accounting. The Accounting Division is responsible for major annual projects that include the preparation of the Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (CAFR), and the County Wide Revenue Forecast Certification. The Internal Audit Division of the Bexar County Auditorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office conducts internal reviews, automated system reviews, and special projects for the Auditor and other County offices and departments. Internal Audit Technical Support also functions as a point of contact for assisting County offices and departments with financial system troubleshooting, answering questions from how to record and enter transactions to fielding requests for security profile and system access changes. The Audit Division is also responsible for assisting the County Auditor in adopting and enforcing regulations consistent with the law needed for the speedy and proper collecting, checking, and accounting for the receipt of funds that belong to the County or to a person for whom a district, county or precinct officer has made collection and the officer holds the funds for their benefit. The Internal Audit Division conducts regular audits of cash on hand at all county offices. Additional Goals of the Internal Audit Division are to: 1. Safeguard county assets and revenues. 2. Safeguard public funds not belonging to the county. 3. Safeguard public funds in the control of the county, district and precinct officials. 4. Find ways to increase revenue and reduce costs. 5. Protect the County from unnecessary liability while maintaining efficient delivery of services. The County Auditor is required to follow the Local Government Code to enforce regulations, prescribes the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prescribing system, maintain oversight of the books and records of the collection of money, investigate the correctness of County accounting, and examine public funds that are subject to the control of any precinct, county, or district official.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Number of Internal Audit Special Projects Number of Payroll Distributions Number of Invoices Processed Number of Grants Monitored Number of Financial/Cashiering System Trainings Number of Deposit Warrants Processed (Revenue)

19-2

16 125,512 106,553 129 38 9,427

FY 2015-16 Estimate 17 127,869 105,519 128 42 9,984

FY 2016-17 Proposed 17 125,000 105,625 129 42 10,050


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Efficiency Indicators: Average Status Form Change per FTE Average Personnel Status Changes by spreadsheet per FTE Average Number of Payments Processed per FTE Average number of Invoices Processed per FTE Average number of Grants Monitored per FTE Average Number of Deposit Warrants per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Audit Reports Issued to Audits Scheduled Length of Time to Process Invoices Amount of Potential Revenue Identified by Internal Audit

3,169

3,425

3,333

3,510 2,358 5,920 32 3,142

2,184 2,317 5,862 32 3,332

2,333 2,342 5,868 32 3,350

90% 9.5 min.

92% 9 min.

93% 8.5 min.

$50,271

$97,709

$110,000

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

$4,498,226 21,125 53,699 47,543

$4,510,073 25,985 57,459 49,046

$4,545,790 22,182 56,079 49,468

$4,635,009 22,950 55,136 47,546

$4,620,593

$4,642,563

$4,673,519

$4,760,641

Program Changes

$64,810 Grand Total

$4,620,593

$4,642,563

$4,673,519

$4,825,451

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 3.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 2 percent compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to turnover that occurred in FY 2015-16.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 3.5 percent compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided at a level that is consistent with last year’s expenditures.

19-3


The Operational Expenses group decreases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to one-time purchases of technology in FY 2015-16 that will not occur in FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials decreases by 3.9 percent when compared to FY 2016-17 Estimates. This is primarily due to one-time purchases of office furniture in FY 2015-16 that will not occur in FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budgeted includes one program change for a total cost of $64,810, as described below. •

One program change adds one Accountant II (NE-09) position for a total cost of $64,810, including salary and benefits. This position is recommended in the Accounting Division to address the increase in County T-Card and P-Card transactions. These transactions must be processed weekly so that the County can take advantage of rebates on expenditures.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Executive County Auditor Executive Assistant First Assistant County Auditor Office Assistant III Technical Support Manager Total – Executive Accounting Accountant I Accountant II Accountant III Accountant IV Accountant V* Accounting Clerk Accounting Clerk II Accounting Clerk III Accounting Division Director Assistant Manager of Payroll Operations Manager of Accounts Payable Manager of Banking Services Manager of Capital Improvements & Contracts Manager of Financial Accounting Manager of Grants Manager of Payroll Operations 19-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

5

5

5

2 7 4 1 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 7 4 1 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

2 8 4 1 3 2 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 2 1

1 1 1 2

1 1 1 2

36

36

37

Audit Director of Audit Division Manager of Audit Services Staff Auditor II Staff Auditor IV Staff Auditor V**

1 1 2 2 1.5

1 1 2 2 1.5

1 1 2 2 1.5

Total - Audit

7.5

7.5

7.5

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

5

5

5

53.5

53.5

54.5

Manager of Retirement & Payroll Administration Staff Auditor I – Payroll Staff Auditor II – Payroll Supervisor of Operations Total – Accounting

Special Projects Director of Special Projects Manager of Special Projects Financial System Functional Lead Financial System Assistant Functional Lead Cashier System Coordinator Total - Special Projects Grand Total - County Auditor

* One Accountant V is paid 100 percent out of the General Fund but reimbursed 30% from RMA funds. ** One Staff Auditor V is paid 50 percent from grant funds and 50 percent from the General Fund.

19-5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3100

COUNTY CLERK Mission:

To provide the County government and the general public with the efficient handling of documents, and to insure that records are provided for public use in a manner that is consistent with the highest standards of law.

Vision:

The County Clerk’s Office is more than just a keeper of records: it is a distributor of them. To fulfill this vision, we will continually seek to expand the use of technology in our operations, striving to keep pace with the needs of a growing public and an increasingly complex County government.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • •

To efficiently record, index and make publicly available all documents filed with the Office. To provide the necessary levels of support for the County Courts-at-Law, Probate Courts and Commissioners Court operations, and to establish a cooperative, collaborative working relationship with all other branches of the County government. To assist with mental health operations in the County; to protect the welfare of the community by removing persons who are a danger to themselves or others; to ensure that the health and rights of individuals within the system are safeguarded. To manage all current operations with fiscal and operational accountability and to focus planning efforts on expanding and improving services to meet future needs. To develop and maintain a highly trained, dedicated and informed staff and to ensure that all staff members have the tools and equipment necessary to perform their tasks. To provide a pleasant and safe working environment for employees and members of the public. To provide the highest level of service in daily interaction with the public and to treat every person with courtesy and respect. To adhere to all statutory requirements as prescribed by State and County law; to vigilantly safeguard the records under custodianship and to uphold the rights of individuals and the public.

Program Description:

The County Clerk is the official record keeper for Bexar County. As such, the County Clerk’s Records Division indexes, copies, exhibits, preserves, and protects all land and personal official records of Bexar County and its citizens. Records include deeds, deeds of trust, abstracts of judgment, Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) documents, prenuptial agreements, military discharges, hospital liens, mechanic liens, federal tax liens, marriage licenses, and assumed business names. The Deeds Unit of the County Clerk’s Record Division maintains historical records dating from 1699 through 1836. These records are preserved as the “Spanish Archives.” The County Clerk also maintains records dating from 1836 through the present, maintaining a complete chronological record for Bexar County. The Vital Statistics Unit maintains business name records and marriage records from 1836 to present, birth and death records prior to 1967, school records, cattle brands, and warehouse bonds. The Treasury Division invests, monitors, and disburses over $4 million in minor’s trust funds generated from the settlement of lawsuits, proceeds from estates, eminent domain funds, and bonds.

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The County Clerk is also the Clerk of the Commissioners Court. The Administration Division of the County Clerk’s Office records and preserves all the records of Commissioners Court hearings and public meetings. The County Clerk is the statutory Clerk for Bexar County’s thirteen Criminal County Courts at Law. The Criminal Courts Division manages the County Courts at Law’s daily caseload to ensure an expedient flow of cases through the judicial system. This Division records and maintains records of criminal Class A and B misdemeanors and bond forfeiture cases. The Civil Courts Division, created in FY 2007-08, combines all of the County Clerks civil judicial responsibilities into one Division. These areas of responsibility include Civil Courts, Mental Health activities and the Probate Courts. The Civil Courts Division manages the daily caseload of two Civil County Courts at Law’s to ensure an expedient flow of cases through the judicial system. This Division records and maintains records of civil suits up to $100,000. The Probate Section files, prepares, and preserves as permanent record all wills, administrations, guardianships, condemnations, and related matters for Bexar County’s Probate Courts, as well as staffing dockets cases, posting notices, and preparing case files for hearing dates in addition to Probate Court cases, involuntary mental health commitment cases, and 4th Court of Appeals transcripts and case documentation. The Mental Health Section serves Bexar County and a thirty-county area by assisting with all mental health patient activity with referring county, public, and private healthcare facilities. Mental Health Section staff files and maintains records and docket hearings related to probable cause, commitment, chemical/substance abuse, and mental retardation cases. Unlike other County hearings, these are held away from the Courthouse at alternative locations for the patients’ benefit. Mental Health Section staff provides support for and attends these hearings. They also handle direct patient and out-ofarea billing. The Licensing and Vital Statistics Section is responsible for issuing marriage licenses (formal and informal), issuing applications and certified copies for incorporated, un-incorporated, and abandonment of assumed names, as well as beer & wine licenses. This section is also responsible for the recording and the custodianship of the following documents: marriage licenses, informal marriage licenses, DD214s, birth certificates, death certificates, assumed names, cattle brands, oaths of office and bonds, personal financial statements of county officials and county judicial officers, county financial records, UCCs, and deputations. The County Clerk is elected Countywide for a term of four years.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of Cases Filed (Criminal) Number of Cases Filed (Probate) Number of Cases Filed (Civil) Number of Cases Filed (Mental Health)

33,087 4,890 43,190 4,464

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FY 2015-16 Estimate

36,000 5,000 36,410 4,638

FY 2016-17 Proposed

38,000 5,100 39,799 4,870


FY 2014-15 Actual Efficiency Indicators: Cases Filed per FTE (Criminal) Cases Filed per FTE (Bond Forfeiture) Cases Filed per FTE (Probate) Cases Filed per FTE (Civil) Amount of dollars deposited into the Treasury per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Records Filed Electronically Percentage of Cases Filed and Ready for Disposition (Bond Forfeiture) Percentage of Daily Public Inquiries Satisfied Percentage of Available Cases Set (Civil) Percentage of Fees Collected (Mental Health)

FY 2015-16 Estimate

2,363 2,571 374 395 445 454 632 650 $170,617,259 $173,333,333

FY 2016-17 Proposed 2,714 400 464 667 $175,000,000

64%

68%

68%

75%

75%

75%

98% 97% 85%

98% 97% 85%

98% 97% 85%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$6,910,706 4,472 168,663 188,064

$7,040,287 12,235 160,552 208,500

$7,679,039 5,236 149,947 208,583

$7,453,323 15,215 174,755 223,500

$7,271,905

$7,421,574

$8,042,805

$7,866,793

Program Change

($23,826) Total

$7,271,905

$7,421,574

$8,042,805

$7,842,967

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 2.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 2.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is due to employees’ separation payouts that occurred in FY 2015-16, which are not budgeted in FY 2016-17.

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The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for travel associated with the upcoming 85th Session of the Texas Legislature, which will begin January 10, 2017. Funding is also proposed for required certifications and continuing education for the County Clerk and staff.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 16.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to an increase in the Repairs and Maintenance – Office Equipment and Furniture account as requested by the County Clerk’s Office. Funding will cover any increases in the annual maintenance agreements for the coin counter and currency counters, typewriter maintenance, and the time clock.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 7.2 when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for the purchase of new furniture for the Criminal Division of the County Clerk’s Office.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes five program changes for a total cost savings of $23,826 as described below. •

The first program change proposes to add one Office Assistant IV (NE-05) in the Administrative Division for a total cost of $55,888, including salary, benefits, and technology. The position is proposed to provide customer service functions in the new Spanish Archives Center to be located in the Federal Reserve Building.

The second program change proposes two salary adjustments and title changes for two Court Services Supervisors (NE-09) to Court Services Coordinators (NE-09) in the Criminal Courts section. The cost of this program change is $10,911, including salary and benefits. The salary adjustments will compensate these two employees for performing job duties associated with the County Courts Manager (E-09) position, which is proposed to be deleted in FY 2016-17.

The third program change proposes to add one Government Relations Advisor (E-09) in the Administration division and to delete one County Court Manager (E-09) in the Criminal Courts division. This program change results in a savings of $30,202, including salary and benefits. The position is proposed to assist the County Clerk with legislative issues.

The fourth program change proposes to add five Data Clerks (NE-05), delete one Lead Indexing & Verification Clerk (NE-03), and delete six Indexing & Verification Clerks (NE-03) in the Records division. This program change results in a savings of $60,423, including salary and benefits. Due to the complexity of new software that will be implemented in FY 2016-17, the tasks of the newly proposed positions will require additional expertise in computer operations. The positions will correct database issues, and verify and index both microfilm and digital reproduction of permanent real property records. The new positions will also be responsible for updating the Official Public Records database and maintaining a GIS foreclosure map web application.

20-4


Authorized Positions:

Administration Administrative Assistant Archivist (Part-time) Chief Deputy County Clerk - Operations Chief Deputy For County Clerk Commissioners Court Coordinator County Clerk Executive Assistant Government Relations Advisor Human Resources Analyst Office Assistant IV Senior Analyst - Planning and Policies

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

1 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1

1 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1

1 0.5 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

Total – Administration

8.5

8.5

10.5

Total – Criminal Courts

1 33 0 2 15 2 53

1 33 0 2 15 2 53

0 33 2 0 15 2 52

1 8 3 5 2 1 8 9 37

1 8 3 5 2 1 10 9 39

1 8 3 5 2 1 10 9 39

Criminal Courts County Courts Manager Court Clerk Court Services Coordinator Court Services Supervisor Court Operations Clerk Lead Court Operations Clerk

Civil Courts Civil Courts Manager Court Clerk Court Services Supervisor Mental Health Clerk Lead Court Operations Clerk Lead Mental Health Clerk Senior Court Operations Clerk Probate and Estates Clerk Total – Civil Courts

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FY 2014-15 Actual Licensing and Vital Statistics Licensing Clerk Licensing and Vital Statistics Manager Recording and Operations Clerk Recordings Services Supervisor Vital Statistics Clerk

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 10 2 0

7 1 0 2 3

7 1 0 2 3

13

13

13

0 0 0 0 2 0 19 0 4 1 0

0 4 6 1 0 1 0 7 4 1 2

5 4 0 0 0 1 0 7 4 1 2

26

26

24

4 1 1 1

4 1 1 1

4 1 1 1

Total – Treasury

7

7

7

Total – County Clerk

144.5

146.5

145.5

Total – Licensing and Vital Statistics Records Data Clerks Deeds Records Clerk Indexing and Verification Clerk Lead Indexing and Verification Clerk Lead Recording Operations Clerks Lead Recording Services Clerks Recording and Operations Clerk Recording Services Clerk Recordings Services Supervisor Recordings Manager Records Center Clerk Total – Records Treasury Treasury and Court Registry Clerk Treasury and Bookkeeping Services Supervisor Registry Funds Accountant Treasury Manager

20-6


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNITS: 3400-3415

COUNTY COURTS-AT-LAW Mission:

County Courts-at-Law will provide current required levels of case dispositions while positioning the Courts to address the challenges of the future.

Vision:

The Bexar County Courts-at-Law are leaders in providing the citizens of Bexar County with professional, efficient, and compassionate court services. The Judges and staff work hard to achieve the proper balance between the requirements of the law, the needs of the people, and the fiscal ability of the County government.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

Provide the highest level of court services to the citizenry commensurate with available resources. Conduct continuous reviews of the court system’s ability to serve the community. Encourage development of improved methods for achieving improved efficiency. Review and monitor court collections to identify and resolve problem areas.

Program Description:

The County Courts-at-Law provide legal resolutions in both criminal misdemeanor and civil cases. There are fifteen statutory courts and one Auxiliary Jail court in the Bexar County system. Two of the County Courts-at-Law give preference to civil cases in which the matter in controversy exceeds $500 but does not exceed $100,000. They provide adjudication in suits of debt, negligence, personal injury, delinquent taxes, and eminent domain. The remaining thirteen statutory County Criminal Courts have general jurisdiction and provide adjudication in misdemeanor criminal cases where the punishment, upon conviction, may be a fine not to exceed $4,000 or a jail sentence not to exceed one year. Three courts are were created by the 81st Legislature. The Auxiliary Court #1 (Jail Court) handles misdemeanor cases involving jailed defendants and is located within the Adult Detention Center. The use of this Court results in faster case dispositions and in significant savings to the County in terms of reducing the number of nights inmates spend in jail awaiting court hearings and minimizing the transportation of inmates between the jail and the Justice Center or Courthouse.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Pending Cases on Docket on Oct 1 New Cases Other Cases Reaching Docket Dispositions Efficiency Indicators: Cost per Disposition Average Indigent Defense Cost per Appt 21-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

35,137 29,573 21,446 37,759

34,603 25,390 19,608 34,616

31,070 29,138 22,267 37,148

$144 $104

$31 $95

$96 $98


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Indicators: Clearance Rate Cases Disposed within 90 days

FY 2015-16 Estimate

79% 40%

FY 2016-17 Proposed

106% 38%

93% 39%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Administration (3400) Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Total County Court 1 (3401) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 2 (3402) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 3 (3403) Personnel Services Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$675,098 4,966 68,931 25,891 4,845

$705,925 5,000 60,750 43,545 0

$751,154 4,090 65,916 42,532 0

$732,252 5,000 65,691 32,000 0

$779,731

$815,220

$863,692

$834,943

$406,104 158 202,713

$401,845 1,000 192,500

$381,451 158 172,503

$408,224 1,000 185,000

$608,975

$595,345

$554,112

$594,224

$405,167 1,474 186,462

$413,282 1,000 192,500

$410,220 1,474 172,310

$419,528 1,000 185,000

$593,103

$606,782

$584,004

$605,528

$376,857 190

$410,562 0

$407,298 0

$416,944 0

$377,047

$410,562

$407,298

$416,944

21-2


FY 2014-15 Actual County Court 4 (3404) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 5 (3405) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 6 (3406) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 7 (3407) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 8 (3408) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 9 (3409) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$397,039 2,013 196,882

$401,968 1,000 192,500

$403,869 2,013 185,145

$408,276 1,000 185,000

$595,934

$595,468

$591,027

$594,276

$390,978 756 194,516

$395,244 1,000 192,500

$400,754 2,491 162,383

$405,129 1,000 185,000

$586,250

$588,744

$565,628

$591,129

$404,962 690 240,161

$400,758 1,000 192,500

$408,137 690 207,281

$408,459 1,000 185,000

$645,813

$594,258

$616,108

$594,459

$381,278 767 168,394

$376,929 1,000 192,500

$386,307 767 181,955

$382,659 1,000 185,000

$550,439

$570,429

$569,029

$568,659

$404,595 369 207,093

$382,538 1,000 192,500

$385,607 369 169,910

$388,142 1,000 185,000

$612,057

$576,038

$555,886

$574,142

$395,293 263 204,160

$400,332 1,000 192,500

$408,546 263 167,809

$417,330 1,000 185,000

$599,716

$593,832

$576,618

$603,330

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FY 2014-15 Actual County Court 10 (3410) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Total County Court 11 (3411) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 12 (3412) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 13 (3413) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total County Court 14 (3414) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$359,063 588

$386,104 0

$386,696 588

$384,407 0

$359,651

$386,104

$387,284

$384,407

$399,823 536 213,837

$399,427 1,000 192,500

$392,572 536 183,640

$405,198 1,000 185,000

$614,196

$592,927

$576,748

$591,198

$382,049 620 207,977

$396,974 1,000 192,500

$395,067 2,634 159,464

$402,749 1,000 185,000

$590,646

$590,474

$557,165

$588,749

$390,681 3,420 177,174

$385,901 1,000 192,500

$385,170 3,420 191,850

$391,318 1,000 185,000

$571,275

$579,401

$580,440

$577,318

$419,833 3,204 199,791

$389,722 1,000 192,500

$389,456 3,204 189,090

$395,479 1,000 185,000

$622,828

$583,222

$581,750

$581,479

21-4


FY 2014-15 Actual County Court 15 (3415) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total Total Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

$401,148 757 194,657

$385,174 1,000 192,500

$385,750 3,447 190,323

$390,704 1,000 185,000

$596,562

$578,674

$579,520

$576,704

$6,589,968 4,966 84,546 25,891 4,845 2,594,007

$6,632,685 5,000 73,750 43,545 0 2,502,500

$6,678,054 4,090 87,970 42,532 0 2,333,663

$6,756,798 5,000 78,691 32,000 0 2,405,000

$9,304,223

$9,257,480

$9,146,309

$9,277,489

Program Changes Grand Total – County Courts-at-Law

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$36,938 $9,304,223

$9,257,480

$9,146,309

$9,314,427

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group increases by 1.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is a result of savings from turnover experienced in FY 2015-16 that is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 22.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided at the FY 2015-16 budget level for judges to attend conferences and seminars.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 10.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Most operational line items are budgeted at the same level they were in FY 2015-16, including transcription services. The decrease in the budget compared to the estimate is due primarily to higher than expected transcription services expenses in FY 2015-16, in County Courts 5, 12, 14, and 15.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 24.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to unbudgeted and unanticipated expenses for Books and Periodicals in FY 21-5


2015-16, which are not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17. ●

The Court-Appointed Attorney Costs group increases by 3.1 percent when compared to FY 201516 Estimates. Court-appointed attorney costs are budgeted at a higher level than FY 2015-16 Estimates to accommodate a slight increase in caseload.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes two program changes for a total cost of $36,938, as described below. ●

The first program change deletes one County Court Administration Clerk (NE-01) and adds one Court Coordinator (E-05). This would allow for an additional Court Coordinator for the County Courts-at-Law to provide coverage. This program change results in no additional cost as the incumbent is currently filling in as a Court Coordinator and is already being compensated at the proposed salary.

The second program change adjusts the salary of the General Administrative Counsel for the County Courts-at-Law to be equivalent to the General Administrative Counsel positions authorized in the District Courts. The total cost of this adjustment including salary and benefits is $36,939.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Judge Administrative Supervisor Attorney II County Court Administration Clerk Court Coordinator Court Reporter* Court Support Specialist General Administrative Counsel Total – County Courts-at-Law

FY 2015-16 Estimate

15 1 1 2 16 15.5 1 1

15 1 1 2 16 15.5 1 1

15 1 1 1 17 15.5 1 1

52.5

52.5

52.5

*One Court Reporter is a part-time position for the Auxiliary Jail Court.

21-6

FY 2016-17 Proposed


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4901

OFFICE OF THE COUNTY MANAGER Mission:

To provide effective, efficient, responsive and quality services to the citizens of Bexar County and to all the Offices and Departments of the Bexar County government.

Vision:

The Office of the County Manager strives to deliver quality service with integrity and dedication to ensure trust and confidence in Bexar County. Our customers will see Bexar County as the government of choice.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Decrease costs and streamline operations in support of all County Offices and Departments; Provide services to Bexar County citizens in an efficient manner; Exercise authority in accordance with applicable Federal and State laws, and applicable County policies, regulations and orders; Strengthen Bexar County’s financial position; and Create and support an environment focused on planning, strategic and innovative thinking, practical solutions and accountability.

Program Description:

On July 12, 2011, Bexar County Commissioners Court approved a county reorganization plan of all departments reporting directly to Commissioners Court and appointed a County Manager. At the discretion of the Commissioners Court, the Manager serves as the chief administrator of those activities that report to the Commissioners Court. The Manager supervises and coordinates these activities of the County departments for the Commissioners, seeing that all orders and policies are carried out. As the statutory Budget Officer and Chief Investment Officer of the County, the Manager is responsible for the preparation of the annual budget and capital program for all Offices and Departments.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Amount of the County’s Investment Portfolio Number of Special Projects/Performance Reviews Number of Agendas/Public Hearings Efficiency Measures: Total Full-Time Equivalents per 1,000 Citizens Average Budget Expenditures per Resident Number of Service Requests from Elected/Appointed Officials Completed

22-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1.1B 10 30

$900M 10 30

$860M 20 42

2.65 $554

2.84 $534

2.83 $506

120

135

150


Effectiveness Measures: County’s Bond Rating by Fitch, Moody’s, and Standard and Poor’s Percent of Service Requests Finished within 10 Business Days

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual AAA 98%

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate AAA 99%

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed AAA 100%

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,101,829 41,000 34,528 4,033

$1,088,230 30,000 33,956 10,650

$992,025 20,270 37,954 6,993

$1,017,951 41,000 33,956 10,650

$1,181,390

$1,162,836

$1,057,242

$1,103,557

Program Change

$0 Total

$1,181,390

$1,162,836

$1,057,242

$1,103,557

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 4.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 2.6 percent went compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Staff turnover was experienced during FY 2015-16 and, as a result, savings was realized in the Personnel Services group. Turnover is not anticipated in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for travel expenses associated with the 85th Texas Legislature Session in Austin, Texas, which will take place 2016.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 10.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for this group is proposed at the previous year’s budgeted amount.

The Supplies and Materials group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for this group is proposed at the previous year’s budgeted amount.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

22-2


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Aide to the County Manager Assistant to the County Manager* Assistant Public Information Officer** Chief of Staff to the County Manager County Manager/Budget Officer Government Relations Manager Office Assistant IV Office Supervisor Public Information Officer Total - Office of the County Manager

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

9

9

9

*The Assistant to the County Manager Position is funded 50 percent from Capital Funds and 50 percent General Fund. **The Assistant Public Information Officer is funded 25% in the Office of the County Manager and 75% from the Alamo Regional Mobility Authority. Note: Corrected authorized position list to move a Contract Analyst to the Capital Improvement Fund.

22-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 1300

CRIMINAL DISTRICT ATTORNEY Mission:

The Criminal District Attorney’s Office seeks to perform its many duties mandated by the Texas Constitution and State laws by investigating, preparing, prosecuting and appealing all criminal cases except Class C misdemeanors, preparing and litigating civil suits filed against the County, and representing the County in all of its legal dealings.

Vision:

The Bexar County District Attorney’s Office is a team of dedicated prosecutors committed to aggressively seeking justice and the protection of the family, person and property of all the citizens of our community.

Goals and Objectives: •

To seek justice, not merely convictions, in all cases in which a citizen is accused of a criminal offense.

To investigate thoroughly, effectively, and efficiently in order to provide all needed facts and background for criminal prosecution.

To promote the well-being of families and children through prosecution and intervention.

To reduce the trauma to victims of crime by clearly and effectively communicating with them throughout the judicial process.

To seek compensation for victims of crime through significant efforts to make perpetrators of crimes pay restitution.

To aggressively develop contacts within our community to create or support existing initiatives to prevent crimes against families, persons, and property.

To provide the County and its Officials and Departments with sound legal advice and representation in civil matters.

Program Description:

The Criminal District Attorney has many duties mandated by the Texas Constitution and State laws. The emphasis is on areas of criminal prosecution, which best promotes a safe environment within the community and is responsive to law enforcement’s needs. The Criminal District Attorney is responsible for the preparation of cases to be presented to the Grand Jury and jury filed information and indictments. The Office also is responsible for trials and appeals of criminal cases, except those Class C misdemeanors filed in San Antonio Municipal Court. The Criminal District Attorney also collects physical evidence and prepares the evidence for trial exhibits. The Office interviews victims and witnesses prior to trial to minimize trauma that may be caused by the judicial system by providing them with support, such as assisting them with court proceedings, as well as adopts procedures within the Office, which give effect to victims’ rights laws. Training is also provided for law enforcement agencies. The Office provides sound legal advice and representation to the County and its Elected Officials in civil actions in State and Federal courts. The Office also develops and maintains contact within the community regarding prevention and intervention in crime. 23-1


In addition, the Criminal District Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office provides staff in the Family Justice Center, which is a collaborative effort of over forty on-site and off-site partners that provide comprehensive legal, medical, mental health, employment, law enforcement, housing, child care, chaplain, and case management services to victims of domestic violence and their children, in one centralized location.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Number of Cases Opened Number of Crime Victims Accompanied to Court Number of Community Outreach Projects Supported Number of Contracts Reviewed Number of Major Projects Number of Legal Research Projects Number of Civil Cases Opened Efficiency Measures: Percentage of Theft/Check Restitution Returned to the Community Number of Applicants for Protective Orders Filed in Domestic Violence Cases Number of Felony Cases per Prosecutor Number of Misdemeanor Cases per Prosecutor Number of Investigation Cases per Investigator Effectiveness Measures: Number of Open Records Requests processed Total Felony/Misdemeanor (including juvenile) Cases Disposed Of Number of Expunctions Processed Number of Nondisclosures Processed Number of Personal Contacts Made with Victims by Advocates Average Number of Services Utilized by an Individual at the Family Justice Center

23-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

56,946 2,661 600 466 44 473 422

56,000 3,000 800 602 58 490 460

57,500 3,100 1,000 620 61 500 490

100%

100%

100%

407 337 2,092 1,539

435 350 1,900 1,302

450 360 1,975 1,337

351

400

420

57,055 825 365

56,279 875 420

57,760 925 500

9,080

8,500

8,600

4

4

4


Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$27,931,949 88,287 472,299 322,455

$29,619,146 95,000 479,313 288,645

$30,671,241 95,816 520,624 298,497

$30,529,584 95,000 436,874 290,000

$28,814,990

$30,482,104

$31,586,178

$31,351,458

Program Change

$792,506 Total

$28,814,990

$30,482,104

$31,586,178

$32,143,964

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes funding for overtime for prosecutors working overnight at Central Magistration and State longevity pay for district attorneys.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for mandated training for attorneys and investigators in order to meet licensing requirements.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 16.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to renovation and moving expenses incurred during FY 2015-16, which are not anticipated in FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 2.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to funding for the purchase of radio equipment for newly approved Investigator positions hired during FY 2015-16. These expenses will not be needed in FY 201617.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes four program changes for a total cost of $792,506 as described below: •

The first program change reclassifies forty-five Misdemeanor Prosecutors from E-08 to E-09 for a total cost of $240,492, which includes salary and benefits. The reclassification and the corresponding salary increase will allow for enhanced recruitment and retention of entrylevel prosecutors in the District Attorney’s Office.

23-3


The second program change adds two Prosecutor IV (E-12) positions in the amount of $208,830, which includes salary, benefits, office equipment ($2,030), and furniture ($1,915). The District Attorney's Office currently has one Attorney handling the Civil Probate/Mental Health caseload in the Intake Division. Mental health hearings take place at the San Antonio State Hospital (three days a week) and the existing attorney has had difficulty making hearings due to logistical issues. This division also has recently been required to handle Department of Aging & Disability hearings and Adult Protective Service (elder removals) hearings. Workload has increased significantly over the last 3 years and these positions will assist in handling the additional workload.

The third program change funds four Investigators’ (NE-11) in the amount of $343,184, which includes salary and benefits, technology ($4,344), furniture ($7,660), weapons ($2,000), and minor equipment ($22,800). There are currently 13 Criminal County Courts at Law. Two of the thirteen courts are family violence courts and both of those courts have assigned Investigators. The remaining eleven misdemeanor courts do not currently have their own assigned investigators. Under the current system in place, if the misdemeanor attorneys have an investigative request, they have to go to their felony “sister” court and ask the felony investigator assigned for assistance. These positions will assist prosecutors in the Criminal County Courts at Law with investigative work on misdemeanor cases in order to increase the effectiveness of the prosecution and relieve Investigators assigned to the felony courts.

The fourth program change adds one Office Assistant II (NE-03) and deletes one Word Processing Specialist (NE-03) at no cost. This is due to internal restructuring of job duties and will better align the duties and responsibilities with those of the actual position.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Accounting Clerk Advocate* Advocate Supervisor Aide to the District Attorney Attorney II Attorney III Bond Forfeiture Coordinator Chief Administrative Attorney Communications Officer^ Community Outreach Strategist^ Courier Criminal District Attorney District Attorney Administrator Criminal District Attorney Chief Investigator Division Chief - DA's Office Evidence Technician

1 36 1 1 8 12 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 6 1 23-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate 1 36 1 1 9 12 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 6 1

FY 2016-17 Proposed 1 36 1 1 9 12 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 1 6 1


FY 2014-15 Actual Evidence Technician II File Clerk First Assistant District Attorney Government Relations Advisor^ Human Resource Manager Human Resources Technician Human Resources Technician II Interns** Investigations Coordinator Investigations Team Leader Investigator - District Attorney Legal Secretary Major Crimes Chief Misdemeanor Prosecutor Office Assistant I* Office Assistant II^ Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Office Supervisor* Paralegal Prosecutor III Prosecutor IV Prosecutor V Purchasing Clerk Technical Support Specialist II Technical Support Specialist III Victim Services Coordinator Word Processing Specialist

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 5 1 0 1 1 0 9.5 1 4 33 3 1 44 12 16 9 4 7 7 44 33 36 1 1 1 1 11

1 11 1 1 1 0 1 9.5 1 4 39 2 1 45 12 17 9 4 7 8 45 34 36 1 2 1 1 11

1 11 1 1 1 0 1 9.5 1 4 43 2 1 45 12 18 9 4 7 8 45 36 36 1 2 1 1 10

359.5

379.5

385.5

2 1 1 1 1 1

2 1 1 1 1 1

2 1 1 1 1 1

Subtotal - Family Justice Center

7

7

7

Total Criminal District Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office

366.5

386.5

392.5

Subtotal - Criminal District Attorneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office Family Justice Center (FJC) Crime Victim Liaison Executive Director Office Assistant II Office Supervisor Programs Manager FJC Senior Information Technology Project Manager

23-5


*One Advocate, one Office Assistant I, one Office Supervisor are frozen. ** All positions are part-time. ^Out of Cycle Added Communications Officer (E-09) and deleted Community Outreach Strategist (E-09) in May 2016. Added Government Relations Advisor (E-09) and deleted Office Assistant II (NE-03) in May 2016.

23-6


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNITS: 3600-3610

CRIMINAL DISTRICT COURTS Mission: To provide immediate, accurate, and beneficial support to the ten Criminal District Courts, Criminal Law Magistrate Court, Drug Court, Central Magistration, Impact Court, and citizens who request assistance.

Vision:

The Office of Criminal District Courts Administration is the leader in developing and maintaining innovative, state-of-the-art support, and assistance for the criminal district courts and the citizens of Bexar County that they serve. The office strives to promote quality communication between our Courts and all other County departments, while insuring that justice is carried out in the most effective and efficient manner possible.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • •

Provide high quality staff-support. Facilitate the functions of other court staff to assist in their productivity. Handle the administrative duties of the courts in an effective manner. Disseminate and communicate all information integral to the effective and efficient performance of the courts. Process writs within the time deadlines specified by statute. Prepare legally correct jury instructions in a timely manner.

Program Description: District Courts are created by the State Legislature and are led by Criminal

District Judges, which are elected for four-year terms. The Texas Legislature has authorized ten Criminal District Courts for Bexar County. Criminal District Courts have original jurisdiction over all criminal matters. The Court Administration provides Spanish interpreters, auxiliary court reporters, visiting judges, and substitutions for court personnel when needed. The Court Administration also coordinates all capital murder cases, prepares and indexes pages for court reporters, assists in processing court appointments of defense attorneys for indigent defendants under a court appointed attorney system, updates monthly lists of eligible investigators for court appointments, and holds training or refresher courses for court clerks. The division assists Administrative Judges for the District Courts with their administrative tasks, distributes monthly statistics to the courts, and assists Judges in legal research and drafting of documents and administrative matters. The Administration prepares writ applications and writ orders for the Judges. The review of appellate court opinions and updates of jury charges based on the law is also a responsibility of the Administration. The Administration also assists citizens needing public information about cases in the Criminal District Court.

24-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Jury Charges Prepared Writ Applications Processed Motions and Other Legal Documents Processed Number of Court Reporter Assignments Number of Vouchers Reviewed

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1,122 186 2,242 1,633 476

818 258 2,432 1,610 432

1,000 250 2,400 1,650 450

Efficiency Indicators: Jury Charges Prepared per FTE Writs Processed per FTE Motions and Legal Documents processed per FTE Average recommended savings per voucher Savings Recommended by Voucher Review Committee

748 74 897 $293 $139,634

545 103 973 $214 $92,237

667 100 960 $250 $112,500

Effectiveness Indicators: Number of Writs returned by Court of Criminal Appeals Net Savings due to VRC review

1 $110,134

0 $66,237

1 $84,500

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Administration (3600) Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 144th District Court (3601) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$2,233,807 17,202 244,475 41,712 29,775 2,945

$2,310,990 20,000 198,091 72,900 26,782 0

$2,291,612 17,132 219,808 67,381 13,313 2,201

$2,544,034 23,700 61,569 63,900 0 0

$2,569,916

$2,628,763

$2,611,447

$2,693,203

$229,633 17,728 708,678

$229,303 25,000 570,000

$233,142 17,365 684,129

$237,570 25,000 600,000

$956,039

$824,303

$934,636

$862,570

24-2


FY 2014-15 Actual 175th District Court (3602) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 186th District Court (3603) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 187th District Court (3604) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 226th District Court (3605) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 227th District Court (3606) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$248,059 18,673 587,098

$232,652 25,000 570,000

$222,477 43,790 644,614

$208,245 25,000 600,000

$853,830

$827,652

$910,881

$833,245

$220,636 32,253 588,918

$227,387 25,000 570,000

$232,188 26,936 659,885

$233,700 25,000 600,000

$841,807

$822,387

$919,009

$858,700

$231,025 17,684 618,686

$222,132 25,000 570,000

$226,571 17,261 609,680

$223,830 25,000 600,000

$867,395

$817,132

$853,512

$848,830

$228,216 10,346 483,378

$229,702 25,000 570,000

$233,602 11,289 486,441

$237,330 25,000 600,000

$721,940

$824,702

$731,332

$862,330

$201,901 11,684 474,348

$245,201 25,000 570,000

$248,817 7,266 489,750

$251,650 25,000 600,000

$687,933

$840,201

$745,833

$876,650

24-3


FY 2014-15 Actual 290th District Court (3607) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 379th District Court (3608) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 399th District Court (3609) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 437th District Court (3610) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

$224,543 11,446 666,055

$229,778 25,000 570,000

$216,413 33,363 696,137

$235,001 25,000 600,000

$902,044

$824,778

$945,913

$860,001

$210,469 25,655 641,915

$228,452 25,000 570,000

$219,914 34,980 629,688

$230,827 25,000 600,000

$878,039

$823,452

$884,582

$855,827

$200,447 22,134 572,692

$201,721 25,000 570,000

$205,945 23,265 746,350

$216,529 25,000 600,000

$795,273

$796,721

$975,560

$841,529

$206,466 11,969 618,387

$207,379 25,000 570,000

$211,878 31,983 612,693

$225,577 25,000 600,000

$836,822

$802,379

$856,554

$850,577

$4,435,202 17,202 424,047 41,712 29,775 5,963,100

$4,564,697 20,000 448,091 72,900 26,782 5,700,000

$4,542,559 17,132 467,306 67,381 13,313 6,261,568

$4,844,293 23,700 311,569 63,900 0 6,000,000

$10,911,038

$10,832,470

$11,369,259

$11,243,462

Program Changes Grand Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Criminal District Courts

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$0 $10,911,038

24-4

$10,832,470

$11,369,259

$11,243,462


Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 1.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group increases by 6.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016-17. The primary reason for the increase is due to the transfer of expenses associated with freelance court reporters from the Operational Expenses group to the temporary salary line item, following guidance from the Internal Revenue Service.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is provided for judges and staff to attend trainings and continuing education seminars.

The Operational Expenses group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is the result of transferring freelance court reporter expenses from the Operational Expenses group into the Personnel Services group, as explained above.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 5.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Several one-time furniture purchases were budgeted and expensed in FY 2015-16, and those costs are not budgeted at the same level in FY 2016-17.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. One-time funding was allocated in FY 2015-16 for the purchase of a video teleconferencing system to be used for visual presentations during court proceedings.

The Court-Appointed Attorney Costs group decreases by 4.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. These expenses were higher than anticipated in FY 2015-16 due to the number of capital cases.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

24-5


Authorized Positions: Judge Administrative Supervisor Capital Case Monitor Chief Staff Attorney Court Interpreter* Court Reporter Court Support Specialist* Criminal Law Magistrate District Court Coordinator* District Court Staff Attorney Drug Court Magistrate Drug Court Coordinator General Administrative Counsel Legal Intern (Part-Time) Supervisor

FY 2014-15 Actual 10 1 1 1 3 15 1 1 12 2 1 1 1 1.5 1

FY 2015-16 Estimate 10 1 1 1 3 15 1 1 12 2 1 1 1 1.5 1

FY 2016-17 Proposed 10 1 1 1 3 15 1 1 12 2 1 1 1 1.5 1

52.5

52.5

52.5

Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Criminal District Courts

*Correction was made to authorized position list to reflect program changes in FY 2014-15.

24-6


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3200

DISTRICT CLERK Mission:

To provide the Judicial System and the public with information and support using the most technologically advanced methods possible at a reasonable cost by: • Fulfilling our statutory duties as record custodians and fee officers to the best of our abilities; • Fostering an environment for our employees that encourages the development of new ideas and the willingness to improve productivity; • Implementing our goals and objectives with a team approach and decision making at all levels of the organization; and • Striving to be a leader and example to other County and State agencies.

Vision:

The District Clerk envisions the Bexar County District Clerk’s Office as becoming a leader and example, not only in Bexar County, but throughout the State of Texas, by providing constant training and education of the workforce; by acquiring and implementing the latest in information technology services, such as imaging technology for the storage and retrieval of case record information; and by implementation of electronic technology for exchange of information through the Internet.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

• • • • •

To perform functions and duties as mandated by law. To incorporate record management principles in imaging information and technology sources. To provide the support and resources for all District and Special Courts of Bexar County. To provide the support and resources necessary for employees to perform their responsibilities and duties. To monitor/verify all receivables and fees charged. To safely deposit receivables in a timely manner. To be responsive to the customers’ need for service and information. To encourage all employees to be customer friendly and service oriented. To provide information and quality services to all at a reasonable cost.

Program Description:

The District Clerk, elected countywide for a term of four years, is an integral part of the District Courts system in Bexar County, providing support services to all Criminal, Juvenile, and Civil District Courts. The Office is divided into six divisions: Administration, Courts, Civil Filings, Court Support, Operations and Records. The District Clerk records the acts and proceedings of the Courts, enters all judgments of the Courts, and records all issued executions and returns on executions. The District Clerk also prepares an annual written statement of fines and jury fees received, and operate the Register of the Court. The District Clerk serves as the official custodian of District Court records by indexing and carefully maintaining the Court records and assisting the Courts and the public in accessing those records. The District Clerk also provides support services to many County Offices and Departments, in particular to the Criminal District Attorney’s Office, the Constables’ Offices, the Sheriff’s Office, the Dispute Resolution Center, Juvenile Probation, and the Texas Attorney General’s Office.

25-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Work Load Indicators: Civil Cases filed Juvenile Cases filed Number of Criminal Cases Filed Number of Documents Imaged

35,589 2,133 12,249 7,383,231

36,820 2,018 12,052 7,472,630

36,452 2,155 12,134 7,926,357

6,098 6,125 90,730

6,137 6,026 92,194

6,198 5,929 93,682

$319,862 $316,420 $12,059,505 $14,955,750

$313,015 $15,000,000

Efficiency Indicators: Civil Cases Filed per FTE Criminal Cases Filed per FTE Civil Hearings Held Effectiveness Indicators: Bond Forfeiture Revenue Collected Civil Court Costs Collected

Appropriations: Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Proposed

$7,729,612 4,767 126,143 263,545 12,499

$7,842,521 5,298 95,845 262,250 0

$8,473,566 5,298 87,654 270,897 0

$8,347,311 6,598 97,917 279,850 57,200

$8,136,566

$8,205,914

$8,837,415

$8,788,876

Program Change

$13,698 Total

$8,136,566

25-2

$8,205,914

$8,837,415

$8,802,574


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 1.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is due to employee separation payouts and anticipated employee turnover savings, which was not realized during FY 2015-16.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 25 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for continuing education for the District Clerk and staff as well as travel associated with the upcoming 85th Session of the Texas Legislature.

The Operational Costs group increases by 11.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This increase is primarily due to an increase in the technology improvement fee account. Funding is proposed for the purchase of two printers for the Civil Filings and Presiding Areas and two commercial Lite LED Backlit LCD TVs for the Presiding Office and one for the Civil Filings Division. These monitors will display information to the public, such as which Judge is presiding this month, who is monitoring Judge, and the date of the next dismissal docket.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 3.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to an increase in the Office Furniture account. Funding is proposed for a customer bench and replacement desks and chairs for staff.

The Capital Expenditures group proposes a total of $57,200 for the purchase of replacement scanners for the Juvenile and Civil Operations Sections. These new scanners will be used in the Presiding Court Offices, Juvenile Section, and in the Criminal Operations Section to support the District Clerk’s goal of going paperless.

There are six proposed program changes in the District Clerk’s Office for FY 2016-17, for a total cost of $13,698, including salary and benefits. These program changes are part of the District Clerk’s re-organization of the Office that began in FY 2015-16. The purpose of the reorganization is to achieve internal standardization of positions within District Clerk’s Office. In FY 2015-16, the positions within the Civil Section were standardized. These proposed program changes will standardize positions within the Criminal Section of the District Clerk’s Office. •

The first program change proposes to reclassify two Court Order Clerks and one parttime Court Order Clerk (NE-02) to Records Clerks (NE-03) in the Records and Finance section. The cost of this program change is $2,220, including salary and benefits.

The second program change proposes to reclassify seven Criminal Assignment Clerk IIs and one part-time Criminal Assignment Clerk II (NE-02) to Criminal Operations Clerks (NE-03) in the Criminal section. The cost of this program change is $6,212, including salary and benefits.

25-3


• •

The third program change proposes to retitle five Criminal Assignment Clerk IIIs (NE-03) to Criminal Operations Clerks (NE-03) in the Criminal section. There is no cost associated with this program change. The fourth program change proposes to reclassify one Office Assistant II (NE-03) position to a Criminal Operations Clerk (NE-03) in the Criminal section. There is no cost associated with this program change.

The fifth program change proposes to add two Lead Criminal Court Clerks (NE-05) and delete two Criminal Court Clerks (NE-04) positions in the Criminal section. The cost of this program change is $5,266, including salary and benefits.

The sixth program change proposes to retitle the Criminal Court Clerk (NE-04) position to Juvenile Court Clerk (NE-04) in the Criminal section. There is no cost associated with this program change. The purpose of the program change is to accurately reflect the duties of the position, as this position is assigned to the Juvenile Courts.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Administration District Clerk Administrative Assistant Chief Deputy Executive Assistant*

Government Relations Advisor Human Resource Technician Human Resources Analyst Office Assistant IV Purchasing Clerk Senior Analyst Policies and Planning Senior Division Chief Total – Administration Civil Operations Civil Court Clerk Civil Filing Supervisor Division Chief - Civil Operations Lead Civil Court Clerk Lead Civil Operations Clerk Senior Civil Operations Clerk Supervisor - Civil Operations Total – Civil Operations 25-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 0 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 2 1

1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 1

1 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 2 1

10

10

10

22 2 1 7 6 16 2

22 0 1 7 6 16 4

22 0 1 7 6 16 4

56

56

56


FY 2014-15 Actual Criminal Operations Criminal Assignments Clerk II Criminal Assignments Clerk III Criminal Court Clerk Criminal Filing Supervisor Criminal Operations Clerk Division Chief - Criminal Operations Juvenile Court Clerk Juvenile Court Clerk Supervisor Lead Criminal Assignments Clerk Lead Criminal Court Clerk Lead Criminal Operations Clerk Lead Juvenile Court Clerk Office Assistant II Supervisor - Criminal Operations Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Criminal Operations Records & Finance Division Accounting Clerk Court Order Clerk Court Registry Clerk Data Control Clerk Division Chief - Records & Finance Finance Clerk Lead Accounting Clerk Lead Finance Clerk Lead Recordings Clerk Lead Records Clerk Lead Registry Clerk Optical Scanning Clerk Records Clerk Recording Clerk Registry/Cashier Supervisor Senior Civil Operations Clerk Senior Finance Clerk Senior Records Clerk Supervisor - Records & Finance Supervisor - Records Supervisor - Finance

25-5

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

7.5 5 24 1 0 1 9 1 1 8 0 0 1 2

7.5 5 24 0 0 1 8 0 0 8 1 1 1 4

0 0 21 0 13.5 1 9 0 0 10 1 1 0 4

60.5

60.5

60.5

5 2.5 2 1 1 0 1 0 2 0 1 8 0 10 1 1 0 0 2 0 0

0 2.5 0 0 1 5 0 2 0 2 0 0 16 0 0 1 2 3 0 2 1

0 .5 0 0 1 5 0 2 0 2 0 0 18 0 0 1 2 3 0 2 1


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Total – Records & Finance Division

37.5

37.5

37.5

Total – District Clerk

164

164

164

*The Executive Assistant was created out of cycle during FY 2014-15.

25-6


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 1200

DPS - HIGHWAY PATROL Mission:

The Department of Public Safety – Highway Patrol Division provides staff support for the surrounding Highway Patrol Troopers and Bexar County citizens allowing the release of troopers to perform enforcement activities on the rural roadways of Bexar County. Specifically, troopers address enforcement in the following areas: 1) traffic enforcement of all vehicles; 2) regulation of commercial and “for hire” traffic; 3) the preservation of the public peace; 4) the investigation of highway accidents; 5) the investigation of criminal activity; 6) the arrest of criminals and wanted people; 7) assistance in emergency management during disaster functions for Bexar County providing manpower and public inquiry assistance; and 8) assisting as State liaison clerks between the city, county, and state during emergency functions.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

To assist the Courts of Bexar County with the creation of a smooth flow of information between the Courts and the Texas Highway Patrol. This smooth exchange of information will create an atmosphere of increased accountability for Bexar County. To increase the apprehension of Bexar County residents wanted by the Justice Courts of Bexar County. To release the troopers of Sergeant Area 3B01 for increased routine patrol devoted to the public safety of the citizens of Bexar County. Increased routine patrol will allow for safer roadways and increased apprehension of law violators and criminals in Bexar County. To interact directly with the citizens of Bexar County through public telephone inquiries to assist the citizens in the following areas: o Highway patrol/criminal law inquiries o Reporting of dangerous situations o Various public complaints o Outstanding violations/warrants o General information o Employment opportunities available with the Texas Department of Public Safety

Program Description:

Bexar County established the Department of Public Safety (DPS) Highway Patrol Division to centralize the handling and distribution of all criminal cases filed by Highway Patrol Troopers of the area and surrounding counties. The Highway Patrol Division coordinates misdemeanor and felony cases between District Courts, County Courts and Justice of the Peace Courts. Highway Patrol Division personnel assemble and forward felony criminal cases to the District Courts of the County and misdemeanor criminal cases to the Justice of the Peace Courts and County Courts at Law. Highway Patrol Division personnel provide administrative support and report the dispositions of all criminal cases issued by Sergeant Area 3B01 to the Texas Department of Public Safety-Austin. Staff prepares complaints and probable cause affidavits for the issuance of warrants by the Justice Courts of the County in all highway patrol citations issued by Sergeant Area 3B01. Upon receiving warrants lists from the Justice Courts of Bexar County, Highway Patrol Division personnel establish telephone contact and prepare written correspondence with the named violators on the warrants to obtain voluntary compliance with the court order.

26-1


Highway Patrol Division personnel utilize the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s computer network to check violatorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; compliance with the phone/written contacts and for the reporting of dispositions. Highway Patrol Division works for all Justice Courts utilizing the County computer network to enter citations into the Justice Court System. Highway Patrol Division also acts as liaison between area troopers and the court systems of Bexar County. Highway Patrol Division interacts directly with the citizens of Bexar County through public telephone to address questions concerning State law and other pertinent public issues. The functions performed by the Highway Patrol Division allow for an increased presence of troopers on routine patrol in Bexar County to increase public safety for the citizens of Bexar County.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Total Traffic Stops Citations Entered Criminal Arrests

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Subtotal

FY 2016-17 Proposed

21,372 6,300 940

22,000 6,400 1,000

23,000 6,500 1,100

7,760 3,241 940

8,248 3,600 1,000

10,925 3,445 1,100

$1,017,315

$1,117,315

$1,125,065

Efficiency Indicators: Citations Delivered to Courts Criminal Arrests Maintained DVDs Delivered to District Attorney Effectiveness Indicators: JP Court Revenue from Citations

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$101,609

$93,925

$98,331

$99,783

$101,609

$93,925

$98,331

$99,783

Program Changes

$0 Total

$101,609

$93,925

26-2

$98,331

$99,783


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group increases by 1.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to changes in the selection of healthcare plans by employees.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Total – DPS Highway Patrol

26-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 0

0 2

0 2

2

2

2


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5100

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT Mission: To strengthen Bexar County’s economic well-being and expand employment opportunities

by collaborating with the private sector, public sector stakeholders, and local communities to create an environment that encourages business retention, expansion, creation and relocation.

Vision:

To be an economic development leader recognized for working with local partners by developing and capitalizing on opportunities to grow the Bexar County economy.

Goals and Objectives: •

Encourage the healthy expansion of the local economy through growth in existing business enterprises, by reducing attrition of jobs, and by attracting external business enterprises in targeted industries to locate, relocate, or expand in the local economy.

Collaborate with local external agencies in activities designed to promote and sustain Bexar County’s economy.

Create and promote economic development incentives that will stimulate development in specified areas of the County.

Leverage Federal investments made in Bexar County.

Conduct and review financial analysis of economic development projects to determine investment feasibility and economic impact.

Administer, manage and oversee contract development and implementation.

Develop and maintain partnerships with external agencies, the business community and community organizations to promote incentives for economic development initiatives undertaken by the business sector.

Leverage the community’s investment in the AT&T Center and Arena Venue to improve the economic activity and quality of life in the Arena Venue District.

Actively participate in the development and implementation of community-wide planning efforts aimed at integrating and optimizing local workforce and economic development efforts, including “San Antonio’s Strategic Plan for Economic Development” (Deloitte study); Brookings Institution Global Cities Initiative; SA2020; and the Committee of Six for Workforce SolutionsAlamo.

Program Description:

The Economic Development Department enhances the focus on issues affecting Bexar County’s economy and provides a variety of business development resources to help the County remain at the forefront of economic development. The Economic Development Department’s goal is to strengthen Bexar County’s economic well-being and expand employment opportunities by 27-1


collaborating with the private sector and local communities to create an environment that encourages business expansion, creation, and relocation.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Workload Indicators: Tax Abatements - Active Incentive Grants - Active Innovation Fund Projects - Active

52 9 N/A

62 10 10

63 10 15

13,600 N/A $276 million

13,600 20 $276 million

14,000 40 $188 million

50:1

50:1

41:1

$409

$409

$330

N/A

$20,800

$25,000

Efficiency Indicators: Jobs Created - Active Tax Abatements Innovation Fund Jobs Created Annual Company Investment - Active Tax Abatements

Effectiveness Indicators:

County Investment to Company Investment - Active Tax Abatements Tax Abatements & Incentive Grants County Investment per Job Created Innovation Fund Projects County Investment per Job Created

Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$604,100 4,088 38,758 3,617

$586,128 12,000 72,216 6,250

$605,279 11,286 52,094 4,259

$620,020 8,000 72,200 6,548

$650,563

$676,594

$672,918

$706,768

Program Change

$0 Total

$650,563

27-2

$676,594

$672,918

$706,768


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 5.0 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 2.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for staff to attend various conferences and workshops related to local workforce development.

The Operational Costs group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to funding provided in FY 2016-17 for website-design and advertisements associated with a workforce strategy to promote labor participation in the region funded.

The Supplies and Materials group increases when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is provided for computer supplies.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions:

Executive Director of Economic Development Deputy Director - Economic Development Economic Development Manager Office Supervisor Senior Analyst – Economic Development Total – Economic Development

27-3

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

5

5

5

1


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 1100

ELECTIONS Mission:

To plan and conduct Federal, State, County, and contract elections and to provide voter registration services to the citizens of Bexar County efficiently, accurately, and in accordance with established laws, regulations, and governmental policies.

Vision:

To conduct Federal, State, County, and contract elections and to provide voter registration services to the citizens of Bexar County in a timely, accurate, efficient and customer-oriented way. The Elections Department will be responsive and accountable to the individual citizens we service dedicated to meeting their needs through the use of sound business practices and improved technology; accurate application of established laws, regulations and policies; and an absolute commitment to quality customer service.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • •

To plan and conduct Federal, State, County, and contract elections for all County political subdivisions. To provide information and guidance to voters and organizations regarding election issues. To maintain accurate voter registration records and to provide resources for voter registration activities. To maintain election histories for elections conducted in the County. To receive and file campaign and expenditure reports for candidates and officeholders. To communicate with the Secretary of State and the U.S. Department of Justice regarding regulatory and legislative issues. To provide a technologically improved and professional environment. To be Help America Vote Act (HAVA) compliant on both the Election and Voter Registration Divisions. Train all election officials and Volunteer Deputy Voter Registrars.

Program Description:

The Elections Department conducts County, State, and Federal elections and holds contract elections for political subdivisions within Bexar County as authorized by the Texas Election Code. The Elections Department prepares ballots, furnishes election equipment and supplies, and coordinates all logistical and managerial components involved with conducting an election. These components involve staffing all polling facilities during the early voting period and, on Election Day, securing and retrieving ballots from the polling facilities ensuring all elections are conducted according to the Election Code. The Department conducts early voting both by personal appearance and by mail and canvasses election returns. The Department also compiles and maintains the record of all elections. The Elections Administrator serves as the County Voter Registrar and is responsible for maintaining accurate and up to date voter registration records, conducting voter registration drives, and maintaining accurate precinct/boundary maps and address records.

28-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Elections Held Including Run Off and Special: Funded by Bexar County Funded by Other Entities Number of Early Voting Election Sites Number of Election Day Voting Sites Efficiency Indicators: Number of Workers per Early Voting Site Number of Workers per Election Day Site Number of Mail Ballots Processed per FTE Number of Voter Registration Maintained per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Early Voting Results Available by 7:15PM Percentage of Election with Results Available 3 hours after receipt of all Ballots Percentage of Errors in Voter Registration Data Submitted to the Secretary of State/TEAM Percentage of Increase/(Decrease) in Registered Voters

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3 41 100 1,129

8 41 147 1,932

3 38 100 1,129

6 7 1,125 12,320

6 7 1,840 15,889

6 5 1,125 14,122

100%

100%

100%

95%

95%

97%

1.90% -8%

1.90% -8%

1.90% 23%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,408,435 1,889 1,529,749 122,777 71,643

$1,531,290 1,750 1,504,844 436,503 15,000

$1,584,009 1,973 1,385,057 405,781 26,649

1,562,129 3,000 1,697,347 219,950 0

$3,134,493

$3,489,387

$3,403,469

$3,482,427

Program Changes

($7,352) Total

$3,134,493

28-2

$3,489,387

$3,403,469

$3,475,074


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group decreases by 1.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to decreased funding for temporary employees. Temporary employees were hired in FY 2015-16 to prepare mass mail outs of voter registration cards in time for voter registration deadlines associated with the upcoming Presidential election.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to an anticipated increase in travel and training requirements for the upcoming Presidential election.

The Operational Costs group increases by 22.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to increased funds for Election Workers Wages and Special Services for FY 201617 required for the upcoming Presidential election.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to a decrease in Postage costs in FY 2016-17. During FY 2015-16, mass mail outs of voter registration cards and certificates were conducted in preparation for the upcoming Presidential election.

There are no Capital expenditures in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes three program changes for a total cost savings of $7,352 as described below. •

The first program change adds one Program Analyst (E-05) position for a total cost of $52,534, including salary and benefits. This position has been grant funded through the Electronic Absentee System for Elections (EASE) grant, which will expire in November 2016. This position ensures that the Elections Department complies with the Military and Overseas Voter Empowerment (MOVE) Act and is responsible for the election ballot process.

The second program change reclassifies one Operations Coordinator (NE-09) to Supervisor of Operations (NE-11) for a total cost of $7,951, including salary and benefits. There have been notable changes in the job scope and responsibilities of the position and this reclassification ensures that the position is graded and titled correctly as a result. New responsibilities include supervising employees and overseeing security protocols before the transportation of election equipment to the voting site.

The third program change deletes one e-Government Developer (E-07) for a total savings of $67,837, including salary and benefits. The Elections Department will seek to contract with a vendor to update and maintain the Elections Department webpage. State law requires the Elections Department webpage to include certain information specific to the administration of elections.

28-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Database Coordinator e-Government Developer Elections Administrator Elections Coordinator Elections Inventory Clerk Election Liaison Elections Training Coordinator Executive Assistant GIS Technician Operations Coordinator Program Analyst Senior Voter Registration Processor Supervisor of Operations Technical Support Specialist IV Voter Registration Coordinator Voter Registration Processor Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Elections

28-4

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 3 1 3

2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 0 1 0 3 1 3

2 0 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 0 1 1 1 3 1 3

20

21

21


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5061

OFFICE OF EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT Mission:

The Office of Emergency Management (OEM) coordinates the Bexar County emergency management program to prepare, prevent, plan, respond and recover from all-hazard events. The OEM develops, maintains and implements the ability to direct, control, manage and coordinate emergency operations in cooperation with local, State and Federal governmental and private sector agencies.

Vision:

Building a safer future through effective partnerships with local government, emergency services, private sector, and volunteer agencies and the citizens of Bexar County to save lives, protect property and reduce the effects of disasters through preparedness, prevention, planning, response, and recovery activities.

Goals and Objectives: • •

• •

Coordinate the County inter-jurisdictional emergency management plan and activities. Provide professional services, support, and oversight to the volunteer fire departments under contract with Bexar County in the areas of Hazardous Materials, Weapons of Mass Destruction, and Community Emergency Response Training. Provide citizen training through the Community Emergency Response Training (CERT) program. Coordinate Community/Private organization response during emergency situations.

Program Description: The Office of Emergency Management provides coordinated management

and utilization of resources during both natural and man-made emergencies. The Office of Emergency Management is housed with the City of San Antonio’s Emergency Management Division at Brooks City Base as the Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The EOC is a project that was voted on by the Citizens of Bexar County during the 2003 City/County Bond Election.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Number of All-Hazards Responder Training Classes Number of Community/Volunteer Training Classes Efficiency Measures: Average Number of Community Partners/Volunteers Trained per Class Average Number of Responders Trained per Class Effectiveness Measures: Total Number of Community Partner/Volunteers Trained Total Number of Responders Trained

29-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

40 12

40 12

40 12

22

22

22

15

15

15

350 900

350 900

350 900


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel. Training and Remunerations Operational Expense Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$488,397 8,217 128,706 256,891

$497,785 10,000 204,504 230,000

$529,798 9,733 196,773 209,403

$519,934 10,000 170,277 205,000

$882,211

$942,289

$945,707

$905,211 $0

Program Change Total

$882,211

$942,289

$945,707

$905,211

Program Justification and Analysis: •

Overall, the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 4.3 when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 1.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is proposed for all authorized positions for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 2.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds travel and training required to update and maintain certifications and licenses for staff.

The Operational Expense group decreases by 13.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is due primarily to the Contracted Services account, which funded a vendor to develop and coordinate a Hazard Mitigation Plan (HMP) for Bexar County and other municipalities. This expense is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 2.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed to decrease within the Vehicle Fuel and Oil account primarily due to the lower cost of fuel.

There are no proposed program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

29-2


Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Assistant Emergency Management Coordinator Bexar County Weapon of Mass Destruction/Hazmat Team Coordinator Citizen Corps Council Coordinator Emergency Management Coordinator Emergency Management Specialist Volunteer Services Specialist

1

1

1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Emergency Management Office

6

6

6

29-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5000, 5027

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ADMINISTRATION AND FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Program Description:

The Facilities Management Department oversees the County Capital Improvement Projects and provides services for other areas including the maintenance for the Adult Detention Center, County Buildings, Forensic Science Center, and Juvenile Institutions. Facilities Management also manages building grounds and the Energy Services division. The Administration Division of the Facilities Management Department provides for the general welfare of the citizens of Bexar County by managing the construction and maintenance of all County Facilities.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Workload/Output Measures: Number of Capital Projects Managed (less than $1 million) Number of Capital Projects Managed ($1-5 million) Number of Capital Projects Managed ($5-10 million) Number of Capital Projects Managed (over $10 million)

40 12 2 0

47 15 2 4

57 15 1 5

Efficiency Measures: Average Number of Change Orders per Project Average Percent Increase in Budget for a Project Average Percent Decrease in Budget for a Project

1.5 5% 0%

1 5% 0%

5 2.5% 0%

Effectiveness Measures: Number of Capital Projects Completed on Schedule Number of Capital Projects Completed within Budget

54 54

68 68

78 78

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$296,695 21,386 116,420 13,914 9,992

$476,694 7,225 440,960 68,906 60,155

$570,901 7,225 250,520 68,102 39,712

$626,273 8,935 173,947 101,885 627,215

$458,407

$1,053,940

$936,460

$1,538,255

Program Changes

$631,517 Total

$458,407 30-1

$1,053,940

$936,460

$2,169,772


-

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 9.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to turnover that occurred in FY 2015-16.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 23.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to additional funding for project management staff to complete project management testing and training.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 30.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is year funding for the Facilities Improvement Maintenance Program (FIMP) is proposed in other appropriation units. Below is a list of FIMP projects proposed for FY 2016-17 in the Operational Costs Group: Door & Key Replacement Exterior Cleaning of Courthouse Campus Veterans Service Office Carpet Replacement 45th District Court - Repair of Witness Stand 150th District Court - Light Covers in Jury Room 288th District Court - Fix Water Leak in Ceiling in Judge's Chambers Total

The Supplies and Materials group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding in the amount of $96,360 is proposed for one FIMP project in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget. ADC & Video Visitation Center (7) Key Watcher 16 Key Small Module Cabinets ADC & Comal Building (7) Key Watcher 16 Key Small Module Cabinets ADC (3) Key Watcher 1 MOD 16 Main Cabinets Total

12,983 108,000 3,993 5,000 5,000 5,000 $139,976

43,645 24,800 27,915 $96,360

The Capital Expenditures group provides FIMP funding in the amount of $627,215. Below is a list of proposed FIMP Projects in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget. ADC Front Entrance Beautification ADC Increase Cameras ADC Public Entrance ADC Day Room Sinks ADC Seal Pipe Penetrations ADC S. Annex - AHUs ADC Underground Hot Water Line

$18,000 105,300 35,100 43,875 77,500 54,990 40,950 30-2


-

Gillette Building - Capital Improvement JDC Repair Intake Roof JDC Backflow Preventer JDC Security Wall Justice Center Hallway Benches Vista Verde 2nd Floor Flooring Total •

70,000 60,000 68,000 18,000 20,000 15,500 $627,215

At the end of FY 2014-15, the County Manager hired a new Facilities Management Director. Over the course of the past year, the Director has overseen the Department and has developed a staffing plan that will allow for more efficient and effective facilities management practices. The reorganization requested by the Director is included in the proposed budget, with details described in several budget narratives included in this document. The total cost associated with the reorganization is $86,085, which is spread over the General Fund and the Capital Improvement Fund. Ten positions are proposed to be added and eight positions are proposed to be deleted, resulting in a net increase of 2 new positions. The program changes associated with the County Buildings Division of the Facilities Management Department are described below: •

The first program change adds one Division Chief (E-13) for a total cost of $143,829, including salary and benefits. This position will oversee a new division in the department proposed to focus on Detention facilities, as maintenance and management of these facilities can be more complex and require more time and attention. Aside from day to day facility operations, this position will be responsible for compliance with Facilities’ Preventive Maintenance program, TCJS and TJJD compliance, condition assessments for buildings and equipment, long-term capital planning, and management of small capital projects. Additionally, the County is expected to open up new county facilities within the next couple years, thus increasing the number of buildings to maintain and operate.

The second program change transfers the Information Technology Department’s Mail Room Division to the Facilities Management Department. The Mail Room positions include one Mailroom Supervisor (NE-08), two Mail Courier II (NE-02), and two Mail Courier (NE-01) positions. There is no cost associated with this program change as it is a transfer from one department to another.

The third program change transfers two positions from the Information Technology Department into the Facilities Department. The Video Conferencing Systems Manager (E-09) and the Court Technology Support Specialist (NE-10) will better assist with the audio visual requirements needed in county-owned facilities. There is no cost associated with this program change as it is a transfer from one department to another.

Facilities Management (Capital Projects Division) The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes two program changes within the Facilities Capital Projects Division, for a total cost savings of $170,140. The first program change is the addition of one Project Manager (E-07) and the deletion of one Senior Construction Coordinator (E-06). This program change is recommended so that the job description is more aligned with actual duties of the position. The total cost savings associated with this program change is $26,245, including salary and benefits.

30-3


-

The second program change is the deletion of one County Architect (NE-12). The new Facilities Management Director does not require an architect on staff. The total cost savings associated with this program change is $143,917, including salary and benefits. The list below represents the authorized positions after recommendations within the Facilities – Capital Projects Division are implemented: • • • •

One Capital Projects Manager (E-11) One Project Manager (E-07) One Project Manager (E-07) One Assistant Project Manager (E-6)

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Court Technology Support Specialist Division Chief Executive Assistant Facilities Management Director Human Resources Technician Lead Electronic Technician* Mailroom Supervisor Mail Courier Mail Courier II Office Assistant Technical and Contracts Compliance Manager Video Conferencing Systems Manager Total – Facilities Management Department

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 0 1 1 0 0 0 0 1 1 0

0 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 0

1 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1

5

7

15

*Audio Visual Technician was re-titled to Lead Electronic Technician in FY 2015-16.

30-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5025

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT – ADULT DETENTION CENTER Program Description: The Facilities Management Department - Adult Detention Center Division is

responsible for the operation, maintenance and repair of the County’s Adult Detention Facilities. Included are the Adult Detention Center and the Adult Detention Center Annex with a total of 4,800 beds, the Sheriff’s administrative office spaces, a detached 96-bed portable detention housing unit located adjacent to the Adult Detention Center Annex, and the ADC South Annex. Responsibilities include a complete maintenance program to include pest control services, repair and minor remodeling of the facilities and upkeep of grounds and surface parking lots. Preventive, corrective, diagnostic, and demand maintenance programs are regularly performed on all equipment, machinery and systems, (including heating, ventilation, air conditioning, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, life safety and critical electronic equipment) to support the safe and efficient operation of the facilities. This division maintains the facilities 24 hours per day, seven days a week. Contracts developed, implemented and overseen include janitorial services, elevator maintenance, recycling and waste disposal services, pest control services, uninterrupted power supply systems, water treatment and other service contracts. Economic effectiveness, efficient services and the application of best building engineering practices to ensure the reliability and effectiveness of all building mechanical/electrical equipment and utility systems are part of our Facilities Maintenance Section responsibilities. The efficient functioning of these systems helps to ensure the County’s compliance with regulatory requirements of State and local agencies, and limits the County's liability. In addition to maintaining compliance with applicable codes and regulations, this section is also responsible for the jail facility maintaining compliance with the Texas Commission on Jail Standards (TCJS) and passing both, annual and periodic TCJS inspections

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload/Output Measures: Number of Work Orders (Demand Generated) Number of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) Building Square Footage Maintained Efficiency Measures: Average Number of Days to Complete Demand and Generated Work Orders Average Number of Days to Complete Preventative Maintenance Work Orders Number of Work Orders (Demand Generated) per FTE Number of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) per FTE

31-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

39,000 4,600 817,801

39,743 4,744 817,801

40,000 6,000 817,801

8

5

5

10

9

9

1,300

1,419

2,222

84

86

109


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Demand Generated) Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Preventive Maintenance) Number of Favorable Audits by Outside Agencies

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

100%

100%

100%

93% 2 out 2

96% 2 out of 2

96% 2 out of 2

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,657,770 4,268 904,081 306,020

$1,728,237 13,150 1,035,958 374,422

$1,608,528 11,500 847,521 379,364

$1,900,547 12,150 918,642 334,529

$2,872,139

$3,151,767

$2,846,913

$3,165,868

Program Changes

($82,502) Grand Total

$2,872,139

$3,151,767

$2,846,913

$3,083,366

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 8.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 18.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to turnover experienced in FY 2015-16 and can also be attributed to an increase in Health Insurance elected by the employees.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 5.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various training for staff in order to learn the latest technologies and techniques regarding safety, repairs, and maintenance of buildings.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 8.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to an increase in Contracted Services, such as elevator service contracts. Contracting with vendors allows for monthly maintenance inspections and other preventative services which will lessen the likelihood of the equipment failing and breaking down unexpectedly.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 11.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is primarily due to lower costs anticipated in Tools & Hardware as a 31-2


result of contracting with vendors for various repairs and maintenance of County buildings. The Department is increasing funding on preventative maintenance contracts as explained in the Operational Expenses appropriation. •

At the end of FY 2014-15, the County Manager hired a new Facilities Management Director. Over the course of the past year, the Director has overseen the Department and has developed a staffing plan that will allow for more efficient and effective facilities management practices. The reorganization requested by the Director is included in the proposed budget, with details described in several budget narratives included in this document. The total cost associated with the reorganization is $86,085, which is spread over the General Fund and the Capital Improvement Fund. Ten positions are proposed to be added and eight positions are proposed to be deleted, resulting in a net increase of 2 new positions. The program changes associated with the Adult Detention Center Division of the Facilities Management Department are described below: •

The first program change adds one Lead Maintenance Technician (NE-09) position for a total cost of $65,106, including salary and benefits. This position will provide supervision and oversight in order to work order process. This position will have the authority to correct work orders and move work orders through the process in a timely manner.

The second program change adds one Lead Life and Safety Technician (NE-09) and deletes one Life Safety Supervisor (NE-10) for a total cost savings of $22,157 including salary and benefits. This position is proposed in order to standardize the staffing across all divisions of the Facilities Management Department. Each division will now have four Life and Safety positions, one of which will be a Lead position.

The third program change deletes one Jail Superintendent (E-10) for a total cost savings of $98,906, including salary and benefits. Under the re-organization of the Department, this position will be redundant within the management structure with the proposed addition of a Division Chief in Facilities Management Administration.

The fourth program change adds three Maintenance Mechanic II (NE-06) positions and deletes four Maintenance Mechanic I (NE-03) positions for a total cost saving of $26,547, including salary and benefits. These technicians can, by themselves, perform repairs with limited supervision, thereby allowing resolution of work orders more quickly.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Carpenter Electrician Electronics Technician I Electronics Technician II Exterminator Facilities Maintenance Supervisor HVAC and Controls Technician

FY 2015-16 Estimate 1 1 3 2 1 1 1

31-3

FY 2016-17 Proposed 1 1 3 2 1 0 1

1 1 3 2 1 0 1


FY 2014-15 Actual HVAC Technician Jail Facilities Specialist Jail Superintendent Life and Safety Supervisor Life and Safety Technician Lead Life and Safety Technician Lead Maintenance Technician Maintenance Mechanic I Maintenance Mechanic II Office Assistant IV Plumber Welder II Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Adult Detention Center Division

31-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 0 1 1 4 0 0 14 4 1 2 1

1 1 1 1 4 0 0 14 4 1 2 1

1 1 0 0 4 1 1 10 7 1 2 1

39

39

38


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5020

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT – COUNTY BUILDINGS Program Description:

The Facilities Management Department - County Buildings Division is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and repair of all County judicial and administrative facilities. These facilities include the Courthouse, Justice Center, Courthouse Annex, Fire Marshal’s building, the Community Supervision and Corrections Department building (Adult Probation), Vista Verde Plaza, the Fleet Maintenance Facility, the Records Management and Training Center, the Elections and Purchasing Building the Paul Elizondo Tower, the Adult Detention Center South Annex Facility (formerly known as Toudouze), the Constable, Justice of the Peace, Biblotech and Tax Office in Precinct 1, Bibliotech in Precinct 2, and the Federal Reserve Building. This division is responsible for the maintenance, pest control services, repair, and minor remodeling of these facilities. Preventive, diagnostic, and demand maintenance programs are regularly performed on all equipment, machinery, and systems. The facilities maintained by this division generally operate five days a week, at least eight hours per day with after hour on-call maintenance support services. This division also monitors the following contracts for proper compliance: janitorial services, elevator maintenance, waste disposal, recycling program, water treatment, un-interruptible power supply systems (UPS), cafeteria concession services, contracted security services, ATM services, uniform services, and contracted correctional facility services. The proper functioning of these systems helps to ensure the County’s compliance with state mandates and limits any liability concerns.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Number of Work Orders (Demand and Generated) Number of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) Building Square Footage Maintained Efficiency Measures: Average Number of Days to Complete Demand and Generated Work Orders Average Number of Days to Complete Preventative Maintenance Work Orders # of Work Orders (Demand and Generated) per FTE # of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) per FTE Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Demand and Generated) Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Preventive Maintenance) Number of Favorable Audits by Outside Agencies

32-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

38,525 3,000 1,384,702

39,000 3,100 1,384,702

40,00 4,000 1,384,702

3

3

3

5 1,937 150

5 1,950 155

5 2,000 1200

100%

100%

100%

96% 2 out 2

96% 2 out of 2

99% 2 out of 2


Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,515,271 10,999 2,429,744 169,568 5,124

$1,187,623 9,501 2,851,762 246,226 0

$1,319,840 9,500 2,656,541 256,612 0

$1,326,005 12,380 2,730,888 219,646 0

$4,130,706

$4,295,112

$4,242,493

$4,288,919

Program Changes

$129,918 Grand Total

$4,130,706

$4,295,112

$4,242,493

$4,418,837

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 4.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed based on FY 2015-16 expenditure estimates.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various training opportunities to keep staff updated on new technologies and techniques regarding safety, repairs, and maintenance of buildings.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 2.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for Contracted Services, which will reduce the cost associated with repairs and maintenance of County buildings. Contracting with vendors allows for monthly maintenance inspections and other preventative maintenance services, which will lessen the likelihood of the equipment failing and breaking down unexpectedly.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 14.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is primarily due to a one-time expenditure in Safety Supplies for AEDs that were purchased in FY 2015-16 and installed at various County buildings.

At the end of FY 2014-15, the County Manager hired a new Facilities Management Director. Over the course of the past year, the Director has overseen the Department and has developed a staffing plan that will allow for more efficient and effective facilities management practices. The reorganization requested by the Director is included in the proposed budget, with details described in several budget narratives included in this document. The total cost associated with the reorganization is $86,085, which is spread over the General Fund and the Capital Improvement Fund. Ten positions are proposed to be added and eight positions are proposed to be deleted,

32-2


resulting in a net increase of 2 new positions. The program changes associated with the County Buildings Division of the Facilities Management Department are described below: â&#x20AC;˘

The first program change adds one Lead Maintenance Technician (NE-09) position for a total cost of $65,108, including salary and benefits. This position is proposed to provide staff supervision that will improve the management process of the Department and improve the process of correcting and managing work orders.

â&#x20AC;˘

The second program change adds one Lead Life and Safety Technician (NE-09) for a total cost of $64,810, including salary and benefits. The job duties of this position are proposed to include the inspection and maintenance of the fire alarm and sprinkler systems in various County buildings.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Building Monitor Carpenter Electrician Electronic Technician II Exterminator Facilities Maintenance Supervisor HVAC and Controls Technician Life & Safety Technician Lead Life and Safety Technician Lead Maintenance Technician Maintenance Helper Maintenance Mechanic I Maintenance Mechanic II Office Assistant II Painter Plumber Senior HVAC Technician Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; County Buildings Division

32-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 2 5 5 1 0 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 0 0 2 4 5 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 2 4 5 1 1 1 1

24

24

26


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5021

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ENERGY SERVICES Program Description:

The Energy Management Program (EMP) was created by Commissioners Court in early 2004 to reduce the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s overall energy consumption and cost. The goal of the EMP is to maximize available energy-efficient conservation technologies, while utilizing sustainable materials and approaches in design, construction and operations. The EMP also aims to ensure compliance with the Energy Conservation and Recycling Policy approved and adopted by the Bexar County Commissioners Court on October 23, 2007.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Total Electricity Consumption (kWh) Total Natural Gas Consumption (CCF) Total Water Consumption (Gallons) Building Square Footage Number of Buildings

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

54,488,660 609,137 63,348,982 2,515,008 28

55,737,158 590,000 64,509,952 2,635,000 29

56,294,530 595,900 65,155,052 2,705,000 30

Efficiency Measures: Consumption of Electricity (kWh) per Square Foot Consumption of Natural Gas (CCF) per Square Foot Consumption of Water (Gallons) per Square Foot

21.67 0.24 27.18

22.16 0.23 25.64

22.16 0.23 25.64

Effectiveness Measures: Percent Increase/Decrease in kWh per Square Foot Percent Increase/Decrease in CCF per Square Foot Percent Reduction in Gallons per Square Foot

0.78% -4.2% -3.3%

2.3% -4% -5.7%

0% 0% 0%

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$124,203 300 6,050,813 626

$49,155 0 6,343,169 0

$46,313 0 6,518,442 0

$42,995 0 6,210,686 0

$6,175,942

$6,392,324

$6,564,755

$6,253,681

Program Changes

$0 Total

$6,175,942 33-1

$6,392,324

$6,564,755

$6,253,681


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 7.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This decrease is due to changes in the selection of health insurance plans by employees.

The Operational Costs group decreases slightly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Electric and Gas Service and Water and Sewer Service is anticipated to remain relatively flat for various County buildings in FY 2016-17.

There are no program changes for the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Data Tracking Specialist Energy Manager* Total – Energy Services Division *The Energy Manager position is frozen.

33-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1

1 1

1 1

1

2

2


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4709

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT – FORENSIC SCIENCE CENTER Mission:

The mission of the Facilities Management Department - Forensic Science Center Facility Maintenance Division is to provide the tenants of the Center (and agencies of the Criminal Justice System) with reliable, cost-effective, and professional facility services and a comfortable working environment.

Vision:

The Bexar County Forensic Science Facility Maintenance Division is committed to providing quick and reliable solutions to maintain a comfortable and safe environment for all tenants and visitors who come to the facility. The Division will constantly strive to adopt new and innovative solutions that will increase the expediency of our work product, decrease costs and decrease the time necessary to accomplish our tasks. We will maintain excellent relations with the public and members of the Criminal Justice System.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Promote public safety and well-being. Maintain Americans with Disabilities Act and Occupational Safety and Health Administration standards in the Forensic Science Center. Automate as many functions as possible to increase the efficiency of the office, without affecting the quality of services provided. Maintain a short turnaround time for all services provided by continuously keeping up with the demands of the tenants. Encourage enhancements to the Center’s service delivery system through continuous improvement and innovations, including utilization of technological solutions to improve operations.

Program Description:

The Forensic Science Center Facility Division is responsible for scheduling and overseeing building interior and exterior maintenance; coordinating special projects related to space planning, cost reductions and analysis of supplier performance; coordinating utility shutdowns to cause the least disturbance to tenants; and adhering to compliance issues of various local, State, and Federal governing entities. Other responsibilities include: addressing the Criminal Investigation Laboratory and Medical Examiner’s Office accreditation requirements in regards to facility issues; implementing and communicating facilities policies and procedures; and monitoring compliance with procedures throughout the facility.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Number of Work Orders (Demand Generated) Number of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) Building Square Footage Maintained

34-1

400 150 49,200

FY 2015-16 Estimate 448 200 49,200

FY 2016-17 Proposed 500 250 49,200


FY 2014-15 Actual Efficiency Indicators: Average Number of Days to Complete Demand and Generated Work Orders Average Number of Days to Complete Preventative Maintenance Work Orders Maintenance Cost per Square Foot without utilities Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Demand and Generated) Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Preventive Maintenance) Number of Favorable Audits by Outside Agencies Percentage of Cost Increase/Decrease to Maintain Square Footage

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3

3

3

5

5

3

$5.83

$5.83

$6.00

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

1 out 1

1 out 1

1 out 1

14.6%

3%

0%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$424,131 6,532

$498,883 9,627

$454,741 9,400

462,365 7,500

$430,663

$508,510

$464,141

$469,865

Program Changes

$0 Total

$430,663

$508,510

$464,141

$469,865

Program Justification & Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Adopted Budget increases by 1.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates group as described below. •

The Operational Costs group decreases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This decrease is due to lower costs anticipated in Buildings Repairs and Maintenance as a result of a decrease in the cost of contracts with various vendors that provide annual maintenance services.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 20.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This decrease is due to a reduction in the budgeted amount for Vehicle Fuel and Oils, which reflects the decrease in the cost of gasoline.

There are no program changes for the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget. 34-2


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5026

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT – JUVENILE INSTITUTIONS Program Description:

The Facilities Maintenance Department – Juvenile Institutions Division is responsible is responsible for the operation, maintenance, and repair of the Juvenile Detention and Administration facilities located at the Bexar County Juvenile Detention Center – Mission Road, Cyndi Taylor Krier Juvenile Correctional Treatment Facility, the Frank Tejeda Juvenile Justice Center, the Juvenile Probation Building, the Fire Arms Training Center and Training Academy located on Farm Road.

Responsibilities for the Juvenile Maintenance Division include maintenance, pest control services, repair and minor remodeling of the facilities. Preventive, corrective, diagnostic, and demand maintenance programs are regularly performed on all equipment, machinery and systems, (including heating, ventilation, air conditioning, mechanical, electrical, plumbing, life safety and critical electronic equipment) to support the safe and efficient operation of the facilities. This division also manages the following contracts for proper compliance: janitorial services, elevator maintenance, waste disposal, recycling program, food services, un-interruptible power supply services, pest control services, and water treatment. The Juvenile facilities operate 24 hours per day; seven days a week and the administrative related buildings operate ten hours a day, five days a week. In addition to maintaining compliance with applicable codes and regulations, this section is also responsible for maintaining compliance at both complexes with the Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD) and passing both, annual and unscheduled TJJD inspections as it relates to the physical plant. Economic effectiveness, efficient services and the application of sound engineering practices to ensure the reliability and effectiveness of all our equipment and utility systems are part of our Facilities Maintenance Division Goals.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload/Output Measures: Number of Work Orders (Demand Generated) Number of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) Building Square Footage Maintained Efficiency Measures: Maintenance Cost per Square Foot Number of Work Orders (Demand Generated) per FTE Number of Work Orders (Preventive Maintenance) per FTE

35-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

17,942 13,607 422,386

17,942 13,607 422,386

17,950 13,607 422,386

$4.19

$4.30

$4.30

854

854

854

647

647

647


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Demand Generated) Percentage of Work Orders Completed (Preventive Maintenance) Number of Favorable Audits by Outside Agencies Percentage of cost increase/decrease to maintain square footage

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

100%

100%

100%

100% 1 out of 1

100% 1 out of 1

100% 1 out of 1

-0.7%

-0.7%

1%

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,011,156 260 621,351 97,066

$1,009,426 1,000 670,726 106,963

$1,081,629 260 616,298 98,295

$1,124,963 3,180 661,268 103,107

$1,729,833

$1,788,115

$1,796,482

$1,892,518

Program Changes

$65,108 Grand Total

$1,729,833

$1,788,115

$1,796,482

$1,957,626

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 estimates. This is due to turnover experienced in FY 2015-16 that is not anticipated in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various training opportunities to learn about the latest technologies and techniques regarding safety, repairs, and maintenance of buildings.

The Operational Costs group increases by 7.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to funding proposed for Contracted Services. The County will contract with a vendor to provide preventative maintenance for juvenile facilities.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to additional funding proposed in Minor Equipment and Machinery for one-time expenditures on equipment.

35-2


â&#x20AC;˘

At the end of FY 2014-15, the County Manager hired a new Facilities Management Director. Over the course of the past year, the Director has overseen the Department and has developed a staffing plan that will allow for more efficient and effective facilities management practices. The reorganization requested by the Director is included in the proposed budget, with details described in several budget narratives included in this document. The total cost associated with the reorganization is $86,085, which is spread over the General Fund and the Capital Improvement Fund. Ten positions are proposed to be added and eight positions are proposed to be deleted, resulting in a net increase of 2 new positions. The program changes associated with the Juvenile Institutions Division of the Facilities Management Department is described below: â&#x20AC;˘ The program change adds one Lead Maintenance Technician (NE-09) position for a total cost of $65,108 including salary and benefits. This position is proposed to provide staff supervision that will improve the management process of the Department and improve the process of correcting and managing work orders.

Authorized Positions:

Electronic Technician II Facilities Maintenance Supervisor HVAC Technician Life & Safety Technician Lead Maintenance Technician Maintenance Mechanic I Maintenance Mechanic II Plumber Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Juvenile Institutions

35-3

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3 2 2 1 0 10 2 1

3 2 2 1 0 10 2 1

3 2 2 1 1 10 2 1

21

21

22


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5070

FIRE MARSHAL’S OFFICE Mission: The mission of the Bexar County Fire Marshal (BCFM) is to develop, foster, and promote

methods of protecting the lives and property of the citizens of Bexar County from fires, both natural and man-made hazards, and other significant events through direct coordination and action with other public safety, private, and business communities. BCFM coordinates with Federal, State, and other local governmental agencies with a focus on reducing the vulnerability to all natural and man-made hazards by minimizing damage and assisting in the recovery for any type of incident that may occur.

Vision:

The BCFM acts in accordance with the highest standards of professionalism, efficiency, integrity and accountability in order to support the mission and goals of Bexar County. We affirm that the responsibility for providing safety from fire and related hazards must be a cooperative effort, and we approach our activities in a genuine partnership with fire service, local governments, other Bexar County departments, regulated fire service industries and the public which we serve. We assure the public and regulated communities that we are service-oriented and always strive to fulfill the needs of our customers in a fair and sensible manner. We provide equal opportunity for all employees and quality services which are accessible to all.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • •

To ensure safety in commercial and public buildings by conducting annual inspections to identify and reduce fire hazards. To reduce the incidence of fire loss of life through public fire safety education. To address concerns of County residents by investigating and addressing complaints related to fire and life safety issues. To determine the origin and cause of fires. To assist in the prosecution of individuals when warranted. To monitor and provide technical and professional assistance to the volunteer fire departments under contract with Bexar County. To provide emergency response dispatching and communication support to volunteer fire departments.

Program Description:

The Bexar County Fire Marshal’s Office (BCFM) performs the following

functions: • • • • • • • • • •

Public Fire Prevention and Education Public Fire Safety Inspections Investigation of Fire Safety Complaints Explosive and Blast Permitting Fire and Building Code Compliance Building Plans Review and Permitting Fire Origin and Cause Determination Fire/Arson Investigation Volunteer Fire Department Contract Administration Coordinate all County Volunteer Department Activities 36-1


â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Oversee emergency communication dispatching for the Volunteer Fire Departments Coordinate and facilitate mutual aid agreements with emergency services districts, volunteer fire departments, municipalities, and the military.

Performance Indicators: Workload Indicators: Number of Annual Fire Inspections Number of Cases Filed with the D.A. Office for Prosecution Number of Emergency Service Requests Received at Dispatch Efficiency Indicators: Number of Inspections per Fire Inspector Number of Investigations per Investigator Number of Dispatcher Calls per Dispatcher Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of citizen complaints closed within 24 hours Average Number of emergency calls dispatched per month

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1,162

1,805

2,700

25

18

24

30,606

31,000

31,500

550 16.8 7,515

451 21.8 7,515

900 26 5,600

90%

100%

100%

2,191

2,482

2,600

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$938,963 21,404 158,041 73,968 2,011

$952,591 19,385 195,831 83,300 1,500

$994,943 19,385 158,877 89,229 750

$1,007,194 20,000 156,339 80,750 0

$1,194,387

$1,252,607

$1,263,184

$1,264,283

Program Change

$3,666 Total

$1,194,387

36-2

$1,252,607

$1,263,184

$1,267,949


Program Justification and Analysis: •

Overall, the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 1.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 estimates due to an increase in the county’s retirement contribution rate as determined by the Texas County and District Retirement System and changes in the health care plans selected by employees in FY 2015-16.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 3.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds additional travel and training required to update and maintain certifications and licenses for staff. This includes staff attending the Texas Fire and Arson Seminar, the State Fire Marshal’s Conference, and the International Association of Arson Investigators.

The Operational Costs group decreases by 1.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is primarily due to the Mutual Fire Aid account, which provides funds to volunteer fire departments in Bexar County. The Camelot Volunteer Fire Department is now part of the Bexar County Emergency Services District #11 and, as a result, does not qualify to receive funding under the Mutual Fire Aid agreements.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 9.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The decrease is primarily due to the lower cost of fuel.

No funding is proposed in the Capital Expenditures Appropriation Group for FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a cost of $3,666. •

One program change proposes to reclassify one Public Safety Communications Supervisor from an E-05 to an E-06. The purpose of this reclassification is to make this position equal to the Sheriff’s Office Public Safety Communications Supervisors, which are also proposed to reclassified to E-06. The cost of this program change is $3,666, including salary and benefits.

Authorized Positions:

Administrative Assistant Chief Fire Investigator Deputy Fire Marshal Fire Marshal Office Assistant I Office Supervisor

36-3

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 10 1 1 1

1 1 10 1 1 0

1 1 10 1 1 0


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Public Safety Communication Supervisor Public Safety Dispatcher I

1 6

1 8

1 8

Total – Fire Marshal’s Office *Two Public Safety Dispatcher I positions are part-time.

21

23

23

Authorized Position Funding Allocations: • • • • • • •

(1) Administrative Assistant funded 45 percent Fire Marshal Office, 45 percent Emergency Management, and 10 percent Fire Code Fund (1) Chief Fire Investigator funded 87 percent Fire Marshal Office and 13 percent Fire Code Fund (5) Deputy Fire Marshal funded 87 percent Fire Marshal Office and 13 percent Fire Code Fund (5) Deputy Fire Marshal funded 50 percent Fire Marshal Office and 50 percent Fire Code Fund (1) Fire Marshal funded 37.5 percent Fire Marshal Office, 37.5 percent Emergency Management, and 25 percent Fire Code Fund (8) Public Safety Dispatcher I funded 75 percent Fire Marshal and 25 percent Fire Code Fund (1) Public Safety Communications Supervisor funded 75 percent Fire Marshal and 25 percent Fire Code Fund

36-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4907

HUMAN RESOURCES Mission: Serving Bexar County, adding value, delivering results. Vision:

Our customers will see Human Resources (HR) as valued partners in making Bexar County the government of choice. We will be leaders in providing human capital services.

Goals and Objectives: •

• • • • •

Create and support an environment focused on planning, strategic and innovative thinking, practical solutions and accountability. Strengthen Bexar County’s financial position. Continuously improve business practices. Attract, develop, motivate and retain a productive and diversified workforce. Strengthen Bexar County’s Civil Service processes to ensure quick and equitable resolution to employee grievances. Accomplish goals in the most cost-effective manner for Bexar citizens.

Program Description:

The Human Resources Division is responsible for the development and administration of County personnel policies and procedures to assure compliance with the federal and state laws and County regulations. The HR division: 1) oversees Employee Relations activities; 2) administers Bexar County employee health insurance, including the Employee Wellness Clinic, Family and Medical Leave Act, sick leave pool, and County-wide training; and 3) oversees the recruitment, examination, and certification process for employment candidates and administers the County’s Civil Service Program, including providing direct support to the Bexar County Civil Service Commission and the Sheriff’s Civil Service Commission.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Workload/Output Measures: Training events provided Number of applications reviewed Number of clinic pre-employment physicals

89 55,992 688

73 72,269 709

75 75,882 710

Efficiency Measures: Number of new hires processed per FTE Number of applications reviewed per FTE

196 17,905

202 18,800

212 19,740

Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of increase/decrease of employee clinic visits Percentage of attendees for training

-0.50% 82%

1% 84%

1% 86%

37-1


-

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$936,391 3,075 62,302 22,248

$943,482 10,000 110,804 44,900

$941,339 5,138 130,006 31,001

$994,505 10,000 155,804 44,900

$1,024,016

$1,109,186

$1,107,484

$1,205,209

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Budget

$0

Program Change Total

$1,024,016

$1,109,186

$1,107,484

$1,205,209

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 8.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 5.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The Human Resources Department experienced turnover during FY 2015-16. Full-year funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for staff to attend the Texas County & District Retirement System conference, a Benefits conference, and an American with Disabilities Act Conference.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 19.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is provided for County-wide background and fingerprint services. This service was previously provided by the Sheriff’s Office but will now be performed by an outside vendor.

The Supplies and Materials group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to providing full funding for office supplies that was not spent during FY 2015-16.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

37-2


-

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Analyst â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Human Resources Assistant County Manager Human Resources Director Human Resources Manager Human Resources Technician I Human Resources Technician II* Office Assistant II Senior Analyst â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Human Resources Total - Human Resources

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3 0.25 1 1 3 0.5 1 3

3 0.25 1 1 3 0.5 1 3

3 0.25 1 1 3 0.5 1 3

12.75

12.75

12.75

*The Human Resources Technician II is funded 50% in the Human Resources Department and 50% in the SelfInsurance Health & Life Fund.

37-3


FUND 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4800, 4802 & 9907

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Mission:

Provide high quality technology infrastructure, enterprise business solutions, and technical services to enable an efficient, effective, and innovative County government.

Vision:

To be recognized as a leader in providing technological excellence and innovation.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Establish service levels in collaboration with customers and deliver upon commitments. Manage the County technology hardware and software assets responsibly. Manage operations and technology investments with a focus on fiscal responsibility. Improve quality processes that result in higher-quality technology outcomes. Increase process improvement efforts that focus on efficiency and cost savings. Strengthen business intelligence/analytics through a focus on enterprise information systems. Enhance content management and workflow to streamline manual processes. Strengthen project portfolio management resulting in better project outcomes. Strengthen enterprise architecture, strategic planning, and multi-year technology roadmaps. Protect data from unauthorized access and misuse and ensure regulatory compliance. Protect all IT network and data assets against cyber-attacks and vulnerabilities. Improve disaster recovery efforts resulting in a redundant and resilient infrastructure. Strengthen resource capacity planning and enhance technology skillsets. Focus on voice of the employee and creating an innovative work environment. Measure BCIT operational and strategic progress and be transparent with results. Aim for achieving world-class IT operations in all divisions and benchmark against others.

Program Description:

Bexar County Information Technology (BCIT) is responsible for the architecture, design, development, implementation, security, maintenance, and support of the technology infrastructure, enterprise information systems, and end-user computing resources across all Bexar County Offices and Departments. BCIT enables efficiency and effectiveness through the use of various technology solutions across all Offices and Departments. BCIT continually researches new technical developments that may help enhance and optimize business processes for Bexar County. This involves a concentrated focus on developing a culture of learning and innovation in support of the BCIT mission and vision. BCIT ensures alignment to County goals and objectives through a focus on strategic planning, enterprise architecture, and project portfolio management best-practice approaches. This includes developing a multi-year technology roadmap in collaboration with Offices and Departments in support of their operational needs and strategic plans.

38-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Applications Development Legacy Software Defects (Fixes) Enterprise Data Center Number of Processed Mainframe Jobs E-Services/ Geographical Information Systems Number of GIS Service Visits Technical Support Number of Help Call Tickets

Efficiency Indicators: Applications Development Legacy Software Defects (Fixes) completed Enterprise Data Center Number of 24/7 Support Calls Taken per FTE E-Services/ Geographical Information Systems Average Number of Inquires per Visit Technical Support Number of Voice/Data Service Calls Closed per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Applications Development Percent of Legacy Software Defects (fixes completed) Enterprise Data Center Percentage of Security calls closed E-Services/ Geographical Information Systems Percentage of GIS System Availability Technical Support Percentage of Calls Resolved by Help Desk Staff

38-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1,284

1,266

3,072

213,076

241,260

283,644

215,000

200,000

291,000

5,148

6,000

3,810

1,335

1,266

2,918

1,392

1,294

12,230

20,000

20,000

60,000

1,287

956

476

100%

100%

100%

98.5%

99.9%

99.9%

99%

99%

99%

97%

98%

98%


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$8,731,663 101,321 5,728,515 329,522 39,228

$8,916,983 132,317 9,059,575 441,900 95,700

$9,492,531 103,792 9,308,226 417,857 95,700

$10,827,090 127,700 8,370,073 423,800 182,640

$14,930,249

$18,646,475

$19,418,106

$19,931,303

Program Change

($1,299,851) Total

$14,930,249

$18,646,475

$19,418,106

$18,631,452

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 14 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. During FY 2015-16, several new positions were created in accordance with recommendations included in the 5-Year IT Strategic Plan conducted by IBM. These positions are fully funded for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 23 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for cloud computing training, as recommended by the IBM 5-Year IT Strategic Plan developed for the Information Technology Department.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 10 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. During FY 2015-16, the County paid Microsoft for three years of True-Up Costs associated with the software licenses used by county employees in the amount of $2,456,238. The payment for FY 2016-17 is anticipated to be significantly lower.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 1.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for the tools and hardware account, and computer supplies are proposed at the same levels that were budgeted in FY 2015-16. The proposed funding will allow BCIT to purchase items needed to repair technology, as needed.

The Capital Expenditures group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for countywide ImageNow licenses, scanners and the purchase of software to provide additional security for the users of the Bexar County Public Information Network (BCPIN).

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The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes four program changes resulting in a net savings of $1,299,851, as described below. •

The first program change transfers County’s Mail Room to the Facilities Department’s Administration Budget. The Mail Room positions include one Mailroom Supervisor (NE-08), two Mail Courier II’s (NE-02), and two Mail Courier’s (NE-01). There is no cost associated with this program change as these positions are being transferred to another Department.

The second program change transfers two positions from the Information Technology Department to the Facilities Management Department – Administrative Division. The Video Conferencing Systems Manager (E-09) and the Court Technology Support Specialist (NE-10) work closely with facilities management staff. Therefore, the transfer of these positions will result in better and more efficient communication. There is no cost associated with this program change as these positions are being transferred to another Department.

The third program change proposes to delete one Director of Technology Innovations (EX01) to be effective April 1, 2017. This position was authorized to implement technology innovation projects in Bexar County. Those projects are anticipated to be complete in March 2017. This savings associated with this program change is $81,506, including salary and benefits.

The fourth program change proposes to delete 9.5 positions for a cost savings of $730,656. This proposed program change is consistent with recommendations included in the IBM 5Year Strategic Plan. The proposed positions to be deleted are: • One Analyst Programmer (E-7) from the Applications Development Division for a total cost savings of $72,669, including salary and benefits. • One Analyst Programmer II (E-9) from the Applications Development Division for a total cost savings of $82,888, including salary and benefits. • One CHRIS Support Specialist (E-07) from the Enterprise Resource Planning Division for a total cost savings of $72,669, including salary and benefits. • One Communications Technician (NE-08) from the Technical Support Division for a total cost savings of $61,185, including salary and benefits. • One Computer Operator (NE-07) from the Technical Support Division for a total cost savings of $57,900, including salary and benefits. • One Part-time Database Analyst (E-08) from the Database and Security Division for a total cost savings of $77,306, including salary and benefits. • Two Systems Programmers (E-08) from the Enterprise Data Center for a total cost savings of $154,612, including salary and benefits. • One Systems Programming Administrator (E-09) from the Enterprise Data Center for a total cost savings of $82,887, including salary and benefits. • One Technical Support Specialist III (NE-10) from the Technical Support Division for a total cost savings of $68,540, including salary and benefits.

38-4


Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Administration Chief Information and Technology Officer Chief Information Officer Deputy Chief Information Officer Director of Technology Innovations Total - Administration Application Development Applications Development Manager Analyst Programmer I Analyst Programmer II Database Analyst Data Security Analyst Senior Technology Business Analyst Technology Business Analyst Web/Print Graphics Designer Total - Application Development CJIS Analyst Programmer II Application Development Coordinator Application Development Program Aid Database Administrator Project Manager Network Security Administrator Senior Software Engineer Senior Technical Training & Support Specialist Software Engineer Technical Support Specialist III Total - CJIS Database and Security Analyst Programmer II Database Analyst Database Coordinator Data Security Analyst Database & Security Manager Total - Database and Security 38-5

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 1 1

1 1 0 1

1 1 0 0

3

3

2

1 8 14 0 1 1 2 1

1 6 13 1 0 1 2 0

1 5 12 1 0 1 2 0

28

24

22

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1

2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1

13

13

13

0 0 0 0 0

2 1.5 1 1 1

2 1 1 1 1

0

6.5

6


FY 2014-15 Actual Enterprise Business Solutions Director, Enterprise Business Solutions Solutions Architect Total - Enterprise Business Solutions Enterprise Data Center Applications Development Coordinator Asset Control Analyst Computer Operator Data Control Clerk Data Control Supervisor Database Analyst Database Administrator Database Coordinator Enterprise Data Center Manager Executive Assistant Lead Computer Operator Mail Courier Mail Courier II Mailroom Supervisor Media Librarian Office/Contracts Supervisor Operations Shift Supervisor Production Control Analyst Systems Programmer Systems Programming Administrator Total - Enterprise Data Center E-Services/Geographical Information Systems E-Government Developer GIS Database Systems Coordinator GIS Manager GIS Senior Analyst Senior Technical Training & Support Spec Technology Training & Support Specialist Webmaster Total - E-Services/Geographical Information Systems

38-6

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 0

1 1

1 1

0

2

2

1 1 3 1 1 2.5 1 1 1 0 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 1

1 2 3 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 3 2 2 1 1 1 3 1 3 1

1 2 2 1 1 0 0 0 1 1 3 0 0 0 1 1 3 1 1 0

30.5

28

19

2 1 1 1 1 2 1

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0

9

0

0


FY 2014-15 Actual Enterprise Resource Planning ABAP Programmer BASIS Administrator CHRIS Support Specialist IT Financial Systems Manager Total - Enterprise Resource Planning Enterprise Strategic Services Director, Enterprise Strategic Services Project Manager, Strategic Management Enterprise Architect Process Excellence Manager Total - Enterprise Strategic Services E-Services & Innovative Technology Analyst Programmer I E-Government Developer GIS Database Systems Coordinator GIS Manager GIS Senior Analyst Senior Technical Training & Support Spec Technology Training & Support Specialist Web/Print Graphics Designer Webmaster Total - E-Services & Innovative Technology IT Infrastructure Services Director, IT Infrastructure Services Solutions Architect Total - IT Infrastructure Services Technical Support Communications Coordinator Communications Supervisor Communications Technician Court Technology Support Specialist Executive Assistant Lead Communications Specialist Lead Communications Technician Network Architect I 38-7

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1

1 1

1 1

3 1

3 1

2 1

6

6

5

0 0 0 0

1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

0

4

4

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1

2 2 1 1 1 1 2 1 1

0

12

12

0 0

1 1

1 1

0

2

2

1 1 3 3 1 1 1 4

1 1 3 3 0 1 1 4

1 1 2 2 0 1 1 4


FY 2014-15 Actual Network Architect III Technical Support Coordinator Technical Support Manager Technical Support Specialist II Technical Support Specialist III Technical Support Specialist IV Video Conferencing Systems Manager

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1

1 1

1

1

1 1 1

2

2

2

6

6

5

1

1

1

1

1

0

28

27

23

0

1

1

0

2

2

Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Project Management Office

0

3

3

BCIT - TOTAL

117.5

130.5

113

Total - Technical Support Project Management Office Director, Project Management Office IT Project Manager

38-8


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNITS: 1000, 1010, 1011, 1012, 1013, 1014

JUDGE/COMMISSIONERS COURT Mission: Our mission is to improve the quality of life for the citizens of Bexar County by providing services that are appropriate, effective, and responsive in a fair and equitable manner.

Vision: Commissioners Court is committed to providing services with excellence. The people of Bexar County are our customers and we will treat them with dignity and respect. We will continuously strive to keep their trust and maintain our credibility. We will empower and support a competent, stable, motivated workforce dedicated to excellence. We will be accountable to our customers and responsive to their needs. We will protect and preserve our diverse cultural heritage. We will explore innovative ideas and services and be accessible to all.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • • • •

Provide quality services which are accessible to all. Manage the public’s resources with efficiency and integrity. Promote public safety and well-being. Encourage flexibility and accountability in all Offices and Departments. Create an environment that encourages continuous improvement, innovation, and communication in County operations. Use technological solutions to improve operations. Promote diversity in the workforce. Value every employee and treat them with respect and fairness. Develop a highly qualified and dedicated workforce. Preserve the history and heritage of Bexar County. Improve community relationships and communications.

Program Description: The Commissioners Court, which is composed of the County Judge and four

Commissioners, is the overall managing/governing body of Bexar County. The County Judge is the presiding officer of the Bexar County Commissioners Court as well as the spokesperson and ceremonial head of the County government. The County Judge is elected Countywide for a term of four years. The Commissioners are elected from four precincts within the County for four year staggered terms. The Court is responsible for budgetary decisions, tax and revenue decisions, and all personnel decisions except for certain positions that are either elected or appointed by the judiciary or other statutory boards and commissions.

39-1


Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload Indicators: Number of Contacts Number of Meetings Attended Number of Speaking Events Conducted Efficiency Indicators: Percentage of Constituency Responded to in 14 Days Percentage of Special Projects Completed in 14 Days Number of Meetings attended per week (staff/official) Effectiveness/Outcome Indicators: Percentage of Constituency Responded to Special Projects Completed/Implemented

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

8,300 1,230 120

8,342 1,250 121

8,384 1,270 122

93%

94%

95%

93%

94%

95%

25

26

27

97% 525

97% 528

97% 531

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual County Judge's Office Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$451,830 $2,013 $10,589 $4,465

FY 2015-16 Budget $456,356 $2,600 $8,735 $3,104

FY 2015-16 Estimate $464,627 $1,905 $7,794 $3,502

Program Changes

FY 2016-17 Proposed $472,141 $2,600 $8,735 $3,104 $0

Subtotal Commissioner Precinct 1 Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$468,897

$470,795

$477,828

$486,580

$338,583 $1,088 $10,750 $3,789

$337,800 $2,500 $9,797 $3,519

$346,712 $1,088 $9,129 $3,288

$353,461 $2,500 $9,797 $3,519

Program Changes

$0 Subtotal

$354,210

39-2

$353,616

$360,217

$369,277


FY 2014-15 Actual Commissioner Precinct 2 Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$288,036 $0 $968 $635

FY 2015-16 Budget $290,505 $500 $1,000 $1,007

FY 2015-16 Estimate $299,186 $500 $780 $1,267

Program Changes

FY 2016-17 Proposed $302,634 $500 $1,000 $1,007 $0

Subtotal Commissioner Precinct 3 Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$289,639

$293,012

$301,733

$305,141

$340,804 $0 $2,527 $3,367

$362,177 $6,936 $3,083 $1,735

$376,268 $6,166 $2,196 $1,446

$368,994 $2,700 $3,083 $1,735

Program Changes

$0 Subtotal

Commissioner Precinct 4 Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$346,698

$373,931

$386,076

$376,512

$351,485 $5,010 $3,745 $2,881

$335,278 $5,100 $3,600 $2,774

$332,362 $5,010 $5,671 $2,492

$334,819 $5,100 $3,600 $2,774

Program Changes

$0 Subtotal

Commissioners Court Administration Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$363,121

$346,752

$345,535

$346,293

$13,884 $1,919

$13,900 $3,000

$13,918 $1,919

$13,900 $3,000

Program Changes

$0 Subtotal

$15,803

39-3

$16,900

$15,837

$16,900


FY 2014-15 Actual Judge/Commissioners Court Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$1,770,738 $8,111 $42,463 $17,056

FY 2015-16 Budget $1,782,116 $17,636 $40,115 $15,139

FY 2015-16 Estimate $1,819,155 $14,669 $39,488 $13,914

Program Changes

FY 2016-17 Proposed $1,832,049 $13,400 $40,115 $15,139 $0

Grand Total

$1,838,368

$1,855,006

$1,887,226

$1,900,703

Program Justification and Analysis: •

Overall, the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group is flat when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases by 8.7 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding in this group allows for Bexar County Commissioners to meet mandatory continuing education requirements.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 1.6 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for LexisNexis services, report development services, printing and binding, telephone and internet, and copier rental.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 8.8 percent when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding remains flat to the previous year’s budgeted amounts for this group.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

39-4


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual County Judge's Office County Judge Assistant to the County Judge Chief of Staff Constituent Services Director Special Assistant to the County Judge

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Subtotal

1 1 1 1 1 5

1 1 1 1 1 5

1 1 1 1 1 5

Commissioner Precinct 1 County Commissioner Executive Assistant to the Commissioner Neighborhood Outreach Specialist Senior Executive Assistant Subtotal

1 1 1 1 4

1 1 1 1 4

1 1 1 1 4

Subtotal

1 1 2 4

1 1 2 4

1 1 2 4

Commissioner Precinct 3 County Commissioner Neighborhood Outreach Specialist Executive Assistant to the Commissioner Senior Executive Assistant Subtotal

1 1 1 1 4

1 1 1 1 4

1 1 1 1 4

Commissioner Precinct 4 County Commissioner Neighborhood Outreach Specialist Executive Assistant to the Commissioner Senior Executive Assistant Subtotal

1 1 1 1 4

1 1 1 1 4

1 1 1 1 4

Grand Total - Judge/Commissioners Court

21

21

21

Commissioner Precinct 2 County Commissioner Neighborhood Outreach Specialist Senior Executive Assistant

39-5


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4900, 4902, 4909, TBD

JUDICIAL SERVICES Mission:

It is the mission of the Judicial Services Department to coordinate and collaborate with County stakeholders to focus on initiative aimed at improving efficiency in the criminal justice process.

Vision:

To expedite the pre-trial and post-trial release and supervision of eligible defendants and streamline processes in order to reduce the time to indictment and the time to disposition without compromising community safety.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • • • •

To provide the Judiciary with needed information and to facilitate the releases of defendants under appropriate conditions. To provide supervision strategies that respond appropriately to the risks and needs posed by released defendants. To implement and maintain viable cost recovery procedures through the collection of authorized fees. To provide a timely process for defendants requesting court appointed counsel in accordance with the law. To continue to analyze the County’s Indigent Defense Program, identifying improvements or alternatives and making recommendations to the Criminal District Courts, the County Courts and Commissioner’s Court. To review the status of detained defendants on an ongoing basis to determine if there are any changes in eligibility for release options. To provide in-house appellate representation for all qualified indigent appellate cases. Provide support to the Specialty Courts to ensure the courts are a humane and cost-effective method to prevent offenders with substance abuse and mental health problems from reentering the criminal justice systems. The reentry council initiative is to provide support to individuals reentering Bexar County after incarceration. The goal of the council is to find safe and effective ways to reduce recidivism. Provide County leadership with a systematic process to continually assess the needs for mental health services in the community and prioritize the best investment of County funds to meet those needs. Advocate on the mental health issues and programs in the County. Negotiate contracts for mental health services paid to outside agencies with County general fund or grant funds. Track performance measures and program compliance metrics and monitor the effectiveness of treatment providers.

40-1


Program Description:

The Judicial Services Department consists of eleven divisions: Administration, Court Collections (CCS), Criminal Investigation Laboratory, Dispute Resolution Office, Medical Examinerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, Mental Health Department, Mental Health Initiative, Population Impact Control Unit (PICU), Pre-Trial Services Office (PTSO), Specialty Courts, and Re-entry Services. The Judicial Services Director provides overall direction to the departments to include general administrative support, planning, budgeting, training, and coordination of the daily operations. In addition to the supervision of the departments, the Director is responsible for coordination and collaboration with the Criminal District Courts, the County Courts at Law, Court Administration, the Community Supervision and Corrections Department (CSCD), and the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. The following Departments are include within the Judicial Services Department. The Pre-Trial Services Office (PTSO) is comprised of the Intake Section, which is staffed twenty-four hours a day/seven days a week, located at the Central Magistration (CMAG) facility and the Adult Detention Center (ADC). The Intake Section interviews individuals eligible for Personal Recognizance (PR) Bonds and provides the results to Magistrate assigned to the CMAG for release decisions. The section also processes defendants requesting court appointed counsel. The supervision section provides supervision to those individuals released on PR Bond and monitors compliance with court ordered conditions on Surety and Attorney Bonds. Those conditions include Domestic Violence, Ignition Interlock Orders, Drug Testing, Drug Treatment, Special Needs Unit, Regular Reporting, and Global Positioning Satellite (GPS). The Pre-Trial Collection Section provides cashiering and collection services for Pre-Trial fees to include bond fees, drug testing, GPS, and Ignition Interlock The Population Impact Control Unit (PICU) reviews, researches, and troubleshoots jail population listings to identify inmates ready or eligible for release. The unit will coordinate releasing processes with the Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office, develop and maintain tracking systems to monitor jail population and review all defendants that were not released on a daily basis to determine if their eligibility status has changed. The Court Collections Services (CCS) division assists defendants through the post-trial process to collect fees and set up payment plans. The section aims to increase collections, reduce the number of warrants issued and the associated costs and, to decrease default rates. They also maximize the collections of court costs and fines. The program is mandated and monitored by the Texas Office of Court Administration.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actuals Pre-Trial Services Workload Indicators: Number of Defendants Interviewed for Personal Bond Number of Defendants Interviewed and Released on PR Bond Number of Defendants Supervised but Released on Bond Other Than PR Bond Efficiency Indicators: Total Supervision Files Closed

40-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

11,598

9,356

10,759

5,721

5,260

6,049

4,522

3,420

3,933

11,656

9,892

11,376


FY 2014-15 Actuals Number of Defendants Closed out due to adjudication Number of Defendants with Warrants for Failure to Appear that were under Supervision of Pre-Trial Services Office

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

8,430

7,266

8,356

880

786

796

$324,944 $221,260 $1,142,545

$423,725 $250,440 $891,276

$487,284 $288,006 $1,024,967

Court Collections Workload Indicators: Number of Defendants Interviewed for Payment Plans Criminal District Courts County Courts Justice of the Peace

13,423 3,714 8,836 873

13,574 3,792 9,172 610

14,929 4,171 10,087 671

Efficiency Indicators: Number of Defendants per FTE Number of Defendants Contacted through AutoDialer Revenue Collected Upfront per FTE

1,495 38,462 $28,752

1,508 37,582 $35,940

1,659 41,340 $39,534

$1,072,882 49%

$1,120,471 52%

$1,352,000 52%

Effectiveness Indicators: Total Bond Fees Waived Total Bond Fees Collected Total Fees Collected and Deposited

Effectiveness Indicators: Total Court Costs and Fines Collected Collection Rate

Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$4,556,974 7,231 717,344 65,154

$4,658,398 10,507 771,457 77,038

$4,814,486 10,563 751,110 63,345

$4,989,677 15,451 707,538 73,717

$5,346,703

$5,517,400

$5,639,504

$5,786,383 0

Program Changes

$109,021 0

Total

$5,346,703

40-3

$5,517,400

$5,639,504

$5,895,404


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 4.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 3.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to savings from turnover experienced during FY 2015-16, and partial funding provided in FY 2015-16 for two Re-Entry specialists, which were added mid-year. All authorized positions are fully funded in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for the Judicial Services Director and staff to travel to the Standards for Health Services in Jails Conference, the Annual Texas Association of Pre-Trial Services Conference, and to Sam Houston University for Criminal Justice Planners meetings. This travel will enable the Judicial Services Director to stay up-to-date with the latest best practices and jail diversion methods across the nation. In addition, funding is provided for Re-Entry personnel to attend the Annual Travis County Vision summit, the Annual Re-Entry Task Force Committee and Statewide Re-Entry Annual Conference in Austin, TX.

The Operational Expenses decreases by 5.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to the transfer of funding for the Pre-Trial Assessment and Improvement Project Phase III from the Pre-Trial Services General Fund budget into Non-Departmental for FY 2016-17. Phase I and II of the Pre-Trial Assessment and Improvement Project were funded in PreTrial Services in FY 2015-16.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 16.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to full year funding for the newly opened Re-Entry Service Center in FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes three program changes for a total cost of $109,021, as described below: •

The first program change adds one Receptionist (NE-01) to the Judicial Services - Re-Entry Services Center for a total cost of $47,463, which includes salary and benefits, and $1,086 for technology items. This position will assist with the daily operations of the Re-Entry Services Center, direct clients and providers to the designated area for scheduled services, and handle the clerical duties associated with being at the front desk.

The second program change adds one Pre-Trial Supervisor (E-04) to the Judicial Services – Pre-Trial Services for a total cost of $61,558, which includes salary and benefits and $1,622 for technology items. This position will assist in supervising Pre-Trial Bond Officers that are working cases for the DA’s Pre-Trial Diversion Program. An increase in caseload has necessitated the addition of Pre-Trial Bond Officers, which has resulted in the need for a supervisor.

The third program change re-titles two Re-Entry Specialists to Re-Entry Technicians. This retitle is recommended to standardize position titles associated with the Re-Entry Center Countywide. 40-4


Authorized Positions: Administration Administrative Supervisor Adult Drug Court/DWI Court Manager Criminal Justice Research Coordinator Judicial Services Deputy Director Judicial Services Director Office Assistant IV Pre-Trial Programs Manager Senior Data Analyst Total - Administration Pre-Trial Administrative Supervisor Collections Officer Lead Pre-Trial Supervisor Mental Health Clerk Office Assistant III PICU Coordinator PICU Manager Pre-Trial Bond Officer I Pre-Trial Bond Officer II Pre-Trial Bond Officer III Pre-Trial Manager Pre-Trial Supervisor Total - Pre-Trial Court Collections Cashier Clerk Collections Officer (Part-Time) Collections Specialist Collections Supervisor Court Collections - Judicial Service Manager Office Assistant III Total - Court Collections

40-5

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

8

8

8

1 2 2 1 1 3 1 15 17 15 1 4

1 2 2 1 1 3 1 15 17 15 1 4

1 2 2 1 1 3 1 15 17 15 1 5

63

63

64

1 1 6 0 1 1

1 0.5 6 1 1 1

1 0.5 6 1 1 1

10

10.5

10.5


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Re-Entry Services

1 0 0 0 1

1 2 0 0 3

1 0 2 1 4

Total - Judicial Services

82

84.5

86.5

Re-Entry Services Re-Entry Program Manager Re-Entry Specialist Re-Entry Technician Receptionist

40-6


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4707

JUDICIAL SERVICESCRIMINAL INVESTIGATION LABORATORY Mission: The mission of the Bexar County Criminal Investigation Laboratory is to provide the citizens of Bexar County and our customers with comprehensive, impartial, reliable scientific analysis of evidence by experts skilled in the latest technology in Forensic Science as cost effective and timely as possible without jeopardizing the quality of work, the integrity of the laboratory, or the principles of justice.

Vision:

To be recognized as a leader among Criminal Investigation Laboratories in providing expert scientific analysis of forensic evidence to support public safety and further the goals of justice.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Present impartial scientific findings and opinions to the customer and the Courts. Provide analytical reports in a timely manner. Provide cost effective scientific services. Provide outstanding customer service. Provide quality services.

Program Description:

The Criminal Investigation Laboratory is part of the Judicial Services Department. The laboratory provides technical and analytical expertise in drug identification, firearm examination, tool mark examination, forensic serology, DNA profiling, and microscopical and chemical analysis of trace evidence. The Criminal Investigation Laboratory conducts scientific examinations and analyses on a wide variety of specimens submitted by police agencies and the District Attorney, such as drugs, firearms, bullets, documents, blood, hair, and fibers. The Criminal Investigations staff maintains proficiency, audits, certification, and financial reports and information to ensure operational efficiency and quality assurance. The Forensic Scientist conducts scientific tests, attends criminal court and testifies. The Director monitors the time it takes to complete a case and prepares, monitors and approves financial reports. The Quality Assurance Manager monitors proficiency tests, audits the sections and writes operational procedures.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Work Load Indicators: Number of Requests Completed Number of Scientific Examinations Completed Number of Hours Testified Efficiency Indicators: Cost per Exam Completed Cost per Hour Billed 41-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

7,800 40,596 297

7,754 40,460 522

7,600 40,500 350

$62 $76

$66 $85

$68 $87


FY 2014-15 Actual Productivity (hours billed/total hours) Number of cases per FTE Effectiveness Indicators: Average Days to Complete Submissions Trace Evidence Section Drug ID Firearms-Tool marks Forensic Biology/DNA

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

66% 266

63% 311

61% 295

62 19 30 44

79 13 22 46

60 13 25 55

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

$2,140,300 28,028 112,454 228,294

$2,250,898 31,903 131,529 246,215

$2,238,126 29,574 119,000 234,934

$2,287,588 23,027 152,124 240,700

$2,509,076

$2,660,545

$2,621,634

$2,703,439 00

Program Change

$51,240 00

Total

$2,509,076

$2,660,545

$2,621,634

$2,754,679

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 5.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 2.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to employee turnover experienced at the beginning of FY 2015-16. All authorized positions are fully funded in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases by 22.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to lower costs to attend conferences and seminars in FY 2016-17. Funding is also provided for Forensic Scientist proficiency testing, Crime Lab required accreditation, and an FBI Quality Assurance Standards audit being conduct in FY 2016-17. The Crime Lab Director will attend The Texas Association of Crime Lab Directors and Texas Forensic Science Commission Meetings.

41-2


The Operational Expenses group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to an increase in the cost of maintenance contracts for lab equipment and new technology equipment required by the Department.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 2.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, primarily due to an increase in Medical & Lab Supplies. The Department did not incur significant expenses for DNA kits and test related materials during FY 2015-16. It is anticipated that these expenses will increase in FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $51,240. •

The first program change adds one Forensic Scientist I - Drug ID (E-05), for a total cost of $51,240, including salary and benefits. The part time, temporary Forensic Scientist in the Drug ID section will be retiring from the Department in FY 2016-17. The part time employee currently completes about 20% of the workload in the Drug ID Division. The new position will enable the Department to continue with current productivity level.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual 1 1 3 1 13 4 1 1

Crime Laboratory Director Assistant Crime Lab Director Crime Lab Specialists Crime Lab Specialist Supervisor Forensic Scientist Forensic Scientist Supervisor Forensic Technician Quality Assurance Manager Total - Criminal Investigation Laboratory

41-3

25

FY 2015-16 Estimate 1 1 4 1 13 4 1 1

FY 2016-17 Proposed 1 1 4 1 14 4 1 1

26

27


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING: 4705

JUDICIAL SERVICES – DEPARTMENT OF BEHAVIORAL AND MENTAL HEALTH Mission:

Act as Commissioners Court advocate, expert and clearinghouse on community mental health issues and programs. This Department will be the leader in planning, coordinating, advocating and organizing community behavioral health stakeholders in activities to continually improve the availability of services in this community.

Vision: Transforming Bexar County to be a model community of behavioral health. Goals and Objectives: •

Provide County leadership with a systematic process to continually assess the need for mental health services and substance abuse services in the community and prioritize the best investment of County funds to meet those needs.

Lead behavioral health stakeholders in pursuing strategies that create a seamless, integrated system of care and safety net services for the mentally ill; improving access to service by providing multiple points of entry to the system of care; coordinating programs, providers and services by continued dialogue with all community mental health and substance abuse stake holders

Continue the work of the Bexar County Mental Health Consortium to further the Strategic Plan to: Create a community behavioral health coordinating structure; raise awareness in the community and with public policy leaders and impact legislation; facilitate training, recruitment and retention of mental health professionals; and ensure a coordinated system of care in the community.

Establish a partnership with the Center for Healthcare Services to ensure that gaps, needs and services identified by the Consortium and other mental health/substance abuse stakeholders are formalized and incorporated in the Center’s service delivery plan.

Be Commissioners Court expert and advocate on behavioral health issues and programs in the County. Negotiate contracts for behavioral services paid to outside agencies with County General Fund or grant funds. Track performance measures and program compliance metrics and monitor the effectiveness of treatment providers.

Identify and coordinate county, state, and federal monies to expand services for mental health and substance use programs.

Program Description: The Mental Health Department reports to the Judicial Services Director,

with a staff of professionals specializing in the issues of mental health and substance abuse, who can devote their exclusive attention to developing, implementing and coordinating policy and community wide strategies to address mental health and substance abuse concerns. This Department will pursue these strategies by building and acting in partnerships with judges, public 42-1


safety officials, attorneys, mental health/substance abuse service providers, agency administrators, school officials, family members, and consumers either collectively in the Mental Health Consortium or individually. The Department also has responsibility for negotiating contracts for mental health services paid to outside agencies with County General Fund or grant funds and tracking performance measures and program compliance metrics for these services.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Coordinate Meetings with Consortium Stakeholders Coordinate Strategic Meetings with Lead Mental Health Stakeholders Provide Public Information Awareness to the Community and/or to Governmental/Legislative Officials Develop Coordinated Approaches and Collaborations Regarding Leveraging Resources with Grant Funding Efficiency Indicators: Number of Public Information Awareness Meetings/ Legislative Meetings Conducted/Attended Number of Grants Written and/or Grant Collaborations regarding Mental Health Services Number of Monitoring Visits Conducted Number of Monitoring Visit Findings Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Targeted Public Information Awareness Meetings/ Legislative Meetings Conducted/Attended Percentage of Targeted Number of Grants Written and/or Grant Collaborations Regarding Mental Health Services Awarded Percentage of Monitoring Visit Findings That are Corrected Within 90 Days

42-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

4

4

5

4

5

10

10

10

10

2

4

6

10

20

30

1 2 2

2 5 2

4 6 2

100%

200%

100%

100%

200%

100%

100%

100%

100%


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$300,502 5,955 1,253954 6,642

$284,377 6,700 1,442,173 5,000

$285,669 7,038 1,441,352 4,773

$305,798 7,275 1,442,642 4,600

Subtotal

$1,567,053

$1,738,250

$1,738,832

Total

$1,567,053

$1,738,250

$1,738,832

$1,760,315 0 $0 0 $1,760,315

Program Change

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to turnover experienced during FY 2015-16. All positions are fully funded in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 3.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for travel to the NACO Legislative meeting, attendance to the National Council for Behavioral Health Conference, and Moral Reconation Therapy training in FY 2016-17.

The Operational Expenses group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Included in this appropriation is $1,437,000 related to the Center for Health Care Services contract, which provides mental health, substance abuse, and support services necessary to divert mentally-ill persons in need of treatment and care from the Magistrate’s office and from the Bexar County Adult Detention Center.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 3.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to expenses in Postage for FY 2015-16, which are not anticipated in FY 2016-17.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

42-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Director Program Coordinator Senior Program Analyst Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mental Health Department

42-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1

1 1 1

1 1 1

3

3

3


JUDICIAL SERVICES – MEDICAL EXAMINER

FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4705

Mission:

The mission of the Medical Examiner's Office is to provide the citizens of Bexar County with accurate scientific determinations of the cause and manner of death of all individuals dying violently, suddenly or unexpectedly in Bexar County.

Vision:

The Bexar County Medical Examiner's Office is committed to providing quality service in the investigation and certification of deaths falling under the jurisdiction of the Office. The Office will constantly strive to adopt new scientific methods that will increase the quality of our work, decrease costs and decrease the time necessary to accomplish our tasks.

Goals and Objectives: •

• • • •

Provide state of the art, expert and impartial forensic pathology and toxicology services to the citizens of Bexar County. Maintain national accreditation in the rapidly changing field of forensic pathology and forensic toxicology. Automate as many functions as possible to increase the efficiency of the Office, without affecting the quality of services provided. Provide services in the most expeditious time frame possible without compromising quality. Maintain a highly qualified, dedicated workforce.

Program Description:

The Medical Examiner’s Office investigates the deaths of all individuals in Bexar County who die suddenly, violently or unexpectedly to determine the cause and manner of death. The Medical Examiner’s Office conducts scene investigations and interviews witnesses, attending physicians, relatives, and police. Based on the information gathered, a decision is made as to whether the case is a Medical Examiner’s case and, if so, whether an autopsy needs to be performed. Whether an autopsy or an external examination is conducted, the Medical Examiner directs that body fluids and tissue be removed from the body and analyzed by the Toxicology Unit to determine the presence or absence of poison, drugs or other chemicals.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload Indicators: Cases Handled by Investigations Cases Accepted Autopsies Performed External Examinations Conducted Efficiency Indicator: Number of Cases Handled Per Doctor Number of NAME Autopsy Equivalents per Doctor Number of Cases Handled Per Investigator Number of Cases Transcribed Per Transcriber 43-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

12,418 2,583 1,623 834

13,144 3,096 1,628 996

13,801 3,406 1,661 1,096

517 333 1,035 818

619 326 1,095 760

619 336 1,062 919


Effectiveness Indicators: Average Days to complete an ME Case from onset to completion, except for toxicology results Average Days to complete the Toxicology Report for an ME Case Average Days to Transcribe Cases

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

24

35

30

33 17

33 23

31 14

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$4,242,982 37,123 527,205 254,188 94,866

$4,589,192 45,470 500,087 286,350 0

$4,741,772 45,508 511,371 290,433 0

$4,718,108 47,587 535,096 288,504 26,965

$5,156,364

$5,421,099

$5,589,083

$5,616,260 00

Program Change

$76,459 00

Total

$5,156,364

$5,421,099

$5,589,083

$5,692,718

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. All authorized positions are fully funded for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 4.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various continuing education certifications and multiple accreditation requirements of the Medical Examiner’s Office.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 4.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to an increase in the amount budgeted for the transportation of bodies. This is due to an increase in the number of deaths. The cost for maintenance of the Medical Examiner’s equipment has also increased. .

The Supplies and Materials group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various medical and lab supplies used to conduct examinations and safety supplies to prevent contamination while examining bodies. 43-2


The Capital Expenditures group provides funding to replace the Morgue’s floor scale, the Mireles Technologies Mantis Elite dissecting microscope, and to update the Vertiq Coroners and Medical Examiner’s software, for a total cost of $26,965.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $76,459. •

The program change adds one Senior Medical Investigator (NE-11) for a total cost of $76,459, including salary and benefits, and $3,531 in technology equipment. This is a support position that will help address the corresponding increase in workload in the Investigations section, the increase of cases that have needed to be further investigated to determine the cause of death, and to have a Supervisor on-site 24/7.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Administrative Supervisor Chief Medical Examiner Chief Medical Investigator Chief Toxicologist Deputy Chief Medical Examiner Forensic Technician Forensic Transcribers Medical Examiner Medical Investigator Morgue Specialist Morgue Supervisor Office Assistant IV Office Assistant III Office Assistant II Records Analyst Senior Medical Investigator Senior Morgue Specialist Senior Toxicology Chemist Toxicology Chemist Total – Medical Examiner’s Office

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 11 7 1 1 2 1 0 2 1 2 6

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 11 9 1 1 2 1 1 2 1 2 6

1 1 1 1 1 1 3 5 11 9 1 1 2 1 1 3 1 2 6

48

51

52

* On December 16, 2015, the department requested to have the position re-titled from Forensic Technician to Toxicology Technician.

43-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4712

JUDICIAL SERVICES – MENTAL HEALTH INITIATIVE Mission:

The Mental Health Advocacy Initiative facilitates significant change in Bexar County through the investment of appropriate resources.

Vision:

To change lives and communities through the careful, deliberate use of tools and resources.

Goals and Objectives: • •

• • •

Early identification of mentally ill inmates that are incarcerated. Identification and facilitation of entrance to mental health treatment, transportation, housing and support services for mentally ill inmates. Ensure that clinically appropriate services are provided to the mentally ill and that effective program evaluation and outcome measurements are used to gauge the effectiveness of the program. Collaborate and establish productive operational partnerships with other entities that will expand the availability of services and resources. Coordinate and participate in community and professional events that will educate others on the Mental Health Initiative program.

Program Description: The Mental Health Advocacy Initiative Program conducts early identification

of mentally ill persons incarcerated at the Bexar County Adult Detention Center and who are brought before the Magistrates’ Office. The Initiative ensures that mental health screenings are conducted in the shortest time possible and facilitates the coordination of mental health treatment and implementation of treatment plan goals with contract providers and County staff. In addition, case management services, information/referrals, and coordination of services for families and persons responsible for the program’s participants are also provided by the Initiative. The Initiative facilitates staffing for the Mental Health Court and educational presentations in the community.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Workload Indicators: Number of Referrals Per Year Number of Mental Health Court Cases Heard Number of Persons Enrolled in Mental Health Court

4,548 1,240 99

1,420* 1,260 86

1,500 1,300 100

Efficiency Indicators: Number of Cases Reviewed at Group Staff Meeting Number of Persons Who Reoffend

2,023 13

1,754 8

2,000 8

44-1


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Indicators: Number of Successful Completions of Mental Health Court Program Recidivism Rate 1 Year Post Program

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

36

50

60

5%

5%

5%

*A change has been applied in the process of how Mental Health Court receives referrals. The process eliminates referrals that do not meet legal program criteria and expedited the referral process as well. ** Efficiency indicator ‘Number of Mental Health Court Group Staff Review Meetings’ has changed to ‘Number of Cases Reviewed at Group Staff Meeting’

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$242,566 1,143 138,527 3,256

$254,022 1,200 170,623 3,300

$261,264 1,350 168,798 2,902

$277,616 3,511 176,615 2,100

$385,492

$429,145

$434,314

$459,842 0

Program Change

$0 0

Total

$385,492

$429,145

$434,314

$459,842

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 5.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 6.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to changes in health insurance plans by employees during FY 2015-16. All positions are fully funded for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for two employees to attend the National Association of Drug Court Professionals in Maryland.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 4.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to an increase in contracted services for Crystal Counseling, which provides mental health services, and Lifetime Recovery Treatment, which provides services to certain “high” risk clients. Additionally, the cost associated with the contract with the 44-2


Community Supervision and Corrections Department for assigned Probation Officers will increase in FY 2016-17. •

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as requested by the Department.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget has no program changes.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Mental Health Court Manager Mental Health Case Manager Office Assistant IV Total – Judicial Services - Mental Health Initiative

44-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 2 1

1 2 1

1 2 1

4

4

4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4201

JURY OPERATIONS Mission:

To summon and welcome jurors in the most courteous manner and make their experience as pleasant as possible, therefore providing the Courts with the best legally qualified juror, as well as to assist jurors by phone or by mail.

Vision:

The Jury Operations is committed to creating a safe and welcoming environment to all potential jurors. This Department will continue to strive to make the jury summons process better and efficient by adopting new and innovative solutions that will keep this Department up to date with the latest technology. With these solutions, Jury Operations hopes to reduce cost and decrease time, therefore increasing jury participation and providing the Courts with the best legally qualified juror.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • • •

To provide high quality staff support To provide information either in person, by phone, by mail or by email regarding qualification, disqualification and excuses and general information with respect to jury duty To provide jurors to court in a timely manner. To mail summons, checks, and letters in a timely manner in accordance with the statue To process jurors as quickly as possible for courts To be up to date with the latest methods and technology with respect to jury summons and responses. Fulfill administrative duties as well as keep up with SB 1704, HB 1271 and GC 62.014. Submit to the Auditor the required documents for Juror reimbursement from the State Comptroller. Submit to Municipal Court for Juror reimbursement. Utilize the i-jury in order to reduce costs related to paper and postage.

Program Description:

Jury Operations coordinates and administers the qualifications, notifications, exemptions, excuses, selection, service, and compensation of selected Bexar County jurors. The Department consolidates payroll of jurors and processes jury pools for seven Justice of the Peace Courts, three Juvenile Courts, twenty-four District Courts, fifteen County Courts-at-Law, two Probate Courts, one Magistrate Court, and six City Municipal Courts. Bexar County provides jurors to the City of San Antonio’s Municipal Court System on an as-needed basis; all additional costs incurred by Bexar County, including the $6 juror fee for the first day and $40 thereafter, and expenses associated with the transport of jurors, are reimbursed by the City on a monthly basis. Juror services sometimes include room and board for selected jurors.

45-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload/Output Measures: Number of Jurors Summoned Number of Calls Received Number of Panels Ordered Petit and JP Number of Jurors Appeared Efficiency Measures: Mailed Received/Mail out per FTE Number of Panels Ordered Petit and JP FTE Number of Jurors Appeared FTE Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of Pool Utilized Average Time to Deliver Panel to Court (min) Juror Appearance Rate

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

252,931 68,097 1,841 73,924

253,510 69,345 2,098 75,564

256,045 70,732 2,355 77,075

20,848 614 18,481

19,529 699 18,891

18,916 785 19,269

97% 15 30%

115% 15 30%

115% 15 35%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$412,035 2,974 1,059,317 148,111

$415,873 4,540 1,066,709 139,344

$435,562 2,974 1,163,302 121,962

$435,519 4,540 1,112,482 143,150

Subtotal

$1,622,437

$1,626,466

$1,723,800

$1,695,691

Program Changes

$47,221 Total

$1,622,437

$1,626,466

$1,723,800

$1,742,912

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x2014;?

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x2014;?

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016-17.

45-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided at the FY 2015-16 budget level for staff to attend jury management training.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 4.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Actual expenses for Jury Pay increased in FY 2015-16 due primarily to capital trials. These expenditures are not anticipated in FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 17.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The Bexar County Information Technology Department now prints envelopes for jury summons mailings, which increases the need for purchasing envelopes and other office supplies.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $47,221 as described below. ●

The program change adds one Assistant Jury Bailiff (NE-02) for a total cost of $47,221 including salary and benefits. The overall number of jury panels ordered has been increasing, as has the juror appearance rate, warranting this additional position.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Chief Central Jury Bailiff Assistant Jury Bailiff* Deputy Jury Bailiff Total – Jury Operations

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 6.5 1

1 6.5 1

1 7.5 1

8.5

8.5

9.5

*One Assistant Jury Bailiff is added in the FY 2016-17 due to increasing workload. One part-time position is included in this count.

45-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4500

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, PRECINCT 1 Mission:

To provide litigants of Bexar County with professional, courteous, timely, and high quality

service.

Vision: To demonstrate to the citizens of Bexar County the overall efficiency and effectiveness of a welloperated and organized County government office.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

To create policies and procedures that maximize the quality of service to Bexar County citizens. To provide accurate oral and written information to litigants and defendants in a professional, dignified, and courteous manner. To provide efficient and effective court docket management. To create a healthy and stable work environment that provides opportunities for training and promotes employee development. To utilize efficient and effective means to collect fines and fees owed to Bexar County.

Program Description:

The Justice of the Peace is an Elected Official. Justice of the Peace Precinct 1 has two Justices, Places 1 and 2. The Place 1 Justice of the Peace is a full-time Judge and the Place 2 Justice of the Peace is a part-time Judge. Both Judges are elected to four-year terms with Places 1 and 2 serving concurrently. The Justice of the Peace presides over the Justice Court and Small Claims Court. The Justice of the Peace also sits as a magistrate for juvenile warnings, felony warrants, and examining trials. The Court’s jurisdiction includes civil disputes and small claims of $10,000 or less, criminal cases on Class C misdemeanors of $500 or less, and sanction power on certain Class C cases (alcohol, tobacco, and education codes). Class C misdemeanor cases include traffic violations, minors in possession of alcohol, and disorderly conduct. The Justice of the Peace handles forcible detainers (evictions), driver’s license suspension hearings, animal cruelty cases, disposition of stolen property matters, and nuisance cases. The Justice of the Peace also presides over hearings on deed restrictions. The Office is responsible for collection of fees of the Court, warrant issuance, various types of civil processes, issuance of summons, assignment and monitoring of community service, and monitoring compliance of mandatory drug and alcohol rehabilitation classes. In addition, the Justice of the Peace conducts hearings, performs marriage ceremonies, and serves as a notary public.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of Criminal Cases Filed Number of Civil Cases Filed Total New Cases Filed

50,155 6,802 56,957 46-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate 60,084 7,486 67,570

FY 2016-17 Proposed 60,084 7,486 67,570


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Efficiency Indicators: Cases Filed per FTE Warrants Issued per FTE Cases Disposed per FTE

3,560 632 3,052

3,378 2,074 4,287

3,218 1,975 4,083

Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Produced Cases Disposed Disposition Rate

10,118 48,837 86%

41,470 85,742 127%

41,470 85,742 127%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$949,305 3,850 31,519 20,488

$1,066,363 5,678 25,299 26,806

$1,120,505 3,585 16,826 22,182

$1,177,446 6,100 18,966 22,262

Subtotal

$1,005,162

$1,124,146

$1,163,098

$1,224,774

Program Changes

$49,898 Total

$1,005,162

$1,124,146

$1,163,098

$1,274,672

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 9.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group increases by 5.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. There were savings in FY 2015-16 due to turnover in various positions.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is provided for Judges and staff to attend various legislative and training seminars.

46-2


The Operational Expenses group increases by 12.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for telephone and internet service was adjusted in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget based on the previous year's actual expenditures.

The Supplies and Materials group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2015-16 included funding for one-time purchases of office furniture for judges and staff, and this budget amount is reduced in FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $49,898, as described below. ●

This program change adds one Court Clerk (NE-04), for a total cost of $49,898 including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Justice of the Peace precincts, and Precinct 1 has a higher workload relative to the other precincts. Increased full-time administrative staff will help maximize efficiency.

Policy Consideration: In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines were

redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. During the FY 2014-15 Budget process, the effects of both redistricting and the anticipated transfer of truancy cases on overall workload distribution between the Precincts were analyzed. However, because not a sufficient amount of time had passed to accurately assess the effects of redistricting and the transfer of truancy cases had not yet occurred, no action was taken in the FY 2014-15 Adopted Budget. The Budget Department analyzed workload during FY 2014-15 and presented recommendations to Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 budget process. Those recommendations included personnel changes for Justices of the Peace based on the workload analysis, which were accepted by Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget. The workload analysis continued in the same manner for Justices of the Peace and Constables during FY 2015-16, and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

46-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1.5 6 1 7 1 3

1.5 6 0 10 1 4

1.5 6 0 11 1 4

19.5

22.5

23.5

Justice of the Peace* Assistant Court Clerk Case Manager Court Clerk** Court Manager Lead Court Clerk Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Justice of the Peace, Precinct 1 *One Justice of the Peace is part-time.

46-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4510

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, PRECINCT 2 Mission: To provide the citizens of Bexar County with a

sense of confidence and open access to our Judicial system in connection with all cases under the jurisdiction of the Court.

Vision: To create a team of well trained, professional staff that will provide uncommon public service

to our citizens and to have an extremely efficient court by use of proactive case management techniques and the use of technology to expedite our caseload, while providing outstanding service to our citizens.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • • •

Open Access: create policies and procedures that facilitate our court being more accessible to our litigants Increase training for staff, by investing in our staff’s education to increase the quality of service we provide to our citizens and litigants Continued use of technology to increase efficiency and productivity Reduce time from case filed to final disposition/judgment Increase disposition rate by utilizing proactive case management techniques Maintain a safe and secure environment for our citizens, litigants and staff Continue a barrier-free communication environment with all County Offices and Departments Maintain a work environment that promotes employee development and growth Participate in programs within our community whose goals coordinate or overlap with Bexar County goals. Continue to participate and be a resource for new legislation and collaborative efforts for Justices of the Peace Courts to improve our judicial process.

Program Description:

The Justice of the Peace presides over the Justice Court and Small Claims Court. The Justice of the Peace also sits as a magistrate for juvenile warnings, felony warrants, and examining trials. The Court’s jurisdiction includes civil disputes and small claims of $10,000 or less, criminal cases on Class C misdemeanors of $500 or less, and sanction power on certain Class C cases (alcohol, tobacco, and education codes). Class C misdemeanor cases include traffic violations, minors in possession of alcohol, and disorderly conduct. The Justice of the Peace handles forcible detainers (evictions), driver’s license suspension hearings, animal cruelty cases, disposition of stolen property matters, and nuisance cases. The Justice of the Peace also presides over hearings on deed restrictions. The Office is responsible for collection of fees of the Court, issuance of warrants, various types of civil processes, issuance of summons, assignment and monitoring of community service, and monitoring compliance of mandatory drug and alcohol rehabilitation classes. In addition, the Justice of the Peace conducts hearings, performs marriage ceremonies, and serves as a notary public. The Justice of the Peace is an elected official. Justice of the Peace Precinct 2 has two Justices, Places 1 and 3, both being full-time Judges. Both Judges are elected to four-year terms with Places 1 and 3 serving concurrently.

47-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of Criminal Cases Filed Number of Civil Cases Filed Total New Cases Filed

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

31,275 9,409 40,684

26,869 9,993 36,862

26,869 9,993 36,862

Efficiency Indicators: Cases Filed per FTE Warrants Issued per FTE Cases Disposed per FTE

2,543 817 2,940

2,168 657 2,489

2,633 798 3,023

Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Issued Cases Disposed Disposition Rate

13,077 47,046 116%

11,174 42,318 115%

11,174 42,318 115%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$1,070,209 5,923 337,899 28,197

$1,045,382 5,678 324,782 28,500

$1,111,530 4,352 327,355 27,800

$1,154,116 6,100 290,897 32,500

Subtotal

$1,442,228

$1,404,342

$1,471,037

$1,483,613

Program Changes

($184,038) Total

$1,442,228

$1,404,342

$1,471,037

$1,299,575

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x2014;?

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 11.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x2014;?

The Personnel Services group increases by 3.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Slight savings occurred in FY 2015-16 due to staff turnover.

47-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 201516 Estimates. Funding is provided for judges and their staff to attend various legislative and training seminars.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 11.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Rental expenses decreased beginning in August 2016 due to the terms of Precinct 2's lease.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 16.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for new and replacement furniture.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes three program changes for a total savings of $184,038 as described below. ●

The first program change deletes three Assistant Court Clerks (NE-01) for a total savings of $106,755. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Justice of the Peace precincts, and Precinct 2 has a lower workload per clerk compared to the countywide benchmark. Average workload per clerk is expected to be more evenly distributed amongst the precincts following this program change.

The second program change deletes the part-time Justice of the Peace Place 2 position, for a total savings of $77,719. In the years since redistricting, the workload distribution between the precincts has shifted significantly. Justice of the Peace, Precinct 2's workload has decreased relative to the other precincts. The savings resulting from this program change represents nine months of savings, as this change is proposed to take effect on January 1, 2017.

The third program change increases the salary of one Court Clerk who was promoted, but soon after took a voluntary demotion. The demotion caused her salary to decrease to be lower than it was prior to the promotion. This results in a total cost of $436.

Policy Consideration: In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines

were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. During the FY 2014-15 Budget process, the effects of both redistricting and the anticipated transfer of truancy cases on overall workload distribution between the Precincts were analyzed. However, because 47-3


not a sufficient amount of time had passed to accurately assess the effects of redistricting and the transfer of truancy cases had not yet occurred, no action was taken in the FY 2014-15 Adopted Budget. The Budget Department analyzed workload during FY 2014-15 and presented recommendations to Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 budget process. Those recommendations included personnel changes for Justices of the Peace based on the workload analysis, which were accepted by Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget. The workload analysis continued in the same manner for Justices of the Peace and Constables during FY 2015-16, and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 4 2 1 9 3

2 4 0 1 9 4

1 1 0 1 9 4

21

20

16

Justice of the Peace* Assistant Court Clerk Case Manager Court Manager Court Clerk Lead Court Clerk Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Justice of the Peace, Precinct 2

*During FY 2013-14, one Justice of the Peace position was authorized as a part-time position. The incumbent is set to serve out the current term as a full-time judge, a term which is set to end on December 31, 2017.

47-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4520

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, PRECINCT 3 Mission:

To be the leading Bexar County Justice of the Peace Court by providing professional, courteous, and prompt customer service to the citizens of Bexar County, while also furnishing a safe, equitable and rewarding work environment to our court employees.

Vision: To provide excellent service to the citizens of Bexar County in all matters of the justice system at the Justice of the Peace level.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • •

Provide professional, efficient, and courteous customer service. Provide citizens and litigants accessibility to information and resources. Provide a safe and secure environment for citizens and staff. Provide proficient court docket management. Effectively process, adjudicate, and dispose of cases in a timely manner. Continue to utilize technology to improve efficiency. Utilize recovery and collection. Enhance employee training and career development.

Program Description:

The Justice of the Peace presides over the Justice Court and Small Claims Court. The Justice of the Peace also sits as a magistrate for juvenile warnings, felony warrants, and examining trials. The Court’s jurisdiction includes civil disputes and small claims of $10,000 or less, criminal cases on Class C misdemeanors of $500 or less, and sanction power on certain Class C cases (alcohol, tobacco, and education codes). Class C misdemeanor cases include traffic violations, minors in possession of alcohol, and disorderly conduct. The Justice of the Peace handles forcible detainers (evictions), driver’s license suspension hearings, animal cruelty cases, disposition of stolen property matters, and nuisance cases. The Justice of the Peace also presides over hearings on deed restrictions. The Office is responsible for collection of fees of the Court, issuance of warrants, various types of civil processes, issuance of summons, assignment and monitoring of community service, and monitoring compliance of mandatory drug and alcohol rehabilitation classes. In addition, the Justice of the Peace conducts hearings, performs marriage ceremonies, and serves as a notary public. The Justice of the Peace is an elected official. Justice of the Peace Precinct 3 has two Justices, Places 1 and 2. The Place 1 Justice of the Peace is a full-time Judge and the Place 2 Justice of the Peace is a parttime Judge. Both Judges are elected to four-year terms.

48-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of Criminal Cases Filed Number of Civil Cases Filed Total New Cases Filed

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

29,253 6,902 36,155

19,001 7,387 26,388

19,001 7,387 26,388

Efficiency Indicators: Cases Filed per FTE Warrants Issued per FTE Cases Disposed per FTE

2,127 559 2,362

1,649 672 2,129

2,199 896 2,838

Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Issued Cases Disposed Disposition Rate

9,503 40,151 111%

10,746 34,059 129%

10,746 34,059 129%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$1,001,901 3,960 190,160 26,132

$931,910 5,678 185,760 31,259

$977,953 5,678 181,548 35,257

$1,026,909 6,100 194,092 31,259

Subtotal

$1,222,153

$1,154,607

$1,200,436

$1,258,360

Program Changes

($154,930) Total

$1,222,153

$1,154,607

$1,200,436

$1,103,430

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x2014;?

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 5.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x2014;?

The Personnel Services group increases by 4.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Turnover during FY 2015-16 resulted in savings.

48-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 4.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for judges and their staff to attend various legislative and training seminars.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Increased funding is proposed for building maintenance and repairs.

The Supplies and Materials group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. Funds were provided in FY 2015-16 to install public wireless internet in the courtroom.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes two program changes for a total savings of $110,293, as described below. ●

The first program change deletes two Court Clerks (NE-04) and two Assistant Court Clerks (NE01) for a total savings of $154,930, including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Justice of the Peace precincts, and Precinct 3 has a lower workload per clerk compared to the countywide benchmark. Average workload per clerk is expected to be more evenly distributed amongst the precincts after this program change.

The second program change deletes the part-time Justice of the Peace, Place 2 position, for no savings in FY 2016-17. In the years since redistricting, the workload distribution between the precincts has shifted significantly. Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3's workload has decreased relative to the other precincts, resulting in a lower caseload per Justice. The term of the existing part-time judge will expire at the end of 2018; therefore no savings will be realized in FY 201617.

Policy Consideration: In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines

were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. During the FY 2014-15 Budget process, the effects of both redistricting and the anticipated transfer of truancy cases on overall workload distribution between the Precincts were analyzed. However, because not a sufficient amount of time had passed to accurately assess the effects of redistricting and the 48-3


transfer of truancy cases had not yet occurred, no action was taken in the FY 2014-15 Adopted Budget. The Budget Department analyzed workload during FY 2014-15 and presented recommendations to Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 budget process. Those recommendations included personnel changes for Justices of the Peace based on the workload analysis, which were accepted by Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget. The workload analysis continued in the same manner for Justices of the Peace and Constables during FY 2015-16, and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1.5 5 2 10 1 2

1.5 5 0 8 1 3

1.5 3 0 6 1 3

21.5

18.5

14.5

Justice of the Peace* Assistant Court Clerk Case Manager Court Clerk Court Manager Lead Court Clerk Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3 *One Justice of the Peace is part-time.

48-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4530

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE, PRECINCT 4 Mission: To provide the public with efficient and effective case management through professional and quality customer service.

Vision: Justice of the Peace, Precinct 4 has a vision to provide the community and professionals

with professional and expedient service. Our vision is to utilize technology and community resources to better assist the public in a timely and efficient manner and ensure quality customer service.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • •

To enter, process, adjudicate, and dispose of cases filed in an efficient, effective, timely, and lawful manner. To enhance the development and growth of all staff members through training and leadership workshops. To utilize current technology and expand services provided to the public to increase efficiency and productivity and ensure prompt customer service. To continue working with programs, citizens, and professionals within the community whose goals coordinate or overlap with Bexar County goals. To work together with other agencies to better utilize effective means of collecting revenue. To utilize staff, information handouts, and web-site for customer accessibility to efficiently obtain information. To effectively and efficiently process and collect revenue on a daily basis.

Program Description:

The Justice of the Peace presides over the Justice Court and Small Claims Court. The Justice of the Peace also sits as a magistrate for juvenile warnings, felony warrants, and examining trials. The Court’s jurisdiction includes civil disputes and small claims of $10,000 or less, criminal cases on Class C misdemeanors of $500 or less, and sanction power on certain Class C cases (alcohol, tobacco, and education codes). Class C misdemeanor cases include traffic violations, minors in possession of alcohol, and disorderly conduct. The Justice of the Peace handles forcible detainers (evictions), driver’s license suspension hearings, animal cruelty cases, disposition of stolen property matters, and nuisance cases. The Justice of the Peace also presides over hearings on deed restrictions. The Office is responsible for collection of fees of the Court, issuance of warrants, various types of civil processes, issuance of summons, assignment and monitoring of community service, and monitoring compliance of mandatory drug and alcohol rehabilitation classes. In addition, the Justice of the Peace conducts hearings, performs marriage ceremonies, and serves as a notary public. The Justice of the Peace is an elected official. Justice of the Peace Precinct 4 has two Justices, Places 1 and 2. The Place 1 Justice of the Peace is a full-time Judge and the Place 2 Justice of the Peace is a parttime Judge. Both Judges are elected to four-year terms.

49-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of Criminal Cases Filed Number of Civil Cases Filed Total New Cases Filed

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

27,894 8,938 36,832

21,024 10,414 31,438

21,024 10,414 31,438

Efficiency Indicators: Cases Filed per FTE Warrants Issued per FTE Cases Disposed per FTE

2,302 1,239 2,649

1,965 732 2,482

2,418 901 3,055

Effectiveness Indicators: Warrants Issued Cases Disposed Disposition Rate

19,821 42,376 115%

11,713 39,718 126%

11,713 39,718 126%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$966,747 7,876 296,252 24,893 0

$959,426 5,841 287,964 33,537 7,000

$1,007,754 5,855 284,160 35,937 7,000

$1,051,819 6,100 289,031 35,700 0

Subtotal

$1,295,768

$1,293,768

$1,340,706

$1,382,650

Program Changes

($110,293) Total

$1,295,768

$1,293,768

$1,340,706

$1,272,357

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x2014;?

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 5.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x2014;?

The Personnel Services group increases by 4.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Turnover during FY 2015-16 resulted in slight savings. 49-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 4.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for judges and their staff to attend various legislative and training seminars.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This includes funding for building maintenance and repairs.

The Supplies and Materials group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates.

There is no proposed funding for the Capital Expenditures group for FY 2016-17. Funds were provided in FY 2015-16 to install public wireless internet in the courtroom. There are no capital expenses budgeted in FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes two program changes for a total savings of $110,293 as described below. ●

The first program change deletes three Assistant Court Clerks (NE-01), for a total savings of $110,293 including salary and benefits. Since the end of FY 2014-15, the workload distribution has shifted significantly across the Justice of the Peace precincts, and Precinct 4 has a lower workload per clerk compared to the countywide benchmark. Average workload per clerk is expected to be more evenly distributed amongst the precincts following this program change.

The second program change deletes the part-time Justice of the Peace, Place 2 position, for no savings in FY 2016-17. In the years since redistricting, the workload distribution between the precincts has shifted significantly. Justice of the Peace, Precinct 4's workload has decreased relative to the other precincts. The current term of the part-time judge will expire at the end of 2018; therefore no savings will be realized in FY 2016-17.

Policy Consideration: In November 2013, the Justice of the Peace and Constable precinct lines

were redistricted to align with those of County Commissioners. Prior to the redistricting process, the countywide population distribution and associated workload between the Precincts was notably out of balance. Based upon the new population in each precinct, a new overall workload was estimated for each precinct and authorized positions were redistributed accordingly. In addition to redistricting, Bexar County reached an agreement on Addendum (A-11) with the City of San Antonio (“City”) to the Master Interlocal Agreement which commenced on October 1, 2013. The Addendum established a Uniform Truancy Case Management Program. Effective October 1, 2014, the County waived its exclusive original jurisdiction and transferred all cases to the City involving juveniles 12 years or older who were charged with offenses related to truancy. The transfer of truancy cases to the City caused a decrease in the overall number of new cases filed with the justice courts. During the FY 2014-15 Budget process, the effects of both redistricting and the anticipated transfer of truancy cases on overall workload distribution between the Precincts were analyzed. However, because not a sufficient amount of time had passed to accurately assess the effects of redistricting and the 49-3


transfer of truancy cases had not yet occurred, no action was taken in the FY 2014-15 Adopted Budget. The Budget Department analyzed workload during FY 2014-15 and presented recommendations to Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 budget process. Those recommendations included personnel changes for Justices of the Peace based on the workload analysis, which were accepted by Commissioners Court in the FY 2015-16 Adopted Budget. The workload analysis continued in the same manner for Justices of the Peace and Constables during FY 2015-16, and the appropriate recommendations are made in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1.5 4 2 10 1 2

1.5 4 0 9 1 3

1.5 1 0 9 1 3

20.5

18.5

15.5

Justice of the Peace* Assistant Court Clerk Case Manager Court Clerk Court Manager Lead Court Clerk Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Justice of the Peace, Precinct 4 *One Justice of the Peace is part-time.

49-4


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4120

JUVENILE – CHILD SUPPORT PROBATION Mission: To promote the rehabilitation and well-being of offenders and their families by redirecting behavior with an emphasis on individual responsibility and the protection and safety of the community.

Vision:

We envision the Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department as a leader in promoting the rehabilitation and well being of offenders and their families. The Juvenile Probation Department vision is to be in the forefront of redirecting behavior with an emphasis on the protection and safety of the community and the well-being of the child.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • •

Improve staff to juvenile ratio in the Mission Road Detention Center and the Cyndi Taylor Krier Treatment Center. Create a database to evaluate the performance of agencies/programs with whom we contract. Aggressively seek new sources of funding, public and private, to fund new, creative programs and initiatives. Increase, at Intake, the use of advice, counsel and release options, when appropriate, in order to decrease the number of cases referred to other Early Intervention Units. Increase the school attendance rate of youth served through the School Based Unit. Increase the percentage of child support probationers making regular payments. Electronically transmit information required by Texas Juvenile Probation Commission. Develop a plan to obtain an alternative information system that would integrate all departmental applications and maintain an interface with the Juvenile Information Management System (JIMS). Develop and/or revamp the current JIMS to provide better information to the department and other officials.

Program Description:

The Bexar County Juvenile Child Support Probation Division monitors and enforces child support payment responsibilities of individuals referred to the division by the courts. Counseling regarding personal responsibility and employment is provided during orientation classes and monthly in person reporting. The division reports payment compliance to the courts and the State Attorney General’s Office. Partial funding for the division is provided by the State Attorney General’s Office through an annually negotiated contract with the County being paid a flat fee per case.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Total Number of Probationers Reports by Case Number of Probationers Assigned to Attend Orientation Class 1 1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

4,275

4,403

4,447

138

238

240

FY 14-15: Based on 11 Orientation classes. The 6/2015 class was cancelled and FY 15-16 Oct, Nov, Dec 2015 significantly higher than average referral numbers.

50-1


FY 2014-15 Actual Monthly Child Support Probation Caseload Supervised

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1,163

1,157

1,169

210 356

231 367

233 371

23

25

26

68%

68%

69%

67% 66%

68% 67%

69% 68%

Efficiency Indicators: Average Caseload Per Child Support Probation Officer Per Month Average Number of Probationer Reports By Case 2 Average Number of Court-Ordered Probation Cases Opened Per Month Effectiveness Indicators: Percent of Probationers Making A Child Support Payment Percent of Probationers Who Attended/Completed Orientation Class Percent of Child Support Funds Collected

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$600,741 1,078 0

$604,153 3,858 450

$490,547 1,456 450

$542,352 3,858 450

$601,819

$608,461

$492,453

$546,660 0

Program Change

$0 0

Total

$601,819

$608,461

$492,453

$546,660

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 11 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

2

The Personnel Services group increases by 10.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to turnover experienced throughout FY 2015-16. Funding for this appropriation is based on the Department’s FY 2016-17 budget request and personnel actions approved by the Juvenile Board.

FY 15-16 Anticipate larger number of reports due to decreased utilization of Min Supervision.

50-2


The Operational Costs group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to lower costs in Copier Rental Expenses in FY 2015-16.

The Supplies and Materials group remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for the purchase of office supplies at the same level as FY 2015-16 budgeted amounts.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Assistant Supervisor Child Support Probation Officer Supervisor - Child Support Probation Program Assistant - Child Support Services Senior Probation Officer - Child Support Services Total - Juvenile - Child Support Probation

Note:

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 5 1 1 4

1 5 1 1 4

1 5 1 1 3

12

12

11

The Juvenile Board approved personnel actions as requested by the Juvenile Probation Department. These changes included re-classifications, position status changes, and title changes.

50-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4113 & 4114

JUVENILE - INSTITUTIONS Mission:

Our mission is to create and maintain a safe and secure atmosphere in which to provide a program that is healthy for the body, mind, and spirit of each child in our care.

Vision:

We envision the Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department as a leader in promoting the rehabilitation and well-being of offenders and their families. The Juvenile Probation Department’s vision is to be in the forefront of redirecting behavior, with an emphasis on the protection and safety of the community and the well-being of the child.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

Increase juvenile compliance with the treatment level system. Improve staff to juvenile ratio in compliance with the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission (TJPC) standards. Develop reality-based training curriculum. Decrease the number of serious incidents by 5 percent. Decrease the number of physical restraints by 5 percent.

Program Description:

The Bexar County Juvenile Probation Institutions Division is comprised of two facilities: one pre-adjudication facility, the Bexar County Juvenile Detention Center, and one postadjudication facility, the Cyndi Taylor Krier Juvenile Correctional Treatment Center. The Juvenile Detention Center, located at 600 Mission Road, has the responsibility of maintaining a safe and secure environment for youth placed in the facility. As indicated in the Mission Statement, emphasis is placed on providing an educational program that will assist the youth in continuing their education upon release, a medical program that addresses medical, dental, and mental health needs, nutritious meals, and physical recreation to improve their health, access to counseling and religious services. The Detention Center has 278 beds separated into twenty dorms and five multiple occupancy housing areas. Residents detained at the Center complete an orientation process to determine the dorm in which they can best function. Supervision of residents is provided by certified Juvenile Detention Officers. Detention Officers ensure that residents are safe and secure, that they participate in Center activities, and that structure and guidance is provided for residents during their stay in Detention. The Krier Center is a secure, long-term, post-adjudication residential treatment facility. It has a capacity of 96 beds separated into eight individual units with twelve beds each. The facility is unique in the manner in which it combines treatment, correctional, educational and medical components to provide residents a comprehensive array of services. Individual, group, and family counseling is provided by eight licensed, masters’ level counselors. Each counselor is assigned a unit of 12 youth as their caseload. Probation officers, counselors, treatment officers, teachers, medical staff, the youth and their families take part in the creation and development of individual treatment programs. The treatment component is managed by the Center’s Clinical Director. Psychiatric consultation is provided through a contract with psychiatrists with the University of Texas Health Science Center’s Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. They provide medication management and valuable input regarding treatment plans.

51-1


The Juvenile Institutions Department is overseen by the Juvenile Board. The Board establishes a juvenile probation department, employs a chief probation officer who meets the standards set by the Texas Juvenile Justice Department, and adopts a budget and establishes policies, including financial policies, for juvenile services within the jurisdiction of the board. The Board may also establish guidelines for the initial assessment of a child by the Juvenile Probation Department.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Mission Road Workload Indicators: Number of Juveniles Detained Average Daily Population Peak Population

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2,338 138 171

2,094 123 153

2,157 127 158

Efficiency Indicators: Number of Total Incidents Number of Violent Incidents Juvenile to Staff Number of Visits

4,625 539 18,187

3,478 322 17,262

3,582 331 17,780

Effectiveness Indicators: Percent Change in Juveniles Detained Percent Change in Total Incidents Percent Change in Visits

-15.6% -33.7% -9.8%

-10.4% -24.8% -5.1%

3.00% 3.00% 3.00%

96 55 69

130 74 88

168 95 96

1,560 194 2,110

3,117 545 2,896

3,117 545 3,724

-17.64% 0%

-12.00% 180.8%

5.00% 0.1%

Krier Workload Indicators: Number of Juveniles Placed Average Daily Population Peak Population Efficiency Indicators: Number of Total Incidents Number of Violent Incidents Juvenile to Staff Number of Individual Counseling Sessions Effectiveness Indicators: Individual Counseling Session Percent Change in Violent Incidents Juvenile to Staff

51-2


Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$15,987,133 0 1,078,801 554,929

$15,648,485 0 1,377,763 512,227

$15,229,248 127 1,229,473 501,869

$15,610,364 0 1,377,763 512,227

$17,620,863

$17,538,475

$16,960,717

$17,500,354 0

Program Change

$0 0

Total

$17,620,863

$17,538,475

$16,960,717

$17,500,354

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for Juvenile Institutions increases by 3.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 2.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for this appropriation is based on the Department’s requests for FY 2016-17 and the personnel actions as approved by the Juvenile Board.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The Department did not request funding for this group for FY 2016-17.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 12.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to maintaining previous budget levels as requested by the Juvenile Probation Department.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 2.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to maintaining previous budget levels as requested by the Juvenile Probation Department.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Mission Road Center Assistant Facility Administrator – Juvenile Detention Center Assistant Supervisor - Institution Services DCPO-Clinical Services Institutions 51-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1

1

1

9 0

9 0

9 1


Detention Recreation Coordinator Facilities Administrator - Juvenile Detention Center Juvenile Detention Officer I Juvenile Detention Officer II Juvenile Detention Officer III Juvenile Detention Shift Supervisor Laundry Worker Main Control Technician Office Assistant IV Shift Team Leader Supervisor Total Juvenile Institutions - Mission

FY 2014-15 Actual 0 1 118 60 7 4 3 13 0 0 1 217

FY 2015-16 Estimate 0 1 118 60 7 4 3 13 0 0 1 217

FY 2016-17 Proposed 2 1 118 60 7 0 0 13 1 1 9 223

1 7 1 1 8

1 7 1 1 8

1 0 0 1 2

Krier Center Assistant Facility Administrator - Krier Center Assistant Supervisor -Institution Services Coordinator - MRC Clinical Services Facility Administrator - Krier Center Counselor II - Krier Center Counseling Facilities Administrator - MRC/Clinical Director Institutions Program Manager - Krier Center Counseling Technician - Information Resources Residential Placement Officer Residential Treatment Officer I Residential Treatment Officer II Residential Treatment Officer III Supervisor â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Institution Services Total Juvenile Institutions - Krier

1

1

0

1 1 18 86 27 8 5 165

1 1 18 86 27 8 5 165

0 0 0 86 27 8 0 125

Total - Juvenile Institutions

382

382

348

Note:

The Juvenile Board approved personnel actions as requested by the Juvenile Probation Department. These changes included re-classifications, position status changes, and title changes.

51-4


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4100 – 4108 & 4115

JUVENILE PROBATION Mission:

To promote the rehabilitation and well-being of offenders and their families by redirecting behavior with an emphasis on individual responsibility and the protection and safety of the community and to support the Juvenile Courts under Title III of the Texas Family Code.

Vision:

We envision the Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department as a leader in promoting the rehabilitation and well-being of offenders and their families. The Juvenile Probation Department’s vision is to be in the forefront of redirecting behavior with an emphasis on the protection and safety of the community and the well-being of the child.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • •

Create a database to evaluate the performance of agencies/programs with whom we contract. Aggressively seek new sources of funding, public and private, to fund new and creative programs and initiatives. Ensure that available resources are used effectively and efficiently. Increase, at Intake, the use of advice, counsel and release option, when appropriate, in order to decrease the number of cases referred to other Early Intervention Units. Increase the school attendance of youth served through the School Based Unit. Increase the percentage of child support probationers making regular payments. Electronically transmit information required by the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission.

Program Description:

The Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department is comprised of three divisions performing functions to meet the departmental goals. The Administration Division’s responsibilities include Community Service Restitution, Victims Assistance, Volunteers in Probation, and the Ropes/Challenge programs. These programs provide resources and support to help juvenile offenders to complete their court-ordered probation conditions or deferred prosecution contracts. The Probation Services Division consists of general field units and specialized units. The field units are responsible for performing pre-adjudication and post-adjudication services to juveniles who have been arrested and/or referred to the Juvenile Probation Department for Intensive Supervision (Felony and Specialized). The specialized units deliver a broad array of programs including the Diversion, Rural Youth/School Based Units, and Residential Services. These units are responsible for providing early intervention services to juveniles who have been arrested and referred to the Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department. Generally, the younger, first-time offenders receive services in a diversion setting. The Administrative Support Services Division is the overhead function of the Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department. In addition to senior management this division includes the Human Resources Office, Clerical, Records Management, Information Management, Fiscal Office, Reimbursement Office, and Facilities Management Services.

52-1


Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Number of Referrals Number of Children Placed on Formal Probation Number of Children Placed in Contract Care Efficiency Indicators: Number of Texas Youth Commission Commitments Number of Successful Releases from Contract Care Average Aftercare Case Load Effectiveness Indicators: Percent of Youths Completing Field Probation Percent of Juveniles Successfully Released from Contract Care and not Readjudicated (6 months) Number of Cases which Successfully Completed Deferred Prosecution

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

4,868 602 95

4,693 698 80

4,834 725 82

35 72 65

64 44 62

55 52 77

28%

26%

25%

66%

71%

71%

906

906

925

Appropriations: Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual $11,415,106 316,027 1,613,241 396,045 35

FY 2015-16 Budget $12,274,108 325,650 1,808,629 326,366 0

FY 2015-16 Estimate $13,581,121 317,378 1,553,532 361,585 565,061

FY 2016-17 Proposed $13,489,902 325,650 1,808,629 326,366 0

$13,740,454

$14,734,753

$16,378,677

$15,950,547 0

Program Changes

$0 0

Total

$13,740,454

$14,734,753

$16,378,677

$15,950,547

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for Juvenile Probation decreases by 2.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for this appropriation is based on the Department’s FY 2016-17 budget request and the approval of personnel actions by the Juvenile Board.

52-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 2.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 estimates. Funding for this appropriation is based on the Department’s request and is allocated at the same level of funding that was adopted in FY 2015-16.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 16.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This increase is primarily due to an increase in the Residential Child Care account, which provides temporary placement of children that require specialized care.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 9.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to one-time expenditures in FY 2015-16 for office furnitureand Level II Ballistic bulletproof vests.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget has no program changes.

Authorized Positions: Administration Clerk - Juvenile Records Coordinator - Employment and Vocational Services Coordinator - Internship Services Coordinator - Victim Services Coordinator - Volunteer Services Juvenile Programs Specialist Lead Specialist - Community Service Restitution Manager - Education Services Office Assistant I Office Assistant II Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Program Aide Program Assistant Psychology Resident - Mental Health Assessment and Triage Specialist - Community Resource Specialist - Education Services Specialist - Post Adjudication Substance Abuse Specialist- Community Service Restitution Supervisor - Post Adjudication Substance Abuse Victim Services Specialist (20 hrs.) Total - Administration

52-3

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 12.5 2 3 0 5

4 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 12.5 2 3 0 5

5 1 0 1 1 0 1 1 3 12.5 2 2 1 5

4 1 1 1 5 0 0.5

4 1 1 1 5 0 0.5

4 0 1 1 5.5 1 0.5

49

49

48.5


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Probation Accreditation & Training Officer Assistant Supervisor - Probation Services Challenge/Ropes Program Officer Coordinator - Detention Transition Services Coordinator - MRC Clinical Services Coordinator - Substance Abuse Services Program Development Coordinator - Substance Abuse Services Counselor II - Krier Center Counseling Counselor - Substance Abuse Services Juvenile Probation Officer Laundry Worker Probation Officer Program Manager - Krier Center Counseling Program Manager - Mental Health Assessment and Triage Residential Placement Unit Supervisor Senior Probation Officer Specialist - Volunteer Services Program Supervisor - Probation Services Supervisor - Residential Services Contract Care Supervisor - Residential Services Krier Supervisor - Sex Offense Intervention Supervisor - Substance Abuse & Family Enrichment Total - Probation Administrative Support Analyst - Fiscal Services Analyst - Information Resources Analyst- Institutions Analyst - Standard Compliance and Investigations Assistant - Human Resources Attorney - Contract and Legal Support Chief Juvenile Probation Officer Clerk - Reimbursement Services Coordinator - Enrichment Services Coordinator - Information Resources Contract Coordinator

52-4

2 18 0 1 0

2 18 0 1 0

0 18 1 1 1

1 1 0 1 0 0 31 0 1 0 29 0 11 1 0 0 0

1 1 0 1 0 0 31 0 1 0 29 0 11 1 0 0 0

0 1 6 1 8 3 32 1 1 1 47 1 7 1 1 1 1

97

97

134

1 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0

1 1 0 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 0

1 3 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Deputy Chief Probation Officer (DCPO) - Probation Services DCPO - Mental Health Services Deputy Chief Probation Officer Institutions Services Director - Finance and Administrative Services Executive Assistant General Counsel Investigator - Standards Compliance and Investigations Lead Clerk - Reimbursement Services Manager - Accreditation and Training Manager - Information Resources Manager - Standards Compliance and Investigations Project Manager Specialist - Contract and Grants Specialist - Fiscal Services Specialist - Human Resources Specialist - Information Resources Specialist - Reimbursement Services Specialist - Supply and Fixed Asset Supervisor - Records Office Supervisor - Reimbursement Services Supervisor - Information Resources Technician - Information Resources Training Officer - Accreditation and Training

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 0 0 1

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 3 2 1 1 0 0 1

2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 0 3 2 1 1 0.5 1 2

Total - Administrative Support

37

37

42.5

Total - Juvenile Probation

183

183

225

Note: The Juvenile Board approved personnel actions as requested by the Juvenile Probation Department. These changes included re-classifications, position status changes, and title changes.

52-5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNITS: 3800-3803

JUVENILE DISTRICT COURTS Mission:

The Juvenile District Courts will fairly administer justice in all cases that properly come before them, while disposing of cases in a timely and efficient manner. The staff will provide immediate, accurate, and beneficial support to the Juvenile District Courts, and citizens who request assistance.

Vision: Juvenile District Courts are leaders that provide all citizens of Bexar County who are involved in

the Juvenile Justice system with efficient, appropriate, and equitable court services. The administrative staff is devoted to developing and maintaining innovative, state-of-the-art support and assistance for the Juvenile District Courts and the citizens of Bexar County whom they serve. The Courts strive to promote quality communication between our courts and all other County departments, while insuring that justice is carried out in the most effective and efficient manner possible.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • •

Provide high quality staff-support. Facilitate the functions of other court staff to assist in their productivity. Handle the administrative duties of the courts in an effective manner. Disseminate and communicate all information integral to the effective and efficient performance of the courts. Prepare legally correct jury instructions in a timely manner. Provide the highest possible level of court services to juveniles and other interested parties. Protect the rights of victims of crime. Dispose of cases in a timely manner.

Program Description: The Juvenile District Courts have three statutorily mandated Juvenile District

Courts. The Courts function with three Judges and three full time Associate Judges. These courts adjudicate all cases involving juveniles under 17 years of age who are charged with felony or misdemeanor offenses. The staff processes court appointments of defense attorneys for indigent juvenile respondents, schedules interpreters, prepares jury charges, and distributes legal notices to all necessary parties. In addition to determining if juveniles are in need of supervision or have committed delinquent conduct, the juvenile courts also may certify juveniles for transfer to adult criminal court. The Courts also receive and respond to orders directed to the Juvenile District Courts from the Court of Criminal Appeals. The staff also prepares the budget for the Juvenile District Courts while providing proper and efficient case flow management for the Courts.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Number of New Cases Filed Number of Cases Disposed Detention Hearings Conducted Number of Families Interviewed for Indigence

2,513 2,487 5,744 2,235 53-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate 2,607 2,626 5,700 2,434

FY 2016-17 Proposed 2,766 2,810 6,770 2,962


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Efficiency Indicators: Average Number of Cases Pending per month Average Number of Dispositions per month Families Interviewed per FTE

400 207 745

423 219 608

494 234 650

Effectiveness Indicators: Number of reversals for charge preparation error Percentage of cases disposed within a year Percentage of cases disposed within 90 days

0 98% 60%

0 98% 70%

0 98% 70%

Appropriations: Administration (3800) Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 289th District Court (3801) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total 386th District Court (3802) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$575,309 12,529 10,586 25,612 1,000

$613,058 13,400 11,925 29,300 0

$592,081 12,491 9,521 25,950 0

$652,672 13,400 10,070 27,300 0

$625,036

$667,683

$640,043

$703,442

$519,287 186 219,520

$496,723 4,666 266,668

$507,092 1,068 259,573

$513,824 3,000 250,000

$738,993

$768,057

$767,733

$766,824

$514,249 315 249,212

$517,662 4,666 266,666

$527,171 528 225,632

$535,024 3,000 250,000

$763,776

$788,994

$753,331

$788,024

53-2


FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$490,930 1,633 272,780

$492,494 6,000 266,666

$503,282 0 251,998

$508,928 3,000 250,000

$765,343

$765,160

$755,280

$761,928

$2,099,775 12,529 12,720 25,612 0 742,512

$2,119,937 13,400 27,257 29,300 0 800,000

$2,129,626 12,491 11,117 25,950 0 737,203

$2,210,448 13,400 19,070 27,300 0 750,000

$2,893,148

$2,989,894

$2,916,387

$3,020,218

436th District Court (3803) Personnel Services Operational Expenses Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Total Total Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Court-Appointed Attorney Costs Subtotal Program Changes

$0 Grand Total

$2,893,148

$2,989,894

$2,916,387

$3,020,218

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 3.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group increases by 3.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Savings resulted from turnover during FY 2015-16, and that position is fully budgeted for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 7.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided at the FY 2015-16 budget level for judicial seminars and conferences.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 71.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to estimated savings in transcription services in FY 2015-16 that is not anticipated to occur in FY 2016-17.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 5.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is provided for office supplies and other various supplies line items. 53-3


The Court-Appointed Attorney Costs group increases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is adjusted to more closely align with court-appointed attorney costs over the past three years.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Judge Administrative Supervisor Associate Judge Court Coordinator Court Interpreter I Court Reporter Court Support Specialist District Court Staff Attorney General Administrative Counsel Office Assistant II Total – Juvenile District Courts

53-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3 1 3 3 1 6 1 1 1 3

3 1 3 3 1 6 1 1 1 3

3 1 3 3 1 6 1 1 1 3

23

23

23


-FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4906

MANAGEMENT AND FINANCE Mission:

To strengthen the County’s strategic and financial position through debt management, revenue maximization, strategic planning, business-process improvement and risk management.

Vision: Our customers will see the Management and Finance Department as valued partners in making Bexar County the leader and best practice model for management and financial services.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

To provide efficient and effective administrative services to all offices and departments. To effectively manage the County’s Debt and Investment Portfolio to ensure opportunities for savings and increased investment revenue. To coordinate the successful issuance of bonds or other financial instruments used to fund projects and programs. To actively promote workplace safety, prevent injuries, and protect the County’s assets.

Program Description:

The Management and Finance Services Department is responsible for cost analyses, debt service schedules, economic analyses, investment plans, and risk management. The Department makes recommendations to management on appropriate courses of action to improve organizational performance and increase operational efficiency. This Department is called upon in a consultative capacity to assist County managers in exploring and seeking new opportunities to reduce operating costs and increase revenue generation. In addition, the Department will continue to provide special studies/projects including conducting organizational reviews, jail population analyses, and management studies as directed by Commissioners Court. Finally, the Department administers the County’s risk management program to include managing the County’s insurance programs, workers compensation and workplace safety.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload/Output Measures: Investment Portfolio Number of New Debt Issuances Efficiency Measures: Average Number of Trades Executed per Quarter County’s Bond Rating Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of Investment Income to General Fund Revenue

54-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1.1B 5

$900M 4

$860M 2

35.3 AAA

36 AAA

36 AAA

0.70%

0.70%

0.70%


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$655,538 6,491 18,585 13,325

$637,611 6,000 18,953 15,300

$646,104 6,617 19,964 6,386

$607,823 6,000 18,953 15,300

$693,939

$677,864

$679,071

$648,076

Program Change

$0 Total

$693,939

$677,864

$679,071

$648,076

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 4.6 percent compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 5.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to the transfer of positions between the Management and Finance Department and the Budget Department. Full funding of all authorized positions is provided for FY 2016-17.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases by 9.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Training funds proposed are consistent with FY 2015-16 budgeted amounts.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 5.1 percent compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for Telephone and Internet, public notices, and other various operational accounts.

The Supplies and Materials group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for office supplies consistent with previous budget levels.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

54-2


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 0.25 1 1 1 1 1

0 1 0.25 1 1 1 1 1

1 1 0.25 1 1 1 1 1

Analyst* Administrative Services Coordinator Assistant County Manager Grants Compliance Coordinator Grants Manager Office Assistant IV Risk Management Coordinator Senior Analyst

Total 6.25 6.25 7.25 *One position was reported in the Budget Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s authorized position list and will not be reported in the Management and Finance Department.

54-3


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 9906, 9908, 9910, & 9999

NON-DEPARTMENTAL GENERAL FUND Program Description: The expenses in the Non-Departmental budget all share a basic similarity-

they represent expenses that benefit multiple Offices and Departments throughout the County. This budgetary approach also serves to streamline the budget and financial accounting processes. Each of the groups of expenditures shown in this budget is described in detail below.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Interfund Transfers Capital Expenditures Debt Service Expenses Contingencies Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$275,374 5,526 28,239,409 220,609 10,496,410 0 17,300 0

$269,135 5,000 28,557,391 224,995 13,607,052 6,505 17,401 17,075,469

$239,143 5,000 28,643,259 225,121 13,532,729 6,003 17,401 0

$257,700 15,000 27,626,305 150,739 18,086,174 0 17,500 22,672,593

$39,254,628

$59,762,948

$42,668,656

$68,826,011

Program Justification and Analysis: •

Overall, the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group increases by 7.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Proposed expenditures in the Personnel Services group include: •

The Personnel Services group provides funding in the amount of $12,000 for employee fidelity bonds. These funds are used to purchase public official bonds for various countywide elected and appointed officials in order to guarantee the public that the elected or appointed official will faithfully perform the duties of their Office.

The VIA Bus Pass Program is funded in the Personnel Services group in the amount of $179,760, which is an increase when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Last year’s expenditures were lower as a result of credits to the County by VIA for previous overpayments. This program is a transportation initiative for the VIA Bus “Big Pass” Program that offers free bus rides to County

55-1


employees who present a County Identification Card, a one-day Bus Pass for Jurors, and vanpool subsidies. •

The Employee Assistance Program is also funded in the Personnel Services group in the amount of $65,940, which is flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The program provides employees with short-term counseling services and referrals for longer term care. Services also include emergency response counseling provided when an employee is involved in a critical incident.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Additional funding is proposed in FY 2016-17 for travel and training for countywide Public Safety Communications personnel. In FY 2015-16, this funding was budgeted in the Supplies and Materials group.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 3.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as described below: •

Bexar County houses federal detainees at the Laredo Street Detention Facility. The GEO Group provides the labor and materials for operating the facility on behalf of Bexar County. Bexar County compensates the GEO Group, Inc. at a rate of $50.60 per day. Bexar County receives compensation from the United States Department of Justice (USDOJ) for housing their federal detainees in the amount of $64.95 per day per detainee. For FY 2016-17, Bexar County is estimated to receive net revenues in the amount of $3,000,000.

A total of $2,570,890 is provided for County liability insurance within the Risk Management Accounting Unit. Of this amount, a total of $1,245,890 is for annual liability insurance premiums. The remainder will be used to pay for the County’s liability for vehicle accidents, lawsuits or other legitimate claims against the County.

A total of $1,919,354 is provided for appraisal fees to the Bexar Appraisal District. The Bexar Appraisal District’s 2017 Proposed Budget set the fees for all governmental entities that its their services.

Funding in the amount of $779,617 is provided within the Repairs and Maintenance – Computer Software account as follows: • Alamo Region Public Safety System (ARPSS) $650,000: ARPSS provides mission critical, data communications to the public safety users of the City of San Antonio (COSA), Bexar County, and the City of Schertz. ARPSS is hosted by the COSA; however, Bexar County and the City of Schertz are responsible for paying percentage shares towards annual operational and maintenance expenses. The percentage shares fluctuate annually based on use of the system. • Rocket Remote Configuration Management (RCM) and AVaiL Web SaaS $86,752: The Sheriff's Office and the Fire Marshal’s Office use Utility Rockets to increase the performance of the AT&T wireless data system and help minimize and eliminate the wireless data coverage gaps within Bexar County. There are currently 137 Rockets

55-2


deployed with another 100 planned for deployment by the end of FY 2014-15. Funding is provided for annual support and maintenance of the 237 Rockets (230 Sheriff’s Office and 7 Fire Marshal’s Office) that are in use. • MCM Technology CommAsset360 Radio Management Application Support & Maintenance $6,300: MCM's CommAsset360 is a land mobile radio (LMR) centric asset management system. Radio Services personnel currently use CommAsset360 to manage all radio equipment countywide. The funding is for annual software maintenance and support, which includes patches and version upgrades. • NetMotion Diagnostics $20,565: NetMotion Diagnostics collects detailed analytics on device performance and location, while also providing an interface for initiating diagnostics and displaying the results. • Datamaxx Omnixx Enterprise Platform / Force Mobile Support & Maintenance $16,000: The Datamaxx Omnixx Enterprise Platform and Omnixx Force Mobile provide Bexar County and connected agencies the ability to search local, State, and Federal criminal justice databases. •

Funding for Security Services in County-owned facilities that do not house courtrooms is provided by armed and unarmed guards for a total cost of $954,498.

BiblioTech, the County’s all-digital library, works to bridge literacy and fill technology gaps in Bexar County by establishing a community presence at physical locations as well as an online presence through digital collections and resources. Membership to the library is free to all Bexar County residents and access to the digital collection is available 24/7. In addition to providing this service to all County residents, Bexar County pays the City of San Antonio (COSA) to provide Bexar County Citizens access to libraries owned by COSA. Since 2000, Bexar County has paid $47 million to COSA for offering these services to the residents of the unincorporated area of Bexar County. In FY 2015-16, Bexar County paid $3,484,028 to COSA for library services. For 2016-17, the annual cost will be $3,184,028, which is a $300,000 decrease when compared to FY 2015-16. The inter-local agreement details the annual cost paid by the County to the City for the next two years. For the next two fiscal years, the annual amount owed to the City will decrease by $300,000. The decrease is due to the County’s increased investment in library services for the community through BiblioTech.

For FY 2016-17, Bexar County provides funding in the amount of $135,000 for a contract with COSA for animal control services provided to the County. In anticipation of the opening of the new animal shelter within the City of Kirby, funding for this contract is only proposed for three months of the fiscal year.

Funding for the third year, of five years total, is proposed for a community and economic development program to stimulate business and commercial activity in Balcones Heights. Funding in the amount of $300,000 is budgeted within the Grant Expenditures account.

A total of $385,000 is provided within the Pauper Burials account.

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Various agreements are budgeted within the Contracted Services account. The City of San Antonio and Bexar County jointly own a radio system; Bexar County's ownership interest is 20 percent, or $357,000, as it relates to system infrastructure. A total of $378,452 is budgeted for the annual operating costs for the Emergency Operating Center (EOC), which is 20 percent of the operating expenses of the EOC. These amounts are paid to the City of San Antonio. In addition, a total of $333,333 is budgeted for Haven for Hope of Bexar County for their Jail Release Program, which provides shelter and case management services for homeless individuals that have been released from jail on bond. Finally, a total of $227,457 is for Catholic Charities, which provides legal guardianship services to clients residing in Bexar County.

A total of $297,910 is provided within the Membership Fees account. Membership fees are proposed for FY 2016-17 as follows: Membership Fees: Alamo Area Council of Governments

Amount $133,809

American Institute of Architects

$819

American Public Human Services Association

$3,090

Conference of Urban Counties

$45,144

County Judges and Commissioners Association of Texas

$4,326

Government Finance Officer Association

$4,913

Greater Austin-San Antonio Corridor Council

$15,450

International Facility Management Association

$184

National Council of Elected - Precinct 3

$17,662

National Association of Counties

$33,000

San Antonio Mobility Coalition

$36,050

Northeast Partnership for Economic Development

$258

South Texas Judge and Commissioners Association

$309

Texas Association of Counties

$2,575

Texas Board of Architectural Examiners Total:

$321 $297,910

The Legal Services account remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for outside attorneys working on pending civil litigation and for collective bargaining agreement (CBA) negotiations with the Deputy Sheriff Association of Bexar County (DSABC). The current CBA with the DSABC expired September 30, 2015, with a new agreement currently in negotiations. Funding for legal services is provided in the amount of $340,000.

The Professional Services account includes the cost of promotional testing for employees in the Sheriff’s Office. A total of $118,700 is provided for professional services in FY 2016-17.

A total of $232,500 is provided within the Lobby Fees account to promote the interests of the taxpayers and the County for the upcoming 85th Texas Legislative Session.

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Funding for Banking Fees is provided in the amount of $367,480. Banking institution fees vary on a monthly basis. The banks provide lockbox services for the County’s Tax Assessor-Collector and depository services for the County.

A total of $190,000 is provided within the Tuition Reimbursement account. The Tuition Reimbursement Program reimburses employees for education expenses for courses that are directly related to their employment with Bexar County.

A total of $190,000 is provided within the Audit Services. The County pays an outside consultant to provide a Single Audit Report and a Report on Conduct of Audit as mandated by the Texas Local Government Code. Also included in this amount is funding for an outside audit of the County’s registry accounts as required by the Texas Legislature. The cost of this service has remained the same since FY 2013-14.

Funding in the amount of $132,000 is allocated for Financial Advisor Services.

A total of $55,000 is funded in anticipation of the acceptance of credit cards by County Offices and Departments. This is the estimated cost that the County will pay for merchant fees associated with credit card transactions for service by the County.

The Non-Departmental Budget provides funding in the amount of $1,096,386 for Contributions to Outside Agencies. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds contributions to 41 outside agencies that provide important social and environmental services, educational programs, economic development initiatives, and other services for Bexar County citizens. FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget $27,600 $38,500 $30,000 $25,000 $32,000 $30,000 $62,572 $59,430 $6,500 $26,460 $30,000 $20,000 $10,000 $15,000 $25,000 $5,000 $5,000 $20,000

Outside Agency Beat AIDS Bexar County Arts Internship Program Boysville Catholic Charities Chamber Orchestra of San Antonio ChildSafe Christian Senior Services Chrysalis Ministries City/County Seniors Communities in School Family Service Association Health Collaborative Jefferson Outreach for Older People JOVEN Madonna Neighborhood Center MLK March Musical Bridges Around the World National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) 55-5


Outside Agency Northeast Senior Assistance Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Peace Initiative Project MEND Project Quest Public Concert Series San Antonio Cultural Arts San Antonio Fighting Back San Antonio Food Bank San Antonio Metropolitan Ministry San Antonio OASIS Seton Home Southeast Community Outreach for Older People Southwest Community Outreach for Older People St. Vincent de Paul The Fund The Magik Theatre The SA Clubhouse The Winds and Words of War Exhibit Urban 15 YMCA of Greater San Antonio (the Y) Youth Orchestras of SA YWCA of San Antonio Grand Total â&#x20AC;˘

FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget $10,000 $25,000 $50,000 $40,000 $80,750 $50,000 $15,000 $20,000 $60,000 $25,000 $15,000 $10,000 $10,000 $10,000 $6,000 $35,000 $10,000 $17,574 $75,000 $11,000 $25,000 $6,000 $22,000 $1,096,386

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for all countywide radio equipment maintenance costs in the amount of $150,239. These funds support operational and maintenance expenses for subscriber equipment, such as control stations, mobiles, and portables, and accessory equipment.

â&#x20AC;˘ The Debt Service group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided in the arbitrage rebate tax account in the amount of $17,500.

55-6


• The Interfund Transfers group increases by 33.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to a significant increase in the transfers from the General Fund to the Health Insurance and Other Post-Employment Benefits funds to cover medical claims. Additionally, the transfer for the purchase of vehicles has increased significantly. The total amount proposed for interfund transfers is $18,086,174 as shown below. Interfund Transfers • $8,025,721 for the Other Post-Employment Benefits (Fund 506) • $4,113,683 for the Self Insured Health and Life (Fund 501) • $3,706,074 for the Fleet Acquisition (Fund 703) • $1,324,765 for the Debt Service (Fund 400) • $339,597 for the Courthouse Security (Fund 203) • $220,576 for the Firing Range (Fund 512) • $64,344 for the Dispute Resolution (Fund 214) • $63,745 for the Law Library (Fund 210) • $62,374 for the Fleet Maintenance (Fund 504) Grant Cash Matches • $119,600 for the Texas Indigent Defense Commission grant. • $38,615 for the Housing and Urban Development Continuum of Care grant. • $3,733 for the OJJ Civil District Court grant. • $3,347 for the Felony DWI Court grant. • Contingency funding in the amount of $18,472,593 is provided for the following in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget: •

Funding in the amount of $5,077,082 is provided for the pending collective bargaining agreement with the Deputy Sheriff Association of Bexar County. This represents the full year cost of a 5.5 percent increase in base wages, as well as other negotiated allowances and incentives included in the County’s current wages and benefits proposal.

Funding in the amount of $3,112,535 is placed in contingencies pending direction from Commissioners Court regarding the Child Welfare Board.

In late FY 2015-16, Bexar County contracted with IBM to conduct a thorough review of the Bexar County Information Technology (BCIT) Department and to develop a 5-year Strategic Plan. The study included a review of the physical safety of the County’s IT infrastructure, the County’s potential migration of software and hardware services to the “Cloud”, IT policies, procedures, and management practices, as well as recommended resource and staffing allocations. Funding in the amount of $2,405,401 is allocated for costs associated with implementation of the first year recommendations in the IT 5-Year Strategic Plan.

A total of $2,380,970 is provided for lease and operational costs associated with the Adult Probation West and Southwest satellite stations, East and West Law Enforcement substations, Fire Marshal’s Office, Gillette Sheriff’s Academy and Patrol Headquarters, and the Video Visitation Center. Adult Probation located and moved into two satellite 55-7


stations during FY 2014-15. It is anticipated that Adult Probation will relocate two additional satellite offices during FY 2016-17. •

Funding in the amount of $1,600,000 is placed in contingencies to adjust the County’s livable wage from $13.00 an hour to $13.50 an hour.

Funding in the amount of $1,400,000 is placed in contingencies for a one percent cost of living adjustment for all employees on the Exempt table and Non-Exempt employees who will not receive a salary adjustment from livable wage increase.

Under an Inter-local agreement, Bexar County pays for half of the total operating expenses at the Central Magistration Facility. The City of San Antonio pays the other half of the expenses and owns the facility. Discussions between the City and the County regarding ownership, operations, staffing and responsibilities of this facility may result in significant changes to the current Magistration process. Therefore, a total of $725,880 is provided for 6 months of operating expenses for the Detention area of the Central Magistration Facility.

A total of $300,000 is allocated for court appointed attorney fees for the judicial courts. Funding will be transferred into the appropriate budgets, if necessary.

Funding in the amount of $286,758 is allocated for Elected Official Salary increases.

Funding in the amount of $269,010 is allocated for five Pre-Trial Bond Officer positions within the Judicial Services Department. Funding for these positions is contingent on an increase in caseload related to the District Attorney’s Office Pre-Trial Diversion program.

A total of $250,000 is provided for temporary Sheriff’s Office Detention Officers. These temporary officers may be hired to decrease the amount of overtime worked by full-time officers in the jail.

Funding in the amount of $250,000 is allocated for an anticipated administration fee to be paid to GEO, pending contract negotiations.

Funding in the amount of $180,000 is allocated for maintenance of software for the Sheriff’s Office related to a new human resource and time keeping management. The implementation of this contract may not occur in FY 2016-17 therefore, funding is recommended in the Contingency Appropriation.

Funding is provided for the Council of State Governments Justice Center to conduct Phase III of the review of the Bexar County Pretrial Services program in the amount of $60,000.

As a result of a Public Safety Dispatcher Study, funding in the amount of $56,489 is provided for a Career Ladder Program for the County’s Dispatchers and Operators funded in the Sheriff’s Office and the Fire Marshal’s Office.

55-8


A total of $106,848 is provided for the Constable Career Ladder Program.

A total of $11,620 is provided for the Crime Lab Career Ladder Program.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes $4,200,000 in Undesignated Funds, which represents 1 percent of the total operating budget. Undesignated funds are used to address unanticipated expenses during the fiscal year.

55-9


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4600

PROBATE COURTS Mission: To provide appropriate, effective and responsive court services and judicial supervision to

probate, estate administration, guardianship, mental health and eminent domain proceedings, in a fair and equitable manner, complying with the Texas Probate Code, Texas Trust Code, Texas Property Code, Texas Mental Health Code, the Code of Judicial Conduct and all other laws of the State of Texas and the United States.

Vision: To be the forum for the efficient administration of decedents’ estates and for the resolution of

any issues or litigation incident to a decedents’ estate; oversight and protection of incapacitated persons through creating and monitoring guardianships of the person and/or estate; protection of the constitutional rights of persons for whom court ordered mental health services are sought; and oversee the orderly acquisition of private property for a public purpose in eminent domain proceedings.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

To provide an accessible and equitable justice system that is responsive to the citizens appearing before the court and to the community in general. To promote public safety and well-being. To oversee the administration of the estates of deceased and incapacitated persons. To protect individual rights and provide justice to all citizens, particularly the mentally ill, incapacitated persons and the heirs/devisees of deceased persons. To provide quality service to all citizens appearing before these courts.

Program Description: Probate Courts 1 and 2 are Statutory Probate Courts as defined in the Texas

Probate Code. A Statutory Probate Court has jurisdiction over all matters or proceedings relating to the estate of a decedent. These courts hear all applications, petitions and motions filed in connection with the administration of decedents’ estates – including (but not limited to) admitting wills to probates, oversight of dependent administrations, heirship proceedings, review and approval of inventories, annual accounts and the distribution of estates. Probate Courts also hear applications, petitions and motions filed in connection with the administration of guardianships of incapacitated persons and minors, including (but not limited to) annual accounts, annual reports on condition and well-being of the ward, and sales of real and personal property. These Courts preside over matters involving interviews, testamentary or charitable trust including contests, trust modification and/or termination. All cases involving civil commitments including warrants, orders for protective custody, orders for commitment and administration of medication are heard in the Probate Courts, as well as all non-jury and jury trials involving any of the aforementioned applications, motions or petitions. Probate Courts also preside over all lawsuits appertaining and incident to estates (descendants and guardianships) including any type of civil litigation such as will contest, personal injury lawsuits, suits for property damage, forcible entry and detainer, wrongful death, breach of fiduciary duty, divorce, custody determination and adoption. In addition, the Probate Courts appoint commissioners in eminent domain proceedings and preside over eminent domain appeals.

Policy Consideration:

In FY 2014-15, the Bexar County Probate Courts created the Enhanced Guardianship Pilot Program. The purpose of the Pilot Program is to protect persons that do not have the 56-1


capacity to make their own decisions due to a mental or physical condition. Another major objective is to protect individuals from abuse, neglect, self-neglect, exploitation, and provide care and the appropriate management of their property. Furthermore, the Pilot Program should result in a decrease in the number of incapacitated people in the San Antonio State Hospital, Bexar County Jail, and the homeless population.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Workload Indicators: Number of Guardianships Filed Number of Mental Health Cases Filed

342 4,464

327 4,638

345 4,870

Efficiency Indicators: Probate Hearings per year Mental Health Hearings per year

4,182 3,811

4,391 4,001

4,610 4,200

275 100

290 110

305 125

Effectiveness Indicators: Show Cause Orders Issued Court Initiated Guardianships

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,825,470 115,112 2,751

$1,651,092 111,086 3,500

$1,684,183 106,703 2,442

$1,553,160 107,116 2,500

$1,943,333

$1,765,678

$1,793,328

$1,662,776

Program Changes

$13,200 Total

$1,943,333

$1,765,678

$1,793,328

$1,675,976

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x2014;?

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 6.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. â&#x2014;?

The Personnel Services group decreases by 7.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is the result of two Attorney IIs assigned to mental health and protective custody cases being transferred to the Public Defender's Office during FY 2015-16. 56-2


The Operational Expenses group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Medical expenses, court-appointed attorney costs, and court costs are the major line items budgeted in this group.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 2.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Sufficient funding is provided for office supplies in FY 2016-17.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $13,200 as described below. ●

The first program change deletes the existing Associate Judge position for a total savings of $149,892. The termination of this position is permitted under Section 54A.206(d)(2) of the Government Code. Funds will not be appropriated to pay the salary for this position in Fiscal Year 2016-17 beginning October 31, 2016.

The second program change adds an Associate Judge to preside over the proceedings for court-ordered mental health services, pursuant to Section 574.0085 of the Texas Health & Safety Code. The total cost of this position, including salary and benefits, is $163,092. The difference in cost for this position compared to the one in the previous program change is $13,200, which is the amount budgeted for health insurance associated with the new position.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Judge Associate Judge Attorney II* Court Investigator Court Investigator II Court Reporter Probate Court Administrative Assistant Probate Court Auditor Probate Court Staff Attorney II Total – Probate Courts

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 1 2 1 1 2 2 4 2

2 1 0 1 1 2 2 4 2

2 1 0 1 1 2 2 4 2

17

15

15

*Two Attorney IIs were transferred from Probate Courts to the Public Defender's Office in FY 2015-16.

56-3


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 7100

BEXAR COUNTY PUBLIC DEFENDER’S OFFICE Mission:

The mission of the Bexar County Public Defender’s Office is to zealously protect and defend the rights of our clients through compassionate and inspired legal representation of the highest quality, in pursuit of a fair and unbiased system of justice for all. The Public Defender’s Office is authorized by the Bexar County Commissioners Court to represent indigent persons, to include those defendants identified with treatable mental health issues, charged with offenses in the misdemeanor courts and on appeal from misdemeanor, felony, and juvenile courts in Bexar County. The office receives its cases by appointment from the Judges.

Goals and Objectives:

• Create a basis of institutional knowledge and consistency within the indigent criminal defense community in parity with the District Attorney’s Office. • Provide trial and appellate representation to indigent clients charged with crimes in misdemeanor courts. • Provide appellate representation to indigent clients convicted of crimes in misdemeanor, juvenile, and felony courts. • Act as a resource and support private defense counsel appointed to represent indigent persons at trial and on appeal. • Provide trial counsel and support services to indigent clients who are acutely mentally ill or are mentally disabled and are charged with a crime in the County’s misdemeanor courts. • Improve the provision of services to mentally ill misdemeanor defendants. • Utilize performance measures of indigent defense services to provide evidence of effectiveness. • Expand the role of the Public Defender’s Office to provide representation to indigent clients in misdemeanor, felony, and juvenile courts.

Program Description:

The Public Defender’s Office consists of three units: Appellate, Mental Health, and a new Misdemeanor Trial unit which began operation in August 2015. The Public Defender’s Office represents indigent individuals as appointed by trial courts to include misdemeanor trial cases and felony, misdemeanor and juvenile appeals. The Public Defender’s Office also represents mentally ill and mentally disabled clients in misdemeanor cases. In addition, the Office assists trial courts and the private bar in researching case law and working on suggested jury charge language. The Public Defender’s Office is monitored by an oversight board and the Office of the County Manager. Its budget is controlled by Bexar County Commissioners Court. Appellate Division The Public Defender’s Office is appointed by the judges of the courts of Bexar County to represent indigent defendants in seeking post-conviction relief. Mental Health – Criminal Division Attorneys in this division represent indigent accused persons who have been deemed to suffer from a mental illness. This division provides criminal defense to this population of clients in the misdemeanor courts of Bexar County in accordance with the local indigent defense plan.

57-1


Misdemeanor Trial Division Created in 2014, this division provides criminal defense to indigent clients accused of a misdemeanor offense. Mental Health – Civil Division This division represents “proposed patients” who are the subject of civil orders of protective custody and/or commitment proceedings in the Probate Courts of Bexar County. This division is appointed pursuant to Texas Health and Safety Code § 574.003. Central Magistration Division The Central Magistration was created in 2015 through a grant from the Texas Indigent Commission. This division provides representation to indigent arrested persons suffering from a mental illness at their initial bail hearing pursuant to Texas Code of Criminal Procedure § 15.17.

Performance Indicators: Appellate Section Workload Indicators: Number of Appointments Number of Substantive Filings 1

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

105 83

80 50

90 75

36 41

30 35

36 40

43

40

35

$4,241

$3,650

$3,250

Mental Health- Criminal Division Workload Indicators: Number of New Cases Opened Number of New Cases Closed

N/A N/A

1000 800

600 500

Efficiency Indicators: Time to Disposition (Average days) Average Caseload per Attorney

N/A N/A

45 250

60 300

Efficiency Indicators: Number of Closed Cases Substantive Filings per Attorney (Average) Number of Days between completion of record and filing of brief (Average) Effectiveness Indicators: Cost per Case Appointed 2

1

Substantive Filings includes briefs on the merits, reply briefs, PDRs, writ responses and/or writs of mandamus. Cost per closed case is calculated by adding personnel costs for Appellate staff and attorneys and assignment of a portion of operating costs and dividing by cases appointed. 2

57-2


Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Cases Disposed Within 90 Days Percentage of Cases Disposed Within 180 days Percentage of Cases with Positive Defense Outcome 3

FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

N/A N/A N/A

85% 98% 30%

90% 98% 30%

Workload Indicators: Number of New Cases Opened Number of New Cases Closed

N/A N/A

300 250

600 500

Efficiency Indicators: Time to Disposition (Average days) Average Caseload per Attorney

N/A N/A

45 250

60 300

Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Cases Disposed Within 90 Days Percentage of Cases Disposed Within 180 days Percentage of Cases with Positive Defense Outcome

N/A N/A N/A

85% 99% 30%

90% 98% 30%

Misdemeanor Trial Division Workload Indicators: Number of New Cases Opened Number of New Cases Closed

N/A N/A

300 250

600 500

Efficiency Indicators: Time to Disposition (Average days) Average Caseload per Attorney

N/A N/A

45 250

60 300

Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Cases Disposed Within 90 Days Percentage of Cases Disposed Within 180 days Percentage of Cases with Positive Defense Outcome

N/A N/A N/A

85% 99% 30%

90% 98% 30%

Mental Health – Civil Division Workload Indicators: Number of OPC’s Opened4 Number of Committed Proceedings

N/A N/A

3,800 550

3,800 550

Efficiency Indicators: Time to Disposition (Average days) Average Cases per Attorney

N/A N/A

30 1,900

30 1,900

3

Positive Defense Outcomes include; no bill by a grand jury, no filing of complaint, dismissal, charge reduction, acquittal, deferred adjudication or reversal on appeal. 4 OPC’s are “orders of protective custody” 57-3


FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of OPC’s Won/Dismissed/Discharged

N/A

83%

83%

Central Magistration Division Workload Indicators: Number of Cases Reviewed

N/A

6,000

6,000

Efficiency Indicators: Cases Presented to Magistrate

N/A

360

400

Effectiveness Indicators: Cases Release to treatment on Mental Health Bond

N/A

65%

70%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$677,001 6,456 27,329 24,453

$923,673 14,300 18,975 18,650

$942,066 14,300 18,113 11,424

$1,080,504 16,185 20,140 16,134

$735,239

$975,598

$985,903

$1,132,963 0

Program Change

$3,449 0

Total

$735,239

$975,598

$985,903

$1,136,412

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 15.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 14.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. During FY 2015-16, two Attorney’s II were transferred to the Public Defender’s Office from Probate Courts. All authorized positions are fully funded in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 13.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to an increase in local mileage for travel to and from Central 57-4


Magistration. Funding is also provided for travel to conferences such as the Rusty Duncan Advanced Criminal Law Conference, the American Bar Association Summit on Public Defense, and the Conference on Criminal Appeals. •

The Operational Expenses group increases by 11.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to an increase in fees for use of case management software utilized by the Public Defender’s Office.

The Supplies and Materials group increases significantly when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is mainly due to additional funding provided for toners for existing printers.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $3,449, as described below. •

The Office Supervisor (NE-08) is proposed to be reclassified to an Administrative Assistant (E-04) and receive a salary adjustment for a total cost of $3,449, including salary and benefits. This position now performs administrative activities related to preparation of the budget, compiles and maintains financial information, and assists the department head with preparation for meetings, conferences, and workshops.

Authorized Positions:

Chief Public Defender Assistant Public Defender I Assistant Public Defender II Assistant Public Defender III Attorney II* Administrative Assistant Office Supervisor Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Total - Public Defender's Office

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 3 2 1 0 0 1 1 1

1 3 1 2 2 0 1 1 1

1 3 1 2 2 1 0 1 1

10

12

12

*Two Attorney II’s were transferred from Probate Courts to the Public Defender's Office on May 9, 2016.

57-5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5044

PUBLIC WORKS – ANIMAL CONTROL SERVICES Mission:

The mission of the Public Works- Animal Control Services Department is to protect Public Health and Safety by administering and enforcing the Bexar County and State of Texas Animal Control and Rabies Control Laws and by educating Bexar County residents on animal control and rabies control issues.

Vision:

We envision the Public Works Department as the leader in developing and maintaining County bridges, and roads. The Public Works Department strives to ensure environmental compliance, fire safety, good working relationships, and high standards of professional management for Bexar County. The management and staff of our Department are facilitators in achieving a balance between diverse priorities and finite resources, by providing the public and other County offices, a thorough analysis, expert advice, prompt, reliable services, and open, honest communications related to the responsible allocation and utilization of Public Works Department services personnel and resources.

Goals and Objectives: • • • •

Quickly and completely investigate animal bites to humans that may involve rabies transmission. Pick up and quarantine animals who have bitten humans. Impound strays and aggressive stray domestic animals and cruelty animals. Accomplish these goals in an efficient, cost-effective manner.

Program Description:

The Bexar County Animal Control Services Department provides animal control services to residents living in the unincorporated areas of Bexar County. Employees of the Department will humanely capture, restrain, and transport loose and/or dangerous animals. The Animal Control Services Department also responds to animal cruelty cases.

Policy Consideration:

On July 21, 2015 Bexar County Commissioners Court approved the Inter-local Agreement between City of Kirby and Bexar County regarding the construction and operation of a combined animal care facility in the City of Kirby expected to be operational during FY 2016-17. The County contributed funding towards the construction of the animal shelter and agreed to provide a kennel manager, pay a pro-rata share of the cost of staffing and operations of the facility, and annual rabies quarantine for the facilities. The city will provide land for the construction of the shared facility, all necessary trade permits and required city inspections, access to public roads, utilities, and parking area, and the necessary staff to operate the shared facility. It is anticipated that the construction and operations of this animal care facility will eventually lead to reduced operational costs for Bexar County for Animal Control Services.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Number of Reported Aggressive Animals Number of Reported Strays

165 2,211 58-1

FY 2015-16 Estimate 210 2,300

FY 2016-17 Proposed 230 2,400


Number of Reported Bites Efficiency Indicators: Cost per Reported Aggressive Animal Cost per Reported Stray Cost per Reported Bite Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Reported Aggressive Animals Impounded Percentage of Reported Strays Impounded Percentage of Reported Bites Investigated

FY 2014-15 Actual 238

FY 2015-16 Estimate 250

FY 2016-17 Proposed 275

$325 $390 $715

$330 $400 $710

$275 $300 $475

85%

95%

95%

43% 100%

50% 100%

75% 100%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$191,705 3,074 119,477 12,482 46,001

$164,864 3,910 197,180 30,680 10,001

$160,142 3,910 132,704 16,629 0

$170,472 5,052 466,360 15,350 0

$372,739

$406,635

$313,385

$657,234 0

Program Change

$72,768 0

Total

$372,739

$406,635

$313,385

$730,002

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as described below. •

The Personnel Service group increases by 6.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to turnover experienced during FY 2015-16. All positions are fully funded in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for employees to attend State of Texas required training, training to get employees familiarized with equine handling, and training on the various aspects of dog handling. 58-2


The Operational Expenses group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed to provide the Animal Control Services Division with the appropriate resources to respond to animal cruelty calls. Additionally, funding is proposed for the operational expenses of the animal care facility in the City of Kirby expected to be operational at the beginning of FY 2017 in Precinct 4 as stated in the Inter-local Agreement with the City of Kirby. The cost for the Animal Care Facility expected to open in January 2017 is $336,600.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 7.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. One-time funding was allocated in FY 2015-16 for mounting equipment for a technician’s truck.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $72,768 as described below: •

The program change adds one Animal Shelter Manager (E-07) for a total cost of $72,768, which includes salary and benefits. This position will oversee the City of Kirby Animal Shelter as stipulated in the Inter-local Agreement. This position will be responsible for managing the shelter staff, shelter programs, physical facilities, and humane treatment of sheltered animals.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Animal Control Services Officer Animal Cruelty Officer Animal Shelter Manager Senior Animal Control Service Officer* Total – Public Works – Animal Control Services

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

3 1 0 0

3 0 0 1

3 0 1 1

4

4

5

* On February 8, 2016, the department requested to have the position re-titled from Animal Cruelty Officer to Senior Animal Control Service Officer.

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FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5041

PUBLIC WORKS – ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Mission: The mission of the Public Works Department is to preserve all County resources by providing efficient, cost effective services which ensures the safety, health and welfare of our customers and improve their quality of life.

Vision:

We envision the Public Works Department as the leader in developing and maintaining County bridges and roads. The Public Works Department strives to ensure environmental compliance, fire safety, good working relationships, and high standards of professional management for Bexar County. The management and staff of our Department are facilitators in achieving a balance between diverse priorities and finite resources, by providing the public and other County offices, a thorough analysis, expert advice, prompt, reliable services, and open, honest communications related to the responsible allocation and utilization of Public Works Department services personnel and resources.

Program Description:

The Environmental Services Department identifies and addresses environmental compliance issues (planned or unplanned), which may present a potential hazard to the County. These issues may include, but are not limited to, management and disposal of hazardous waste streams generated by County facilities, remediation of contamination at facilities, management of underground fuel storage tanks, health inspections, environmental assistance on capital projects, and representation of the County on local and civic environmental committees. This division acts as an Authorized Agent of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) to regulate, permit, and inspect installation of private on-site sewage facilities (OSSF) in Bexar County. In addition, this division administers and enforces the Nuisance Abatement Court Orders by investigating public complaints, properly notifying offenders, and monitoring removal of public nuisances. Environmental Services represents and promotes the County’s position on air and water quality issues, including implementation of control strategies in response to the non-attainment-deferred designation given by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). This division also represents the County on the Texas Clean Air Working Group. The Environmental Services Division implements EPA Phase II Storm Water rules for Bexar County to include development of the Storm Water Management program. It represents Bexar County on the Alamo Area Council of Governments Resources Reclamation Committee and the City of San Antonio River Quality Committee. This division reviews all proposed subdivision plats utilizing On-Site Sewage Facilities within Bexar County (including the City of San Antonio and suburban cities) to ensure the protection of public health and safety by determining suitability.

Policy Consideration:

In FY 2014-15, Bexar County contracted with the City of San Antonio to conduct the Camelot II Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) Pilot Program. For the past eight years, Bexar County had implemented various programs in an attempt to solve the illegal dumping problem in the Camelot II area. However, State Law prohibits a County from conducting a mandatory MSW program within a city’s Extraterritorial Jurisdiction. In effect, the City of San Antonio offered to partner with Bexar County to conduct the Camelot II MSW Pilot Program for the next three years. In the first year, the City of San Antonio, through an Inter-local agreement, provided initial cleanup of the existing illegally dumped materials, 4 Dial-aTrailer events, and a three person crew to allow for collection of materials outside of the cart. The second and third year of the Camelot II Pilot Program the services and rate provided under the 59-1


agreement are to be equal to City of San Antonio residents. The City of San Antonio provided waste collection once a week, curbside collection of brush and bulky materials twice a year, and access to the City of San Antonio’s brush and bulky collections and household hazardous waste drop off sites.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Nuisance Complaints Number of OSSF Inspections Number of Nuisance Inspections Efficiency Measures: Cost per Nuisance Complaint Cost per OSSF Inspection per FTE Cost per Nuisance Inspections Effectiveness Measures: Percentage of Nuisance Complaints Resolved Average Inspects Per Resolved Complaint Percentage of OSSF Inspections Successfully Installed Percentage of OSSF Successfully Installed

Appropriations:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2,171 2,598 5,245

2,050 2,300 5,650

2,000 2,400 5,700

$78 $53 $53

$75 $55 $55

$75 $55 $55

91% 7.5 100%

92% 8 100%

95% 7 100%

100%

100%

100%

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$266,034 946 174,469 18,252

$265,180 1,500 449,524 19,695

$273,388 1,500 249,755 16,580

$274,646 1,225 388,900 17,050

$459,701

$735,899

$541,223

$681,821 0

Program Change

$0 0

Total

$459,701

$735,899

$541,223

$681,821

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in the FY 2016-17. 59-2


The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group decreases by 18.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates based on the Department’s request. Funding for training and mileage is provided to allow staff to receive their certifications from the Texas Environmental Health Association, Texas On-Site Wastewater Association, and attend the Environmental Illegal Dumping Conference in Austin Texas.

The Operational Expenses group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to an increase in Contracted Services. Funding is provided for health inspections in the unincorporated area of the County to be performed by a contract vendor and for the second year of trash collection for the Camelot II Pilot Program by the City of San Antonio in the amount of $150,696.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 2.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to the decrease in prices for vehicle fuel during FY 2015-16. Funding is provided for vehicle fuel and uniform replacements for employees.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Environmental Engineer* Environmental Services Inspector Sanitarian I Sanitarian II Total – Public Works –Environmental Services

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 2 1

1 1 2 1

1 1 2 1

5

5

5

*The Environmental Engineer (E-11) position is funded 25% from the General Fund and 75% from the Storm Water Mitigation Fund.

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- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4301

PURCHASING Mission:

The Purchasing Department will pursue superior customer service and ensure customers know we have provided value and met or exceeded all their expectations and business requirements. Leadership within the Purchasing Department is committed to providing encouragement and support to each individual in the Department, to increase their knowledge of Purchasing best practices and continually striving to improve upon customer service provided and always representing Bexar County in a professional manner. Building customer relationships is vital to achieving the Purchasing Department goals. Goals are achieved by ensuring the customer is thoroughly supported, kept informed at all times, understanding expectations, meeting those expectations and managing the acquisition process.

Vision:

The Bexar County Purchasing Department is recognized for our exceptional results of collectively utilizing our knowledge of best practices in procurement, cost effective purchasing, value added service which leverages the County’s spending power and common work practices to deliver the best total value of acquisition and superior supplier performance.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • •

Purchase the proper goods and services to suit the business need. Obtain the best possible price for goods and services. Have goods and services available when and where they are needed. Insure a continuing supply of needed goods and services. Guard against any misappropriation of assets produced by Purchasing. Insure responsible bidders are given a fair opportunity to compete for Bexar County’s business by following statutory requirements for competitive bids and proposals and by Bexar County’s internal purchasing procedures. Insure public funds are safeguarded by confirming the best value is received for the public dollar. Insure public spending is not used to enrich Elected Officials or government employees, or to confer favors on favored constituents. Insure historically underutilized businesses (small, minority, and women-owned) have an equal opportunity in the contract awards process.

Program Description:

The Purchasing Agent, appointed by the Purchasing Appointment Board, supervises all purchases made by the County through competitive bids or proposals, and directly procures all supplies, equipment, and services, except real property and professional services. The Purchasing Agent also maintains the County's fixed assets inventory, transfers supplies, materials and equipment as necessary within the County, and disposes of surplus property by auction or competitive bid. An annual report is prepared and submitted to the Purchasing Appointment Board, which consists of three District Judges and two members of Commissioners Court. The Board has also designated the Purchasing Agent as the County’s Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Coordinator. Planning and coordinating the purchase of furniture, fixtures and equipment for major capital projects is the Purchasing Department’s responsibility, as well.

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Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Requisitions Purchase Orders Issued IFB/RFP Solicitations Issued Contracts Processed (New & Extended) Fixed & Controlled Assets Inventoried Purchasing Card Transactions Efficiency Measures: Number of Days to Process Informal Requisitions Number of Days to Process Formal Requisitions Assets Transferred Effectiveness Measures: Purchase Dollars Purchasing Card Dollars Revenue (Auction & Rebates) Cost Avoidance with Asset Transfers

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

13,897 11,206 47 72 61,578 4,081

13,248 10,204 60 85 63,493 4,702

13,000 9,286 65 100 65,192 5,419

5 122 1,874

4 120 2,469*

4 120 2,000

$257,159,350 $651,046 $0 $1,087,740

$336,865,414 $969,619 $0 $1,546,133*

$441,293,692 $745,382 $20,000 $1,200,000

*A large number of assets transferred from the AT&T Center due to the renovations that occurred during FY 2014-15.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials

$1,180,514 4,899 26,670 21,021

$1,134,072 33,163 109,715 20,744

$1,076,307 31,113 102,315 20,260

$1,147,131 11,999 73,278 18,760

Subtotal

$1,233,104

$1,297,694

$1,229,995

$1,251,168

Program Changes

$49,147 Total

$1,233,104

60-2

$1,297,694

$1,229,995

$1,300,315


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 5.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 6.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to turnover within the Purchasing Department that occurred during FY 201516.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group decreases significantly when compared to FY 201516 Estimates. This is primarily due to a one-time expense that was required during FY 2015-16 to pay off the countywide Travel Card balance from various Offices and Departments.

The Operational Expenses group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. In FY 2015-16, the Purchasing Department moved into a new facility and made onetime purchases of technology to be used in the training room.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 7.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to one-time purchases of Office Supplies and Computer Supplies in FY 2015-16.

There are three program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for a total cost of $47,774 as described below. •

The first program change adds one Receptionist (NE-01) position for a total cost of $46,377, including salary and benefits. The Purchasing Department moved into a new facility, which has a receptionist area at the entrance of the building. This new position is proposed to staff the reception area and provide customer service to incoming visitors.

The second program change reclassifies one Lead Fixed Asset Specialist (NE-06) to Fixed Asset Supervisor (NE-07) for a total cost of $2,770, including salary and benefits. There have been notable changes in the job scope and responsibilities of the position and this reclassification ensures that the position is graded and titled correctly as a result. New responsibilities include supervising employees and coordinating all auction activities associated with surplus property.

The third program change retitles three Procurement Data Analyst (NE-07) positions to Buyer (NE-07) at no cost. A new Purchasing Agent was hired in FY 2015-16. As a result, the new Purchasing Agent requested that the position titles of these three employees match the job duties being performed, which consists primarily of processing purchase orders.

60-3


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Buyer Buyer/Contract Specialist Contract Manager Fixed Asset Specialist Fixed Asset Supervisor Lead Fixed Asset Specialist Procurement Card Specialist Procurement Data Analyst Purchasing Agent Purchasing Assistant Project Lead Purchasing Project Lead Receptionist Senior Contract Specialist Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Purchasing Department

60-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 4 1 2 0 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 1

0 4 1 2 0 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 1

3 4 1 2 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1

16

16

17


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 2500-2503, 2505-2508, 2598, 2599

SHERIFF - ADULT DETENTION CENTER Mission: To deliver detention services and conduct operations to maintain the proper well-being of

incarcerated men and women, provide a safe environment to the staff, inmates and public within the facility, and remain fiscally responsible and accountable to the citizens of Bexar County. To provide an environment for incarcerated persons in which correction of behavior is possible if the individual so desires, through innovative programs. Such an environment shall include the protection of the incarcerated person from victimization within the facility. To provide an environment for incarcerated men and women that maintains the appropriate due process and constitutional level of confinement. To set and uphold professional standards for all staff by the recruitment, development and retention of a competent, stable, and motivated workforce dedicated to excellence. To provide information to the courts, upon request, to ensure proper decisions are reached during the sentencing phase.

Vision:

The Bexar County Adult Detention Center envisions a fully staffed modern system consisting of a multi-complex 4,563 bed facility compliant with Federal and State mandates; providing innovative programs to incarcerated men and women; a safe and secure environment for staff; the incarcerated, volunteers, and general public, through the efficient management of resources implementation of technology and continuous assessment of operational processes to maintain effectiveness and fiscal responsibility and accountability.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • •

To provide a safe and secure environment for inmates, staff and public. To maintain compliance with the Texas Commission on Jail Standards. To efficiently operate and staff 4,563 rated bed capacity multi-complex facility. To aggressively recruit, retain, and train staff. To expand inmate visitation hours through the implementation of remote video visitation.

Program Description: The Bexar County Sheriff is the chief law enforcement officer of the county

and responsible for leading the organization and properly managing resources for the custodial care of incarcerated men and women. The Sheriff appoints a Jail Administrator to supervise, direct, and control the daily operation of the adult detention system that includes a Main Jail and Annex facilities rated with a combined 4,563 bed capacity. The Detention Division operates 24 hours per day, 365 days per year and administers services in accordance with the Texas Commission on Jail Standards (TCJS). Functions and activities include providing a safe and secure environment for all incarcerated men and women, staff, and the public, fingerprint, photograph, and processing all inmates in accordance with State mandates. Properly store and account for all inmate property for safekeeping. Provide trained and certified staff to administer proper supervision of all inmates within the facilities. Provide nutritious meals, sanitary clothing, bedding and living environment to all incarcerated men and women. Provide a law library, rehabilitative programs, and recreation to incarcerated men and women. Deliver privileged and non-privileged inmate correspondence. To utilize an effective classification system that maximizes the utilization of inmate beds to make the appropriate housing assignments while maintaining the safety and security of the facilities. Manage work programs that reduce the costs associated with maintaining the detention facilities. Provide incarcerated men and women the opportunity to retain employment to 61-1


meet financial obligations related to child support and court fines. Maintain standards in accordance with the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Provide cost avoidance services through Jail Industries using inmate labor to work on County owned properties.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Work Load Indicators: Total Number of Inmates Booked Total Number of Inmates Released Authorized Bed Capacity

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

56,267 56,513 4,563

54,000 54,300 4,563

56,879 56,795 4,563

Efficiency Indicators: Average Daily Inmate Population Average Daily Number of Bookings Average Number of Daily Releases

3,807 154 155

3,574 147 148

3,678 156 156

Effectiveness Indicators: TCJS Citations for Non-Compliance

0

0

0

Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel and Remunerations Operational Expense Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$55,131,182 36,589 4,249,214 1,411,414 288,355

$54,983,587 34,285 4,150,812 1,812,947 334,775

$55,093,689 34,297 4,067,522 1,810,747 327,754

$54,888,188 36,669 4,305,729 1,449,124 66,707

$61,116,754

$61,316,406

$61,334,009

$60,746,417

Program Change

$0 Total

$61,116,754

$61,316,406

$61,334,009

$60,746,417

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to the FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. In FY 2016-17, $250,000 is budgeted for overtime per the Collective Bargaining Agreement with the Deputy Sheriff’s Association of Bexar County.

61-2


The Travel and Remunerations group increases by 6.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Training funds are provided for certifications, professional development, and conferences related to jail management.

The Operational Expense group increases by 5.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is primarily due to an anticipated increase in the amount budgeted for inmate meals. This cost is driven by inmate population in the Adult Detention Center, which for FY 2016-17 is estimated to average 3,678 per day, an increase of 2.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 20.0 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding was provided for the purchase of clear mattresses and covers in FY 2015-16, which will not be required in FY 2016-17.

The Capital Expenditures group provides funding for the replacement of one soft mount washer and two natural gas dryers in the amount of $66,707.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes two program changes at no cost. •

The first program change re-titles one MATCH/PATCH Technician to Re-Entry Technician. This re-title is recommended to standardize position titles associated with the Re-Entry Center Countywide.

The second program change re-titles one MATCH/PATCH Coordinator to Re-Entry Coordinator. This re-title is recommended to standardize position titles associated with the Re-Entry Center Countywide.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actuals Adult Detention Assistant Jail Administrator^ Clerk Deputy Chief - Administration & Accreditation Standards^ Deputy Chief Assistant Jail Administrator^ Deputy Chief Jail Administrator Deputy Sheriff - Detention Deputy Sheriff - Detention Corporal Deputy Sheriff - Detention Sergeant Deputy Sheriff - Detention Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff - Detention Captain Deputy Sheriff - Detention -Mail Courier Deputy Sheriff - Detention -Special Management Escort Deputy Sheriff - Detention Lt. -Special Operations Unit

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1 1 1 0 1 650 131 58 14 7 1 5 1

FY 2015-16 Estimate 0 0 0 2 1 650 131 55 17 7 1 5 1

FY 2016-17 Proposed 0 0 0 2 1 650 131 55 17 7 1 5 1

..............

...............


FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

G.E.D. Instructor* Inmate Booking Clerk Inmate Disciplinary Technician Inmate Human/Education Services Supervisor Jail Programs Manager Jail Support Services Supervisor Librarian Library Clerk Mail Courier^ Mailroom Supervisor Manager of Jail Services & Programs MATCH/PATCH Coordinator MATCH/PATCH Technician Office Assistant II Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Paralegal Librarian Prison Rape Elimination Act Coordinator Processing Clerk^ Re-Entry Coordinator Re-Entry Technician Security Monitor Security Monitor II* Senior Administrative Supervisor Services & Programs Supervisor Video Visitation Supervisor^ Subtotal - Adult Detention

2 2 1 2 1 0 1 2 4 1 0 1 1 2 1 4 1 1 4 0 0 10 2 1 0 0 915

2 2 1 0 0 1 1 2 4 1 1 1 1 3 1 4 1 1 4 0 0 10 2 0 1 1 915

2 2 1 0 0 1 1 2 4 1 1 0 0 3 1 4 1 1 4 1 1 10 2 0 1 1 915

Inmate, Banking, & Laundry Banking Supervisor Business Office Operations Supervisor Clothing/Property Supervisor Clothing/Property Technician Inmate Banking Clerk Laundry Supervisor Laundry Technician Senior Clothing/Property Supervisor Subtotal - Inmate, Banking, & Laundry

5 1 3 15 13 1 5 0 43

5 1 3 15 13 1 5 1 44

5 1 3 15 13 1 5 1 44

Grand Total - Sheriff's Adult Detention Center

958

959

959

61-4


*One GED Instructor and one Security Monitor II is frozen. ^Out of cycle program changes: Added one Video Visitation Supervisor in May of 2016. Retitled Assistant Jail Administrator and Deputy Chief - Administration and Accreditation Standards to Deputy Chief Assistant Jail Administrator in FY 2015-16.

61-5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 2001, 2002, 2006, 2007, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2099, 2101, 2199, 2200, 2205, 2300, 2400, 2401, 2406

SHERIFF’S OFFICE - LAW ENFORCEMENT Mission:

To ensure the public safety and security for the citizens of Bexar County. To accept, register and thoroughly investigate all complaints of alleged misconduct by all Sheriff’s Office employees, and to provide equal and fair investigations. To support the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office and its duties by providing timely, accurate and transparent communications to the citizens of Bexar County. To conduct competent investigations in order to enforce the law efficiently and impartially while protecting lives, property, and the rights of all people and developing strong community partnerships to improve the quality of life for the citizens of Bexar County and those entrusted in our care. To maintain the highest standards of vigilance in security matters and integrity in daily practices and provide a professional, trained, skilled, effective, and compassionate response to the execution of mental health related court ordered processes. To work as an equal partner with the community to reduce crime and the fear of crime, reduce fatality crashes, protect children in school zones, combat gang violence, and to improve the quality of life in our community. To serve as the critical communications link between the citizen and public safety services. To provide training and education to the full-time and reserve deputies and civilians of the Sheriff’s Office, supported by the administrative policies and procedures necessary for the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office to meet its mission of ensuring public safety and security for the citizens of Bexar County. To provide superior, efficient and cost effective service to all State Criminal Courts, County Criminal Courts, Magistrate Courts and Probate Courts and to pursue and apprehend fugitives from justice in Bexar County, across the State of Texas and the United States of America. To provide prompt delivery of civil process from the State District Courts, County Courts, Probate Courts and all other courts in Bexar County, Texas.

Vision:

To be the benchmark agency for professional, efficient and effective law enforcement, detention and jail services. To ensure employees of the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office are held to a high standard of conduct and integrity in order to preserve the essential relationship of trust and confidence within the community. To maintain a professional communications organization, which provides timely, effective and transparent communication with the citizens of Bexar County, Sheriff’s Office employees, and other stakeholders. To provide the citizens and law enforcement of Bexar County access to publicly available Sheriff’s Office Records, in a professional and efficient manner while protecting and storing all records. To provide the highest quality of investigative services to the community and other law enforcement agencies. To incorporate training and technology to prepare for incidents in and around County facilities for which it is responsible for and will decrease further by securing transportation of prisoners to court, with greater comfort and dignity. Committed to the prevention of crime and the protection of life and property, the preservation of peace, order and safety, the enforcement of laws, and the safeguarding of constitutional guarantees. Use information and communications technology effectively to advance the Public Safety Communications Center’s (Dispatch/911 Emergency) business vision and to enable and support flexible, responsive, and innovative public service. To be the benchmark Sheriff’s Office Training and Policy Division within the State of Texas. To work in conjunction with all law enforcement agencies to apprehend the individual whom is wanted for a crime and make our community a safer place to live. To provide professional and expedient civil process to the court system and citizens of Bexar County.

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Goals and Objectives: Administration: • Provide vigorous preventative and enforcement activities • Provide a safe and secure environment for inmates, staff and public • Maintain compliance with the Texas Commission on Jail Standards • Ensure requests for service from citizens are dispatched promptly and that public safety responders are provided the necessary tactical and operational support to carry out their assigned duties • Ensure safety and security of the civilians, judges, employees, and inmates within the County Courts-at-Law, District Courts, Presiding Courts, Magistrate Courts and Juvenile Courts of the Courthouse, Justice Center and Juvenile Justice Professional Standards and Integrity: • Receive complaints and concerns regarding Officers • Ensure all citizen complaints are handled in all alleged misconduct • Promote employee excellence by investigation of alleged misconduct • Promote community confidence in the Sheriff’s Office • Ensure fair, impartial, and equal investigation of alleged employee misconduct Communications and Public Information: • Provide information to the public regarding the Sheriff’s Office activities • Inform Sheriff’s Office employees with news and helpful information to help them better understand the mission and goals of the Sheriff’s Office and to do their jobs • Assess and manage issues that will affect the reputation of the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office and advise on strategies and tactics Records Management: • To preserve and protect all Sheriff’s Office documents required for archive • Provide 24 hour turn around for criminal history and photographic (mug shot) requests from outside agencies, (i.e., District Attorney’s Office, Texas Department of Criminal Justice Parole Division, Untied States Adult Probation Department) • Provide one hour turnaround for requests for criminal histories and photographs (mug shots) for law enforcement agencies • Provide immediate response for telephone requests for inmate information • Provide 48 hour turnaround for data entry of offense and assignment reports generated by Patrol and Detention Division staff into the County mainframe computer Criminal Investigations Division: • Commitment to service and providing the highest quality of investigative services to the community and other law enforcement agencies • Recognize the individual needs of people: conduct investigations efficiently and impartially while protecting lives, property and the rights of all people

62-2


• • • •

Be responsive to community needs by implementing strong community partnerships through enforcement, educational and crime preventive programs to improve the quality of life for the citizens of Bexar County Efficient utilization of resources by providing quality services in the most efficient and cost effective manner Meeting the challenges of the future by providing the highest quality of service with the use of technological advancements, continued training and efficient use of resources Commitment to employees by providing good working conditions, proper training and resources to perform their assigned duties

Court Services Division: • To ensure safety and security of the civilians, judges, employees, and inmates within the County Courts-at-Law, District Courts, Presiding Courts, Magistrate Courts and Juvenile Courts of the Courthouse, Justice Center and Juvenile Justice • To apply proactive crime prevention procedures to deter crime at all Bexar County Judicial Buildings. • Maintain officer readiness availability to respond to any incidents that may jeopardize security and safety at all County facilities • Maintain security of 1.5 detention holdover in the Justice Center for the protection of inmates • Provide safe and secure transportation of inmates to and from court in the Justice Center, Courthouse, Juvenile Justice Center, Federal Courts, and City Magistrate Courts • Provide immediate law enforcement response to incidents and calls of service to any incident occurring at facilities or properties controlled or owned by Bexar County in the inner city • Assist the public in and around the Bexar County facilities in a manner as to reflect the highest professionalism and compassion possible • Provide the courts with the conduit through which to process service and paperwork to and from the Sheriff’s Office • Through the use of technology and training, develop a security plan to be put in place in the event of emergencies or disaster • Maintain an efficient "Emergency Response Team (E.R.T.) team capable of responding to any emergency situation that threatens the security of the Judges, employees, civilians and inmates of all County facilities • Oversee daily operating and activities of the Mental Health Unit Patrol: • Providing vigorous preventative and enforcement activities • Providing quality and equitable services in the most efficient and cost effective manner and by treating each citizen with the highest respect and courtesy • Obtaining community cooperation by establishing and maintaining a meaningful and productive partnership with citizens to resolve community problems and improve the quality of life • Recognizing that our neighborhoods/communities must be involved to control crime Public Safety Communications: • Answering 9-1-1, non-emergency, and other calls for service from citizens in the most professional manner possible while doing so as effectively as possible

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• • • • • •

Ensuring that requests for service from citizens are dispatched promptly and that public safety responders are provided the necessary tactical and operational support to carry out their assigned duties Ensuring that criminal justice information is entered, validated and safeguarded through the training of staff, development of policies, and by using appropriate physical and technical security Providing responsive user, hardware, and system support for deployed public safety communications platforms such as but not limited to the City of San Antonio / Bexar County Radio System, CAD System, and Mobile Data Systems Providing public safety communications technology training to empower users, improve business processes, and reduce operational downtime Acting as an internal technology consultant to Executive Staff to identify public safety communications technology internal / external dependencies as they independently develop and implement their respective operational / business plans Improving short term and long term public safety technology strategic planning to enhance business process automation and reduce technology stagnation

Training and Policy: • Provide well-trained and effective Detention Officers, law enforcement Deputies, and Telecommunicators to the Sheriff’s Office • Provide well-written and defensible policies and procedures for the Sheriff’s Office • Provide efficient and dignified Honor Guard support to the Sheriff’s Office • Provide a well-trained and effective Sheriff’s Reserve Division to the Sheriff’s Office • Meet or exceed all standards and requirements of the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement in regards to the training and education of peace officers, detention officers, and Telecommunicators employed by the Sheriff’s Office Judicial Services and Warrants: • Track, locate and arrest violent and non-violent criminal fugitives from justice • Provide services to the courts by entering active fugitive warrants into local, state and national databases expeditiously, accurately and efficiently • Providing cost-effective extradition services for fugitives apprehended outside of Bexar County and the State of Texas • Conduct research on fugitives to reduce man-hours and provide a higher arrest rate when tracking individuals Civil: • To improve the services (delivery) of civil documents • To use manpower effectively and efficiently • To expand on Civil process service during yearly in-service and continuing training • To allocate the resources available and utilize them to maximize performance

Program Description:

Administration: Provides leadership and direction to operational and support units to effectively and efficiently achieve the mission and objectives of the Sheriff’s Office.

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Professional Standards and Integrity: This section investigates all citizen complaints and alleged charges of misconduct, assists public with general information, articulates to citizens when alleged misconduct is proper conduct per Policy and Procedure, investigates all complaints from Inmates of the Detention Facility, reports findings to the Sheriff and Division Administrators, initiate investigations, serve Administrative Orders (e.g., Administrative Leave, Proposal for Dismissal, Order of Dismissal, Fitness for Duty, etc.), coordinates with Federal Authorities on any activity identified as a Civil Rights Violation being investigated by them, coordinates and works with Patrol and other Divisions during emergency situations, operates and oversees random drug testing under the Collective Barging Agreement, prepares case jackets for open records requests, District Attorney and Subpoena Duces Tecum, and maintains personnel records such as attendance and worker’s compensation. Communications and Public Information: This section provides information to the public regarding Sheriff’s Office activities. This division informs Sheriff’s Office employees with news and helpful information to help them better understand the mission and goals of Sheriff’s Office. This section monitors and responds to all inquiries from the public regarding Sheriff’s Office activities and distributes the inquiry to the appropriate division. This section also produces an Annual Report to the citizens of Bexar County. This section also provides content and maintains the Sheriff’s Office public website and social media channels. Central Records: This section responds to requests for offense, assignment, and crash reports from the public and criminal justice agencies, as well as requests for criminal histories and inmate photographs (mug shots) from media outlets and criminal justice agencies. This section operates and manages the LiveScan/AFIS (Automated Fingerprint Identification System) and all arrest reporting systems. This section responds to telephone requests for inmate information from all customers. This section performs data entry and archives offense and assignment reports generated by the Patrol and Detention. It also produces and disseminates the mandatory Uniform Crime Report to the Texas Department of Public Safety. This section processes fingerprints for all internal and external departmental applicants (i.e. general public, in house volunteers, contractors, and medical staff). This section provides after-hours and weekend warrant creation and support. This section also investigates claims of Identity Theft and report findings to the District Attorney and the Texas Department of Public Safety. This section also processes background checks for applicants. Criminal Investigations: This section is responsible for the initiation and follow-up investigation of crimes committed against persons and property to the unincorporated areas in Bexar County. Criminal Investigations include Homicide, Burglary, Auto Theft, General Investigations, Polygraph, Crime Scene, Property/Evidence Storage, Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS), Computer Crimes, Special Crimes/Intelligence, Sex Offender Registration, Narcotics, and Asset Seizure. The investigative section is responsible for on-scene investigation, interviewing witness and suspects, working with other law enforcement and social agencies, case preparation for prosecution, and testifying in court. The other specialized operations include surveillance and covert activity, tracking habitual offenders, tracking sex offenders, undercover and covert operations, and evidence collection, handling, and storage. Court Services: This section assigns Deputies as mandated by State statute, transports all inmates from the Adult Detention Center to all courts as mandated by court orders, operates the 1.5 detention holdover cell in 62-5


an efficient, safe manner that complies with the Texas Commission on Jail Standards, maintains the Communications Dispatch Center for the Court Services Division, summons all Bexar County Sheriff’s Office Deputies for court appearance, administers the security surveillance monitor initiative at all entrances to judicial buildings, and provides basic law enforcement services in the central sector of the inner city. Patrol Services: This section is the largest Law Enforcement division, both in terms of staffing and operational responsibilities, in the Sheriff’s Office. Patrol is responsible for basic law enforcement services including aggressive traffic /DWI enforcement to residents in the unincorporated areas of the County, developing community programs designed to reduce crime, developing effective coordinated enforcement strategies to curb alcohol related offenses and working with the community to develop lasting, working relationships to improve quality of life issues. Patrol uses innovative technological solutions to enhance responsiveness to the community, gathers meaningful quantitative data to identify trends and patterns useful in the reduction of traffic accident fatalities, implements strategic partnerships with local intervention programs to better help victims of crime, trains citizens to be the “eyes and ears” of law enforcement. Patrol also develops coordinated strategies with other public safety agencies to identify and combat homeland security issues. Public Safety Communications: This section provides quality customer service to citizens calling for assistance, uses innovative technology solutions to enhance our responsiveness to the community, gather meaningful quantitative data to identify trends and patterns useful in deployment of operational resources, trains all personnel accessing the Texas Crime Information Center (TCIC), National Crime Information Center (NCIC), Texas Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (TLETS), National Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (NLETS) systems in their use as well as TCIC/NCIC policy and procedures, enters all Protective Orders, Missing Persons, Stolen Vehicles, and Guns into Texas Crime Information Center (TCIC) and National Crime Information Center (NCIC) and performs all Wanted Person/Stolen Vehicle Hit Confirmations, validates monthly all Protective Order, Missing Person, Stolen Vehicle, and Gun Record, provides Tier 1 and limited Tier 2 support for all public safety communications and technology hardware platforms in use within the Sheriff’s Office 24/7, manages, monitors, maintains, and troubleshoots multiple systems not directly supported by Bexar County Information Technology such as but not limited to the City/County Radio System, (CAD), and Mobile Data Systems, develops and manages E-Sheriff initiatives, improves technical support and planning services by informally drafting subject matter experts with appropriate technology skills to provide direct support to specialized projects within their respective Division/Section. Training and Policy: This section includes four branches, which include Sheriff’s Academy, Policy and Plans, Sheriff’s Honor Guard, and Sheriff’s Reserve. The Sheriff’s Academy provides initial licensing training for all newly hired Detention Officers, Patrol orientation, initial licensing training for Telecommunicators, and continuing education courses for employees. The Policy and Plans Branch collaborates with other division leaders to establish goals, objectives and policies for the management of the Sheriff’s Office and implementation of these policies and plans. The Sheriff’s Honor Guard represents the Sheriff’s Office and County of Bexar at major ceremonial events at the local, State, and National level and presents the colors at governmental and memorial events and other community-based events, adding dignity and ceremony to events. The Sheriff’s Reserve provides a highly-trained and well-equipped group of licensed peace officers who volunteer hours of service to augment various Sheriff’s Office functions, 62-6


provides Deputies other sections to conduct extraditions, warrants, transports, and other law enforcement functions. Judicial Services and Warrants: This section pursues and apprehends all criminal fugitives by arrest or extradition from other law enforcement agencies, transports fugitives in a safe and cost-effective manner back to Adult Detention Center to await disposition by the court, enters and researches fugitive warrants issued by the courts into local, state and national databases, provides validation of warrants already entered into the databases to insure that the most current information on the fugitive is available to law enforcement agencies, and returns executed warrants to the court for disposition. Civil: This section of the Sheriff’s Office services the courts of Bexar County to serve all civil process. This includes citations, executions, orders of sales, writs, child attachments, Commissioner Court sales, subpoenas, tax sales, Attorney General documents. The section maintains an accurate maintenance of attempted service as well as documents served. All civil process is performed and served by professional Law Enforcement Deputies of the Sheriff’s Office.

Performance Indicators: Workload Indicators: Number of Patrol CAD Incidents Number of Minor Complaints – PSI Number of Media Requests for Information Number of Criminal History Processed (Bookings) Number of Offenses – CID Number of Inmate Transports – Court Services Number of Emergency Detentions Total 9-1-1 Calls Answered - PSCC Number of Basic Jailer Course (courses/students) Number of Fugitive Warrants Executed Number of Subpoenas Received Number of Total Emergency Detention Transports Efficiency Indicators: Average Response Time – Emergency Incidents (Minutes) Minor Complaints Handled per PSI Investigator Number of Cases Carried Over – CID Percentage of Total Emergency Detentions Completed Average Speed of Answer – 9-1-1 Calls (Seconds) Percentage of Detention Cadets Graduating (Target-90%) Fugitive Warrants entered per Clerk (8) Average Subpoena Served per Deputy (25)

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FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

196,425 327 9,324 62,758 41,905 62,434 279 157,792 6/144 5,302 22,788 20

211,704 268 9,324 61,903 43,581 66,180 306 162,526 8/155 5,553 21,513 30

226,523 308 9,400 60,756 45,324 64,307 319 178,526 9/180 5,553 21,513 33

11:36 65 21,601

10:40 54 22,681

10:35 62 23,815

100%

100%

100%

13

12

11

98% 5,107 912

98% 4,883 861

98% 4,883 861


FY 2014-15 Actual Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Patrol CAD Incidents – Deputy Initiated Activity Percentage of Investigations Completed within Collective Bargaining Agreement 180 Day Period Request for Criminal History Data (Turnaround) Percent Change in Cases Carried Over – CID Number of Adult Inmates/Defendants Transported per Deputy Percentage of 9-1-1 Calls Answered <10 seconds Percentage of Extradited Fugitives Percentage of Subpoenas Served

Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

46%

49%

50%

100% 24 hours -

100% 24 hours -3%

100% 24 hours 5%

4,458 53% 100% 51%

4,729 63% 100% 50%

4,593 66% 100% 50%

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$54,783,333 412,082 2,693,614 2,137,259 312,649

$56,157,089 446,042 2,561,376 2,531,247 650,685

$57,500,381 397,715 2,717,819 2,103,478 639,120

$57,115,424 470,353 2,579,050 2,195,931 455,698

$60,338,937

$62,346,439

$63,358,513

$62,816,456

Program Change

$996,085 Total

$60,338,937

$62,346,439

$63,358,513

$63,812,541

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions within Law Enforcement Division.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 18.3 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for public safety training and other required training for each division within Law Enforcement, with most of the funding being provided for Court Services, Mental Health, Patrol, CID, and Warrants.

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The Operational Expenses group decreases by 5.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates primarily due to a decrease in the Technology Improvement Fee and Repairs and Maintenance for Computer Hardware accounts. These decreases were requested by the Sheriff’s Office.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 4.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, which is primarily due to vehicle fuel, ammunition, and uniforms. Although gas prices have remained low in FY 2015-16, it is anticipated fuel costs will increase slightly in the upcoming fiscal year. Uniforms for cadets, which were previously budgeted in the Adult Detention Center Division, are also now funded in the Law Enforcement Division.

The Capital Expenditures group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for replacement of vehicle attachments ($73,424), the replacement of handheld metal detectors ($2,000), two Lektriver cabinets ($89,868), 184 Tasers ($203,929), 25 SERT vests ($22,650), and 25 body armor vests ($63,827).

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes nine program changes for a total cost of $996,085 as described below: •

The first program authorizes and funds three Deputy Sheriff – Law Enforcement Sergeant (LE-06) for the Patrol Section for a total cost of $314,868, which includes salary and benefits, technology ($1,935), and equipment ($19,581). These positions will provide additional supervisory coverage in the Patrol Section, specifically increasing the number of Sergeants on the second shift from four to six. This will improve the span of control for each Patrol District.

The second program change authorizes and funds two Extradition Coordinators (NE-08) for the Warrants Section within Judicial Services for a total cost of $110,801, which includes salary and benefits. The addition of two civilian Extradition Coordinators will allow the Sheriff’s Office to reassign two uniformed officers, who currently handle desk duties, back to the Fugitive Apprehension Unit as a second shift Pick-Up Team.

The third program change authorizes and funds fifty percent of one Deputy Sheriff – Law Enforcement Lieutenant Special Projects (LE-08) for the Patrol Section for a total cost of $59,794, which includes salary and benefits, technology ($1,290), and equipment ($6,527). The Sheriff’s Office currently has a Patrol Lieutenant assigned “part-time” to overseeing and implementing special projects including but not limited to fleet, body camera implementation, and Records Management System implementation. This new position will take over the incumbent’s responsibilities related to Patrol, and allow the current Lieutenant to handle special projects full-time. The remaining fifty percent of the position will be funded in the Capital Improvement Fund for a total cost of $51,977.

The fourth program change authorizes and funds five Deputy Sheriff – Law Enforcement Officers (LE-03) in the Public Safety Communications Center for a total cost of $340,447, which includes salaries, benefits, and equipment ($5,900). These positions will provide security for the Bexar Metro Quarry Run Regional Emergency Operations Center (REOC), which will now house Bexar County’s Public Safety Communications Section. Bexar

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County entered into a contract with Bexar Metro 911 stipulating that, in lieu of rent and maintenance and operational costs, Bexar County would provide 24x7x365 security for the facility. These positions will fulfill that requirement. •

The fifth program change authorizes and funds two Public Safety Communications Supervisors (E-06) in the Public Safety Communications section, for a total cost of $140,763, which includes salary, benefits, and technology ($3,067). These positions supervise the Public Safety Communications Dispatchers and Operators. These new positions will add additional supervisory coverage in the Dispatch Center and begin to provide coverage during the weekend, which is currently handled by Dispatcher II’s.

The sixth program change adds one Terminal Agency Coordinator (NE-06) and deletes one Public Safety Operator (NE-05) in the Public Safety Communications section, for a total cost of $4,022, which includes salary and benefits. The Terminal Agency Coordinator will be the single point of accountability for all communication and compliance issues with respect to TLETS/NLETS dependent TCIC/NCIC access privileges.

The seventh program change adds one Office Assistant III (NE-03) and deletes one Office Assistant II (NE-02) in the Training, Planning, and Policy Section for a total cost of $2,831, which includes salary and benefits. In addition to current duties, this position will now be assigned with budget preparation, assisting with special projects, verifying invoices and authorizing vendor payments.

The eighth program change reclassifies four Public Safety Communications Supervisors from an E-05 to an E-06 for a total cost of $18,136, which includes salary and benefits. This program change is necessary to alleviate salary compression issues resulting from livable wage adjustments to the Non-Exempt Pay Table and career ladder changes approved in recent fiscal years.

The ninth program change reclassifies one Public Safety Communications Assistant Manager from an E-06 to an E-07 for a total cost of $4,423, which includes salary and benefits. This program change is necessary to alleviate salary compression issues resulting from livable wage adjustments to the Non-Exempt Pay Table and career ladder changes approved in recent fiscal years.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actuals Administration Administrative Assistant Chief Deputy Deputy Sheriff - Detention Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement

1 1 1 1 62-10

FY 2015-16 Estimate

1 1 1 1

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1


FY 2014-15 Actuals Office Assistant II* Office Assistant IV Sheriff

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Subtotal - Administration

2 1 1 8

2 1 1 8

2 1 1 8

Professional Standards & Integrity (PSI) Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Sergeant PSI Deputy Sheriff Law Enforcement Sergeant Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Lieutenant Office Assistant IV Subtotal - PSI

2 3 1 1 7

2 3 1 1 7

2 3 1 1 7

Subtotal - PIO

1 1 1 3

1 1 1 3

1 1 1 3

Central Records Clerk Digital Imaging Specialist Fingerprint Examiner* Manager ID & Records Records/Identifications Clerk*^ Records/Identifications Supervisor Subtotal - Central Records

2 2 12 1 41 5 63

2 2 12 1 41 5 63

2 2 12 1 41 5 63

Criminal Investigations Crime Victim Liaison Crime Intelligence Analyst Deputy Chief - Criminal Investigations Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff Law Enforcement Sergeant Deputy Sheriff LE Investigator Evidence Receipt Clerk Latent Print Examiner Office Assistant I Office Assistant III Subtotal - Criminal Investigations

1 0 1 30 3 9 45 3 1 1 4 98

1 1 1 30 3 9 47 3.5 1 1 4 101.5

1 1 1 30 3 9 47 3.5 1 1 4 101.5

Public Information Office (PIO) Change Management Specialist Chief Communications Officer Office Assistant III

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FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Court Services Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement^ Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff -Law Enforcement Sergeant Office Assistant IV Security Monitor Subtotal - Court Services

126 1 5 2 1 135

128 1 6 2 1 138

128 1 6 2 1 138

Patrol Deputy Chief - Patrol Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Captain Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff - LE Lieutenant Special Projects** Deputy Sheriff Law Enforcement Sergeant Evidence Receipt Clerk Fleet Technician GIS Analyst Office Assistant III Records/Identifications Clerk Subtotal - Patrol

1 223 3 8 0 19 1 0 1 2 1 259

1 223 3 8 0 19 0 1 1 2 1 259

1 223 3 8 1 22 0 1 1 2 1 263

Public Safety Communication Center (PSCC) Administrative Clerk I Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Operations Supervisor - Patrol Division Public Safety Communications Manager Public Safety Communications Supervisor Public Safety Dispatcher I Public Safety Dispatcher II* Public Safety Operator Technical Support Specialist IV Terminal Agency Coordinator Subtotal - PSCC

2 0 1 1 4 21 11 11 2 0 53

2 0 1 1 4 21 11 16 2 0 58

2 5 1 1 6 21 11 15 2 1 65

1 2 1 1

1 2 1 1

1 2 1 1

Training, Policy & Planning Deputy Chief - Training, Plans & Standardization Deputy Sheriff - Detention Deputy Sheriff - Detention - Instructor Deputy Sheriff - Detention Corporal 62-12


FY 2014-15 Actuals Deputy Sheriff - Detention Sergeant Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Sergeant Office Assistant II Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Subtotal - Training, Policy & Planning

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 11 1 1 0 1 21

2 11 1 1 0 1 21

2 11 1 0 1 1 21

Subtotal - Cadets

50 50

50 50

50 50

Judicial Services Criminal Warrants Processor Deputy Chief - Court Security & Judicial Services Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Captain Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Lieutenant Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement Sergeant Extradition Coordinator Office Assistant II Office Assistant III Office Assistant IV Office Supervisor Records/Identifications Clerk Subtotal - Judicial Services

5 1 64 1 1 4 0 1 8 1 2 1 89

5 1 64 1 1 4 0 1 8 1 2 1 89

5 1 64 1 1 4 2 1 8 1 2 1 91

Grand Total - Sheriff's Law Enforcement

786

797.5

810.5

Cadets Deputy Sheriff - Detention Cadet

*Two Office Assistant II (Administration), one Fingerprint Examiner (Central Records), five Records/Identifications Clerks (Central Records), one Public Safety Dispatcher II (PSCC) are frozen. ** The Lieutenant Special Projects is funded 50% General Fund and 50% Capital Improvement Fund ^Out of cycle program changes: Added two Deputy Sheriff - Law Enforcement MHU in Court Services. Note: A Security Monitor II was corrected to be authorized in Adult Detention Center.

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- FUND: 100

ACCOUNTING UNIT: 2702-2706

SHERIFF’S OFFICE - SUPPORT SERVICES Mission: To support Public Safety through effective oversight and implementation of human resource

services to the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office. To be progressive in their abilities to provide superior service, increase productivity, implement procedures that are cost effective, and provide leadership in the allocation and disbursement of county funds. To provide professional delivery and professional management of all requested supplies, to manage effectively, and to meet and exceed the challenges of an ever changing supply environment. To improve staff efficiency and increase productivity through the research, planning, acquisition, implementation and support of applicable technologies and to support Public Safety through effective oversight and implementation of human resource services to the Bexar County’s Sheriff’s Office.

Vision:

To excel in service and support to all Sheriff’s Office Division, County entities and the public while persistently pursuing innovative and cost effective methods to reduce costs and increase efficiency. To be a good steward’s of Sheriff Office resources and to support to those who protect and serve by ordering and delivering what is needed. To increase the transparency of the technology layer and respective components to support the organization’s automated business processes and to blend technology with the other significant business process components (human resources, best business practices, policies, etc.) to meet or exceed ever-increasing citizen expectations.

Goals and Objectives:

Personnel: • To provide leadership by promoting a broad set of principles and standards of conduct, which will govern the employer/employee relationship and enable the Sheriff’s Office to successfully provide for public safety • To facilitate the implementation of plans and procedures that address the resource needs of the Sheriff’s Office • To provide quality services accessible to all employees • To limit possible litigation by promoting Human Resources principles which enable the Sheriff’s Office to function in an effective manner Business Office: • Process, reconcile and deposit all funds, cashier reports and deposit warrants to County Auditor and Treasury within three business days • Collect, distribute, bills of cost, capias, Justice of the Peace administrative fees, and other miscellaneous transactions on a daily basis • Process all bond types, surety, Personal Recognizance Bonds, Out of County, and Capias • Prepare and type manual check for Civil Division which include refunds and disbursements • Process all requisitions for all services within a 24-hour period in the Lawson Financial System • Ensure equipment service call for fax/copier are completed in a timely manner to prevent work delays • Process and maintain extradition funds to ensure travel expenditures are processed timely in order to replenish the funds on hand

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• • •

Staff will effectively cross train in all areas within the Business Office on in-house processes and procedures to ensure effectiveness Collect and cashier bond forfeitures timely and effectively on a daily basis Process refund, disbursement checks, and ensure check stock is maintained

Warehouse: • Receive, safeguard and effectively dispense all supplies and materials ordered and required of the Bexar County Sheriff Office • Monitor and process all requisitions effectively and efficiently • Review and reduce all excessive ordering • Conserve all available resources • Ensure that operations in the Warehouse are timely and 100% accurate • Communicate effectively with all internal and external customers on supplies utilization • Train all personnel on being good stewards of resources and be financially conservative • Support all operations of the Bexar County Sheriff Office by planning for, storing and delivering all required items • Implement and use technology to reduce waste and improve efficiency and accountability Technical Services: • Minimize business process downtime resulting from a failure of any technology component • Improve technical support and planning services by informally drafting subject matter experts with appropriate technological skills to provide direct support to specialized projects within their respective division/section • Position a transition towards a managed competition environment including service charge back and transfer of managerial responsibility • Continue the migration of technological infrastructure from mainframe to client/server: robust enterprise server, database backend licensing, with the objective being to completely replace our infrastructure • Aggressively develop and manage our E-Sheriff efforts by empowering citizens and staff through the provision of information via our public Internet presence and the development of our organizational Intranet

Program Description:

Personnel: This section supports employment and human resource functions for the Sheriff’s Office including, but not limited to recruitment, job postings, rehires, processing pre-employment assessments, and military leave. Personnel is also responsible for all timekeeping transactions, tracking of military leave, payroll submittals including shift, duty, and supervisory differentials, detention and law enforcement step pay plans, education incentives, uniform and parking allowances, law enforcement and jailer proficiency certification pay, and overtime and compensatory time. Another function is the license management of the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) for their employees. The section also provides discipline management support for detention, law enforcement, and civilian employees. This section is also involved with the employee grievance processes and hearings with Bexar County Sheriff’s Civil Service Commission. The Personnel section also processes transfer orders, promotions, demotions, and the overall organizational structure. Any employee medical or injury related events that involving longterm absences, Family Medical and Leave Act (FMLA) requests, worker’s compensation, and/or light

63-2


duty are processed in the Personnel section. This section also handles occurrences with resignations and Equal Employment Opportunity Complaints (EEOC) compliance or complaints. Business Office: This section processes and ensures all account payables are paid accurately and in timely fashion and ensures all receivables are received and recorded accurately. This section collects, audits, and deposits payments for the Civil Division to include, Order of Sales, Executions, “Tax Suit,” as well as, other various fees. This section also processes inmate restitution payments from the Banking Section and from the courts. The Business Office collects, verifies, cashiers, and deposits funds for “Cash Bonds” and “Capias Profine” on a daily basis. This section also prepares and processes extradition trip vouchers and ensures requisitions are processed timely to replenish extradition funds. This section also processes all service and reimbursement requisition in Lawson. The Business Office maintains records, archives annually and prepares annual reports on all transactions performed. This section is also responsible for cashiering all quantities of cash, business checks, and money orders for the Sheriff’s Office and resolves any inquiries pertaining to Business Office transactions and various procedures. This section creates and tracks collection letters for Bond Forfeitures and tracks inventory for in and out of county transactions while also collecting, processing and distributing all Surety bonds, Capias Profine, and out of county bonds daily. This section also maintains and distributes receipt books to various locations within the Sheriff’s Office. Warehouse: This section provides internal and external customer service for 44 Departments within the Sheriff’s Office. All funds that are utilized are accounted for through the Warehouse section. This section trains customers on the requirements of processing requisitions and processes customer supply requests within 48 hours of receipt. This section is also responsible for reviewing requisitions for accuracy and appropriateness of supply issuance including available funding within each section. The Warehouse section also researches available vendors to fill required orders and identifying the most cost-effective vendor. This section also receives and accounts for all fixed assets received. All repairs for cleaning and heavy duty equipment, as well as all printers are managed by this section. This section is also responsible for receiving all shipments at the central loading dock area. The Warehouse section opens any incoming correspondence and disseminates to the appropriate desk/area for continued processing. This section receives, safeguards, and dispenses all supplies and materials ordered and required of the Bexar County Sheriff Office Technical Services: This section provides direct responsibility for the complex mainframe environment comprised of several hundred zero-client machines and printers requiring intimate familiarity with the complex technology layer and infrastructure that supports the unique mission-critical and life safety business processes, which includes security access for several thousand users (Bexar County, multiple local, regional, State and Federal law enforcement agencies) for the Computer Assisted Dispatch System (CADS), Inmate Management Information Systems (IMIS) and several subsystems with the Criminal Justice Information System (CJIS). This section also manages the staff’s access to the National Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (NLETS), National Crime Information Center (NCIC), Texas Crime Information Center (TCIC) and several San Antonio Police Department systems. This section also provides direct responsibility of the complex computer environment that is comprised of several hundred workstations, multiple servers and a variety of network components including: fiber optic cabling, switches, routers, etc. The staff is the first level responder to every mainframe related issue

63-3


while coordinating with the County’s Information Technology Department. This section is also responsible for the Sheriff’s Office mobile data network and implementations of new third-party systems along with outside agencies.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload Indicators: Number of Employee Personnel Files Maintained Number of Surety, Cash Bonds, Capias Collected Number of Supply Items Ordered Number of Support Call Requests Efficiency Indicators: Number of Records Maintained per FTE Number of Monthly Bail Bond Fees Deposited Average time to process a Requisition in Lawson (minutes) Average Time per Support Call Resolved – Mainframe (minutes) Effectiveness Indicators: Percentage of Labor Relation Lawsuit Activity per Size of Workforce Number of Surety bonds, cash bonds, capias collected Percentage of Requisitions Processed in 24 hours Percentage of Support Calls Resolved - Mainframe

Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

6,778 54,414 1,538,872 22,500

6,868 47,798 1,600,000 25,200

7,000 50,179 1,600,000 26,460

392 3,089

468 3,243

500 3,305

15

12

12

10

10

10

3% 794 80% 100%

3% 849 85% 100%

2% 909 85% 100%

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

$2,139,810 9,609 104,940 29,982 0

$2,103,483 21,350 114,268 38,576 20,000

$2,243,907 21,350 109,371 44,507 20,000

$2,213,441 34,551 168,269 49,311 0

$2,284,341

$2,297,677

$2,439,135

$2,465,572

Program Change

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$0 Total

$2,284,341

63-4

$2,297,677

$2,439,135

$2,465,572


Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget increases by 1.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. •

The Personnel Services group decreases by 1.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates and represents full funding of all current authorized positions. The decrease in funding is related to changes in health insurance plans selected by employees.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is provided for various computer training programs, leadership, and human resource workshops.

The Operational Expenses group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to an increase in technology upgrades at the request of the Office, recruitment services, and contracted services related to the maintenance of keycard security systems.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 10.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due to additional funding provided for First Aid Kits and badges and credential cases for uniform staff.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget does not include funding for Capital Expenditures.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes one program change at no cost. •

The first program change re-titles three Pre-Employment Specialists to Human Resource Technicians. This re-title is recommended to standardize position titles associated with human resource duties Countywide.

Authorized Positions: Personnel Archivist Chief Administrative Officer Employee Disciplinary/Grievance Tech Grievance & Appeals Specialist Human Resources Technical Support Specialist Human Resource Analyst Human Resources Manager Human Resource Supervisor Human Resources Technician Office Assistant II Office Assistant III Open Records Specialist

63-5

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 0 3 2 1

1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 4 2 0 1

1 1 0 0 1 0 0 3 7 2 0 1


Personnel Supervisor Pre-Employment Coordinator Pre-Employment Specialist Worker's Comp/Light Duty Coordinator Subtotal - Personnel

FY 2014-15 Actual 1 1 2 1 17

FY 2015-16 Estimate 0 0 3 1 17

FY 2016-17 Proposed 0 0 0 1 17

Information Technology Network Architect II Software Engineer Technical Services Manager Technical Support Specialist III Technical Support Specialist IV Subtotal - Information Technology

1 1 1 1 1 5

1 1 1 1 1 5

1 1 1 1 1 5

Business Office/Warehouse Business Manager Business Office Supervisor Chief Financial Officer* Deputy Sheriff - Detention Sergeant Lead Accounting Clerk Office Assistant II Office Assistant IV Supply Clerk I Subtotal - Business Office/Warehouse

1 1 1 1 2 2 3 2 13

1 1 1 1 2 2 3 2 13

1 1 1 1 2 2 3 2 13

Total - Sheriff's Support Services

35

35

35

* In FY 2014-15, position was titled Director of Grants and Public Information

63-6


- FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5101

SMALL BUSINESS AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP DEPARTMENT (SB&E) Mission: The County’s Department of Small Business and Entrepreneurship (SB&E) embodies the strong

partnership between economic development and entrepreneurship. The Department of Small Business and Entrepreneurship (SB&E), which is charged with the responsibility of administrating the Small, Minority, & Women Owned Business Enterprise (SMWBE) Program, Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) Program and coordination for US DOT Title VI Regulations as applied to Bexar County’s Federal Highway (FHWA) funded projects, seeks to establish innovative programs that involve new or existing businesses. Through the Department of Small Business and Entrepreneurship (SB&E), we seek to encourage County Offices, Departments, funded agencies and potential primary contractors to have in place or develop an aggressive outreach and recruitment program that reaches minority and female populations to encourage participation in their opportunities.

Vision: To increase small, minority and women owned business participation in Bexar County projects and procurements through the integration of public, non-profit and private sector efforts and resources.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Establishing procedures for the implementation of policies. Developing and implementing educational programs to assist SMWBEs to compete effectively for County contracts. Making recommendations to the Commissioners Court to further the objectives of Bexar County Administrative Policies 8.0, 8.2 and Title VI. Compiling a written quarterly report reflecting program statistics and the progress in attaining the County goals. Receiving and reviewing all internal and external complaints and recommendations regarding the implementation of the Title VI, SMWBE and DBE policies. Auditing compliance with the SMWBE policy on all purchases after award, during the performance of the contract, and after completion. Reviewing, developing and providing access to a directory of certified SMWBEs and those in the South Central Texas Regional Certification Agency (SCTRCA) certification process. Establishing outreach activities and materials to provide information and needed assistance to SMWBEs to increase their participation in the County’s procurement, contracting and certification process. Providing staff support for the SMWBE Advisory Committee. Serving as Bexar County's liaison to the State of Texas Historically Underutilized Business (HUB) Program and the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). Working with Offices and Departments to identify SMWBEs for use in the purchase of professional and personal services. Establishing efforts to build and maintain partnerships with other public and non-profit agencies and private enterprise organizations for the purpose outlined in this policy. Contacting bidders who fail to submit the requisite SMWBE and DBE documentation.

64-1


-

Program Description:

In order to fully implement the intent and goals of the program, the Department of Small Business and Entrepreneurship (SB&E) is designated as the office responsible for the implementation, monitoring, and general operations of the SMWBE and DBE policy requirements. The Small, Minority and Woman-Owned Business Enterprise (SMWBE) and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) staff coordinates with the designated liaisons of all County offices, funded entities and facilities to assure compliance with the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s goals. The Department of Small Business and Entrepreneurship (SB&E) is responsible for the overall administration of the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s SMWBE/DBE/Title VI Policies.

Performance Indicators: Workload/Output Measures: Number of referrals to/by SMWBE/DBE Program for County procurement Number of users trained on the County automated vendor system Number of SMWBE/DBE Program contacts Number of vendor renewals for certification or renewal Efficiency Measures: Number of SMWBE/DBE contacts per FTE Number of partnerships and agency relationships developed and maintained per FTE Number of vendor records maintained or developed for applications, certification, or training Effectiveness Measures: Percent of SMWBE/DBE contacts obtaining County procurement information Percentage of SMWBE/DBE contacts utilizing County bid process Percentage of SMWBE/DBE awarded prime contract Work on County Projects (Target 20%) Percentage of SMWBE/DBE awarded sub-contract Work on County Projects (Target 20%) Average Percentage of SMWVBE/DBE awarded prime or sub-contract work on other county reported agreements, funded entities, facilities or agencies

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

16,000

19,000

20,000

280

360

500

66,000

75,000

80,000

3,200

4,200

4,700

17,000

16,000

20,000

42

48

55

92,000

95,000

98,000

75%

75%

80%

40%

45%

50%

N/A*

N/A*

20%

N/A*

N/A*

20%

27%

23%

20%

*Data not collected during this time.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses

$327,776 3,547 141,008 64-2

FY 2015-16 Budget $345,861 5,650 263,358

FY 2015-16 Estimate $324,685 5,342 263,684

FY 2016-17 Proposed $354,895 6,350 230,365


FY 2014-15 Actual Supplies and Materials Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

37,151

42,500

39,236

42,200

$509,482

$657,369

$632,947

$633,810

Program Changes

$0 Total

$509,482

$657,369

$632,947

$633,810

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below •

The Personnel Services group increases by 9.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to turnover that occurred during FY 2015-16. Full year funding is provided for all authorized positions in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 18.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to an increase in the local mileage line item to allow staff to conduct outreach efforts.

The Operational Costs group decreases by 12.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to a decrease in Contracted Services funds as requested by the Department.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 7.6 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to additional funding provided for a one-time expenditure for Payment Data Certification Status Verification Reports that will assist the Department in collecting data relating to small businesses.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Analyst – SMWBE Compliance Contracts Specialist Office Assistant I Senior Data Analyst SMWBE Program Manager Total - SB&E

64-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1 1

5

5

5


TAX ASSESSOR - COLLECTOR

FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3300, 3302 3310, 3313

Mission:

The Tax Assessor-Collector's office is responsible for calculating ad valorem property tax levy, administering collections, centrally providing remittances and reporting to all taxing jurisdictions, and also functioning as an agent for the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles in providing vehicle registration and titling services. The Tax Assessor-Collector collects motor vehicle special inventory taxes and also collects funds for the permitting of beer and liquor sales in Bexar County.

Vision:

To be the number one Tax Assessor-Collector's Office in the State of Texas by providing enhanced and innovative programs and the best customer service possible for the citizens and businesses of Bexar County; and to also strengthen our community by "Helping keep Families in their Homes” with an emphasis on helping our senior citizens, our disabled, our Veterans, and ultimately our children.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • •

Provide an environment where all citizens and businesses are treated fairly, with respect, and with the best customer service possible. Provide taxing jurisdictions with easy, secure, and seamless access to tax assessing and collection information and data for their area Provide incentives and reduce barriers to the public to support improved tax assessing, collecting, and vehicle titling services, i.e., "one stop" services Serve as a model for other county agencies or offices by providing good management and maintaining effective internal control. Minimize waste of government assets and taxpayer monies. Develop an efficient process for remitting payments to taxing jurisdictions. Support, fund, and participate in pilot programs and prototypes to quickly assess emerging technologies and approaches to cash management, tax assessment and collection, and vehicle titling. Assume a greater and more active leadership role to identify and resolve issues. Foster a learning organization with a supportive management team, where all employees can acquire the knowledge, skills, and tools to succeed, and a work environment where all employees are valued and respected for their shared contributions.

Program Description:

The Tax Assessor-Collector is elected Countywide for a term of four years. The Tax Assessor-Collector has three primary areas of responsibility: calculation and collection of ad valorem taxes and the registration and titling of motor vehicles, and the issuance of liquor license permits. The Tax Assessor-Collector also acts as an agent for the Texas Department of Motor Vehicles, Texas State Comptroller of Public Accounts and Texas State Beverage Commission to collect beer and liquor license fees. Ad Valorem Taxes – The Tax Assessor-Collector is responsible for the assessment and collection of current and delinquent ad valorem taxes on real and personal property for Bexar County and forty-five other taxing units. Included in the collection of taxes is the mailing out of a combined tax statement. Consolidation of all tax collection with the Tax Assessor-Collector yields savings in cost of tax collection 65-1


for all taxing entities, and therefore the County citizens. Bexar County and all other taxing units have designated the Tax Assessor-Collector as the official who calculates the annual effective tax rate. Motor Vehicle Registration and Titling, and State Comptroller â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Tax Assessor-Collector acts as an agent for the Texas Department of Transportation of Motor Vehicles Titles and Registrations and the State Comptrollers of Public Accounts in registering, licensing, titling, and collecting sales tax on motor vehicles in Bexar County. The Tax Assessor-Collector operates three branch offices located in highly populated areas of the County. These satellite locations provide the citizens of Bexar County convenient access to services provided by the Office of the Tax Assessor-Collector.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Work Load Indicators: Incoming/Outgoing Mail Motor Vehicle Registrations Processed Title Transfers Processed Tax Statements Mailed Efficiency Indicators: Percentage of Calls Answered Title and Register Vehicles per Day, Per FTE (Including In Person, Franchise Dealers and Title Services) Effectiveness Indicators: Mail Sorting Accuracy Train Clerks Regarding Current Laws and Procedures for State of Texas within 10 Days Hearing Held Once a Month and Rejections Corrected on a Daily Basis to Ensure 100% Accuracy

65-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

560,016 1,5130,135 491,927 869,062

571,216 1,560,738 501,766 872,973

559,792 1,591,952 511,801 881,220

91.0%

93.1%

92.1%

108

110

112

96.7%

96.9%

97.0%

98%

98%

98%

100%

100%

100%


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures

$9,552,086 26,541 615,351 715,046 32,236

$9,896,388 30,200 700,917 738,158 18,000

$10,376,757 22,430 642,416 751,545 10,810

$10,290,164 27,000 652,184 714,353 69,159

Subtotal

$10,945,260

$11,383,663

$11,803,958

$11,752,860

Program Changes

$178,188 Total

$10,945,260

$11,383,663

$11,803,958

$11,931,048

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Adopted Budget increases by 1.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates, as described below. •

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases by 20.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds travel for the annual Texas Association of Collector/Assessors conference and funding is also provided for certification classes.

The Operational Costs group increases by 1.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to an increase in Rental Expenses as a result of building improvements for the northeast substation.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases by 4.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to a decrease in Postage funds in FY 2016-17 as requested by the Department.

The Capital Expenditures group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to funding in the amount of $59,159 for security camera upgrades for the three substation locations. This upgrade will improve security measures and accountability associated with monetary transactions between employees and customers.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes four program changes for a total cost of $178,188, as described below: •

The first program change adds four part-time Title and Registration Processor I (NE-03) positions for a total cost of $13,684, which includes salary and benefits. This program change converts temporary funding to permanent part-time positions. One part-time Title and Registration 65-3


Processor position will be located at each Tax Office location to assist the public with correct documentation regarding taxes, title transfers, and registrations. As a result, this will improve customer service to the public. •

The second program change adds one Lead Title and Registration Processor (NE-05) position for a total cost of $52,531, including salary and benefits. This additional position is proposed due to a new rule changes from the Texas Department of Motor Vehicle requiring the Tax AssessorCollector’s Office to conduct additional audits of Title Services Deputies (full service deputies) and Limited Service Deputies and Dealer Deputies (a newly created category of deputy) who issue titles or register vehicles on behalf of Bexar County.

The third program change adds one Property Tax Supervisor (E-05) position for a total cost of $63,864, including salary and benefits. Due to an increase in workload, the Training and Development Specialist was temporally reassigned to assist in the Property Tax Division. The additional position will allow for the temporarily reassigned employee to return to the original duties and adequate supervision in the Property Tax Division.

The fourth program change adds one Account Clerk (NE-03) position for a total cost of $48,108, including salary and benefits. There has been an increase in Point of Sales transactions for both the Property Tax and Motor Vehicle Divisions, and an increase in daily ACH transactions for Webdealers. The additional position will allow the division to achieve the daily deadline of reconciling deposits.

Authorized Positions: Administration Tax Assessor – Collector Administrative Clerk II Aide to the Tax Assessor – Collector Chief Deputy of Administration Chief Deputy of Operations Human Resource Technician Office Assistant II Office Assistant III Training and Development Specialist Project Director Total - Administration

FY 2014-15 Actual

Communications Support Archive & Research Processor Information Clerk Information Clerk II Lead Clerk – Information Center Office Supervisor Public Information & Support Manager Purchasing Clerk 65-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 10

1 12 0 1 1 1 1

1 10 2 1 1 1 0

1 10 2 1 1 1 0


Support Services Clerk Support Service Lead Support Services Supervisor Total - Communications Support

FY 2014-15 Actual

1 0 1 19

FY 2015-16 Estimate

1 1 1 19

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 19

Financial Reporting Accounting Assistant I Account Clerk Financial Reporting Manager Financial Reporting Supervisor Lead Account Clerk Lead Vault Cashier Office Assistant II Refund Audit Clerk Vault Cashier Vault Cashier II Total - Financial Reporting

4 6 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 22

4 6 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 22

4 7 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 2 23

Motor Vehicle Registration Beer/Liquor License Processor Downtown Station Manager Lead Inventory Clerk Lead Title & Registration Processor Motor Vehicle Inventory Clerk Motor Vehicle Registration Director Motor Vehicle Training Instructor Office Assistant II Senior Vehicle Inventory Clerk Substation Manager Title & Registration Processor I Title & Registration Processor II Title & Registration Supervisor Total - Motor Vehicle Registration

1 1 0 6 2 1 1 1 1 3 66 16 6 105

1 1 1 6 2 1 1 1 0 3 66 20 6 109

1 1 1 7 2 1 1 1 0 3 68 20 6 112

Total - Property Tax

5 1 1 20 11 3 4 4 49

5 1 1 24 15 3 0 0 49

5 1 1 24 15 4 0 0 50

Total - Tax Assessor-Collector

205

209

214

Property Tax Lead Property Tax Processor Office Assistant II Property Tax Director Property Tax Processor I Property Tax Processor II Property Tax Supervisor Tax Processor I Tax Processor II

65-5


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 9951

TRIAL EXPENSE Program Description:

The Trial Expense budget allocates funding for various costs directly related to trials and appeals, including expenses for prosecution, defense, and adjudication of cases. These costs include: travel expenses associated with cases requiring a change of venue and payment for appeals cases argued before the Court of Criminal Appeals; psychiatric evaluations, which may be done at the request of either the State or defense; and professional testimony for both defense and District Attorney experts. Funding is also provided for court costs, which include freelance court interpreters, the breath test program, required AIDS and STD testing, and a fee to fund the 4th Administrative Judicial Region. Investigation services, which are considered a cost of indigent defense, are also funded in the Trial Expense budget.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$1,341,770 186,438

$1,272,984 195,182

$1,530,314 187,914

$1,527,620 195,182

$1,528,208

$1,468,166

$1,718,228

$1,722,802

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Operational Expenses group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This includes an increase in rates paid for freelance Spanish language interpreters, which was offset by a reduction in the budget for Pro Tem Prosecutors for misdemeanor and felony cases.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 3.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This includes funding for breathalyzer supplies at the same budget level as FY 201516.

66-1


FUND: 100 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3500

4TH COURT OF APPEALS Program Description: The 4th Court of Appeals has intermediate appellate jurisdiction in both civil

and criminal cases appealed from the District Courts and the County Courts-at-Law. The jurisdiction covers a 32-county geographical region surrounding San Antonio. The 4th Court of Appeals hears cases that have not yet been submitted to the Supreme Court of Texas or the Court of Criminal Appeals. Cases decided by County Courts-at-Law involving amounts of $100 or less are excluded. By statute, the 4th Court of Appeals consists of one Chief Justice and six Justices elected within the 32-county district for staggered six-year terms.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Operational Expenses Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$87,395 1,453

$82,301 2,000

$82,007 1,656

$82,726 1,600

$88,848

$84,301

$83,663

$84,326

Program Justification and Analysis: ●

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below. ●

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Pursuant to Section 31.001 of the Government Code, the Commissioners Court in the county of each court of appeals may pay additional compensation in an amount that does not exceed the limitations of Section 659.012 to each of the Justices. Funding is provided at the same level as last year.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 3.4 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to a slight decrease in the amount budgeted for telephone and internet service to align more closely with expenses in previous years.

Authorized Positions:

Chief Justice Justice Total – 4th Court of Appeals

67-1

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 6

1 6

1 6

7

7

7


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ROAD FUNDS


Bexar County, Texas County Road and Bridge Operational Budget 207 Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance

$14,271,414 $14,271,414

$13,469,704

$10,412,127

$13,469,704

$10,412,127

Revenue Property Taxes Other Taxes Licenses and Permits Intergovernmental Revenue Fees on Motor Vehicles Service Fees Proceeds from Sales of Assets Other Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues

$787 360,000 134,665 376,022 15,706,620 893,743 59,023 13,405 $17,544,265 $17,544,265

$450 360,000 142,067 246,204 16,236,717 549,829 13,548 73,745 $17,622,560 $17,622,560

$450 360,000 130,000 300,000 16,200,000 400,000 1,000 50,500 $17,441,950 $17,441,950

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$31,815,679

$31,092,264

$27,854,077

$17,365,433 814,461 $18,179,894 $166,081

$18,112,922 2,266,418 $20,379,340 $300,797

$19,392,901 1,381,000 $20,773,901 $0

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$18,345,975

$20,680,137

$20,773,901

Appropriated Fund Balance

$13,469,704

$10,412,127

$7,080,176

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$31,815,679

$31,092,264

$27,854,077

APPROPRIATIONS Highways Capital Expenditures Subtotal Interfund Transfers

68-1


FUND: 207

PUBLIC WORKS - COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE FUND Mission:

The mission of the Public Works â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Road and Bridge Division is to provide for the safe and efficient movement of people and commerce over County roads and bridges; to assist in improved air and water quality and land development through administering environmental regulations and subdivision development standards; and to efficiently and effectively manage the resources of the Public Works Department.

Program Description:

During FY 2010-11 the County Road and Bridge Fund was created by consolidating the Farm to Market and Lateral Road Fund (096) and the Special Road and Bridge Fund (280). The two funds were merged due to declining from vehicles sales tax revenues that were reallocated to the general fund per the legislative statute. The County Road and Bridge Fund continues to provide construction and maintenance of County roadways and bridges. It also continues to combine funding for major road improvement projects to be performed by the County, including all operational costs (personnel, operational, supplies, and capital expenditures) related to completing those projects. Revenue sources for this fund are generated from vehicle registration fees and fees on the sale of motor vehicles and are augmented by funds from the State based on road miles maintained. During the 83rd Texas legislative session, state officials approved the option for Commissioners Court to collect an additional $10 motor vehicle registration fee to be used and collected by the Regional Mobility Authority for long-term transportation projects. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes the authorization for Bexar County to exercise its option at collecting the fee. Construction and maintenance of the farm to market road system is coordinated with the Texas Department of Transportation and is currently carried out by staff in three Public Works service centers. All operational expenses for the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Public Works service centers are included in this fund. Also included are costs for plat reviews, subdivision construction plan reviews, traffic engineering, right of way management and acquisition services, construction inspection and monitoring, capital project design review, capital project management, and limited in-house design.

Performance Indicators:

Workload/Output Measures: Number of Work Orders for Traffic Maintenance Number of Work Orders for Road Maintenance Number of Road Center Lane Miles Maintained Number of Permit Applications Made

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

6,021 3,507 1,270 4,006

6,100 4,000 1,310 3,580

6,200 4,200 1,350 4,250

20.63 $3,137 2,772

23.53 $2,750 2,500

24.71 $2,619 3,000

Efficiency Measures: Number of Road Maintenance Work Orders Processed per FTE Cost per Work Order for Maintenance Number of Permits Inspected per FTE (Inspector)

68-2


Percent of Work Orders Completed – Traffic Maintenance Percent of Miles of Roads Resurfaced Percent of First Submittal Plat Reviews Completed in 7 Days

FY 2014-15 Actual 98% 8% 98%

FY 2015-16 Estimate 98% 8% 98%

FY 2016-17 Proposed 98% 8% 98%

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Interfund Transfers Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$10,535,209 23,197 2,713,268 4,056,330 851,890 166,081

$10,366,177 37,110 3,265,580 4,789,172 2,633,532 300,797

$10,706,716 34,190 3,145,301 4,226,715 2,266,418 300,797

$11,224,242 37,110 3,808,425 4,451,354 1,381,000 0

$18,345,975

$21,392,368

$20,680,137

$20,902,131

Program Changes

($128,230) Total

$18,345,975

$21,392,368

$20,680,137

$20,773,901

Program Justification and Analysis: •

Overall, the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for the County Road and Bridge Fund increases by 0.5 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The increase is due primarily to increased expenditures in the Personnel Services and Operational Costs appropriation units as described below.

The Personnel Services group increases by 4.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2015-16 Proposed Budget provides sufficient funding based on historical turnover trends. The personnel appropriation continues to include costs associated with two full-time positions and 8 salary supplements for positions that dedicate a portion of work time to the Alamo Regional Mobility Authority (RMA). The cost associated with these positions will be reimbursed by the Alamo RMA throughout the fiscal year.

The Operational Costs group increases by 21 percent when compared to the FY 2015-2016 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes $1,100,000 in funding for resurfacing various roads. This appropriation continues to fund recurring operational costs, such as maintenance of the County’s heavy fleet, garbage disposal services, which are required for neighborhood trash cleanup, professional or contracted services related to data collection, and G.I.S. services. 68-3


The Supplies and Materials group increases expenses by 5 percent when compared to the FY 201516 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget provides funding for vehicle fuel and oil, construction materials and supplies, expansion of heavy fleet maintenance operations, and other supply costs associated with operating the Service Centers.

The Capital Expenditures group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates; this decrease is due a large capital expenditure in FY 2015-16 for the service centers. Capital Expenditures included in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget allow for annual equipment replacement, as well as previously budgeted funds needed to complete various improvements to the Vista Verde Building and the Service Centers.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes the following program changes for a net cost of $174,165: •

The first program change adds three Mechanic II (NE-06) positions to the Heavy Fleet Division. These Mechanic II’s are recommended based on the Mercury Fleet Management and Utilization Study. Adding these positions should eliminate 3,240 hours of unnecessary equipment downtime. It also positions the heavy fleet division for future maintenance expansion and greater scope of responsibilities. The total cost of the proposed program change is $165,885.

The second program change provides for the addition of three Office Assistant III (NE-04) positions and the deletion of 3 Administrative Clerk II (NE-02) positions. The increased duties and responsibilities of the positions have evolved over time. The total cost of the proposed program change is $8,280.

The third program change deletes six Equipment Operator II w/ Pesticide Licenses (NE-05) from this fund. They are being transferred to the Storm Water Protection Fund. There is no cost associated with this program change.

68-4


Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Administration Administrative Assistant Asset Manager Attorney III Capital Projects Engineer Civil Engineers Civil Engineering Assistant Construction Administration Engineer Construction Inspector I Construction Inspector II County Engineer Development Services Engineer Division Chief â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Public Works Engineering Services Manager Engineering Technician II Fiscal and Administrative Services Manager GIS Analyst Human Resources Technician Inventory Control Technician Office Assistant IV Office/Contracts Supervisor Operations Project Coordinator Paving Crew Foreman Public Works Operations Manager Right of Way Specialist Safety Program Supervisor Senior Construction Inspector Subdivision Technician Survey Crew Chief Survey Crew Worker Survey Instrument Operator Technical Support Specialist III Traffic Safety Coordinator Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Administration

68-5

1 0.5 1 1 2 7 1 5 4 1 1 1 0.5 2 1 1 1 0 4 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46

FY 2015-16 Budget

1 0.5 1 1 2 7 1 5 4 1 1 1 0.5 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 0.5 1 1 2 7 1 5 4 1 1 1 0.5 2 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 0 1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 46


FY 2014-15 Actual Southeast Service Center Administrative Clerk II Concrete Crew Foreman Equipment Operator I Equipment Operator II Equipment Operator II w/Pesticide Licenses Field Maintenance Worker Office Assistant III Public Works Assistant Superintendent Public Works Superintendent Senior Equipment Operator Tire Service Worker Welder I Total – Southeast Service Center Northeast Service Center Administrative Clerk II Equipment Operator I Equipment Operator II Equipment Operator II w/Pesticide Licenses Field Maintenance Worker Office Assistant III Pavement Marking Operator I Pavement Marking Operator II Public Works Assistant Superintendent Public Works Superintendent Public Works Superintendent – Traffic Senior Equipment Operator Traffic Control Fabricator I Traffic Control Fabricator II Traffic Counter I Traffic Counter II Traffic Maintenance Supervisor Traffic Sign Technician I Traffic Sign Technician II Total – Northeast Service Center

68-6

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 30 8 2 19 0 3 1 10 1 1

1 1 30 8 2 19 0 3 1 10 1 1

0 1 30 8 0 19 1 3 1 10 1 1

77

77

75

1 19 6 2 11 0 1 2 2 1 0 3 1 1 1 1 1 3 3

1 19 6 2 11 0 1 2 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3

0 19 6 0 11 1 1 2 2 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 0 3 3

59

59

57


FY 2014-15 Actual Northwest Service Center Administrative Clerk II Equipment Operator I Equipment Operator II Equipment Operator II w/Pesticide Licenses Field Maintenance Worker Office Assistant III Public Works Assistant Superintendent Public Works Superintendent Senior Equipment Operator

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 18 6 2 13 0 1 1 3

1 18 6 2 13 0 1 1 3

0 18 6 0 13 1 1 1 3

45

45

43

1 0 0 1 7 3

1 1 1 0 7 3

1 1 1 0 7 6

Total – Public Works Fleet Maintenance

12

13

16

Alamo Regional Mobility Authority Office Assistant IV Operations Engineer Total – Alamo Regional Mobility Authority

1 1 2

1 1 2

1 1 2

241

242

239

Total – Northwest Service Center Public Works - Fleet Maintenance Automotive Part Clerk Automotive Service Writer Fleet Maintenance Superintendent Equipment Maintenance Coordinator Mechanic I Mechanic II

TOTAL –COUNTY ROAD & BRIDGE FUND

68-7


FUND: 700

PUBLIC WORKS - COUNTY ROAD AND BRIDGE MULTI-YEAR PROJECTS The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget recommends a total of $12,750,000 for new and existing road projects. The narrative below details the amounts allocated to each project and through which phase the project is funded. The following new project is funded through design only: Highland Oaks ($750,000). The following new project will be funded through design and construction: Sanctuary Subdivision ($1,500,000) Additional funding is proposed for the following existing projects for construction: Grosenbacher Road Extension Phase IA ($3,000,000) and Candlewood Phase II ($3,000,000) The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget also recommends the following Countywide Projects: Traffic Safety Improvements ($2,000,000), Drainage Improvements ($1,000,000), and Rehabilitation Improvements ($1,500,000). The following Projects have been completed: Binz Engleman Sidewalks ($57,135), Boerne Stage Road Phase I ($87,294), Bulverde/Evans Intersection ($168,362), Galm Road Phase I ($44,013), Galm Road Phase II ($86,246), Macadona ($779,059), TPC Signals ($2,760), and West Military Road Bridge ($179,307). This proposed budget also recommends closing the following projects: Drainage Improvements – FY 2015 ($56,374), Rehabilitations Improvements – FY 2015 ($48,120), and Traffic Safety Improvements – FY 2015 ($625,922) Below is a list of all active multi-year road projects, including the newly adopted projects: Project Babcock Road Phase V (also in Flood) Big Country V Binz Engleman Sidewalks Boerne Stage Road Phase I (also in Flood) Borgfeld Road Phase I Borgfeld Road Phase II Bridgewood Subdivision Bulverde Pedestrian Amenities Bulverde Phase V (also in Flood) Bulverde Road Phase IV (MPO) Bulverde/Evans Intersection Candlewood Phase I Candlewood Phase II Donop (Baker-Hughes) Drainage Improvements - FY 2015 Drainage Improvements - FY 2016

FY 16-17 Budget Proposed $1,189,535 4,762,073 500,000 745,000 6,376,134 11,837,773 8,000,000 2,520,000 7,123,796 10,349,461 1,000,000 5,330,000 3,600,000 4,817,475 1,000,000 1,000,000 69-1

Activity to Date $1,181,754 4,043,224 442,865 657,706 6,366,725 11,616,960 942,395 6,597,788 1,821,382 831,638 4,584,523 491,700 943,626 -

Remaining $7,781 718,849 57,135 87,294 9,409 220,813 8,000,000 1,577,605 526,008 8,528,079 168,362 745,477 3,600,000 4,325,775 56,374 1,000,000


FY 16-17 Budget Proposed

Project Drainage Improvements - FY 2017 Evans Road Phase I Fischer Rd Phase I Fischer Rd Phase II Galm Road Phase I Galm Road Phase II Galm Road Phase III (MPO) Glen Mont Drive (MPO) Grosenbacher Schematic/ROW Strip Map Highland Oaks Macdona Marshall Road Old CC Rd (Baker-Hughes) Old Corpus Christi Rd Phase II (Alcoa) Old FM 471 & Talley Palm Park Drainage Precinct 2 Pavement Restoration Rehabilitation Improvements - FY 2015 Rehabilitation Improvements - FY 2016 Rehabilitation Improvements - FY 2017 Roft Road San Antonio Ranch Rehab Phase I Sanctuary Subdivision Shaenfield Place Subdivision Steubing Rd Talley Road Phase I TPC Signals Traffic Safety Improvements - FY 2015 Traffic Safety Improvements - FY 2016 Traffic Safety Improvements - FY 2017 Walzem Watson Rd Phase I (MPO) West Military Road Bridge WT Montgomery Road Phase I Totals:

Activity to Date

$1,000,000 500,000 2,192,400 608,475 6,374,713 5,500,000 9,921,853 9,970,657 5,000,000 750,000 3,268,113 4,176,000 3,604,185 253,000 1,580,000 840,589 2,755,062 1,500,000 1,500,000 1,500,000 3,100,000 1,000,000 1,500,000 3,500,000 3,000,000 2,075,000 420,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 2,000,000 8,148,896 6,619,033 2,020,000 6,223,953 $

176,553,176

69-2

Remaining

$467,316 321,561 526,100 6,330,700 5,413,754 548,225 9,604,226 2,489,054 562,010 448,400 653,527 72,301 1,451,880 586,353 424,048 -

$1,000,000 32,684 1,870,839 82,375 44,013 86,246 9,373,628 366,431 5,000,000 750,000 779,059 3,613,990 3,155,785 253,000 926,473 768,288 2,755,062 48,120 913,647 1,500,000 2,675,952 1,000,000 1,500,000 3,253,978 2,839,894 11,020 2,760 625,922 1,710,341 2,000,000 826,246 6,619,033 179,307 72,139

246,022 160,106 2,063,980 417,240 1,374,078 289,659 7,322,650 1,840,693 6,151,814 $

90,287,983

$

86,265,193


Bexar County, Texas ATD & TxDOT Fund Company 701 Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$ 54,697,721

$103,343,776

$114,745,130

$ 54,697,721

$103,343,776

$114,745,130

$ 15,318,619 $ 9,071,130

$ 15,000,000 $ 4,900,000

$ 73,248,639

$ 15,163,848 $ 8,234,183 $ 101,128,577 $ 277,537 $ 124,804,145 $ 124,804,145

$127,946,360

$228,147,921

$134,745,130

$ 15,431,921 $ $ 15,431,921 $ 9,170,663

$ 6,810,481 $ 60,919,967 $ 67,730,448 $ 45,672,343

$ $ $ $

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$ 24,602,584

$113,402,791

$ 67,404,610

Appropriated Fund Balance

$103,343,776

$114,745,130

$ 67,340,521

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$127,946,360

$228,147,921

$134,745,130

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Other Taxes Intergovernmental Revenue Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$ 48,782,000 $ 76,890 $ 73,248,639

$ $

100,000

$ 20,000,000 $ 20,000,000

APPROPRIATIONS Highways Intergovernmental Expenditures Subtotal Interfund Transfers

70-1

13,017,098 39,080,033 52,097,131 15,307,479


FUND: 701

TEXAS DEPT. OF TRANSPORTATION AND ADVANCED TRANSPORTATION DISTRICT MULTI-YEAR FUND The Texas Department of Transportation and Advanced Transportation District Multi-Year Fund includes the following roadway improvement projects: Loop 1604 – Lower Seguin Road: The improvements will expand Loop 1604 from its existing two-lane configuration to a four-lane divided roadway. The improvements will also include bridge structures crossing the Salitrillo Creek floodplain, new traffic signalization at Autumn Run Road, and flashing beacons at Graytown Road. (Pass-Through Financing Agreement with TxDOT and the Advanced Transportation District) Culebra Road – FM 471: The improvements will widen Culebra Road from its existing two-lane configuration to a four-lane divided roadway with anticipated bicycle and pedestrian amenities. The project will increase roadway capacity to allow for projected growth, increase safety with the continuation of the existing section east of FM 1560 and added bicycle amenities will enhance regional mobility. (Pass-Through Financing Agreement with TxDOT and the Advanced Transportation District) Potranco Road (S.H. 211) – FM 1957: The improvements will expand the existing two-lane rural roadway section to an urban roadway section consisting of one 11-foot and one 14-foot travel lane in each direction with a 14-foot raised center median within an 80’ ROW (Minimum). There are three cross drainage structures within these project limits located within the existing 100-year floodplain. The project will relieve traffic congestion by increasing capacity and will enhance regional mobility. (PassThrough Financing Agreement between TxDOT and Westside 211 Public Improvement District) US 281 Improvements: The improvements will expand US 281 to a freeway section with frontage roads, general purpose lanes, and one high occupancy vehicle lane in each direction from Loop 1604 to Stone Oak Parkway. The project will relieve existing traffic congestion by increasing capacity and enhance regional mobility. (TxDOT 825 Plan) Loop 1604 Improvements: The improvements will expand Loop 1604 to an eight-lane expressway with the addition of two lanes in each direction from FM 1957 (Potranco) to FM 471 (Culebra) and US 90 to FM 1957 (Potranco). (TxDOT 825 Plan)

Project Loop 1604 – Lower Seguin Rd. FM 471 – Culebra FM 1957 – (S.H. 211) Potranco US 281 Improvements Loop 1604 Improvements Total

Project Budget $30,702,000 18,080,000 55,600,000 48,000,000 52,000,000 $204,382,000

70-2

Activity to Date $28,890,621 18,077,294 42,314,179 8,919,967 52,000,000 $150,202,061

Funds Available $1,811,379 $2,706 13,285,821 39,080,033 0 $54,179,939


OTHER OPERATING FUNDS 


Bexar County, Texas  JP Security Fund 112  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$371,869

$422,223  

$465,641

   Total Beginning Balance 

$371,869

$422,223  

$465,641

Revenue Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$68,900 $1,594  $70,494 

$62,124   $2,397   $64,521  

$60,000 $1,500  $61,500 

   Total Revenues 

$70,494

$64,521  

$61,500

$442,363

$486,744  

$527,141

 Judicial      Subtotal 

$20,140 $20,140 

$21,103   $21,103  

$40,000 $40,000 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$20,140

$21,103  

$40,000

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$422,223

$465,641  

$487,141

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$442,363

$486,744  

$527,141

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  APPROPRIATIONS 

71‐1


FUND: 112 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE SECURITY FUND   

In 2005,  the  79th  Texas  Legislature  created  the  Justice  of  the  Peace  Security  Fund,  supported  by  the  collection  of  a  $4  fee  assessed  to  defendants  convicted  of  misdemeanor  cases  in  Justice  of  the  Peace  Courts. Of the money collected, $3 is deposited in the Courthouse Security Fund, and $1 is deposited in  the Justice of the Peace Security Fund. This fee may only be used to provide funds for specific security  enhancements for justice courts including: metal detectors, identification cards and systems, electronic  locking and surveillance equipment, court security personnel, signage, confiscated weapons inventory,  locks  or  other  security  devices,  bulletproof  glass,  and  education  for  court  security  personnel.  Commissioners Court approves this fund’s budget in accordance with Chapter 102 of the Texas Code of  Criminal Procedure. 

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual  Operational Expenses  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$20,140

$40,000

$21,103  

$40,000

$20,140

$40,000

$21,103  

$40,000

Program Change 

$0 Total 

$20,140

$40,000

$21,103  

$40,000

Program Justification and Analysis:    The  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  provides  $10,000  for  each  Justice  of  the  Peace  Precinct  for  the  purchase of security upgrades as requirements are identified.   

71‐2 


Bexar County, Texas  Family Protection Fee (Fund 121)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017   

     

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actuals

Estimate

Proposed

 

     

     

 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance 

 

 

 

Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers      Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

 

$18,693  

$0   $0 

$18,693  

  $115,699 

$40,155    

$118,462   0 

0 $115,699

$114,000 0

$118,462    

$0

$114,000  

$0  

$115,699  

$40,155

$0

$118,462    

$115,699

$114,000  

$137,155  

$154,155

APPROPRIATIONS

  Judicial      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance   

$97,006 $97,006 

$97,000   $97,000    

$97,006   

$97,000  

$18,693

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

72‐1

$154,155  

$40,155    

$115,699

$154,155 $154,155 

$0  

$137,155  

$154,155


‐ FUND:   121  

FAMILY PROTECTION ACCOUNT    

Program Description:  Section 51.961 of the Texas Government Code provides for the mandatory  collection of a $15.00 fee by the District or County Clerk when a petition for divorce is filed. The statute  provides that the monies collected through this fee are to be deposited into a special revenue account  called the Family Protection Account. On August 10, 2010, Commissioners Court approved the use of the  Family Protection Fee for costs associated with the prevention of family violence and child abuse. Due to  the limited amount of revenue generated by the fee, only a portion of these costs can be funded in the  Family Protection Account.  The remainder of the costs will be funded in a discretionary fund managed  by  the  District  Attorney’s  Office.    The  Family  Protection  Fee  was  previously  collected  in  the  General  Fund.   

Appropriations:  

Operational Expenses  Subtotal

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

$97,006

$112,000

$97,000

$154,155

$97,006

$112,000

$97,000  

$154,155

Program Change 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$0 Total

$97,006

$112,000

$97,000  

$154,155

Program Justification and Analysis:    

Funding is provided in the Operations group for rental expenses associated with the Family Justice  Center facility.  All funding projected to be generated by the fee is allocated for these costs.  

 

72‐2


Bexar County, Texas  County Clerk Records Management (Fund 200)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

      FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance   Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers  Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

  General Government    Capital Expenditures      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$15,132,303 $19,336,061  $17,093,711  $15,132,303  $19,336,061   $17,093,711          $5,337,540 $5,390,062   $4,904,000  68,409 $5,405,949 

91,329 $5,481,391  

70,000 $4,974,000  

$0 $5,405,949

$14,400 $5,495,791  

$20,538,252  $24,831,852   $22,067,711   

$1,085,353 17,307 $1,102,660 $99,531

$7,603,976 34,634  $7,638,610   $99,531  

$8,524,537 0 $8,524,537 $214,531   

$1,202,191   

$0 $4,974,000

$7,738,141  

$8,739,068  

$19,336,061 $17,093,711   $13,328,643      $20,538,252  $24,831,852   $22,067,711 

       

73‐1


FUND: 200  ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3100

RECORDS MANAGEMENT – COUNTY CLERK FUND   

Program Description:   The main purpose of the Records Management ‐ County Clerk Fund is to  provide funding to maintain and preserve the essential public records of the County.  The County Clerk  uses  these  funds  to  preserve  the  history  and  the  heritage  of  Bexar  County  by  providing  records  management and preservation services after filing and recording documents in the records of the Office  of  the  County  Clerk.    The  County  Clerk  is  responsible  for  maintaining  historical  records  filed  from  the  year 1699 to present.  Activities include records preservation, storage and retrieval as well as disaster  preparedness.    The  main  functions  funded  in  the  Records  Management‐County  Clerk  Fund  include  storage costs and the imaging contract costs for the County Clerk’s Office.   

Performance Indicators:  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

Workload Indicators:  Number of files pulled    Number of files returned/re‐filed  Number of Perma Boxes Handled  

8,755 47,300 51,311

8,755 47,300  51,311 

8,755 47,300 51,300

Efficiency Indicators:  Number of files pulled per FTE  Number of files returned/re‐filed per FTE  Number of Perma Boxes handled per FTE 

2,918 15,766 17,103

2,918 15,766  17,103 

2,918 15,766 17,103

3 HOURS 5 HOURS 4 HOURS

3 HOURS  5 HOURS  4 HOURS 

3 HOURS 5 HOURS 4 HOURS

Effectiveness Indicators:  Average daily response time (pulled & delivered)  Average time needed to pick‐up and re‐file   Average time needed to handle Perma Boxes 

Appropriations:  FY 2014‐15  Actual  Personnel Services  Travel, Training and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials   Interfund Transfers  Capital Expenditures  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$14,710 6,987  1,017,987  45,669  99,531  17,307 

$0 21,730 8,346,272 155,500 99,531 0

$0 8,344  7,477,954  117,678  99,531  34,634 

$0 19,525 8,349,512 155,500 214,531 0

$1,202,191

$8,623,033

$7,738,141  

$8,739,068

73‐2


Program Change 

FY 2014‐15  Actual   

FY 2015‐16  Budget   

FY 2015‐16  Estimate   

FY 2016‐17  Proposed  $0 

Total

$1,202,191

$8,623,033

$7,738,141  

$8,739,068

Program Justification and Analysis:  

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget increases by 13 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates  as described below.      The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  in  the  amount  of  $19,525  is  proposed  to  cover  mandatory  training  for  the  County  Clerk  and  training  for  key  personnel.  Funding  is  also  proposed  for  attending  various  conferences  hosted  by  the  National  Association  of  Counties  and  the  International Association of Clerks, Recorders, Election Officials and Treasurers.  

The Operational  Expenses  group  increases  by  11.7  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  is  proposed  for  imaging  services  in  the  amount  of  $7,967,639.  The  remaining funding is for professional services related to the preservation of documents and  the printing and binding account.  

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  This  is  due  to  funding  for  tools  and  hardware  and  minor  equipment  and  machinery for the County Clerk’s archives based on previous budgeted levels. 

The Interfund  Transfers  group  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  The  transfer  is  for  the  cost  of  storage  space  and  preservation  of  records  in  the  Records  Management  Center  for  the  County  Clerk’s  Office.  Additionally,  on  July  14,  2016,  the  County  Clerk  authorized  a  total  of  an  additional  $100,000  for  various  Offices  and  Departments imaging projects and $15,000 for the installation of a carport at  the  Records  Storage Center. 

Funding is not proposed within the Capital Expenditures group in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed  Budget.  Expenses  that  occurred  in  FY  2015‐16  were  associated  with  the  replacement  of  a  van that was involved in an accident. 

73‐3


Bexar County, Texas  Countywide Records Management (Fund 201)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

      FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal        Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

$61,982

$117,992

$108,604

$61,982

$117,992  

$108,604

 

 

 

$401,378 10,105

$407,093   1,203 

$411,483

$408,296  

$400,000 600 $400,600   

$411,483  

$408,296    

$473,465

 General Government    Judicial    Public Safety      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$526,288  

$214,095 89,702 51,676

$355,473

$417,684  

$117,992

    74‐1 

$402,000  

$108,604    

$473,465

$402,000  

$402,000 0 0

$417,684    

$509,204

$417,684   0  0 

$355,473  

$400,600  

$107,204  

$526,288  

$509,204


FUND 201 

RECORDS MANAGEMENT – COUNTY WIDE FUND   

Program Description:   The Records Management – County Wide Fund was created to account for  revenues generated by fees for defendants convicted of an offense in a County or District Court and the  issuance  of  certain  certificates.  In  1999,  the  Legislature  increased  the  fee  from  $10  to  $20,  effective  September  1,  1999.  This  revenue  may  only  be  used  for  records  management  and  preservation  or  automation purposes for any Office or Department in the County. Government Code Section 25.0171(b)  (1999) mandates counties to create a separate fund for these revenues. These funds are generally used  for microfilming of records, digital imaging of records, and costs related to record storage.    The  mission  and  goal  of  the  Countywide  Records  Management  Fund  is  to  provide  funds  and  resources  that  can  be  used  to  microfilm/image  records  stored  by  County  Offices  and  Departments  in  the  Courthouse  or  at  an  off‐site  records  facility  in  order  to  better  utilize  office  space  and  preserve  County  records.  Microfilming/imaging  provides  97  percent  savings  in  storage  space.  County  Offices  and  Departments  use  this  funding  to  facilitate  the  storage  of  their  records  at  the  County  off‐site  storage  facility.  Currently,  the  Records  Management  Center  is  able  to  provide  some  microfilming  services  to  County  Offices  and  Departments;  however,  most  microfilm  work  is  outsourced  to  private  service  companies.   

Performance Indicators:   

Work Load Indicators:  Records Storage Space Recovered in Square Feet  Records Storage Projects Completed  Building Square Feet Maintained  Efficiency Indicators:  Number of Square Feet Utilized for Storage  Number of County Offices Using Records Center  Number of County Offices Destroying Paper Records        Expired or Imaged       Effectiveness Indicators:  Ratio of stored space used to reused space  Percent of offices using Records Center  Percent of Offices Destroying Paper Records Expired       or Imaged 

74‐2

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

1,700 3  72,000 

1,500 3  72,000 

1,600 5 72,000

58,000 44 

58,000 46 

58,000 39

25

25

10

96% 86% 

96% 87% 

98% 90%

80%

80%

75%


Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

$355,473

$439,388

$417,684

$402,000

$355,473

$439,388

$417,684

$402,000

Operational Expenses  Subtotal

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

Program Change 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$0 Total

$355,473

$439,388

$417,684

$402,000

Program Justification and Analysis:      

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget increases by 3.8 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates  as described below.   

The Operational  Expenses  group  decreases  by  3.8  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates  due  to  reducing  the  transfer  amount  for  the  Records  Storage  Center  Facility  operational  cost,  which  is  proposed  at  $100,000  for  FY  2016‐17.  This  includes  utilities,  maintenance and repairs, and other expenses necessary to operate the facility. In FY 2015‐16, a  total of $229,388 was transferred for operational expenses to the Records Storage Facility Fund.  The  transfer  amount  is  based  on  the  annual  operational  needs  of  the  Records  Storage  Center  Facility. 

The Operational  Expenses  group  also  includes  funding  in  the  amount  of  $302,000  for  other  imaging projects countywide for FY 2016‐17. In FY 2015‐16, a total of $210,000 was allocated for  countywide imaging projects. The Records Committee met on July 14, 2016 and recommended  the following funds be appropriated accordingly: 

Office/ Department  Auditor’s Office  Criminal Investigations Laboratory   District Attorney’s Office  District Clerk’s Office  Elections Department  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 1  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 2  Justice of the Peace, Precinct 3  Purchasing Department  Sheriff’s Office  Tax Assessor‐Collector   Total   74‐3 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed Budget  $14,950  $19,436  $59,802  $67,277  $14,950  $22,426  $22,426  $16,446  $14,950  $26,911  $22,426  $302,000 


Bexar County, Texas  District Clerk Records Management (Fund 202)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

      FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed     

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Fines and Forfeitures  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal        Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

 

 

$155,359 $155,359 

$118,089   $118,089  

$203,972 $203,972 

$162 359,274 754 $360,190 

$0 355,328   1,143  $356,471  

$0 $350,150 700 $350,850 

$360,190

$356,471  

$350,850

$515,549

$474,560  

$554,822

$397,460 $397,460 

$270,588   $270,588  

$400,000 $400,000 

$397,460

$270,588  

$400,000

$118,089

$203,972  

$154,822

$515,549

$474,560  

$554,822

APPROPRIATIONS     Judicial      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS     

    75‐1 


FUND:   202     ACCOUNTING UNIT:   3200 

RECORDS MANAGEMENT ‐ DISTRICT CLERK FUND     

Program Description:  Revenues generated by a $5 records management and preservation fee on  each  document  filed  by  the  District  Clerk  as  approved  in  2003  by  the  78th  Legislature  (HB  1905)  are  deposited in the District Clerk Records Management Fund. The fee may only be used with approval of a  budget submitted by the District Clerk to Commissioners Court in accordance with Chapter 111 of the  Texas Local Government Code.     

Performance Indicators:    Work Load Indicators:  Number of Imaged Documents processed by Civil  Number of Imaged Documents processed by Criminal  Number of Imaged Documents processed by Adoptions  Efficiency Indicators:  Number of Documents Imaged per FTE in Civil  Number of Documents Imaged per FTE in Criminal  Number of documents processed per FTE in Adoptions  Effectiveness Indicators:  Average Time to File a Case (civil)  Average Retrieval Time for a Court Request (civil)  Total amount of backlogged boxes for Quality Assurance      (adoptions) 

FY 2014‐15  Actuals  505,066 980,004 64,227

FY 2015‐16  FY 2016‐17  Estimate  Proposed    509,238  512,835 1,659,660  1,750,000 28,080  12,277

82,680 163,334 32,114

79,004 276,610  14,040 

75,491 350,000 12,277

12 minutes 45 minutes 356

12 minutes  45 minutes  296 

12 minutes 45 minutes 296

Appropriations:  FY 2014‐15  Actual  Operational Expenses  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$397,460

$350,000

$270,588

$400,000

$397,460

$350,000

$270,588  

$400,000

Program Change 

$0 Total 

$397,460

      75‐2 

$350,000

$270,588  

$400,000


Program Justification and Analysis:     

The FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  increases  by  47.8  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates as described below.    Funding is proposed in the Operational Expenses group to pay for imaging services for the District  Clerk  Records  Division.  Funding  is  also  proposed  for  first  year  of  a  two‐year  project  for  the  preservation of 122 volumes of the historical records from 1838 to 1922.  

75‐3


Bexar County, Texas  Courthouse Security Fund (Fund 203)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017   

     

 

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

      FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal    Transfers In      Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

 

 

$1 $1 

$694,753 1,264 $696,017  $551,695  $1,247,712  $1,247,713 

$213,089     $213,089       $676,171   1,207  $677,378     $127,751   $805,129     $1,018,218    

$33,897 $33,897 

$640,000 1,200 $641,200  $339,597  $980,797  $1,014,694 

APPROPRIATIONS     Judicial      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$1,034,624 $1,034,624  $1,034,624  $213,089  $1,247,713 

76‐1

$984,321   $984,321     $984,321     $33,897     $1,018,218  

$1,014,694 $1,014,694  $1,014,694  $0  $1,014,694 


FUND: 203 

COURTHOUSE SECURITY FUND   

Program Description: In October 1993, Commissioners Court established the Courthouse Security 

Fund to  account  for  revenue  generated  by  security  fees  authorized  by  the  73rd  Texas  Legislature.    In  1997, the 74th Texas Legislature added Justice of the Peace Court security fees.  A $5 fee for security is  collected  at  the  time  of  filing  for  each  civil  case  filed  in  District  Courts  or  County  Courts‐at‐Law.  The  County  also  collects  $5  from  defendants  convicted  of  a  felony  offense  in  a  District  Court  and  $3  from  those  convicted  of  a  misdemeanor  offense  in  any  court.  In  addition,  the  County  receives  $1  for  every  document filed that is not subject to the $5 security fee. The legislature created the fees to help fund  security services in buildings housing Courts, such as the Bexar County Courthouse, the Cadena‐Reeves  Justice Center, the Juvenile Justice Center and the Tejeda Justice Center.  These funds are also utilized to  help  pay  the  cost  of  the  communication  and  law  enforcement  services  provided  by  the  Bexar  County  Sheriff’s  Office.  The  Sheriff’s  Office  provides  security  using  security  monitors  and  law  enforcement  officers deployed at entrances to many County buildings housing courts.  Constables provide security for  the Justices of the Peace courts.    

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

$1,034,624

$1,002,851

$984,321

$1,014,694

$1,034,624

$1,002,851

$984,321  

$1,014,694

Personnel Services  Subtotal

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

Program Change 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$0 Total

$1,034,624

$1,002,851

$984,321  

$1,014,694

Program Justification and Analysis:    

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget increases by 3.1 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates.  This  represents  full  funding  for  all  current  authorized  positions.  Turnover  occurred  in  FY  2015‐16  that is not anticipated in FY 2016‐17.        This fund will continue to require an interfund transfer from the General Fund due to the increase in  cost of personnel services as described above.  An interfund transfer is proposed in the amount of  $339,597 to provide sufficient funding for the fund through the fiscal year.  

   

76‐2


Authorized Positions:  FY 2014‐15  Actual  Deputy Sheriff ‐ Law Enforcement  Security Monitor  Telecommunications Specialist  Total ‐ Courthouse Security Fund

76‐3

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

2 14 6

2 14  7 

2 14 7

22

23

23


Bexar County, Texas  District Clerk Technology (Fund 205)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

      FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal        Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS

  General Government      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$79,897 $79,897 

$90,602   $90,602       $257,070   861  $257,931     $257,931     $348,533  

$258,880 661 $259,541  $259,541  $339,438 

$248,836 $248,836    $248,836 

      77‐1 

$290,000 $290,000  $290,000   

$48,533    

$339,438

$294,233

$300,000  

$90,602

 

$245,700

$245,000 700 $245,700 

$300,000   $300,000    

$48,533 $48,533 

$4,233  

$348,533  

$294,233


- FUND:   205     ACCOUNTING UNIT:   3200

DISTRICT CLERK‐ TECHNOLOGY FUND   

Program Description:  State  law  requires  District  Clerks  to  maintain  a  large  number  of  court  records on a permanent basis. In order to preserve and maintain these documents, offices are storing  documents electronically or in a digital format.  State law and state library rules dictate that the film and  digital images be maintained permanently with a storage plan to secure the future transition of digitized  records to new media that allows access to these records.  Transitioning paper records to digital formats  can  be  costly  for  counties  that  do  not  have  in‐house  computer  service  departments,  as  contracted  vendors  often  maintain  proprietary  controls.   While  current  statute  allows  District  Courts  to  assess  records management fees, the District Clerks' offices do not have control over the funding and counties  can use the monies for other methods of records preservation.     Senate  Bill  1685  from  the  81st  Legislature  authorizes  the  Commissioners  Court  of  a  county  to  adopt  a  District Court Records Archive Fee of not more than $5 for the filing of a suit, including an appeal from  an inferior court, or a cross‐action, counterclaim, intervention, contempt action, motion for new trial, or  third‐party petition, in a District Court in the county. It requires that the fee be set and itemized in the  county's budget as part of the budget  preparation process and be approved in a public meeting.  This  fee is for preservation and restoration services performed in connection with maintaining District Court  records.   

  Appropriations:  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

$248,836

$300,000

$300,000

$290,000

$248,836

$300,000

$300,000

$290,000

Operational Expenses  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

Program Change 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$0 Total 

$248,836

$300,000

$300,000

$290,000

Program Justification and Analysis:   

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget decreases by 3.3 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates  as described below. 

The Operations Expenses group decreases by 3.3 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates.  Funding is proposed for the first year of a two‐year project to preserve 122 volumes of the historical  records from 1838 to 1922.   

77‐2


Bexar County, Texas   Parking Facilities (Fund 206)   Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017           

FY 2014‐15   Actual 

FY 2015‐16   Estimate  

FY 2016‐17   Proposed 

$1,310,604   $1,310,604  

$1,362,070   $1,362,070

AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance      Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance  

$1,177,737   $1,177,737 

Revenue    Service Fees    Other Revenue        Total Revenues  

$1,354,011   $1,224,408    $1,040,000 9,420             16,668               4,000  $1,363,431  $1,241,076   $1,044,000

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  

$2,541,168 

$2,551,680  

$2,406,070

$662,258  118,306    $780,564   $450,000 

$739,610   0     $739,610    $450,000  

$719,051  0  $719,051   $450,000 

APPROPRIATIONS      General Government      Capital Expenditures  Sub Total     Interfund Transfers    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS  

$1,230,564 

$1,189,610 

$1,169,051 

Appropriated Fund Balance  

$1,310,604

$1,362,070  

$1,237,019

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS  

$2,541,168

$2,551,680  

$2,406,070

78‐1


- FUND:    206

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT –  PARKING FACILITIES FUND   

Program Description:   The  mission  of  the  Facilities  Management  –  Parking  Facilities  is  to  operate  and  provide  convenient 

parking for  Bexar  County  citizens  and  members  of  the  community,  to  enforce  public  safety,  and  to  provide the best customer service.    Vision:   The Bexar County Parking Division is committed to providing safe and reliable solutions in an effort to  provide sufficient parking spaces and safe environment for employees and visitors utilizing the parking  facilities.  The  Division  strives  to  adopt  new  and  innovative  solutions  that  will  provide  credit  card  payment  methods,  increase  accessibility  to  parking,  maintain  parking  rates,  promote  safety,  and  maintain a clean parking environment.   

Goals and Objectives:   

 Plan for future needs of parking spaces that support County Buildings   Plan and maintain Americans with Disabilities Act and Occupational Safety and Health  Administration standards in parking facilities   Plan and implement maintenance programs for all parking structures and parking lots    Develop and train employees to provide friendly and excellent customer service   Maintain a safe and inviting parking environment   Accomplish and meet department goals in the most cost‐effective manner for Bexar County   citizens     

  

Program Description:  The  Facilities  Management  ‐  Parking  Facilities  Fund  was  established  to  account  for  the  collection  of  revenues from parking fees and expenditures for the daily operation and maintenance of the County’s  parking  facilities.  The  fund  also  contributes  revenue  to  the  Debt  Service  Fund  to  pay  a  portion  of  the  principal and interest due semi‐annually on the outstanding bonds issued for the construction of Bexar  County parking garages.    The Parking Facilities program is responsible for the safe, efficient, and cost‐effective parking of public  and  private  vehicles  with  an  emphasis  on  providing  parking  for  the  Bexar  County  Justice  Center,  Paul  Elizondo  Tower,  the  Courthouse,  and  the  Courthouse  Annex.  The  County  opened  the  five‐story,  668  parking  space  garage  in  June  1988  as  part  of  the  Justice  Center  development.  The  new  Flores  Street  Parking Garage opened in August 2011 and houses the Human Resources Department on the first floor.  Contract  parking  is  available  to  County  employees  and  other  downtown  customers.  Some  reserved  space  is  also  available  for  County  elected  and  appointed  officials  and  other  personnel.  In  addition,  discounted parking is available for those summoned for jury duty.    The Parking Division is responsible for the Flores Street Parking Garage, Comal Street Parking Garages,  and  several  County  parking  lots,  such  as  the  lots  located  at  the  Adult  Probation  Building,  Juvenile  78‐2 


Building, Cindy  Krier  Detention  Center,  Adult  Detention  Center  South  Annex,  Courthouse  Annex,  Precinct 1 Pleasanton Road, Fire Marshal’s Office, Justice of the Peace, Precinct 1, and the Vista Verde  Building. 

Performance Indicators:  FY 2014‐15  Actual    415 140 43,220

Workload/Output Measures:   Number of Monthly Rate Customers, Flores St  Number of Monthly Rate Customers, Comal St  Number of Jurors    Efficiency Measures:  Average Number of Daily Customers, Flores St  Average Number of Daily Customers, Comal St  Daily Average Percent of Daily Capacity, Flores St  Daily Average Percent of Daily Capacity, Comal St    Effectiveness Measures:   Revenue Generated on Daily Rate Spaces, Flores St  Revenue Generated on Daily Rate Spaces, Comal St  Special Events Revenue (Fiesta) 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate    450  441  45,000      425  190  98%  20%      $1,050,000  $397,797  $95,500 

409 229 97% 24%

$1,008,587 $433,432 $40,260

FY 2016‐17  Proposed    450 110 45,000

425 190 98% 20%

$1,050,000 $300,000 $95,000

  Appropriations:        Personnel Services  Travel, Travel and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  Interfund Transfers  Capital Expenditures  Subtotal

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

$333,803 1,000 294,795 32,660 450,000 118,306

$299,052 3,905 387,329 28,550 450,000 199,631

$1,230,564

$1,368,467

$323,772  3,905  381,540  30,393  450,000  0    $1,189,610 

 

 

 

$0

$1,230,564

$1,368,467

$1,189,610

$1,169,051

Program Change  Total               

                              

78‐3

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed  $320,995 3,055 369,351 25,650 450,000 0 $1,169,051    


Program Justification and Analysis:   

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget decreases by 1.7 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates  as described below.   

The Personnel  Services  group  remains  relatively  flat  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Full year funding is proposed for all authorized positions.    The Travel, Training and Remunerations group decreases by 21.8 when compared to FY 2015‐16  Estimates. This is primarily due to budgeting for one conference and certification courses at the  amount requested by the Department.    The Operational Costs group decreases by 3.2 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates.  The decrease is due to a projected decrease in the cost of Electric and Gas Services. 

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  decreases  by  15.6  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. This is primarily due to a decrease in Office Supplies and Tools and Hardware funds  proposed in FY 2016‐17 as requested by the Department. 

An Interfund  Transfer  in  the  amount  of  $450,000  is  proposed  for  FY  2016‐17,  which  will  be  transferred  to  the  Debt  Service  Fund  to  pay  debt  service  associated  with  construction  of  the  parking facilities.  

There are no program changes proposed for FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget.   

Authorized Positions:  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

Parking Garage Attendant  Parking Operations Manager 

6 1 

6 1 

6 1   

7

7

Total – Parking Facilities Fund 

78‐4


Bexar County, Texas   Storm Water Mitigation Fund 209   Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017   FY 2014‐15  Actuals    AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$6,910,562

   Total Beginning Balance 

$6,910,562

Licenses and Permits  Service Fees  Other Revenue  Insurance Premiums Revenue      Subtotal 

$0 $2,064,442  $30,423  $2,094,865 

   Total Revenues 

$2,094,865

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$9,005,427

APPROPRIATIONS   General Government      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers 

$1,848,491 $1,848,491 $86,457 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$1,934,948

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$7,070,479

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$9,005,427

79‐1

FY 2015‐16  Estimate            $7,070,479     $7,070,479     $78,150   $2,198,462   $41,265     $2,317,877     $2,317,877     $9,388,356         $2,529,337  $2,529,337   $70,412     $2,599,749     $6,788,607     $9,388,356  

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$6,788,607 $6,788,607  $75,000  $2,100,000  $30,000  $2,205,000  $2,205,000  $8,993,607 

$2,563,870 $2,563,870 $1,590,000  $4,153,870  $4,839,737  $8,993,607 


FUND: 209  ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5042 

PUBLIC WORKS ‐ ENVIRONMENTAL   SERVICES STORM WATER MITIGATION   

Program Description:    The  Public  Works  ‐  Environmental  Services  Storm  Water  Mitigation  program implements and manages the Bexar County Storm Water Quality (BCSWQ) program, which was  mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Texas Commission on Environmental  Quality  (TCEQ)  MS4  Phase  II  Storm  Water  rules.  This  program  is  responsible  for  developing  and  presenting educational programs to inform the public on the proper management and disposal of used  oil,  antifreeze,  paints,  and/or  hazardous  or  toxic  materials  typically  found  in  the  residential  environment. The program also conducts outreach activities to provide reasonable household hazardous  waste collection and assist with neighborhood clean‐up activities and events designed to reduce or lead  to the reduction of the discharge of pollutants into storm water. It monitors and inspects to detect and  eliminate  illicit  discharges  to  reduce  pollutants  from  entering  storm  water  conveyances.  The  program  reviews  plats,  construction  plans,  and permit  applications  of  new  development  and  redevelopment  to  insure  compliance  with  appropriate  best  practices  controls  for  storm  water  runoff  during  and  post  construction. During and after construction, the program is responsible for monitoring, inspecting, and  enforcing  construction  sites  to  ensure  the  quality  of  storm  water  runoff.  This  program  also  enforces  pollution  prevention  by  County  operations  through  education  and  monitoring  of  good  housekeeping  techniques by County personnel during County operations. This program acts as an Authorized Agent of  the TCEQ to inspect, administer, and regulate storm water activities within the unincorporated areas of  Bexar County.    In  June  2003,  HB  2031  (78th  Legislature)  granted  Bexar  County  the  authority  to  implement  a  Storm  Water program. In December 2003, Commissioners Court approved the Bexar County’s proposed Storm  Water Mitigation Program. In June 2007, SB 1932 was passed allowing entities flexibility in developing a  funding mechanism. TCEQ finally approved a general permit on August 13, 2007, allowing entities like  Bexar County Phase II coverage.   

Performance Indicators:      

FY 2014‐15  Actual    1,832 431 1,426

Workload/Output Measures:  Number of Storm Water Inspections  Number of Complaints   Number of Complaint Inspections    Efficiency Measures:  Cost per Storm Water Inspection  Cost per Complaint  Cost per Complaint Inspection    Effectiveness Measures:  Percent of Sites that are Compliant  Percent of Complaints Inspected  

$52 $139 $68   92% 99%

79‐2

FY 2015‐16  Estimate    2,012  545  1,495      $55  $135  $65      95%  95% 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed    3,000 600 1,495

$55 $135 $65

95% 100%


Appropriations:  

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

Personnel Services  Travel, Training, and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  Interfund Transfer  Capital Expenditures    Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

$608,335 8,838 408,018 23,368 86,457 799,932

$599,799 9,455 1,011,849 93,892 90,000 1,462,710

$1,934,948

$3,267,705

Program Change   

Total

$1,934,948

$3,267,705

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$621,157  9,265  561,372  24,833  70,412  1,312,710    $2,599,749 

$3,837,611

00

$316,259

00

$2,599,749

$4,153,870

$628,986 10,618 1,086,765 371,242 1,590,000 150,000

Program Justification and Analysis:    

   

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget increases significantly when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates as  described below.        The  Personnel  Services  Group  increases  by  1.3  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. The increase is due to slight turnover experienced during FY 2015‐16. All positions are  fully funded in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget.  

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group increases by 14.6 percent when compared to FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  is  provided  for  additional  training  and  certification  seminars  for  personnel to maintain job knowledge and state required licenses.  

The Operational  Expenses  group  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  This  increase  is  mainly  due  to  carrying  over  funding  for  the  Freeman  Coliseum  drainage  repair  project  in  the  amount  of  $342,940.  Funding  is  also  provided  for  the  Southern  Edwards Plateau‐Habitat Conservation plan management and legal costs, annual contracts that  help keep hazardous waste off County roads and ditches, maintenance for County owned water  quantity and quality basins, and yearly river assessment required by the EPA. 

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  The  increase  is  due  to  funding  proposed  for  photographic  equipment  for  evidence  gathering  of  contamination  violators.  Funding  is  also  provided  for  pesticide  supplies  and  materials for the Pesticide Operators being transferred from the Road & Bridge Fund.    The Interfund Transfer group includes funding in the amount of $90,000 for the required local  match  for  the  Southern  Edwards  Plateau‐Habitat  Conservation  Plan  (SEP‐HCP)  grant.  The  SEP‐ HCP grant is for the development of a habitat conservation plan to protect endangered species  habitat  within  Bexar  County  thereby  allowing  the  continued  development  of  Bexar  County  in  compliance with Federal Fish and Wildlife laws. Funding is also provided for the Brooks City Base 

79‐3


Mission Reach  in  the  amount  of  $1,500,000.  Brooks  Development  Authority  broke  ground  on  The  Greenline  urban  linear  park  that  links  Brooks  City  Base  to  the  Mission  Reach  of  the  San  Antonio  River.  Through  the  Greenline  Project  the  ecosystem  of  the  San  Antonio  River  will  continue  to  restore  the  storm  water  channel  into  a  functioning  habitat  that  will  reestablish  ecological functions lost after the original channelization.     The  Capital  Appropriation  group  decreases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. The decrease is due to a one‐time expense in FY 2015‐16 from Storm Water Funds to  the  DoSeum  in  the  amount  of  $740,000,  for  expenses  associated  with  improving  storm  water  runoff quality. Funding is provided in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget for the completion of the  LID demonstration project.    The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget includes one program change for a total cost of $316,259, as  described below.     The program change transfers six Equipment Operator II with Pesticide License (NE‐05)  positions  to  the  Storm  Water  Fund  from  the  Road  and  Bridge  Fund  at  no  cost.  In  addition, the position is reclassified to a Pesticide Operator (NE‐06) for a reclassification  cost of $15,625, including salary and benefits. These positions will help address the need  for reducing water‐borne, mosquito diseases in the County’s unincorporated areas and  will help reduce the population of mosquitoes that spread diseases such as Zika, West  Nile Virus, Chikungunya virus, yellow fever, and other known diseases in central Texas.   

Authorized Positions:  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

    Civil Engineer Assistant  1  1  1 Office Assistant IV  2  2  2 Pesticide Operator  0  0  6 Senior Information Technology Project Manager  1  1  1 Senior Storm Water Inspector  1  1  1 Storm Water Quality Inspector I  1  1  1 Storm Water Quality Inspector II  2  2  2       Total –Storm Water Mitigation Fund 8  8  14   Note:  The  Environmental  Engineer  (E‐11)  position  is  funded  75%  from  the  Storm  Water  Fund  and  25%  from  the  General  Fund.  The  authorized  position  can  be  found  within  the  General  Fund  Public  Works‐ Environmental Services Division.   

79‐4


Bexar County, Texas  Law Library (Fund 210)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$4

$110,539  

$106,364

   Total Beginning Balance 

$4

$110,539  

$106,364

Revenue Service Fees  Proceeds from Sales of Assets  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$519,354 613  105,028  $624,995 

$514,747   0   100,758   $615,505  

$518,000 0  90,800  $608,800 

Transfers In      Total Revenues 

$263,034 $888,029 

$226,456   $841,961  

$63,745 $672,545 

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$888,033

$952,500  

$778,909

 Judicial      Subtotal 

$777,494 $777,494 

$846,136   $846,136  

$778,909 $778,909 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$777,494

$846,136  

$778,909

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$110,539

$106,364  

$0

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$888,033

$952,500  

$778,909

APPROPRIATIONS

80‐1


FUND: 210 

LAW LIBRARY            

Program Description:    The  Bexar  County  Law  Library  is  housed  on  the  fifth  floor  of  the  Bexar  County  Courthouse  along  with  the  San  Antonio  Bar  Association  (SABA).  The  Law  Library  provides  reference  books  and  guides  that  total  approximately  80,000  bound  volumes.  The  Law  Library  Fund  receives revenues from court fines and from charges for copies made. SABA has renovated much of the  area for the 4th Court of Appeals. The space includes several conference rooms available for attorney  conferences and a courtroom used for various hearings and functions.       The  Library  is  available  to  all  Judges,  attorneys  and  the  general  public.  The  staff  continually  maintains  the  Law  Library  collection  through  the  acquisition  of  new  books  and  supplemental  materials.  Increasingly, the Law Library is providing access to legal resources through electronic means such as CD‐ ROMs  and  electronic  data  services.  It  also  has  video  equipment  available  for  all  the  courts.  The  Law  Library  houses  the  copier  for  library  customers  as  well  as  all  patrons  of  the  County  Courthouse  and  Justice Center.   

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual  Personnel Services  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$267,597 318,184  191,713 

$260,544 362,550  216,630 

$268,563   361,268   216,305  

$276,853 340,377  161,679 

$777,494

$839,724

$846,136  

$778,909

Program Changes 

$0 Total 

$777,494

$839,724

$846,136  

$778,909

Program Justification and Analysis:  ●  The  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  decreases  by  7.9  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16   

   

Estimates as described below.       ●  The  Personnel  Services  group  increases  by  3.1  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016‐17.      ●  The Operational Expenses group decreases by 5.8 percent when  compared to FY 2015‐16 

Estimates. This  includes  a  decrease  in  funding  for  online  services  with  Thomson  West,  which  provides  judges  and  patrons  with  access  to  digital  legal  content.  The  reduced  cost  was set when the contract was renewed in June 2016.   

80‐2 


● The  Supplies  and  Materials  group  decreases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16 

Estimates. This is due to a decrease in costs for books and periodicals required by the Law  Library. The reduced cost was set when the Thomson West contract was renewed in June  2016.     

  ●  Due  to  declining  revenues  within  the  Law  Library  Fund,  the  Proposed  Budget  includes  an 

interfund transfer of $63,745 from the General Fund.   

● There are no program changes in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget. 

Authorized Positions: FY 2014‐15  Actual    Copy Machine Operator  Law Library Administrator/Librarian  Law Library Clerk  Library/Account Clerk  Office Assistant III  Receptionist  Total – Law Library Fund

 

80‐3

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

1 1 2 1 1 1

1  1  2  1  1  1 

1 1 2 1 1 1

7

7

7


Bexar County, Texas  Drug Court Fund Summary (Fund 211)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017  FY 2014‐15 Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$250,879

$226,929  

$167,526

   Total Beginning Balance 

$250,879

$226,929  

$167,526

Revenue Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$94,006 1,042  $95,048 

$94,722   1,117   $95,839  

$95,000 900  $95,900 

   Total Revenues 

$95,048

$95,839  

$95,900

$345,927

$322,768  

$263,426

 Judicial      Subtotal 

$118,998 $118,998 

$155,242   $155,242  

$194,437 $194,437 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$118,998

$155,242  

$194,437

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$226,929

$167,526  

$68,989

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$345,927

$322,768  

$263,426

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  APPROPRIATIONS 

81‐1


FUND: 211 

DRUG COURT FUND    

Program Description:  The  Drug  Court  Fund  provides  resources  to  be  used  exclusively  for  the  development and maintenance of drug court programs operated within the County. The Bexar County  Felony  and  Misdemeanor  Drug  Court  program  directs  eligible,  non‐violent  substance  abusers  into  a  complete program of drug treatment and rehabilitation services. The goal of the program is to break the  cycle of drugs and crime by substituting jail or prison with an effective treatment alternative. The Drug  Court  changes  the way  non‐violent  drug  addicted  defendants  are  handled  by  treating  the  participants  for the addiction, which is usually the reason for their involvement within the criminal justice system. It  is  built  upon  a  unique  partnership  between  the  criminal  justice  system  and the  drug  treatment  community. However, it also includes the personal involvement of the Drug Court Judge.  This fee that  supports this fund is authorized by the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure, Chapter 102, Subchapter A,  Article 102.0178 and equates to a $60 fee for drug cases. This fee was instituted on June 15, 2007.   

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual  Personnel Services  Operational Expenses  Subtotal

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$46,324 72,674 

$36,203 116,652 

$155,242   0  

$194,437 0 

$118,998

$152,855

$155,242  

$194,437

Program Changes 

$0 Total

$118,998

$152,855

$155,242  

$194,437

Program Justification and Analysis:  ●  The  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  increases  by  25.2  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16 

Estimates as described below.    

● The  Personnel  Services  group  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. 

This is  due  to  several  out‐of‐cycle  personnel  changes  that  occurred  during  FY  2015‐16.  In  December  2015,  two  Case  Managers  who  were  previously  grant‐funded  were  moved  into  the  Drug  Court  Fund.  In  July  2016,  partial  funding  for  one  Veterans  Court  Case  Manager  position  was  removed  from  the  Drug  Court  Fund  due  to  new  grant  funding  from  the  Texas  Veteran's  Commission. In August 2016, due to an elimination of grant funding from the Texas Department  of Transportation, funding for one DWI Court Intake Specialist and partial funding for an Adult  Drug Court/DWI Court Manager position were added to the Drug Court Fund. 

81‐2


● There are no program changes in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget. 

Authorized Positions: FY 2014‐15  Actual  Case Manager*  Intake Specialist*           Total – Drug Court Fund

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

0 0

2 1 

2 1

0

3

3

*Out‐of‐cycle adjustments and partial funding:          • In December 2015, two Case Managers (Problem Solving Courts and Criminal District Courts)  became fully funded in the Drug Court Fund as the grant expired.    • For part of FY 2014‐15 and FY 2015‐16, one Adult Drug Court/DWI Court Intake Specialist was  funded at 20% in the Drug Court Fund, and the remainder was funded by a grant from the Texas  Department of Transportation (TxDOT). Beginning August 2016, that position is fully funded in the  Drug Court Fund due to an elimination of TxDOT grant funding.    • For part of FY 2014‐15 and FY 2015‐16, one Veterans Court Case Manager was funded at 43% in  the Drug Court Fund, and the remainder was funded by a TxDOT grant. In July 2016, the position  became fully funded by new grant funding from the Texas Veterans Commission and was therefore  removed from the Drug Court Fund.    • Beginning August 2016, one Adult Drug Court/DWI Court Manager is funded at 12% in the Drug  Court Fund and 88% in the General Fund. Previously, the 12% portion of the position was funded by  a TxDOT grant.            

81‐3


Bexar County, Texas   Fire Code (Fund 212)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance      Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance  

$3,659,706 $3,659,706

Revenue      Service Fees      Revenue From Use of Assets        Total Revenues  

$1,769,418 15,844 $1,785,262

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  

$5,444,968

APPROPRIATIONS      Public Safety      Capital Expenditures      Contingencies       Subtotal      Interfund Transfer 

$1,010,541 123,706 0 $1,134,247 $231,666

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS  

$1,365,913

Appropriated Fund Balance  

$4,079,055

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS  

$5,444,968

             

82‐1

$4,079,055 $4,079,055      $1,803,262  22,661  $1,825,923    $5,904,978        $1,229,708  31,500  102,080  $1,363,288  $231,666    $1,594,954    $4,310,024    $5,904,978 

$4,310,024 $4,310,024

$1,600,000 15,000 $1,615,000 $5,925,024

$1,125,382 5,000 87,261 $1,217,643 $231,666 $1,449,309 $4,475,715 $5,925,024


FUND:   212

FIRE CODE FUND        

Program Description:  The  Fire  Marshal’s  Office  is  responsible  for  reviewing  plans  for  new  commercial construction and inspecting buildings for compliance with Bexar County's Fire and Building  Codes.  Revenues are generated from fees charged for these services.  State law mandates that counties  establish  a  separate  fund  for  these  revenues.    State  law  also  mandates  that  revenues  in  this  fund  be  expended only for administration and enforcement of the Fire Code.   

This fund was established in September 1993 and the fees were instituted in May 1994.     

Performance Indicators:      Work Load Indicators:    Number of Annual Fire Inspections  Number of Fire Education Events  Number of Emergency Service Requests Received at       Dispatch               Efficiency Indicators:  Number of Inspections per Fire Inspector       Average Number of Fire Education Events per Month  Number of Dispatcher Calls per Dispatcher    Effectiveness Indicators:  Percentage of citizen complaints closed within 24         hours  Code complaints investigated within 24 hours of       receiving complaint  Average number of emergency calls per dispatcher        per month   

82‐2

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

1,162 16

1,805 10 

2,700 4

30,606

31,000     451  2  7,515     

31,500

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

100%

2,191

2,482

2,600

550 4 7,515

900 1 5,600


Appropriations:       Personnel Services  Travel, Training and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  Capital Expenditures  Interfund Transfers  Contingency    Subtotal   

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actual

Budget

Estimate

Proposed

$798,277 16,956 93,279 102,029 123,706 231,666 0

$829,028 33,413 122,854 118,906 31,500 231,666 102,080

$1,365,913

$1,469,447

Program Change    Total 

$1,365,913

$1,469,447

$841,952  37,583  238,369  111,804  31,500  231,666  102,080    $1,594,954        $1,594,954 

$852,315 33,963 120,198 118,906 5,000 231,666 0 $1,362,048 $87,261 $1,449,309

Program Justification and Analysis:   

Overall, the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget decreases by 9.1 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16  Estimates.     The  Personnel  Services  group  increases  by  1.2  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in FY 2016‐17.   

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group decreases by 9.6 when compared to FY 2015‐16  Estimates.  Funds  will  allow  staff  to  attend  the  continuing  education  classes  by  International  Code  Council,  the  State  Fire  Marshal’s  Office  Conference  and  trainings  conducted  by  the  Alamo Area Council of Governments.  

The Operational  Expenses  group  decreases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  was  estimated  but  not  expensed  to  cover  the  cost  of  the  case  management  system  in  FY  2015‐16.  The  Fire  Marshal’s  Office  is  examining  new  case  management systems that would better suit the needs of the Office. 

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  increases  by  6.4  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  The  increase  is  due  to  the  vehicle  fuel  and  oil  account.  In  FY  2015‐16,  expenses  were not charged to this account and were erroneously expensed to the Fire Marshal’s Office  General  Fund  budget.  These  expenses  will  be  corrected  and  expensed  to  the  appropriate  budget. 

Funding is proposed in the Interfund Transfer group for FY 2016‐17. The funds will be used for  debt service on bonds issued to pay for a new Fire Marshal’s Office building.  

82‐3


The Capital  Expenditures  group  decreases  significantly  when  compared  to  the  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. One‐time funding was allocated in FY 2015‐16 for the installation and purchase of  rocket modems for the Fire Marshal vehicles, which is a signal device that enhances the ability  to utilize radio and computers in areas of the county where radio signals currently are weak.  Funding is proposed for vehicle attachments as needed.    The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget includes three program changes for a total cost of $87,261 as  described below.     The  first  program  change  proposes  two  part‐time  Deputy  Fire  Marshal  (NE‐11)  positions.  These  positions  will  work  in  the  office  to  conduct  plan  reviews  and  intake  duties  from  individuals  applying  for  permits.  Additionally,  there  are  over  4,000  annual  fire  inspections  that must be completed annually. The addition of the new two part‐time positions will allow  other Deputy Fire Marshals to increase the number of annual safety inspections. The cost of  this  program  change  is  $55,639,  including  salary  and  benefits.  Included  in  the  program  change amount is $2,062 for the purchase of technology for these positions.     The second program change proposes one Temporary Full‐time Administrative Clerk I (NE‐ 01) to assist with the backlog of purchasing requests from the Fire Marshal’s Office and the  Emergency  Management  Office.  The  Bexar  County  Information  Technology  Department  is  assessing  and  recommending  the  implementation  of  technology  for  the  Fire  Marshal’s  Office,  which  will  relieve  the  workload  of  the  Administrative  Assistant.  Therefore,  this  position  is  proposed  for  one‐year  of  funding.  The  cost  of  this  program  change  is  $30,400,  including salary and benefits.     The  third  program  change  proposes  to  reclassify  one  Public  Safety  Communications  Supervisor  from  an  E‐05  to  an  E‐06.  The  purpose  of  this  reclassification  is  to  make  this  position  equal  to  the  Sheriff’s  Office  Public  Safety  Communications  Supervisors,  which  are  also  proposed  to  be  reclassified  to  an  E‐06.  The  cost  of  this  program  change  is  $1,222,  including salary and benefits. This position is funded 25 percent out of the Fire Code Fund  and can be found in the Fire Marshal’s Office General Fund Authorized Position List.    

Authorized Positions:  FY 2014‐15  Actual  Chief Fire Inspector  Deputy Fire Marshal*   Office Assistant II 

1 5 1 Total – Fire Code Fund

7

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

1 5  1    7 

*includes two part‐time positions  Authorized Position Funding Allocation:   (1) Chief Fire Investigator funded 87 percent Fire Marshal and 13 percent Fire Code Fund   (5) Deputy Fire Marshal funded 100 percent Fire Code Fund    (1) Office Assistant II funded 100 percent Fire Code Fund   82‐4 

1 6 1 8


Bexar County, Texas  Juvenile Case Manager Fund 213  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$349,745

$6,299  

$0

   Total Beginning Balance 

$349,745

$6,299  

$0

Revenue Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$395,692 318  $396,010 

$361,397   467   $361,864  

$340,000 400  $340,400 

   Total Revenues 

$396,010

$361,864  

$340,400

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$745,755

$368,163  

$340,400

 General Government      Subtotal 

$739,456 $739,456 

$368,163   $368,163  

$340,400 $340,400 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$739,456

$368,163  

$340,400

$6,299

$0  

$0

$745,755

$368,163  

$340,400

APPROPRIATIONS

Appropriated Fund Balance  TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

83‐1


FUND: 213 

JUVENILE CASE MANAGER FUND      

In 2005, the 79th Texas Legislature created the Juvenile Case Manager Fund allowing the assessment of a  fee of up to $5 to defendants convicted of fine‐only misdemeanor cases in Justice of the Peace Courts  and County Courts at Law. Bexar County Commissioners Court approved the collection of the $5 fee in  2006.  This  fee  may  only  be  used  to  provide  funds  for  salary  and  benefits  of  Juvenile  Case  Managers  employed to provide services in cases involving juvenile offenders.     In 2013, the 83rd Texas Legislature approved the collection of an additional $2 fee on all misdemeanor  convictions (other than those relating to a pedestrian or the parking of a motor vehicle) in Justice of the  Peace  Courts  to  fund  a  newly  created  State  Truancy  Prevention  and  Diversion  Fund.  This  new  fund’s  purpose  is  to  expand  the  scope  of  Juvenile  Case  Managers  state‐wide  to  include  prevention  and  intervention  services  to  juveniles  prior  to  involvement  with  the  criminal  justice  system.  The  County  keeps  $1  of  the  $2  fee  to  fund  Juvenile  Case  Managers,  with  the  remaining  $1  going  to  the  State’s  Truancy Prevention and Diversion Fund.   

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual  Operational Expenses  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$739,456

$360,300

$368,163  

$340,400

$739,456

$360,300

$368,163  

$340,400

Program Changes 

$0 Total 

$739,456

$360,300

$368,163  

$340,400

Program Justification and Analysis:    

Funding in the amount of $340,400 in Operational Expenses is proposed for FY 2016‐17. Pursuant to  the  Uniform  Truancy  Case  Management  Agreement  that  was  entered  into  with  the  City  of  San  Antonio in FY 2013‐14, the County will continue to transfer the balance of funds in the Juvenile Case  Manager  Fund  to  the  City  on  a  quarterly  basis  to  support  the  community’s  Uniform  Truancy  Case  Management Program. The decrease when compared to the FY 2015‐16 estimate is due to declining  revenue projections for FY 2016‐17.  

83‐2


Bexar County, Texas   Dispute Resolution (Fund 214)   Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

     

AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance      Undesignated Funds  

     

$540,237  220  $540,457   

$126,902 $667,419  

$44,113   $584,570   

$667,419    

APPROPRIATIONS      Judicial        Subtotal  

$639,988

    84‐1 

$618,526  

$24,032    

$667,419

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS  

$618,526 $618,526 

$615,956

$55,418

Appropriated Fund Balance  

$618,526      

$615,956   $615,956 

$612,001

$64,344 $594,494   

    $612,001 $612,001

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS  

$24,032   $24,032      $530,000  150  $530,150   

$55,418

$540,084 433 $540,517

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  

     

 

Transfers In       Total Revenues  

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$55,418  

$0

Revenue   Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

$0

    Total Beginning Balance  

     

$0  

$639,988  

$618,526


FUND: 214  ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4711   

DISPUTE RESOLUTION FUND    

                                       

Mission: The  Bexar  County  Dispute  Resolution  Center  (BCDRC)  is  committed  to  providing  timely,  effective, and caring services to each person in need of our assistance.    Treat our clients with dignity and respect, striving to earn their trust and maintain our credibility.    Provide  our  clients  with  a  forum  in  which  to  resolve  their  problems  and  disputes  in  a  peaceful  and  expedient manner.    Utilize  every  opportunity  to  educate  the  citizens  of  Bexar  County  about  our  services,  promoting,  and  encouraging the use of mediation as a means of resolution.    Recognize  the  immense  contributions  volunteer  mediators  make  to  our  success  and  our  ability  to  conduct the business of the Center.    Strive  to  maintain  the  leading  edge  in  mediation  in  the  State  of  Texas  and  to  sustain  the  Center  as  a  model to be emulated state‐wide.    Vision:  The vision of the Bexar County Dispute Resolution Center is to provide Bexar County residents  with  direct  access  to  mediation  (through  the  utilization  of  volunteer  mediators)  as  an  alternative  approach to resolving interpersonal, family, business consumer, and community disputes and to assist  the courts in the expedient resolution of civil disputes, thereby relieving undue court congestion, costs  and delays.   

Goals and Objectives:            

Provide Bexar  County  residents  with  direct  access  to  alternative  methods  and  resources  for  resolving disputes of all types.  Provide dispute resolution services to assist Bexar County residents to resolve disputes in a fair,  expeditious, and inexpensive manner.  Provide  information  and  referral  services  for  disputes  that  can  best  be  served  by  other  community, governmental, and/or social service agencies.  Assist the courts in the resolution of both civil and  criminal  disputes, thereby, relieving undue  court congestion, costs, and delays.  Provide  the  public  school  systems  of  Bexar  County  with  a  peer  mediation  system  which  will  enable students to resolve their own problems in a peaceful manner.  Increase  the  public’s  awareness  and  knowledge  of  the  use  of  mediation  as  an  appropriate  means of dispute resolution.    Encourage  enhancement  of  the  Center’s  service  delivery  system  through  continuous  improvements  and  innovations,  including  utilization  of  technological  solutions  to  improve  operations.  Seek  new  projects  and  innovative  applications  for  mediation  in  various  arenas,  which  will  enhance Bexar County Dispute Resolution Center contributions to the community.  Recruit,  train,  and  utilize  community  volunteers  as  mediators,  intake  workers,  and  presenters. 84‐2 


Program Description:  The  Bexar  County  Dispute  Resolution  Center  has  three  primary  functions:  mediation,  information/referral,  and  community  education.  The  Center  offers  mediation  services  to  Bexar  County  residents  as  an  alternative  method  of  resolving  citizens'  disputes  in  a  peaceful  and  expeditious  manner,  thereby avoiding  judicial action. The Center's mediation services include  multiple  programs:  Community‐Based  Mediation,  Court‐Ordered  Litigation  Mediation,  Family  Mediation,  Children’s  Court  Mediation,  Mediation  in  the  Justice  of  the  Peace  Courts,  Multiparty  Public  Policy  Dispute  Resolution,  San  Antonio  Housing  Authority  Hearings,  and  Neighborhood  Mediation  at  San  Antonio Police Department’s substations. The Center offers an information and referral service, which  assists  citizens  with  problems  or  disputes  that  can  best  be  addressed  by  other  community,  governmental,  or  social  service  agencies.  The  Center  also  conducts  community  education  activities  through  the  Center’s  Speakers  Bureau.  These  activities  promote  the  use  of  mediation  and  conflict  management  as  alternative  means  of  dispute  resolution.  Speakers  Bureau  activities  include:  presentations, lectures, conferences, program exhibits, and conflict management training seminars. The  Center provides peer  mediation training programs  to the school systems of Bexar County through  the  “Amigos  in  Mediation”  (AIM)  program.  In  addition,  the  Center  conducts  Advanced  Mediation  Training  for volunteer mediators.     

Performance Indicators:     

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

Workload Indicators:  Dispute Resolution Services  Number of Clients Served  Cases set for Mediation  Number of Community Awareness & Education        Activities 

6,226 3,093

Peer Mediation Services  School Completing Peer Mediation Trainings  Students Trained as Peer Mediators  Peer Mediation Programs Supported by AIM Program 

6,200 2,900

774

6,200 2,900    700 

95 2,050 158

80 2,000  148 

80 2,000 148

26 514 196,460

26 470  200,000 

24 480 200,000

834 1,736 99%

850 1,750  98%   

900 1,750 98%

700

Efficiency Indicators:  Dispute Resolution Services  Average number of days to process a Case  Average Number of Active cases per Month  People Reached Through Community Outreach  Peer Mediation Services  Student Mediations Conducted  Number of Disputants Participating in Mediation  Peer Mediation Agreement Rate   

84‐3


FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

Effectiveness Indicators:  Dispute Resolution Services  Percent of Cases Resolved  Cases Diverted from Court  Hours of Work Contributed by Volunteers1   Dollar Value of Volunteer Support  Estimated Savings to Bexar County from Cases Court        Ordered to Mediation2  

84% 73% 5,992 $381,680 $2,395,000

Peer Mediation Services3   Percent of Reporting Participants Stating Mediation        Prevented Inappropriate Action  Percent of Reporting Participants Stating They Would        Use Mediation Again  Percent of Reporting Schools Stating They Would        Recommend the Program 

83% 99% 100%

80% 70%  5,550  $400,000    $2,440,000    90%    97%    100% 

80% 70% 5,575 $415,000 $2,480,000

95% 98% 100%

  Appropriations:   FY 2014‐15  Actual  Personnel Services  Travel, Training, and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$561,546 22,371  17,708  10,376 

$566,137 23,705 15,548 10,300

$568,223 23,645  14,188  9,900 

$568,234 23,590  15,844  10,858 

Subtotal

$612,001

$615,690

$615,956

$618,526

00

$0

Program Change   

00

Total

$612,001

$615,690

$615,956

$618,526

1

Hours include time contributed by volunteers as mediators, community speakers, intake assistants and  mediation trainers.  2   Estimated  savings  are  based  upon  cost  not  encumbered  for  court  costs  and  ad  litehy6ms  due  to  the  successful 

mediation of these cases.  3  Percent’s include only those participants and/or schools responding to the measure. 84‐4 


Program Justification and Analysis:      

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget remain relatively flat when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates as  described below. 

The Personnel  Services  group  remains  relatively  flat  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.   Full funding is provided for all authorized positions in the FY 2016‐17. 

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group remains relatively flat compared to FY 2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  is  provided  for  volunteer  stipend  payments  as  requested  by  the  Center  to  assist volunteers with travel and parking expenses. 

The Operational  Expenses  group  increases  by  11.7  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. This is due to funding a new printer, toner, and Adobe Pro software for FY 2016‐17.  

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  increases  by  9.7  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. This is primarily due to increased funding for books and periodicals to obtain up‐to‐ date Texas Codes.    There are no program changes in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget. 

Authorized Positions:    

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

Dispute Resolution Center Director   Intake Coordinator  Intake/Mediation Manager   Mediation Coordinator   Office Assistant II   Office Assistant IV   Peer Mediation Coordinator   Total ‐ Dispute Resolution Fund 

84‐5

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

1 2 1 2 2 1 1

1 2  1  2  2  1  1 

1 2 1 2 2 1 1

10

10

10


Bexar County, Texas  Domestic Relations Office (Fund 215)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actuals

Estimate

Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal     Transfers In     Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

$97,978   $97,978 

$68,949   $68,949 

$89,949 $89,949

$355,450                764 $356,214  

$351,968   391  $352,359 

$350,000 250 $350,250

$21,655 $374,014     $442,963 

$0 $350,250

$0 $356,214 $454,192

$440,199

APPROPRIATIONS     Health and Public Welfare      Subtotal    Interfund Transfer    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$378,330   $378,330  $6,913

Appropriated Fund Balance  TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

    85‐1 

$385,243 

$346,102   $346,102  $6,913     $353,015  

$416,383

$68,949

$89,949

$23,816

$454,192

$442,963  

$440,199

$409,470 $409,470 $6,913


FUND:  215  ACCOUNTING UNIT: 4102 

DOMESTIC RELATIONS OFFICE FUND     

Program Description:   The Domestic Relations Office (DRO) Fund is maintained by a $15 fee paid  upon  filing  of  a  civil  suit.  The  DRO  is  located  on  the  third  floor  of  the  Bexar  County  Courthouse  and  provides social services to Bexar County citizens. Specifically, the DRO provides social and mental health  services  support,  supervised  visitation  and  neutral  exchanges,  cooperative  parenting  group  classes,  visitation  enforcement  program,  and  low  cost  social  study  program  to  the  citizens  of  Bexar  County  involved in family law matters.  The DRO is a statutorily established office (Texas Family Code Chapter  203) administered by the Bexar County Juvenile Probation Department.    Prior  to  2000,  the  DRO  was  known  as  an  Enforcement  Office,  and  as  an  extension  of  the  District  Attorney’s  office  enforced  child  support  orders.  In  the  summer  of  2000,  the  Juvenile  Probation  Department  initiated  an  agreement  with  the  Office  of  Attorney  General  (OAG)  to  transfer  its  enforcement  function  to  the  OAG  and  consolidate  the  county  enforcement  function  into  one  entity  under the OAG.  The transfer became effective August 1, 2000. In 2001, the Juvenile Board approved the  formation of contracts for supervised visitation and neutral child exchange services. In December 2001,  the Juvenile Board Chairman Andy Mireles appointed an Advisory Board to the DRO. The DRO Advisory  Board has assisted the Bexar County Juvenile Board in developing the current services of the DRO. 

Performance Indicators:  FY 2014‐15  Actual  Work Load Indicators:  Number of Non‐Custodial Parents Served  Average Number of Cases Open per Month  Number of Intake Interviews Conducted  

121 90 588

Efficiency Indicators:  Number of Non‐Custodial Parents with Increased     Parenting Time Annually  Number of Neutral Exchanges    Number of hours of supervised visits  Effectiveness Indicators:  Percentage of Clients Reporting Improved Safety for     Children  Percentage of Clients Reporting Reduced Conflict     or Violence with Other Parent when Exchanging     Children  Percentage of Clients with Increased Parenting Time     Visitation 

85‐2

81 1,334 2,820

FY 2015‐16  Estimate  96  90  779        72  1,452  2,534     

FY 2016‐17  Proposed  130 90 1,028

81 1,455 2,540

99%

90%

90%

91%

90%   70% 

90%

67%

72%


Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual    Personnel Services  Travel, Training, and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

$242,621 0  135,617  92 

$207,324  0  138,078  700 

$271,216 2,000 135,554 700

6,913

6,913

6,913

6,913

$385,243

$419,526

$353,015

$416,383

00

$0

00

$353,015

$416,383

Program Change  Total 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$274,359  2,000  135,554  700 

Interfund Transfer  Subtotal 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

$385,243

$419,526

Program Justification and Analysis:   

The FY 2016‐17 Adopted Budget increases by 18 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates,  as described below.   

The Personnel Services group funding increases by 30.8 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16  Estimates due to savings from turnover in FY 2015‐16. Full funding is provided for all authorized  positions in the FY 2016‐17. 

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group includes the same level of funding as allocated in  the FY 2015‐16 Budget as approved by the Juvenile Probation Board. 

The Operational  Expenses  group  decreases  by  1.8  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  for  this  group  is  provided  at  the  same  level  as  the  FY  2015‐16  Budget  as  approved by the Juvenile Probation Board. 

The Supplies and Materials group remains flat when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates.  

The Interfund Transfer group provides funds for the Access Coordinator position, which is grant  funded.  The Domestic Relations Office receives $59,918 annually from the Access and Visitation  grant  program.  The  Access  Coordinator  works  directly  with  non‐custodial  parents  to  resolve  visitation issues.    The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget includes no program changes.   

85‐3


Authorized Positions:    

FY 2014‐15 

 

Actual

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

Domestic Relations Office Director  Office Assistant III  Program Specialist  Staff Attorney         Total – Domestic Relations Office Fund   

85‐4

FY 2016‐17  Proposed   

1 1 1 1

1 1  1  1    

4

1 1 1 1  

4

4


Bexar County, Texas  Justice of the Peace Technology Fund 300  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16   Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$234,375

$285,641  

$214,454

   Total Beginning Balance 

$234,375

$285,641  

$214,454

Revenue Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$275,301 1,061  $276,362 

$247,325   1,224   $248,549  

$249,000 800  $249,800 

   Total Revenues 

$276,362

$248,549  

$249,800

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$510,737

$534,190  

$464,254

 Judicial      Subtotal 

$225,096 $225,096 

$319,736   $319,736  

$244,450 $244,450 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$225,096

$319,736  

$244,450

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$285,641

$214,454  

$219,804

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$510,737

$534,190  

$464,254

APPROPRIATIONS

86‐1


FUND: 300 

JUSTICE OF THE PEACE TECHNOLOGY FUND           

In 2001,  the  77th  Texas  Legislature  created  the  Justice  of  the  Peace  Technology  Fund  (JP  Tech  Fund)  funded by the assessment of a fee of up to $4 to defendants convicted of misdemeanor cases in Justice  of the Peace Courts. Bexar County Commissioners Court approved the collection of the $4 fee in 2001.  The  County  collected  the  fee  for  approximately  two  months,  but  it  was  suspended  due  to  pending  litigation. A judgment was handed down June 30, 2003 dismissing the litigation. On September 9, 2003,  Commissioners Court reauthorized the collection of the $4 fee. This fee may be used to provide funds  for  technological  enhancements  for  justice  courts  including:  computer  systems,  computer  networks,  computer  hardware,  computer  software,  imaging  systems,  electronic  kiosks,  electronic  ticket  writers,  and  docket  management  systems.  In  accordance  with  article  102.0173  of  the  Texas  Code  of  Criminal  Procedure, the statute lists technological enhancements that may be purchased from the fund; however  the enhancements are not limited to the items on the list. County Commissioners Court determines and  approves what items may be purchased from the fund.    

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

Personnel Services  Travel, Training, and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Capital Expenditures 

$156,453 0  40,000  28,643 

$12,500 3,000  301,651  0 

$15,086   3,000   301,650   0  

$0 0  244,450  0 

Subtotal

$225,096

$317,151

$319,736  

$244,450

Program Changes 

$0 Total 

$225,096

$317,151

$319,736  

$244,450

Program Justification and Analysis:  ●  The  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  decreases  by  23.5  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16 

Estimates as described below.    

●  There  is  no  proposed  funding  for  the  Personnel  Services  group  for  FY  2016‐17.  One  full‐time  employee  was  transferred  out  of  this  fund  at  the  end  of  FY  2014‐15,  but  was  paid  a  small  amount in FY 2015‐16 due to the timing of pay periods at the turn of the fiscal year. Additionally,  funding was provided during FY 2015‐16 for temporary workers. No such funding is budgeted for  FY 2016‐17.     

86‐2


● There is no proposed funding for the Travel, Training, and Remunerations group for FY 2016‐17. 

During FY 2015‐16, a budget transfer was processed to allow Justice of the Peace Precinct 2 to  use a portion of their tech fund allocation to pay for technology‐related training. This use of the  Justice of the Peace Technology Fund is permitted by the statute governing this type of fund.     

  ●  The  Operational  Expenses  group  decreases  by  19  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16 

Estimates. This is due a decrease in the funding proposed for a software contract in the JP Tech  Fund for FY  2016‐17. The County’s agreement with CourtView  Justice Solutions is budgeted in  the  Justice  of  the  Peace  Technology  Fund  for  a  total  amount  of  $164,450  for  FY  2016‐17.  CourtView  will  provide  software  support  and  maintenance  for  the  Justice  of  the  Peace  case  management system. More specifically, CourtView will maintain the case management system  and  implement  periodic  software  updates  as  needed  to  ensure  that  the  system  operates  in  conformity with all performance standards and functional requirements provided by the County.  Additionally,  $20,000  in  Technology  Improvement  funding  is  allocated  to  each  precinct  within  the Justice of the Peace Technology Fund.         ●  There are no program changes in the FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget. 

Authorized Positions:  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

1  1 

0  0 

0  0 

2

0

0

Analyst Programmer II  Technology Business Analyst  Total – JP Tech Fund

   

86‐3


Bexar County, Texas  District and County Courts Technology Fund 301  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017  FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$92,247

$125,388  

$154,039

   Total Beginning Balance 

$92,247

$125,388  

$154,039

Revenue Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$32,662 479  $33,141 

$34,976   751   $35,727  

$30,000 450  $30,450 

   Total Revenues 

$33,141

$35,727  

$30,450

$125,388

$161,115  

$184,489

 General Government      Subtotal 

$0 $0 

$7,076   $7,076  

$10,000 $10,000 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$0

$7,076  

$10,000

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$125,388

$154,039  

$174,489

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$125,388

$161,115  

$184,489

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  APPROPRIATIONS 

87‐1


FUND: 301 

DISTRICT AND COUNTY COURTS TECHNOLOGY FUND   

Program Description: Article 102.0169 of the Texas Code of Criminal Procedure provides for the  mandatory  collection  of  a  $4  fee  by  a  defendant  convicted  of  a  criminal  offense  in  a  County  Court,  statutory County Court, or District Court. The fee shall be deposited in a fund known as the District and  County Court Technology Fund. The fund shall be used to cover the expenses associated with continuing  education  and  training  for  County  Court,  statutory  County  Court,  or  District  Court  judges,  and  clerks  regarding technological enhancements for those courts. These funds may also be used for the purchase  and maintenance of technological enhancements for a County Court, statutory County Court, or District  Court.    The District and County Court Technology Fund shall be administered by and under the direction of the  Commissioners Court of the County.                                                                                                                                                       

Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual  Supplies and Materials  Total 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$0

$29,775

$7,076  

$10,000

$0

$29,775

$7,076  

$10,000

Program Justification and Analysis:   

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  includes  $10,000  in  funding  for  technological  improvements  for  County Court‐at‐Law courtrooms and jury rooms. 

 

87‐2


Bexar County, Texas  Courthouse Facilities Improvement (Fund 306)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

  AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance   

$216,205  $216,205 

$571,340    $571,340  

$1,061,602   $1,061,602 

$517,977  2,079   $520,056

$512,601    4,495   $517,096 

$500,000    2,100     $502,100

$736,261 

$1,088,436  

$1,563,702 

$164,921   $164,921 

$177,100 $177,100

$164,921 

$26,834 $26,834    $26,834 

Appropriated Fund Balance   

$571,340 

$1,061,602 

$1,386,602 

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$736,261

$1,088,436 

$1,563,702

Revenue Service Fees  Other Revenue      Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS    APPROPRIATIONS      Capital Expenditures      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS   

88‐1

$177,100


FUND: 306 

COURTHOUSE FACILITIES IMPROVEMENT FUND           

The Courthouse  Facilities  Improvement  Fund  is  a  Bexar  County  Operating  Fund  created  as  a  result  of  legislation passed by the 81st Session of the Texas Legislature. The legislation allows the assessment of a  fee  of  up  to  $15  for  each  civil  case  filed  in  the  court.  The  fees  collected  may  be  used  for  the  construction, renovation, or improvement of the facilities that house the Bexar County Civil and Criminal  Courts. This fund is budgeted by approval of the Commissioners Court in accordance with Section 51.706  of the Texas Government Code.       Appropriations:  FY 2014‐15  FY 2015‐16  FY 2015‐16  FY 2016‐17  Actual  Budget  Estimate  Proposed      Capital Expenditures  $164,921 $365,000 $26,834  $177,100   Total $164,921 $365,000 $26,834  $177,100    

Program Justification and Analysis:     

Overall, the  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates as described below.      The Capital Expenditures group proposes funding in the amount of $117,100 as follows:      Replacement  of  an  air  conditioning  unit  located  in  the  Bexar  Courtly  Courthouse  for  a  total cost of $58,500.     Replacement of an AHU handler, ductwork, and additional dual zone control. Replacing  the  ductwork  and  adding  the  zone  control  will  improve  energy  savings  at  the  Bexar  County Courthouse for a total cost of $93,600.     Funding  for  repairs  and  replacement  of  the  existing  roof  of  the  Bexar  Courtly  Courthouse is proposed in the amount of $25,000. 

88‐2


Bexar County, Texas  District Attorney M.I.L.E.S. Program (Fund 332)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017     

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Other Revenue      Subtotal        Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

 

APPROPRIATIONS     General Government      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

89‐1

$188,244   $188,244      $27,400  191,081  $218,481    $218,481    $406,725   

$303,068     $303,068       $54   0   $54     $54     $303,122    

$103,657  $103,657  $0    $103,657    $303,068    $406,725 

$0  $0   $303,122     $303,122     $0     $303,122  

$0 $0 

$0 0 $0  $0  $0 

$0 $0 $0  $0  $0  $0 


- FUND:   332

D.A. MILES FUND     

Program Description:  The  M.I.L.E.S.  (Meaningful  Intervention  Leading  to  Enduring  Success)  Program was created by the District Attorney’s office in September 2014 under Article 102.012 of the  Texas Criminal Code of Procedure. The program is for first time offenders between the ages of 17 and 21  charged  with  certain  misdemeanor  offenses  and  offers  them  an  opportunity  to  have  their  charge  dismissed  following  successful  completion  of  a  six  month  supervisory  term  and  full  payment  of  restitution  and  other  fees.  The  opportunity  provides  a  path  for  first  time  offenders  that  meet  certain  qualifications to conclude their criminal justice involvement without a conviction on their record. Courts  will reduce the number of defendants on their dockets and the jail administrator could see less jail beds  utilized  in  the  future  if  the  recidivism  of  these  defendants  is  reduced.  The  application  fee  for  the  program  is  $50  and  if  accepted,  the  program  fee  is  $350  for  participants  charged  with  a  Class  B  Misdemeanor and $450 for participants charged with a Class A Misdemeanor.    The District Attorney's office considers the following factors before placing a client in the program:     Victim's input will be considered before placing an individual in the program, if applicable.   Restitution amount, if applicable, will be considered if the amount is higher than an amount a  person could reasonably be expected to pay during the length of the program.   Any other factors noted in the application materials. 

Pre‐Trial Services supervises participants for three months, unless the period of supervision is extended  to six months because the defendant is not in financial compliance at the end of three months.    Appropriations:  FY 2014‐15  Actual  Personnel Services  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials   Interfund Transfers  Subtotal

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$87,217 14,260  2,180  0 

$0 0 0 312,433

$0 0  0  303,122 

$0 0 0 0

$103,657

$312,433

$303,122  

$0

Program Change 

$0 Total

$103,657

$312,433

$303,122  

$0

Program Justification and Analysis:     In  FY  2015‐16,  the  D.A.  Pre‐Trial  Diversion  program  replaced  the  D.A.  MILES  program.  Therefore,  there are no expenditures or revenues proposed for FY 2016‐17.  89‐2 


Bexar County, Texas  DA Pre‐Trial Diversion Program (Fund 333)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017       

      FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Service Fees  Fines and Forfeitures  Proceeds from Sales of Assets  Other Revenue  Insurance Premiums Revenue      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers      Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

  $0  $0 

$0 1,116 11 34,400 $35,527  $0  $35,527  $35,527 

      FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$33,270     $33,270       $34,933   0  0  140,770    $175,703     $303,122   $478,825     $512,095    

$330,169 $330,169 

$32,000 0 0 141,000 $173,000  $0  $173,000  $503,169 

APPROPRIATIONS     Judicial      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$2,257 $2,257  $2,257  $33,270  $35,527 

90‐1

$181,926   $181,926     $181,926     $330,169     $512,095  

$302,899 $302,899  $302,899  $200,270  $503,169 


‐ FUND:   333  

DISTRICT ATTORNEY’S   PRE‐TRIAL DIVERSION FUND     

Program Description: 

During 2015,  the  District  Attorney’s  Office  implemented  a  Pre‐Trial  Diversion  (PTD),  a  program  which  will  replace  the  former  MILES  Program.    This  program  was  created  under  Article  102.0121  of  the  Texas  Criminal  Code  of  Procedure.    The  participation  is  expected  to  surpass  800  participants.  The  opportunity  provides  a  path  for  first‐time  offenders,  meeting  certain  qualifications,  to  conclude  their  criminal  justice  involvement  without  a  conviction  on  their  record.  In  addition  to  the  reduction  in  the  number  of  defendants  on  the  court  dockets,  the  District  Attorney’s  Office anticipates a reduction in jail bed days, as these defendants will now be supervised rather than be  incarcerated. The Judicial Services Department will supervise and tailor conditions to meet and address  the specific issues contributing to an individual defendant committing crimes.      Appropriations:  FY 2014‐15  FY 2015‐16  FY 2015‐16  FY 2016‐17  Actual  Budget  Estimate  Proposed  Personnel Services  Subtotal

$2,257

$146,480

$181,926

$142,096

$2,257

$146,480

$181,926  

$142,096

Program Change 

$160,803 Total

$2,257

$146,480

$181,926  

$302,899

Program Justification and Analysis:     

The FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  the  FY  2015‐16  Estimates as explained below.    The  Personnel  Services  group  decreases  by  21.9  percent  due  to  the  one  time  funding  for  three  temporary Pre‐Trial Bond Officer I positions during FY 2015‐16 for the implementation of the District  Attorney’s Pre‐Trial Diversion Program with the Judicial Services Department.     The  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  includes  one  program  change  for  a  total  cost  of  $160,803,  as  described below.   

90‐2


The program change adds three Pre‐Trial Bond Officer I (NE‐05) positions for a total cost of  $160,803, including salary, benefits, and technology equipment ($3,258). The Pre‐Trial Bond  Officers  will  supervise  and  tailor  conditions  to  meet  and  address  the  specific  issues  contributing  to  an  individual  defendant  committing  crimes.  Of  the  three  Pre‐Trial  Bond  Officers, two will be assigned to the misdemeanor caseload and one will be assigned to the  felony caseload. 

Authorized Positions:   

Paralegal Pre‐Trial Bond Officer             Total ‐ DA Pre‐Trial Diversion Program Fund

90‐3

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actual

Estimate

Proposed

0 0

3 0 

3 3

0

3

6


Bexar County, Texas   Fleet Maintenance Fund 504   Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017   FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS  Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$365,275

   Total Beginning Balance 

$365,275

Revenue Service Fees  Proceeds from Sales of Assets  Other Revenue      Subtotal 

$760,658 1,968 260 $762,886 

Transfers In      Total Revenues 

$0 $762,886 

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS 

$1,128,161

  $337,749     $337,749       $750,000   0  110  $750,110     $0   $750,110     $1,087,859    

$141,791 $141,791 

$725,000 0 0 $725,000  $62,374  $787,374  $929,165 

APPROPRIATIONS   General Government      Subtotal 

$790,412 $790,412 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS 

$790,412

Appropriated Fund Balance 

$337,749

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$1,128,161

91‐1

$946,068   $946,068     $946,068     $141,791     $1,087,859  

$929,165 $929,165  $929,165  $0 $929,165 


FUND:    504  ACCOUNTING UNIT: 5050   

PUBLIC WORKS – FLEET MAINTENANCE FUND     

Program Description: The Public Works ‐ Fleet Maintenance Fund was established to provide for  the safety and extended life of the County’s light vehicles. The Fleet Maintenance Department is tasked  with  providing  County  vehicles  with  periodic  preventive  maintenance,  evaluating  and  recommending  vehicles  for  replacement  based  on  maintenance  and  operational  cost  analyses,  developing  specifications for contract repairs, and serving as technical advisor to other Offices and Departments in  developing  special  equipment  and  vehicle  bid  specifications.  The  Fleet  Maintenance  Director  is  the  Chair of the Bexar County Vehicle Replacement Committee.   

Goals and Objectives:   

     

Provide safe  and  mechanically  sound  vehicles  to  our  customers,  especially  those  who  drive  emergency vehicles that provide for public safety for Bexar County Citizens.  Reduce  the  number  of  unscheduled  repairs  by  providing  an  aggressive  and  methodical  preventive maintenance program for all Bexar County vehicles and equipment.  Assist  all  Offices  and  Departments  in  having  the  proper  vehicle  or  piece  of  equipment  to  perform their missions.  Assist in getting the best return for all Bexar County vehicles at the time of sale.  Establish a work atmosphere that promotes the effective and efficient management of Bexar  County resources.  Establish  a  work  center  atmosphere  that  promotes  the  effective  and  efficient  management  of  County resources. 

Performance Indicators:  FY 2014‐15  Actual   

Workload Indicators:  Total Number of Light Vehicles in Fleet   Number of Maintenance Services Performed on  Patrol Vehicles  Number of Maintenance Services Performed on  Traffic Vehicles 

910

1,216

1,124

1,004

550

505     .18  .14  132      98%  97%  98% 

505

97% 97% 98%

  91‐2 

992 

.16 .11 142

Effectiveness Indicators:  Percentage of Days Available – Patrol Vehicles   Percentage of Days Available – Traffic Vehicles  Percentage of Days Available – Light Vehicles 

FY 2016‐17   Proposed 

991

Efficiency Indicators:  Maintenance Cost per Mile (Patrol)  Maintenance Cost per Mile (Traffic)  Ratio of Vehicles per Mechanic 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

.20 .16 130

98% 97% 98%


Appropriations: FY 2014‐15  Actual 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$688,667 0  72,515  29,230 

$790,678 3,100 124,401 61,876

$769,567 3,100  87,145  86,256 

$797,885 3,100 82,880 45,300

Subtotal

$790,412

$980,055

$946,068

$929,165

00

$0

Personnel Services  Travel, Training, and Remunerations  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  

Program Change   

00

Total

$790,412

$980,055

$946,068

$929,165

Program Justification and Analysis:   

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget decreases by 1.8 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates  as described below.  

The Personnel Services group increases by 3.7 percent when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates.  This  increase  is  due  to  savings  from  turnover  experienced  during  FY  2015‐16.  Full  funding  is  provided for all authorized positions in the FY 2016‐17. 

The Travel,  Training,  and  Remunerations  group  remains  flat  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. Funding is provided for the Fleet Manager to travel to the Government Fleet Expo &  Conference to keep up with the latest best practices in fleet management.    The  Operational  Expenses  group  decreases  by  4.9  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. This is due to the one‐time funding for renovations of the facilities during FY 2015‐16.  Funding  is  provided  in  FY  2016‐17  for  the  new  Fleet  Management  Information  System,  which  will improve turnaround time for vehicles entering the shop. Additional funding is also available  for  data  lines  associated  with  the  recent  installation  of  wireless  internet  at  the  Fleet  Maintenance  facility,  which  will  allow  for  better  customer  service.  Funding  is  also  provided  in  the  Repairs  &  Maintenance‐Buildings  account  for  minor  facility  upgrades,  including  the  installation of solar lights in the parking lot and security cameras for the facilities.   

   

The Supplies  and  Materials  group  decreases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. This is primarily due to the one‐time purchase of office furniture for improvement to  the  customer  service  area  and  office  workspaces  for  FY  2015‐16.  Funding  is  provided  for  the  purchase of minor equipment such as a tire machine, transmission flusher, and air conditioner  machine in FY 2016‐17.  The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget has no program changes.    An inter‐fund transfer from the General Fund is proposed in the amount of $62,374 to provide  91‐3 


supplement the fund through FY 2016‐17. 

Authorized Positions: 

Automotive Journeyman  Automotive Mechanic  Automotive Parts Clerk  Automotive Service Worker  Automotive Service Writer  Fleet Maintenance Operations Manager  Fleet Maintenance Superintendent  Fleet Technician  Maintenance Controller  Office Assistant III             Total ‐ Fleet Maintenance Fund   

91‐4

FY 2014‐15  Actual  2  5  1  2  0  1  1  1.5  0  1 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate  2  4  1  2  1  1  1  1  1  1 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed  2  4  1  2  1  1  1  1  1  1 

14.5

15

15


Bexar County, Texas   Technology Improvement Fund 565  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 

        FY 2014‐15  Actual 

     

AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance      Undesignated Funds        Total Beginning Balance  

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

      $376,835  $376,835 

 

Revenue      Service Fees     Other Revenue       Subtotal        Transfers In     Total Revenues 

       

      $1,768,877   $1,768,877  

  $1,098,962  $42,525  $1,141,487 

$2,247,220 $2,247,220 

  $932,938   $0   $932,938  

$739,275 $0  $739,275

$1,811,482  $2,952,969 

 TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS  

$1,234,748   $2,167,686  

$3,329,804 

   

APPROPRIATIONS      General Government        Subtotal  

$3,936,563  

$1,560,927 $1,560,927 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS  

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS  

92‐1

$2,479,720

$2,247,220  

$3,329,804 

$2,479,720 $2,479,720 

$1,689,343

$1,768,877

       

   

$4,535,495

$1,689,343   $1,689,343  

$1,560,927

Appropriated Fund Balance  

   

$1,549,000 $2,288,275 

$2,055,755

$3,936,563  

$4,535,495


‐FUND:   565 

TECHNOLOGY IMPROVEMENT FUND   

Program  Description:    The  Technology  Improvements  Fund  was  established  in  FY  1998‐99  as  a  result  of  a  performance  review  of  the  Bexar  County  Information  Technology  Department  (BCIT).  The  outside  consultant,  MGT  of  America,  made  recommendations  designed  to  improve  the  County’s  technology planning and services. This fund facilitates the purchase of computer‐related equipment. It is  designed to satisfy the departmental requirement for an internal information technology budget, while  maintaining centralized control of the purchasing process to maintain countywide technology standards.  The  goal  is  to  maintain  the  highest  level  of  performance  for  each  department’s  unique  needs,  while  maintaining overall connectivity between systems.    Prior  to  FY  1998‐99,  the  technology  improvements  were  expensed  either  in  the  BCIT  budget  or  appropriated in the capital expenditure line item of individual offices and departments. This budgeting  approach made it difficult to track and control the County’s investments in technology.    The system of allocating all the costs of technology improvements to County Offices and Departments  more accurately assesses the true costs of the operation of these offices and departments. This system  also  places  managerial  control  of  these  costs  within  each  organization.  Once  transferred  to  the  Technology  Fund,  the  funding  for  each  Office  and  Department’s  technology  needs  are  tracked  separately  to  ensure  that  the  contributions  made  by  each  are  used  only  to  purchase  their  technology  equipment  recommended  in  the  budget  process.  In  turn,  this  system  also  gives  County  Officials  and  Department  heads  better  cost  information  with  which  to  assess  their  Office’s  or  Department’s  performance. 

Performance Indicators:  (See Information Technology)     

Appropriations:      

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

Personnel Services  Operational Expenses  Supplies and Materials  Subtotal: 

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$91,522 0 1,469,405

$139,477 0 943,950

$140,560 58,515  1,490,268 

$160,935 0 2,288,275

$1,560,927

$1,083,427

$1,689,343        

$2,449,210

$1,689,343  

$2,479,720

Program Changes   

Total  

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

$1,560,927

92‐2 

$1,083,427

$30,510


Program Justification and Analysis:    

The FY 2016‐17 Proposed Budget increases significantly when compared to FY 2015‐16 Estimates as  described below.     The  Personnel  Services  group  increases  by  14.5  percent  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates. This is due to turnover experienced in FY 2015‐16. Full year funding is provided for all  authorized positions in FY 2016‐17.    

No funding is proposed within the Operational Expense group for FY 2016‐17. During FY 2015‐ 16, one‐time funding was used to purchase two servers and additional video recording storage  space for surveillance of county facilities.    The  Supplies  and  Materials  group  increases  significantly  when  compared  to  FY  2015‐16  Estimates.  Funding  is  proposed  for  the  purchase  of  new  technology  items  for  Offices  and  Departments.  Funding  in  the  amount  of  $1,549,000  is  proposed  for  the  County’s  personal  computer and notebook replacement program.    The  FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  includes  a  total  of  $30,510  in  technology  needs  which  will  support recommended program changes for various offices and departments as shown below.      Technology for Proposed Program Changes   Bibliotech ‐ Admin  Bibliotech ‐ East  Bibliotech ‐ South  County Clerk  District Attorney  District Attorney Pretrial Fund  Facilities ‐ Admin  Facilities ‐ Adult Detention Center  Facilities ‐ County Buildings  Facilities ‐ Juvenile Institutions  Fire Code Fund  Judicial Services Admin  Judicial Services Crime Lab  Judicial Services Medical Examiner  Judicial Services Pretrial  Judicial Services Re‐Entry  Sheriff ‐ Law Enforcement  Total Cost

92‐3

Cost $690   $1,679   $299   $2,707   $4,060   $3,258   $2,525   $299   $299   $299   $3,093   $1,616   $1,086   $1,535   $1,622   $1,086   $4,357   $30,510 


Authorized Positions:  FY 2014‐15  Actual      Network Architect I  Network Architect II               Total – Technology Improvement Fund

FY 2015‐16  Estimate   

FY 2016‐17  Proposed   

1 1

1 1    2 

2

1 1 2

Appropriations:  

The FY  2016‐17  Proposed  Budget  includes  a  total  of  $739,275  in  technology  needs  for  Countywide Offices and Departments as shown below. 

Proposed Technology  Amount 

Office/Department Agrilife 

$2,279

Auditor  

$7,795

Bail Bond Board  

$700

Bexar Heritage and Parks 

$2,106

Bibliotech  

$274

Budget  

$5,000

Central Magistration ‐ Criminal District Clerk 

$3,528

Central Magistration ‐ Criminal District Courts  Civil District Courts 

$2,549 $9,326 

Civil District Courts ‐ Children's Court 

$1,553

Civil District Courts ‐ Family Drug Court 

$362

Community Resources ‐ Community Programs  

$1,175

Community Resources ‐ Direct Client Services 

$295

Community Resources ‐Veterans Services  

$2,171

Community Supervision and Corrections 

$33,334

Constable Precinct 1 

$2,601

Constable Precinct 2 

$6,814

Constable Precinct 3 

$3,560

Constable Precinct 4 

$1,547

County Clerk 

$53,657

County Courts‐At‐Law 

$13,391

Criminal District Courts 

$8,029

Dispute Resolution 

$1,377

92‐4


Office/Department

Proposed Technology Amount

District Attorney 

$42,724  

District Clerk 

$14,242  

Emergency Management Office 

$36,812  

Facilities ‐ Administration 

$6,513  

Facilities ‐ Adult Detention Center 

$5,607  

Facilities ‐ County Buildings 

$5,607  

Fire Code Fund 

$63,748  

Human Resources 

$5,077  

Information Technology ‐ Application Development 

$2,600  

Information Technology ‐ Tech Support  

$20,000  

Judicial Services ‐ Court Collections 

$9,999  

Judicial Services ‐ Criminal Investigations Lab 

$11,922  

Judicial Services ‐ Medical Examiner  

$8,078  

Judicial Services ‐ Mental Health Initiative 

$1,754  

Judicial Services ‐ Pretrial Services 

$6,918  

Jury Operations  Justice of the Peace Precinct 1  Justice of the Peace Precinct 2  Justice of the Peace Precinct 3  Justice of the Peace Precinct 4  Juvenile Probation  Juvenile Services ‐ Administration  Law Library  Management & Finance  Mental Health Department  Public Defenders Office   Public Works ‐ Storm Water   Sheriff ‐ Academy   Sheriff ‐ ADC  Sheriff ‐ Adult Detention CTR Annex   Sheriff ‐ Adult Detention CTR Comal   Sheriff ‐ Archives  Sheriff ‐ Central Records   Sheriff ‐ Civil    Sheriff ‐ Communications  Sheriff ‐ Dispatch/Communications  Sheriff ‐ Human Services  Sheriff ‐ Intake/Release 

$2,200   $20,000   $20,000   $20,000   $20,000   $5,086   $1,275   $3,289   $9,000   $469   $295  $4,950  $20,122   $35,185   $1,992   $10,555   $650   $1,867   $1,955   $7,762   $28,649  $11,222   $825   92‐5 


Office/Department

Proposed Technology Amount

Sheriff ‐ Mental Health   Sheriff ‐ Patrol Substations  Sheriff ‐ Personnel  Sheriff ‐ Support Services Admin  Sheriff ‐ Warrants  Sheriff ‐ Work Release   Tax Office ‐ Financial Reporting   Tax Office ‐ Property Tax  Tax Office ‐ Tax Administration  Total 

$3,500 $9,424  $9,923  $69,463  $5,893   $55   $1,710  $4,270  $2,665  $739,275 

92‐6


FUND:   700 

CAPITAL LEASE PROJECTS FUND                   Program Description: The projects in this fund were funded through Master Lease Agreements up until  2008‐09. This funding mechanism allowed the County to match the term of the liability to the life of the  asset  being  financed  at  competitive  rates.  Upon  expiration  of  the  Master  Lease  Agreements,  the  remaining  cash  balance  in  the  Capital  Lease  Projects  Fund  was  reprogrammed  to  establish  the  Efficiencies  and  Innovations  Project.    The  following  are  the  current  projects  created  to  enhance  daily  business  operations  and  create  efficiencies  to  include  the  automation  of  business  processes.  The  remaining Efficiencies and Innovations Project balance is also reflected in the list below.       Project  Project Budget  Activity to Date  Funds Available  KOVIS Licenses   $261,868  $17,316  $244,552 AMS Financial Management Maintenance   135,027  67,514  67,513 Medical Examiner Imaging Project   70,000  25,000  45,000 HR Online Open Enrollment  200,000 199,999  0 Efficiencies And Innovations Project  720,709 0  720,709 Total $1,387,604 $109,830  $1,277,774

93‐1


Bexar County, Texas  Fleet Acquisition Fund 703  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017     

FY 2014‐15  Actuals 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

 

AVAILABLE FUNDS 

Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds      Total Beginning Balance    Revenue  Fines and Forfeitures  Proceeds from Sales of Assets  Other Revenue      Subtotal    Interfund Transfers      Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS   

 

  $0  $0 

 

$1,494,229   $1,494,229  

$411,220   $200,000  $4,395                         ‐    $415,615   $200,000 

$3,106,161 $3,135,495   

$2,532,403   $2,948,018  

$3,706,074 $3,906,074 

$4,442,247  

$4,537,913

$3,810,408   $3,810,408  

$0 $0  $3,740,317  $3,740,317 

$3,810,408  

$3,740,317

$631,839  

$797,596

$4,442,247  

$4,537,913

$3,135,495 

APPROPRIATIONS

  General Government    Public Safety    Capital Expenditures      Subtotal    TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

$20,591  $47,200  $1,573,475  $1,641,266 

$1,641,266 

$1,494,229 

$3,135,495 

94‐1

$631,839 $631,839 

 

$421 28,913                        ‐    $29,334 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 


FUND:   703 

FLEET ACQUISITION FUND    

Program Description: The Fleet Acquisition Fund was created in the FY 2014‐15 Adopted Budget  to  provide  a  more  transparent  vehicle  acquisition  process.    These  funds  are  used  to  purchase  new  vehicles,  as  well  as  replacement  vehicles  as  recommended  by  the  Bexar  County  Vehicle  Replacement  Committee and approved by Commissioners Court.    

The Fleet  Acquisition  Fund  will  receive  its  revenue  from  budgeted  funds  in  the  appropriate  funding  source (Capital Fund, Road and Bridge Fund, General Fund, etc.) established by the Budget Department.  Once transferred to this fund, the funding for each Office and Department’s  vehicle purchases will be  tracked separately to ensure vehicles recommended in the budget process are purchased.    

Appropriations:   

FY 2014‐15  Actual 

    

General Government  Public Safety  Capital Expenditures   

Total

FY 2015‐16  Budget 

FY 2015‐16  Estimate 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed 

$20,591 47,200 1,573,475

$0 0 2,693,490

$0 0  3,810,408 

$0 0 3,740,317

$1,641,266

$2,693,490

$3,810,408  

$3,740,317

Program Justification and Analysis:    

The Fleet Acquisition Fund includes an Interfund Transfer totaling $3,706,074 from the general fund  for replacement vehicles.   The remaining $34,243 will be transferred from the Appropriated Fund  Balance.      The  table  below  reflects  vehicle  replacement  costs  for  each  Office  or  Departments,  as  well  a  new  vehicle for Agrilife Extension Services for transporting materials and supplies for program outreach.     

Office/Department Agrilife Extension Services  Constable Precinct 1  Constable Precinct 2  Constable Precinct 3  Constable Precinct 4  Facilities Management  Fire Marshal  Juvenile Probation  Public Works   Sheriff's Office  Total  

94‐2

Amount $34,243 42,469 47,500            360,000              190,000              37,262               40,000  27,492    389,850 2,492,000  $      3,740,317


Bexar County, Texas  Community Infrastructure and Economic Development (Fund 815)  Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017     

FY 2014‐15 

FY 2015‐16 

FY 2016‐17 

Actuals

Estimates

Proposed

  AVAILABLE FUNDS    Beginning Balance    Undesignated Funds 

$2,839,759

$5,987,326

$3,719,961

   Total Beginning Balance 

$2,839,759

$5,987,326

$3,719,961

$4,223,101 0 

$14,448 0 

$0 0

$4,223,101

$14,448

$0

$4,223,101

$14,448

$0

$7,062,860

$6,001,774

$3,719,961

 Capital Projects 

$1,075,534 0 

$1,177,222 1,104,591 

$2,042,241 170,409

   Subtotal 

$1,075,534

$2,281,813

$2,212,650

$1,075,534

$2,281,813

$2,212,650

$5,987,326

$3,719,961

$1,507,312

$7,062,860

$6,001,774

$3,719,961

Revenue  Intergovernmental Revenue  Other Revenue      Subtotal        Total Revenues    TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS    APPROPRIATIONS      General Government 

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS    Appropriated Fund Balance    TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS 

95‐1 


‐ FUND:  815 

COMMUNITY INFRASTRUCTURE   AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND   

Program Description:  Pursuant  to  the  Texas  Constitution  Article  III,  §  52‐a  and  Chapter  380  of  the  Texas  Local  Government  Code, a City is authorized to establish and provide for the administration of one or more programs for  making  grants  of  public  money  to  promote  state  or  local  economic  development  and  to  stimulate  business  and  commercial  activity  in  and  around  the  municipality.  Using  this  Code,  the  City  of  San  Antonio (COSA) created a program for the purpose of making loans and grants available for economic  development projects meeting certain criteria.       The City‐owned electricity service, CPS Energy (“CPSE”) developed a fund to support these efforts.  As  part of its current corporate policy to assist political subdivisions within its service area, CPSE reserves  on an annual basis one‐percent (1%) of retail electricity sales within the political subdivision in escrow  for  use  by  the  political  subdivision  for  Community  Infrastructure  and  Economic  Development  projects  (“CIED Funds”).    Bexar  County  has  demonstrated  the  need  to  use  the  available  and  uncommitted  City  CIED  funds  reserved  by  CPSE  for  use  to  support  County‐identified  economic  development  projects  that  meet  the  requirements of Chapter 380 of the Texas Local Government Code, but that may fall outside the scope  of CPSE’s CIED Fund Policy. Because of this, COSA has agreed to allow the County access to available and  uncommitted CIED funds through a 381 grant agreement with the understanding that County would use  these  funds  for  economic  development  projects.    Parameters  to  be  met  to  be  considered  for  use  of  these funds are:     The  economic  development  project  supports  the  attraction,  retention  or  expansion  of  companies in targeted industries, as defined in the approved City or County Tax Abatement  Guidelines.    The  economic  development  project  supports  development  at  or  around  military  bases,  educational institutions or other nongovernmental institutions which results in job creation  or retention in targeted industries.   The economic development project promotes commercial or mixed‐use development in the  City’s Inner City Reinvestment and Infill Policy area.   The  economic  development  project  includes  public  improvements,  training,  property  acquisition,  site  development,  and  facility  construction  or  improvements  that  support  a  targeted industry.   The economic development project may include studies or planning activities that promote  growth in targeted industries or economic development.                95‐2 


Below are the project allocations within this Fund:  FY 2014‐15  Actuals  Projects  EDF Contribution (SA EDF)  MA ‐ PETCO  381 Grants  Innovation Fund  Workforce Initiative  Economic Development Programming  Economic Development Capital Projects‐Roads 

$535,000 40,000 349,621 0 0 150,913 0

Grand Total

$1,075,534

FY 2015‐16  Estimate    $535,000  40,000   322,222  150,000  0  130,000  1,104,591    $2,281,813 

FY 2016‐17  Proposed  $535,000 0 432,241 850,000 100,000 125,000 170,409 $2,212,650

Economic Development Foundation (EDF) Contribution  The City of San Antonio began looking at opportunities to improve corporate retention and recruitment  in the summer of 2008. As a result, several issues were identified which included an assessment of the  strengths  and  weaknesses  of  the  community’s  overall  retention  and  recruitment  processes.  The  corporate  retention  and  recruitment  subcommittee  has  worked  over  the  past  year  to  acquire  information and interview stakeholders in the economic development community. The committee also  evaluated national economic industry trends and best practices from other cities. The recommendations  will  help  the  local  economic  development  community  refocus  economic  development  efforts  on  attracting  and  retaining  new  businesses.  The  subcommittee’s  recommendations  have  three  main  components:  1)  create  a  long‐range  vision  and  strategic  plan,  2)  establish  a  process  and  structure  for  economic  development  in  San  Antonio,  and  3)  improve  resource  utilization.  A  part  of  their  recommendations include establishing funding for the San Antonio Economic Development Foundation  from the City of San Antonio and the County of Bexar in an amount of $535,000 from each entity. For FY  2016‐17  funding  in  the  amount  of  $535,000  has  been  allocated  towards  the  EDF  pending  contract  negotiations.    381 Grant Agreements  Funding in the amount of $432,241 is appropriated for the County’s various 381 grant agreements.     Innovation Fund  Innovation  in  the  Cyber/IT  industry  and  its  ecosystem  aligns  well  with  central  city  revitalization  and  growth  in  the  desired  high‐wage/  high‐skilled  economic  activity.  To  develop  this  industry,  the  County  has established a $1,000,000 Innovation Fund in FY 2015‐16 that will be used for direct incentives and  other support programs. Funding in the amount of $850,000 is available to continue the program for FY  2016‐17.    Workforce Initiative   In  the  FY  2015‐16  Adopted  Budget,  $100,000  was  allocated  to  San  Antonio‐Talent  for  Economic  Competitiveness  (SA‐TEC)  to  assist  with  providing  dedicated  staffing  support  to  the  SA‐TEC  board.  Subsequently, SA‐TEC merged into the San Antonio Works program. SA Works, which currently operates  within  the  San  Antonio  Chamber  of  Commerce,  was  created  to  grow  and  enhance  the  existing  career  and  technology  programs  currently  in  place  throughout  the  community  to  meet  specific  high‐skill  workforce  needs.  The  SA  Works  program  is  now  transitioning  to  the  San  Antonio  Economic  Development Foundation. Funding in the amount of $100,000 is appropriated for Workforce Initiatives.   95‐3 


Economic Development Programming  Funding in the amount of $125,000 is provided for support of various professional services agreements  and  sponsorships  within  the  local  and  regional  geographic  area  to  assist  Economic  Development  in  performing its key functions of job retention and job growth.   

95‐4


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GRANT FUNDS


Bexar County, Texas Grants-In-Aid (Fund 800) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Intergovernmental Revenue Proceeds from Sales of Assets Other Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfers Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$4,398,863

$3,943,840

$0

$4,398,863

$3,943,840

$0

$21,126,740 $2,744 $40,497 $21,169,981

$7,777,276 $0 $45,126 $7,822,402

$18,257,483 $0 $600 $18,258,083

$93,370 $21,263,351

$126,550 $7,948,952

$255,295 $18,513,378

$25,662,214

$11,892,792

$18,513,378

$301,946 $1,452,056 $2,457,467 $234,157 $17,166,955 $21,612,581 $105,793

$166,070 $798,631 $1,351,607 $128,786 $9,447,697 $11,892,791 $0

$259,674 $1,248,768 $2,113,422 $201,375 $14,690,140 $18,513,378 $0

$21,718,374

$11,892,791

$18,513,378

$3,943,840

$0

$0

$25,662,214

$11,892,792

$18,513,378

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Judicial Public Safety Capital Projects Health and Public Welfare Subtotal Interfund Transfers TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS Appropriated Fund Balance TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

96-1


Fund: 800, 808, 809, 810, 811, 812, 814, 816

GRANTS-IN-AID FUND Program Description:

Bexar County uses grants to supplement annual budget allocations in support of services provided by County Offices and Departments. Grant funds also serve as potential seed money for new programs and/or services, particularly within County priority areas of concern, identified gaps in service, and other service needs. By policy Commissioners Court approves, in advance, Office and Department applications for discretionary grant funding. Programs and services funded by grant monies are authorized only for the term of the grant. Likewise, positions that are funded by grant resources are authorized only for the term of the grant and employees who seek to fill these positions are notified of this condition of employment. Grants appearing in this fund vary from year to year as some expire and others become active. Currently, all grants budgets appear under this fund, including grants received that were not anticipated at the time that the budget was prepared. The County's cash matches for grants, if required, are appropriated in the Non-Departmental budget. Estimates are based on the best available data at the time the budget is prepared.

Performance Indicators:

Each grant includes performance indicators particular to its service and/or program activities. These indicators become part of the grant submission and award. Bexar County Offices and Departments which are awarded grant funds are responsible for adhering to all grantor requirements, including but not limited to grant certifications, training, submission of regular progress reports, maintenance of written policies and procedures and other documentation supporting grant activities, and notifying the grantor agency of grant changes. Performance reports are reviewed by the County in recommending support for grant renewal or continued service funding through other nongrant means.

Appropriations:

County grants are listed with the total grant budget, expenditures to date, and the remaining funds available. Each Grant is listed by funding source. Many of the grant years are different than the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiscal year. Therefore, a significant amount of funds can be carried forward each year, depending on the term of each grant. Due to various grant applications and terms, grant appropriations and authorized positions are approximate and may fluctuate throughout the Fiscal Year.

96-2


Grant Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Adult Probation JAG Adult Drug Court JA1605390101 Probation Officer Texas Veterans Commission MS1612470603 & MS1612470604/CJ16 Probation Officer Juvenile Probation Early Intervention CJ1528411, JJ161501 Program Asst-Sub Abuse & Family Enrich. Senior Juvenile Probation Officer Juvenile Probation Officer Program Manager CJD Juvenile Drug Court CJ1519410101 Juvenile Probation Officer Child Access and Visitation Grant JM162201 Access Coordinator JAG - Project Sentry JA1504410102 Senior Probation Officer Criminal District Attorney Early Intervention CJ1418410102 Misdemeanor Prosecutor Victim Empowerment (COSA) MS1632133001, MS1622133001 Licensed Professional Counselor Community Resource Manager Crime Victim Liaison Office Assistant IV Justice Assistance Grant JA1607130001, JA1607130002 Advocate Human trafficking CJD Grant CJ1621410101 Prosecutor III Civil District Court JAG - Family Drug Treatment Court JA1605370001 Family Support Monitor Family Drug Court Manager CJD - Family Drug Court Program CJ1508370002, CJ5408370001

96-3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1

1

1

1

1

2

1 2 1 0

0 1 1 1

0 1 1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

2

2

2

1

0

0

1 1 1 1

1 1 0 1

1 1 0 1

2

2

1

1

1

1

1 0

0 1

0 1


FY 2014-15 Actual Civil District Court Family Drug Court Monitor Hidalgo Foundation â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Early Intervention Program Family Support Monitor Manager Criminal District Courts Adult Drug Court Grant CJ1406390103 Case Manager (Felony) Data Tracking Specialist SAMSHA - Adult Treatment Court SA1644390101 Case Manager Re-Entry Program Income MS1220390101 Case Manager Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office ReAct Grant MS1504230001 Sheriff Deputy Law Enforcement Investigator Judicial Services Veterans Court CJ1607470601&TVC Veterans Treatment Court Manager Veterans Treatment Court Project Director Texas Veterans Commission Veterans Court Case Manager BC Adult Treatmt Crt Collabor - Fund 211 Problem Solving Courts-Case Manager DWI Grant / Fund 211 Intake Specialist - Problem Solving Court Case Manager - Problem Solving Court Adult Drug Court/DWI Court Manager Prostitution Prevention Program CJ1409470401 Case Manager - Criminal District Court CMAG Diversion Program CJ1405470406 Pre-Trial Bond Screening & Assessment Public Defenders MS1665401 Assistant Public Defender I Office Assistant IV

96-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2

2

2

0 0

2 1

2 1

1 1

1 1

1 1

3

3

3

1

1

1

2

2

2

1 1

1 1

1 1

1

1

1

1

1

1

1 0 0

0 1 1

0 1 1

1

1

1

3

3

3.5

0 0

3 1

3 1


FY 2014-15 Actual Community Resources Comprehensive Energy Assistance Program CEAP16 Client Services Supervisor Client Services Manager Intake Worker Office Assistant I Office Assistant IV SARAH Continuum of Care MS1656470401, MS1647470401 Continuum of Care Planning Coordinator Office Assistant IV Child Welfare Strategic Alliance JA1607471401 Forensic Interview Specialist Ryan White AR169900001, AM169900001, BS169900001, AS169900001 Accountant III - Grants Staff Auditor V HIV Fiscal Monitor HIV Contract Analyst HIV Planner HIV Planning Council Liaison HIV Analyst HIV Coordinator Lead Fiscal Monitor Office Assistant IV Community Health Manager Clerical Office Supervisor Grants-in-Aid Total

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 0.5 5 1 2

1 0.5 7 1 2

1 0.5 7 1 2

1 1

0 0

0 0

1

1

1

1 0.5 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 0.5 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

1 0.5 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

63

68

68.5

Appropriations: Activity Code CEAP14 CEAP15

Grant Title CEAP-2014* CEAP-2015

CEAP16 ESG15 ESG16 HI02 HI0301502001 HI0301502002

CEAP-2016 Emergency Solutions Grant Emergency Solutions Grant HIDALGO FOUNDATION-2002 SBS Technology Updates Children's Drug Court

HI0301502003

Historical Furniture Restoration

96-5

Budget 7,669,409 6,471,682

Activity to Date 7,406,868 5,794,953

Funds Remaining 262,541 676,729

5,408,268 168,132 185,671 257,799 903,995 320,000

1,139,457 2,311 2,769 47,712 -

4,268,811 165,821 182,902 210,087 903,995 320,000

4,583

-

4,583


Budget 400,009 202,973

Activity to Date 50,000 -

Funds Remaining 350,009 202,973

350,000 148,530 381,600 709,083 634,084 661,658

32,097 148,382 381,090 711,667 629,863 623,436

317,903 148 510 (2,584) 4,221 38,222

JAG Program-2016 Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program-2011* Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program-2012* Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program-2013* Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program-2014* Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program-2015

604,223 5,776,130 1,678,080 1,662,679 1,391,609 1,323,072

507,393 4,871,536 1,398,035 1,390,248 1,298,313 1,158,417

96,830 904,594 280,045 272,431 93,296 164,655

JJ16 JM11 JM12 JM13 JM14 JM15

Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program-2016 Juvenile Prob-Miscellaneous Grants 2011 Juvenile Prob-Miscellaneous Grants 2012* Juvenile Prob-Miscellaneous Grants 2013* Juvenile Prob-Miscellaneous Grants 2014 Juvenile Prob-Miscellaneous Grants 2015

1,225,537 1,814,077 835,477 936,804 1,896,850 66,576

936,692 690,033 710,799 860,144 1,344,696 64,382

288,845 1,124,044 124,678 76,660 552,154 2,194

JM16 JP14 JP15 JP16 AM14 AM15

Juvenile Prob-Miscellaneous Grants 2016 TJJD-2014* TJJD-2015 TJJD-2016 Ryan White Part A-MAI 2014* Ryan White Part A-MAI 2015

66,576 10,649,065 10,065,955 9,798,673 472,848 470,836

36,076 9,451,689 9,348,148 6,984,786 454,068 461,245

30,500 1,197,376 717,807 2,813,887 18,780 9,591

AM16 AR14 AR15 AR16 AS14 AS15

Ryan White Part A-MAI 2016 Ryan White Part A 2014* Ryan White Part A 2015 Ryan White Part A 2016 Ryan White Part A-Supplemental 2014* Ryan White Part A-Supplemental 2015

466,156 2,998,941 3,142,285 3,170,862 1,438,559 1,458,931

114,901 2,947,694 3,104,209 482,118 1,438,274 1,458,931

351,255 51,247 38,076 2,688,744 285 -

AS16 BH14 BH15 BH16 BS14 BS15

Ryan White Part A-Supplemental 2016 Ryan White-Hopwa 2014* Ryan White-Hopwa 2015 Ryan White-Hopwa 2016 Ryan White Part B-State Service Delivery 2014* Ryan White Part B-State Service Delivery 2015

1,545,038 245,968 163,106 159,497 1,801,720 1,710,630

76 242,240 163,106 53,771 1,750,061 1,687,695

1,544,962 3,728 105,726 51,659 22,935

BS15A BS16 SR14 SR15

Ryan White Part B - Admin Supplemental Award Ryan White Part B-State Service Delivery 2016 Ryan White Part B-State Services 2014* Ryan White Part B-State Services 2015*

714,219 184,879 746,330 688,944

682,910 21,854 733,647 725,743

31,309 163,025 12,683 (36,799)

Activity Code HI05 HI0901370001

Grant Title HIDALGO FOUND-2005 Celebrating Family Drug Court

HI16 HLS13 HLS14 JA13 JA14 JA15

Hidalgo Found: Early Intervention State Home Land Security Prg-2013* State Home Land Security Prg-2014 JAG Program-2013* JAG Program-2014 JAG Program-2015

JA16 JJ11 JJ12 JJ13 JJ14 JJ15

96-6


Budget 563,197 342,508

Activity to Date 411,968 328,607

Funds Remaining 151,229 13,901

Ryan White Part B-Supplemental 2016 Central Magistration Diversion* Adult Drug Court* Veterans Court* Family Drug Treatment Court* Prostitution Prevention Program*

71,000 86,986 274,284 130,596 209,671 150,000

12,276 63,848 258,109 115,474 208,709 150,000

58,724 23,138 16,175 15,122 962 -

CJ1418 CJ1419 CJ1420 CJ1421 CJ1505 CJ1506

Early Intervention* Juvenile Drug Court* New Life Project* Human Trafficking Unit Program* Central Magistration Diversion Adult Drug Court Grant

236,485 110,607 81,175 84,556 165,215 296,227

234,710 91,680 80,407 84,556 88,238 195,611

1,775 18,927 768 76,977 100,616

CJ1507 CJ1508 CJ1509 CJ1519 CJ1520 CJ1521

Veterans Court Family Drug Treatment Court Prostitution Prevention Prgm BC Juvenile Drug Court New Life Project Human Trafficking Unit Program

140,026 222,251 195,447 108,739 72,191 224,869

174,908 155,983 119,648 46,808 23,579 73,237

(34,882) 66,268 75,799 61,931 48,612 151,632

CJ1524 CJ1525 CJ1526 CJ1527 CJ1528 DJ1601

BCWMD/Hazmt Rgnl Rspn Team Air Sustn Rgnl CC Prg: Outreach Sv Rgnl Typ4 Incd Mgt Tm:Incd/Mlg Drug Interdiction Unit Proj Connect @ Lanier H.S. MIND Court - Travel

50,000 50,000 70,000 52,530 91,446 249,980

32,490 17,332 27,600 52,529 51,415 6,356

17,510 32,668 42,400 1 40,031 243,624

DJ1602 DJ1603 DT1501 DT1518 DT1526 DT1531

PREA Prevention Felony DWI Court FY15-17 Texas Traffic Safety-Click it or Ticket* Texas Traffic Safety-S.T.E.P.* No-Refusal Initiative (DWI)* Texas School Safety Ctr - Tobacco

250,000 200,000 19,324 499,985 206,217 54,450

14,870 41,266 19,324 492,473 104,994 45,900

235,130 158,734 7,512 101,224 8,550

DT1550 DT1618 DT1626 DT1631 DT1650 SA1544

DWI Court (CC#6)* TX Traff Sfty-S.T.E.P: Ovrtime No-Refusal Initiative TX State Schl Sfty Ctr:Tobacco TTS DWI Crt: Intake Specialist Adult Treatment Court Collaborative

125,000 500,000 104,259 38,325 137,501 399,798

93,504 293,221 36,639 25,561 87,633 364,322

31,496 206,779 67,620 12,764 49,868 35,476

SA1644 MS0501230001 MS0502230001 MS0503230001

Adult Treatment Court Collaborative OCDETF -Overtime FBI - Overtime DEA - Overtime

325,000 75,917 56,209 58,750

117,496 143,061 78,674 93,699

207,504 (67,144) (22,465) (34,949)

Activity Code SR16 SS15

Grant Title Ryan White Part B-State Services 2016 Ryan White Part B-Supplemental 2015*

SS16 CJ1405 CJ1406 CJ1407 CJ1408 CJ1409

96-7


Budget 78,932 111,903

Activity to Date 253,022 137,213

Funds Remaining (174,090) (25,310)

111,607 122,478 1,451,549 7,407 159,633 24,760

99,485 120,782 1,430,878 5,155 117,861 -

12,123 1,696 20,671 2,252 41,772 24,760

PCT#3 off duty patrol UTSA Bulletproof Vest* Federal Voting Assistance Program K-9 Donation* Bulletproof Vest (2012)* ReAct Grant*

18,576 135,212 466,939 32,084 250,294 165,567

134,506 193,693 31,997 250,103 163,637

18,576 706 273,246 87 191 1,930

MS1415471101 MS1429230001 MS1431230001 MS1442690101 MS1449220001 MS1449990001

SA Bar A Donation 2013-2014* Bulletproof Vest (2014)* Texas School Safety Ctr - Tobacco* Hidalgo BiblioTech Donation 2013 ESG Award-TBRA* 2013 ESG Award - Administration*

19,821 198,728 60,630 640,725 103,022 8,353

18,677 39,999 48,830 559,360 103,022 8,353

1,144 158,729 11,800 81,365 -

MS1450 MS1453490201 MS1458410101 MS1504230001 MS1512470601 MS1522133001

TxDOT DWI Court* B.C. Prostitution Prevention P* UTHSCSA-Sex Education Prgm* ReAct Grant* Veteran Texas Commission* Family Justice Cntr Found-OAIV

179,832 150,000 9,000 177,488 75,000 42,350

104,237 55,114 176,383 74,929 40,534

75,595 94,886 9,000 1,105 71 1,816

MS1524133001 MS1532133001 MS1532133002 MS1547470401 MS1556470401 MS1557101301

Allstate Foundation Grant* Victim Empowerment COSA Grant Dream Center COSA Grant SARAH Continuum of Care* BC Planning Grant-SARAH TX State University-Tobacco Grant*

48,342 47,667 58,416 94,388 121,647 12,000

29,667 28,506 59,696 82,097 60,227 -

18,675 19,161 (1,280) 12,291 61,420 12,000

MS1559 MS1604230001 MS1605470301 MS1615471101 MS1622133001 MS1624133001

Community Back to School - Education Fairs ReAct Grant SAWS:Von Ormy Street Drainage SA Bar A-Donation FY15-16 Family Justice Cntr Found-OAIV AllState Foundation

8,471 79,947 153,821 8,051 44,170

1,630 59,057 1,785 20,699 36,112

6,841 20,890 153,821 6,266 (20,699) 8,058

MS1632133001 MS1632133002 MS1656470401 MS1657101301

Victim Empowerment COSA Grant Dream Center COSA Grant BC Planning Grant-SARAH TX State Unvrsty-Tobacco #3

47,667 58,416 105,463 12,000

29,917 36,293 -

17,750 22,123 105,463 12,000

Activity Code MS0504230001 MS1001230001

Grant Title US Marshals-Overtime Immigration/Customs-Overtime

MS1008510001 MS1008510002 MS1014504101 MS1122200101 MS1214470201 MS1214470202

Lackland AFB Joint Land Use Study* Lackland Trainin Light Study* SEP-HCP National Night Out* Prescription Discount Card-Gen Prescription Discount Card-FM

MS1216300301 MS1229230001 MS1234110301 MS1235 MS1329230001 MS1404230001

96-8


Activity Code MS1665 MS1666

Grant Title TX Indigent Defense Commission Projct Dove:Crime Vict Liaison

Budget 302,379 99,879 Grand Total

$109,733,945

Activity to Date 153,169 24,459 $84,494,335

Funds Remaining 149,210 75,420 $25,239,610

*The term of these grants have ended or are expected to end during FY 2015-16.

Pending Grants:

Below is a list of pending grants Commissioners Court has authorized staff to submit applications for during FY 2015-16. Bexar County is in the process or has submitted applications for the following grants and is pending acceptance of the grant award: Activity Code TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Pending Grants Texas Attorney General – District Attorney VINE Agreement Texas Department of Transportation – BCSO STEP Grant Texas Department of Transportation – District Attorney No Refusal Initiative Texas Veterans Commission – Texas Veterans Court Grant Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division - Prostitution Prevention Program Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division - Family Drug Court Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division - Veterans Treatment Court Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division - Adult Drug Court Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division - CMAG Pre-Trial Diversion Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division - Body Cameras Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division – District Attorney Border Prosecution Unit Program Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division – Early Intervention Program for 225th Civil District Court Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division – Violence Against Women (Pearls Court) Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division – Juvenile New Life Program Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division – Bexar County Sheriff Critical Response Tactical Equipment Office of the Governor, Criminal Justice Division – Bexar County Sheriff PREA Office of the Governor – Defense Economic Adjustment Assistance Grant (DEAAG) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – Cooperative Agreements to Benefit Homeless for Pre-Trial and CMAG (3 year grant application) Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) - Flexible Treatment Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) ReCAST Civil Unrest Recovery Program

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Budget $88,080 600,000 44,584 200,000 280,071 252,062 144,226 401,066 194,503 700,000 113,212 203,334 97,013 47,120 126,281 200,000 4,712,500 800,000 975,000 5,000,000


Activity Code TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD TBD

Pending Grants U.S. Department of Justice Second Chance Act - Co-Occurring Reentry Center Program (3 year grant application) U.S. Department of Justice and Mental Health Collaboration - CMAG Diversion Program for Treatment U.S. Department of Justice – Felony DWI Court – (2nd year) U.S. Department of Justice – Adult Felony Court (3 year grant application) U.S. Department of Justice and Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) - Adult Drug Court Collaborative (3 Year grant application) U.S. Office of Violence Against Women – Pearl’s Court (3 year grant application) U.S. Office of Violence Against Women – Juvenile Justice Safe Havens Collaborative (3 year grant application) Texas Indigent Defense Commission - CMAG Public Defenders (2nd year) Texas State University - Tobacco Enforcement Program (Bexar County Sheriff) Texas State University – Tobacco Enforcement Program (Constable, Precinct 3) Office of Juvenile and Delinquency Programs – Family Drug Court (3 year grant application

Budget 650,000 250,000 100,000 300,000 1,375,000 361,525 599,995 195,443 61,950 12,600 400,000

Total $19,632,312

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Bexar County, Texas HOME Program (Fund 802) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds

$5,888

($18,627)

$0

$5,888

($18,627)

$0

$172,284 $172,284

$398,845 $398,845

$533,384 $533,384

$172,284

$398,845

$533,384

$178,172

$380,218

$533,384

$196,799 $196,799

$380,218 $320,218

$533,384 $533,384

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$196,799

$380,218

$533,384

Appropriated Fund Balance

($18,627)

$0

$0

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$178,172

$380,218

$533,384

Total Beginning Balance Revenue Intergovernmental Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS Health and Public Welfare Subtotal Interfund Transfers

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FUND: 802

COMMUNITY RESOURCES

HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP FUND (HOME) Mission:

To provide Bexar County residents with a comprehensive array of services to encourage selfsufficiency skills and allow recipients to maximize their talents resulting in an improved quality of life which positively impacts the Bexar County community.

Vision:

To develop the human and physical infrastructure of Bexar County through the Administration of public service programs with the provisions of local, state and federal funding and HOME funding for new construction, rehabilitation, and acquisition of single family, multi-family and transitional living facilities. The Community Resources Department oversees the day to day operations of local Contractors or Sub-recipients to ensure the delivery of quality services that will benefit the low and moderate income persons and neighborhoods having a particular housing need or down payment assistance within Bexar County Jurisdictional areas. (Federal Register, 24 Section 92.205)

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • •

To maximize available resources To provide educational programs To provide access to entitlement benefits To provide financial assistance To provide information and referral To provide community development activities

The United States Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) program requirements state that agencies involved in the planning, application and performance reporting related to the receipt of federal funds from the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and the HOME Investment Partnership Act (HOME) must complete a Consolidated Plan. The Consolidated Plan is a 5-year strategic planning document. More information regarding the Consolidated Plan process may be viewed in the Community Development Block Group (CDBG) narrative. For purposes of CDBG and HOME programs, housing is defined as an activity carried out for the purpose of providing or improving permanent residential structures which, upon completion, will be occupied by low and moderate income households. This could include the acquisition, new construction, reconstruction or rehabilitation of non-luxury housing with suitable amenities, including real property acquisition, site improvements, conversion and demolition. Other expenses may include financing costs, relocation expenses of any displaced persons, families, businesses or organizations. Tenant-based rental assistance may also be used with HOME funding, to include security deposits, payment of reasonable administrative planning costs and payment for operating expenses of community housing development organizations. The housing must be permanent or transitional. (Federal Register, 24 Section 92.205)

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Program Description:

The HOME Investment Partnership Program goals are to effectively and efficiently allocate the supply of decent, safe and affordable housing for low-to-very low income residents within the Bexar County unincorporated areas. The Programs ensure compliance with the HUD regulations and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars. A Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) is a private nonprofit, community-based, service organization that has staff with the capacity to develop affordable housing for the community it serves. A portion of HOME funding is allocated for Community Development Housing Organizations within Bexar County, for FY 2015-16 no funding is allocated for this purpose. On July 12, 2016, Commissioners Court approved the final selection of the FY 2016-17 HOME Projects which are outlined below. A One Year Action Plan describing the use of funds for these projects and the amount of funding allocated for each project was submitted to HUD on August 15, 2016. FY 2016-17 will be the twenty-fifth year that Bexar County has received HOME funding; the County will receive $533,384.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload Indicators: HOME Pre-Application Evaluated Per Year HOME Applications Evaluated Per Year Tax Credit Applications Evaluated Per Year HOME Contracts Executed TBRA Contracts Executed Efficiency Indicators: Projects Completed Monitoring/Site Visits Completed Met HUD Expenditure Ratio by Quarter Effectiveness/Outcome Indicators: Number of Audit Findings by HUD Percent of Projects Monitored with Audits Completed and Findings Resolved within 90 Days Low to Moderate Income Individuals Affected

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FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 6 6 2 20

0 6 14 1 30

2 2 19 1 30

10 10 100%

15 10 100%

15 40 100%

0

0

0

100%

100%

100%

230

470

470


HOME Funding: FY 2016-17

Total

FY 2016-17 Proposed $533,384 $533,384

Total

FY 2016-17 Proposed $80,007 400,039 53,338 $533,384

Funding Source HOME Funding

Funding Allocation Available for Community Development Housing Organization (CHDO) Available for FY 2016-17 HOME Projects Available for HOME Administration

The fiscal year for HOME is October 1, 2016 – September 30, 2017. Funding may be carried over from one year to another. HOME authorized positions and reclassifications are contingent upon available HOME grant funding. Authorized positions for HOME are listed on the CDBG narrative.

Program Justification and Analysis: HOME PROJECTS: Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2016-17

Amount

Habitat for Humanity of San Antonio – Lenwood Heights – Single Family Homes (CHDO) Administration Total Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2015-16

$533,384 Amount

Habitat for Humanity of San Antonio, Inc. – Hope Village Franklin Development – Artisan at Judson Park Bexar County Community Development & Housing - Tenant Based Rental Assistance Administration Total

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$480,046 53,338

$200,000 100,000 138,741 48,748 $487,489


Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2014-15

Amount

The NRP Group, LLC – Eagles Rest Project Housing Authority of Bexar County – Tenant Based Rental Assistance Bexar County Community Development & Housing - Tenant Based Rental Assistance Neighborhood Services of San Antonio – Converse Gardens Phase II Administration

$250,000 125,000 27,670 80,533 53,689

Total Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2013-14

$536,892 Amount

Bexar County Community Development & Housing - Tenant Based Rental Assistance Housing and Community Services - TG 106, Inc.(CHDO) Neighborhood Housing Services - First Time Home Buyer Program Administration Total Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2012-13

$276,909 77,269 109,440 51,513 $515,131 Amount

Bexar County Community Development & Housing Housing and Community Services - TG 106, Inc.(CHDO) Administration Total Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2011-12

$200,000 124,900 36,100 $361,000 Amount

Housing and Community Services (CHDO) Bexar County Tenant Based Rental Assistance National Alliance on Mental Illness Administration

$87,386 136,935 300,000 58,257 Total

Approved Projects Fiscal Year 2010-11

$582,578 Amount

Housing and Community Services (CHDO) Haven for Hope Multi Family Housing Bexar County Tenant Based Rental Assistance Administration

$99,391 400,000 96,951 66,206 Total

$662,548

Note: The above amounts represent total allotted allocations for previous years. Not all allocations will be spent in the fiscal year in which they were approved; therefore, total operating appropriations may be different. 97-5


Bexar County, Texas CDBG Program (Fund 803) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Intergovernmental Revenue Other Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

($20,076)

($40,817)

$0

($20,076)

($40,817)

$0

$2,093,050 0 $2,093,050

$224,466 0 $224,466

$2,180,749 0 $2,180,749

$2,093,050

$224,466

$2,180,749

$2,072,974

$183,649

$2,180,749

$2,113,791 $2,113,791

$183,649 $183,643

$2,180,749 $2,180,749

$2,113,791

$183,649

$2,180,749

($40,817)

$0

$0

$2,072,974

$183,649

$2,180,749

APPROPRIATIONS Health and Public Welfare Subtotal TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS Appropriated Fund Balance TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

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FUND: 803

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) Mission:

To facilitate significant change in Bexar County through the investment of appropriate resources. This will be accomplished by: identifying and maximizing all available resources in the community; working cooperatively with other governmental agencies, organizations and institutions to provide planned, comprehensive services for our customers that avoid duplication of services; refining program and service delivery designs to identify additional opportunities for effective and efficient delivery of services; developing and implementing a comprehensive plan, administration of the program and coordination of projects/activities to effect change for the citizens of Bexar County with comprehensive array of services and improvements.

Vision:

To change lives through careful, deliberate use of tools and resources available to the department. This will be accomplished through effective administration of the following: Public Service Programs throughout Bexar County with resources from local, state and federal funding at sites accessible to the citizens of the County; Community Development Block Grant resources to advance the environment through construction of water, sewer, drainage, road, street and sidewalk projects and other public facilities; Community Development Block Grant and HOME program resources to provide housing by providing new construction, rehabilitation and acquisition of single family, multi-family and transitional living facilities to help stabilize families’ lives.

Goals and Objectives: •

• • • •

Provide quality services and client satisfaction through the timely and cost effective expenditure of resources Enhance access to and delivery of entitlement benefits through Bexar County Provide and promote quality information and referrals to other resources Promote community involvement and development activities Maintain complete and accurate project records to avoid HUD non-compliance findings

Every five years, Bexar County is required to conduct comprehensive assessments of housing and community development needs as well as identify strategies and goals to meet these needs. Bexar County's Consolidated Plan fulfills these requirements to enhance the quality of life for Bexar County Residents.

CDBG Regulations: Definitions of Priorities Public Service – Providing funding to sub recipients for those concerned with employment, crime prevention, child care, health, drug abuse, education, fair housing counseling, energy conservation, welfare, homebuyer down payment assistance or recreational needs. Housing – An activity carried out for the purpose of providing or improving permanent residential structures which, upon completion, will be occupied by low and moderate income households. This could include the acquisition or rehabilitation of property, new housing construction or conversion of nonresidential structures.

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Public Facilities – Acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation or installation of public facilities and improvements carried out by the recipient. Such facilities could include shelters, halfway houses for run-away children, drug offenders or parolees, group homes for mentally challenged persons and temporary housing for disaster victims. Infrastructure – Acquisition, reconstruction, rehabilitation and installation of distribution lines and facilities of privately-owned utilities, provided such activities meet a national objective. A grantee may use CDBG funds to pay the costs of placing underground utilities, such as gas or telephone lines. A grantee may be able to install water and sewer lines to be owned and operated by a private utility. Economic Development – Eligible activities are extensive and include acquisition, construction, reconstruction, rehabilitation or installation of commercial or industrial buildings, structures and other real property equipment and improvements, including railroad spurs or similar extensions. Additionally, private for profit businesses may receive grants, loans and other forms of support for any activity where the assistance is appropriate to carry out an economic development project. Lastly, in connection with eligible economic activities, developers must outreach to market available forms of assistance, screen applicants, review and underwrite applications, screen, refer and place low to moderate income applicants for employment opportunities generated by a CDBG eligible economic development activity.

Program Description:

The CDBG Division’s goals are to effectively and efficiently allocate the supply of CDBG funding for all eligible projects for eligible residents and areas of Bexar County. The Bexar County Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) ensures compliance with the U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) regulations and the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) circulars. Beginning in the month of January, five public hearings were held throughout Bexar County to solicit funding requests from the general public, service organizations and participating cities for the CDBG, HOME, and ESG funding. For FY 2016-17, a total of 20 requests for funding were submitted. The preliminary selection of CDBG, HOME, and ESG projects was reviewed by Commissioners Court on June 7, 2016 and published in the San Antonio Express-News. Thereafter, a required publication of public notice, followed by a 30-day public comment period, was conducted. Commissioners Court is required by regulation to review all public comments received and then approve or make changes to the final selection of projects to be funded with CDBG, HOME, and ESG funding for the current year. On July 12, 2016 Commissioners Court approved the final selection of the FY 2016–17 CDBG, HOME, and ESG Projects as shown in this budget narrative after the Authorized Positions Listing and in the HOME services section of this budget document. A One Year Action Plan describing the use of funds for the projects selected and the amount of funding allocated for each project was developed and submitted to Housing & Urban Development (HUD) by August 15, 2016. In conjunction with the One Year Action Plan, a Five Year Consolidated Plan (Con Plan) for CDBG, HOME, and ESG funding must be submitted to HUD by August 15th. The Consolidated Plan is a HUD program requirement which allows Bexar County to identify the housing and community development needs of its residents. The plan covers the Urban County jurisdiction and is comprised of the Balance of Bexar (participating incorporated cities and unincorporated areas). During the CDBG, HOME, and ESG public hearings in the months of January and February every year, citizens are asked (along with public and private agencies that provide housing, health services and social services) to participate in the

98-3


identification of housing and non-housing community needs in the Urban County jurisdiction. FY 2016-17 is the fourteenth year of Bexar County’s participation in the CDBG program.

Performance Indicators: FY 2014-15 Actual Workload Indicators: Pre-Applications Evaluated per Year Applications Evaluated per Year Monitoring/Site Visits Completed Projects Completed Efficiency Indicators: CDBG Contracts Executed by January Percent of Projects Monitored with Audits Completed and Findings Resolved within 90 days Effectiveness/Outcome Indicators: Number of Audit Findings with HUD Low to Moderate Persons Served

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0 36 170 7

0 36 145 18

20 15 100 15

15

16

15

100%

100%

100%

0 7,984

0 9,218

0 15,906

CDBG Funding: FY 2016-17 Proposed Funding Source *U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD) Total * Funding year is October 1, 2016 – September 30, 2017 Funding Allocation 15% available for Public Service Projects 20% available for Administration Costs Total available for all other FY 2016-17 CDBG Projects Total

FY 2016-17 Proposed $2,180,749 $2,180,749 FY 2016-17 Proposed $235,580 436,149 1,509,020 $2,180,749

All Public Service funding must be expended within the program year and not more than 15 percent of the current year’s allocation can be expended for public service funding.

Not more than 20 percent of the current year’s allocation can be expended for administration.

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CDBG funding can be carried over to the next year, excluding public service and administration costs. If all public service and administration costs cannot be expended during the budget year, the additional funding may be used for eligible CDBG project with budgetary short falls during the budget year. CDBG authorized positions and reclassifications are contingent upon available CDBG grant funding.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Community Development and Housing Manager Intake Worker Housing Rehabilitation Inspector Community Development and Housing Senior Analyst Community Development and Housing Analyst Office Assistant IV

FY 2015-16 Estimate

1 0 1 1 2 1

1 1 0 1 2 1

FY 2016-17 Proposed 1 1 0 1 2 1

Total 6 6 6 *Full funding for authorized positions in FY 2016-17 will come from a combination of Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) funding, HOME funding, and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) funding.

Community Development Block Grant Funded Projects: FY 2016-17 Public Service Somerset Senior Citizens Center Joven, Inc Parent/Child, Inc Boys and Girls Club of San Antonio Greater Randolph Area Services Program Greater Randolph Area Services Program Society of St. Vincent de Paul

Amount

Total Public Service Projects

$27,715 $30,000 $32,865 $40,000 $30,000 $25,000 $50,000 $235,580

Infrastructure and Public Facility City of Balcones Heights – Glenarm Place Street Reconstruction Phase I City of Converse – Fair Meadows Street Reconstruction Phase II City of Kirby – Pageland/Theodor Street Reconstruction City of Leon Valley – Conestoga Water and Sewer Replacement Project City of Universal City – Parkview Estates Storm Drainage Phase XII City of Somerset – Sixth Street Reconstruction – Phase 5 Total Infrastructure Projects

$300,000 $250,000 $280,000 $160,992 $218,028 $300,000 $1,509,020

Total Administration Costs

$436,149

Total FY 2016-17 CDBG Approved Budget

$2,180,749

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PAST CDBG FISCAL YEARS:

Fiscal Year 2015-16 Kirby – John Sterling Park Improvements Boys & Girls Clubs of San Antonio Communities in Schools of SA Daughters of Charity Services of SA San Antonio Food Bank GRASP – Northeast Senior Congregate Meal Program GRASP – Rental Assistance Program New Hope Church Parent Child Incorporated Somerset Senior Citizens Center, Inc. – Senior Program Support Somerset Senior Citizens Center, Inc. – Senior Program Transportation St. Vincent de Paul City of Balcones Heights – Leisure Street Construction – Phase II City of Converse – Fair Meadows Street Reconstruction Phase II City of Helotes – Leslie Road ADA Curb Cuts City of Leon Valley – Timberhill Drive & Huebner Drainage Improvement Project City of Sandy Oaks – Infrastructure Master Plan City of Somerset – Sixth Street Reconstruction – Phase IV City of Von Ormy – Quarterhorse Road Improvements – Phase II City of Universal City – Parkview Estates Storm Drain Phase XI Administrative

Amount $44,241 $35,000 30,014 35,000 55,000 30,000 25,000 10,000 32,865 28,363 7,400 27,336 250,000 200,000 25,000 175,000 75,000 200,000 200,000 200,000 421,304

Total FY 2015-16 CDBG Approved Budget

$2,106,523

Fiscal Year 2014-15 ASSIST, Inc. – Basketball Court Casa Helotes – Phase III Sprinkler System/Outside Security Lighting GRASP – Senior Citizens Center Parking Lot Improvements Boys & Girls Clubs of San Antonio Communities in Schools of SA Daughters of Charity Services of SA Food Bank GRASP New Hope Church Parent Child Incorporated Somerset Senior Citizens Center, Inc. – Senior Program Support Somerset Senior Citizens Center, Inc. – Senior Program Transportation St. Vincent de Paul City of Balcones Heights – Leisure Street Construction City of Kirby – Telegraph/Rutledge Reconstruction City of Somerset – Sixth Street Reconstruction – Phase III City of Von Ormy – Quarterhorse Road Improvements City of Universal City – Parkview Estates Storm Drain Phase X Administration Total FY 2014-15 CDBG Approved Budget

Amount $17,115 160,000 129,501 30,000 30,000 30,000 50,000 25,000 36,000 30,418 34,915 9,000 20,000 227,200 198,668 180,000 250,000 208,575 416,598 $2,082,990

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Fiscal Year 2013-14

City of Schertz (Pickrell Park) New Hope Church Greater Randolph Area Service Provider San Antonio Food Bank St. Vincent De Paul Project MEND San Antonio Family Endeavors Parent Child Incorporated Project QUEST Boys and Girls Club City of Universal City - Parkview Estates Storm Drainage Phase IX City of Somerset - 6th St. Reconstruction Project Phase II City of Kirby - Alan Dean Drive Street Reconstruction Macdona - Street Reconstruction City of Balcones Heights - Hanch Drive Street Reconstruction Administration Total FY 2013-14 CDBG Approved Budget Fiscal Year 2012-13 JOVEN Losoya Area After School Youth Program Casa Helotes Senior Citizens Center ASSIST, Inc. (Somerset) New Hope Church Greater Randolph Area Service Provider San Antonio Food Bank Project MEND San Antonio Family Endeavors Parent Child Incorporated Bexar County Detention Ministries Boys and Girls Club City of Universal City City of Live Oak City of Kirby - Priority # 1 City of Converse City of Somerset - Priority 1 City of Balcones Heights Administration

Amount $61,884 38,125 33,125 53,125 31,272 33,125 38,125 30,418 30,000 23,125 200,000 322,398 216,000 209,961 335,000 413,920 $2,069,603 Amount $30,000 34,435 99,716 30,000 20,000 30,000 30,000 30,000 29,107 30,000 30,000 194,000 29,084 167,325 145,500 105,730 187,226 305,177

Total FY 2012-13 CDBG Approved Budget

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$1,527,300


Fiscal Year 2011-12 JOVEN Losoya Area After School Youth Program Bexar County Utility Assistance Program San Antonio Family Endeavors After School and Summer Camp Program St. Vincent De Paul Rental Assistance Program Project MEND–Durable Medical Equipment San Antonio Food Bank Food Distribution Services Boys and Girls Club of San Antonio Youth Services Casa Helotes Senior Citizens Center City of Somerset–City Park Improvements Phase I City of Von Ormy Park Improvements City of Somerset Street Repairs Universal City Parkview Estates Storm Drainage Phase VII Balcones Heights Beryl Drive Street Reconstruction and Design City of Converse Fair Meadows Phase I City of Von Ormy Infrastructure Improvements Administration Total FY 2011-12 CDBG Approved Budget

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Amount $30,000 63,775 30,000 30,000 25,000 30,000 30,000 200,000 88,804 50,000 99,875 170,000 76,016 150,000 200,000 318,367 $1,591,837


CAPITAL FUNDS


FUND: 700

NOVEMBER 2003 BOND REFERENDUM FUND Program Description: The 2003 Bexar County Bond Election consisted of four separate propositions: Proposition 1 (Juvenile Probation, Adult Probation and Jail Improvements); Proposition 2 (Road and Bridge Improvements); Proposition 3 (Parks and Recreation Improvements); and Proposition 4 (Emergency Operations Center and Senior Citizens Facilities Improvements). The projects total cost is $100.2 million. A commitment was made that the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ad valorem tax rate would not increase to pay for the bonds associated with these projects. Bexar County partnered with the City of San Antonio on several of the bond projects to bring Bexar Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one million plus residents more City-County collaboration and more streamlined delivery of services. These projects include: an Emergency Operations Center, a Senior Citizens Multi-purpose Facility in the Medical Center area and a Historic Museum. All projects have been completed except the Thelma Area Senior Community Center. Bexar County has issued all bonds associated with this fund. PROPOSITION 1 Juvenile Probation, Adult Probation and County Jail Improvements Funding in the amount of $47,981,948 was allocated for Proposition 1, including $16,425,225 for an Adult Probation Facility, $1,151,154 for a Sheriff's Automated Fingerprint System, $28,506,495 for (5) Juvenile Probation improvements, $1,249,503 for completion of an upgrade to the Jail Electronic Lock System, and $649,571 for Public Safety Radio System Enhancement. This proposition consisted of a total of 9 projects, all of which are now completed. PROPOSITION 2 Road and Bridge Improvements Funding in the amount of $40,581,000 was been allocated for Proposition 2, which provided for the reconstruction of roads in areas of high growth to support existing and proposed schools, improved driving conditions and safety, as well as supports economic development for Bexar County by leveraging funds through partnerships. This proposition consisted of a total of 12 projects, all of which are now completed. PROPOSITION 3 Parks and Recreation Improvements Funding in the amount $6,958,007 has been allocated for Proposition 3 which provides for the purchase, acquisition, construction and equipping of parks and recreation improvements and venues in Bexar County. The proposition also includes cultural and educational facilities. Seven of the 13 projects will leverage $4,775,000 towards earlier investments or public partnerships including parks, a historic center, recreational facilities and community centers. This proposition consists of a total of 14 projects, of which 13 are complete. The Thelma Area Senior Community Center project has not been completed. PROPOSITION 4 Emergency Operations Center and Senior Citizens Multi-purpose Facilities Improvements A total of $4,750,000 was allocated for Proposition 4, which represented Bexar County's share of the costs as a result of the partnership with the City of San Antonio: $4,000,000 for an Emergency Operations Center, and $750,000 for a Senior Citizens Multi-Purpose Center (Medical Center Area). This investment leveraged a combined City and County investment in the amount of $27 million for facility development. Both projects have been completed.

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Bexar County, Texas Flood Control M&O Company 208 Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance

$63,057,642 $63,057,642

$73,273,004 $73,273,004

$13,864,599 $13,864,599

Revenue Property Taxes Intergovernmental Revenue Proceeds from Sales of Assets Other Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues

$11,635,616 15,567 279,708 7,286 $11,938,177 $11,938,177

$127,005 26,803 2,356 101,659 $257,823 $257,823

$80,000 20,000 2,570 25,000 $127,570 $127,570

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$74,995,819

$73,530,827

$13,992,169

$1,288,066 434,749 $1,722,815 $0

$1,354,763 1,311,465 $2,666,228 $57,000,000

$1,632,361 1,217,270 $2,849,631 $0

$1,722,815

$59,666,228

$2,849,631

Appropriated Fund Balance

$73,273,004

$13,864,599

$11,142,538

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$74,995,819

$73,530,827

$13,992,169

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Capital Projects Subtotal Interfund Transfers TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

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FUND: 208

FLOOD CONTROL M&O FUND Mission:

The mission of the Public Works Department is to preserve all County providing efficient, cost effective services which ensure the safety, health and welfare of our customers and improve the quality of life. We envision the Public Works Department as the leader in developing and maintaining County roads, bridges, vehicles, equipment, parks, and facilities. The Public Works Department strives to ensure environmental compliance, fire safety, good working relationships, and high standards of professional management for Bexar County. The management and staff of our department are facilitators in achieving a balance between diverse priorities and finite resources, by providing the public and other County Offices a thorough analysis, expert advice, prompt, reliable services, and open, honest communications related to the responsible allocation and utilization of Public Works personnel and resources.

Program Description:

The Flood Control Fund was established to account for the accumulation of ad valorem tax revenue collected for flood control projects including payments to the San Antonio River Authority (SARA) pursuant to the amendatory contract. The County collects a set ad valorem property tax rate for the operation and maintenance of the flood control operation. Prior to FY 2004-05, Bexar County collected taxes dedicated solely for flood control purposes and transferred a significant portion of the revenue to the San Antonio River Authority (SARA) to pay for debt service associated with flood control projects that SARA engineered, designed, constructed, operated and maintained. In FY 2004-05, Bexar County started collecting this tax revenue. This tax revenue supports the Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s projected costs for flood control components of the San Antonio River Capital Improvement Project, as well as provides additional funding for projects in other watersheds. The Public Works Department, Flood Control Division, manages the fund. Personnel and Capital costs associated with these projects are also appropriated within this fund. The Floodplain Management provides policy and procedural guidance for floodplains. It also supports staff in review of floodplain development issues. It enforces, identifies, and issues floodplain violation notices to property owners who violate Bexar Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flood Damage Prevention Court Order. The division also receives, investigates, and responds to drainage and flooding concerns.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Workload/Output Measures: Number of Capital Projects in Planning Phase Number of Capital Projects in Design Phase Number of Capital Projects in Construction Efficiency Measures: Number of Capital Projects Managed per FTE Average Time to Complete the Design Phase (Years) Average Time to Complete in Construction Phase (Years) Effectiveness Measures: Number of Capital Projects Completed

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FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2017 Projection

2 26 12

0 17 19

0 7 17

6 2.5

6 2.5

6 2.5

2

2

2

8

14

10


Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Interfund Transfer Capital Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-2017 Proposed

$812,494 3,022 467,656

$843,202 8,635 519,260

$807,221 6,200 529,023

$885,201 4,125 733,785

4,892

12,066

12,319

9,250

0 434,749

57,000,000 2,000,000

57,000,000 1,311,465

0 1,217,270

$1,722,815

$60,383,163

$59,666,228

$2,849,631

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The Flood Control Maintenance and Operations FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The main reason for this decrease is due to the one-time interfund transfer to the Flood Control Capital Fund that occurred in FY 2015-16.

The Personnel Services group increases by 9.6 percent when compared to the FY 2016-17 Estimates. This is primarily due to turnover experienced in FY 2015-16 that is not anticipated in FY 2016-17.

The Travel and Remunerations group funds all required certification and continuing education for Flood Control personnel.

The Operational Costs group increases by 38.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is the result of additional funding for maintenance costs associated with the installation of HighWater Alert Life-Saving Technology (HALT) units throughout the County, as more locations at low water crossings have come online.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is due to a decrease in the budgeted amount for vehicle fuel due to lower fuel prices and a reduction in usage.

The Capital Appropriation remains relatively flat compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The following cash-funded Flood Control Projects are funded in the capital appropriation: •

Local Project – This project provides funding for analysis and design of small flood control projects within the County.

County Parks Flood Control – This project provides funding for analysis and design of flood control and erosion mitigation for Comanche and Pletz Parks.

Espada Flood Mitigation – This project provides funding for real estate and land acquisition in the Espada area. It includes appraisal services, relocation services, and any other expenses incurred for acquiring property in the area. 100-3


Project Local Project County Park Flood Control Espada Flood Mitigation Total:

Budget $431,211 350,000 5,549,980 $6,331,191

Authorized Positions:

Activity to Date $175,004 5,964 5,478,446 $5,659,414

FY 2014-15 Actual

Asset Manager Capital Projects Engineer Civil Engineer Civil Engineering Assistant Engineering Services Manager GIS Technician Infrastructure Services Coordinator Office Assistant IV Real Estate Specialist Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Public Works - Flood Control

100-4

Funds Available $407,424 344,036 465,810 $1,217,270

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

.5 1 2 2 .5 1 1 1 1

.5 1 2 2 .5 1 1 1 1

.5 1 2 2 .5 1 1 1 1

10

10

10


Bexar County, Texas Flood Control Capital Projects Fund 702 Project

Budget

Activity to date

Funds Available

Babcock Phase V

$6,716,949

6,458,032

258,917

Calaveras 10 Dam

3,591,140

3,591,140

0

CB 09 - Cimarron Subdivision

4,101,562

1,149,400

2,952,162

Confluence Park

1,000,000

0

1,000,000

High Water Detection Phase III

6,200,000

3,071,221

3,128,779

750,000

750,000

0

11,346,800

1,156,489

10,190,311

5,780,900

5,213,416

567,484

12,145,638

12,145,266

372

4,349,495

4,100,857

248,638

41,690,494

41,578,492

112,002

LC 18 - Boerne Stage Rd

9,908,802

9,902,013

6,789

LC 19 - Local Projects - Whisper Creek (Pct 3)

1,916,246

1,662,293

253,953

LC 23 - French Creek Trib NWWC - Environmental

5,382,889

4,988,862

394,027

LC 26 - FCDS - Verde LWC

3,235,000

2,771,350

463,650

LC 27 - Old Fredericksburg Road

1,528,846

1,363,964

164,882

Martinez Dams

5,316,060

5,316,060

0

MR 11 - Pearsall Road Bridge at Elm Creek

5,445,000

736,569

4,708,431

MR 30 - Grosenbacher Rd South of Madrona

1,514,341

1,499,345

14,996

MR 31 - Elm Forest at Turtle Cross

2,544,971

2,147,104

397,867

MR 32 - Medio Creek NWWC Sunset Subdivision

9,404,000

871,464

8,532,536

MR 33 - North Talley Road LWC

4,800,000

210,826

4,589,174

Program / Project Management FY 13-17

19,220,865

16,076,679

3,144,186

SA 02 - Laddie Place RSWF Phase III

27,491,524

27,333,168

158,356

SA 03 - Barbara Drive

9,200,000

9,151,670

48,330

SA 06 - Rock Creek NWWC/Outfall Phase I

3,400,000

3,163,225

236,775

SA 17 - Real Road

1,727,605

1,550,342

177,263

SA 22 - San Pedro Phase III

2,523,912

2,346,649

177,263

SA 34 - Elmendorf Lake

7,500,000

7,500,000

0

28,588,748

6,907,736

21,681,012

SA 45 - Cacias Road LWC

1,444,640

1,444,640

0

SA 46 - Kirkner Road LWC

2,026,080

1,699,650

326,430

SA 47 - Henze LWC

2,821,974

2,742,406

79,568

19,975,000

2,123,028

17,851,972

$250,000

0

250,000

Jefferson HS Drainage LC 05 - FCDS - S. Hausman LC 06 - FCDS - Prue Rd. at French Creek LC 09 - Hausman Drainage Project Phase I (1604 to Babcock) LC 15 - Huebner Creek RSWF LC 17 - Huebner Creek Enhanced Conveyance NWWC

SA 43 - Six Mile Creek Drainage Improvements

SA 55 -Woodlawn @ 36th St. Drainage Salado Creek

101-1


Project

Budget

Activity to date

Funds Available

$127,931,074

38,329,018

$89,602,056

SC 04 - Knoll Creek

9,860,700

9,775,577

85,123

SC 05 - Mid Beitel Channel Improvements

2,816,645

1,807,572

1,009,073

SC 09 - Perrin Beitel Bridge Expansion

11,215,775

1,663,583

9,552,192

SC 15 - Rosillo Creek RSWF

10,416,372

10,264,038

152,334

SC 18 - Roland Ave Bridge

7,773,979

7,572,052

201,927

SC 27 - Bulverde and Jung Mud Creek Trib A

4,033,573

3,982,521

51,052

SC 41 - Salado Creek Tributary D @ Ira Lee

4,204,068

3,330,336

873,732

Seeling Channel Phase II

4,000,000

4,000,000

0

Toutant Beauregard LWCs

6,450,000

1,695,614

4,754,386

$463,541,667

$275,143,667

$188,398,000

SARIP - San Pedro Creek Restoration

Total

101-2


FUND: 702

FLOOD CONTROL CAPITAL PROJECTS FUND Program Description:

This fund consists of multi-year capital improvements projects funded from the County’s Flood Control tax. Below is a list of all active projects with an overview of the scope of work to be performed: •

Babcock Road Phase V – This project consists of improving existing cross drainage structures within these project limits located within the 100-year flood plain. Four bridges and one bridge class culvert will ensure a “no rise” water surface elevation solution while passing the 100-year runoff. The estimated cost of this project is $6,716,949.

Calaveras 10 Dam Rehabilitation - This project provides for the rehabilitation for Calaveras Dam. The dam is owned and operated by the San Antonio River Authority (SARA). The improvements follow the Federal Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standards. SARA is the project manager. The total estimated cost of this project is $3,591,140.

CB 09 Cimarron Subdivision – The purpose of this project is to remove ten homes from the 100-year floodplain of West Salitrillo Creek in the Cimarron Subdivision. The estimated cost of this project is $4,101,562.

Confluence Park – As part of the Urban Waters Federal Partnership, the estimated $10 million Confluence Park project will be an environmentally sustainable, education green space located in the southern urban core of San Antonio at 310 W. Mitchell. The park will include an educational pavilion, a large scale water catchment system, ecotype demonstration areas and will be a destination for hiking and biking along the Historical Mission Reach portion of the San Antonio River. Commissioners Court has committed $1,000,000 to the San Antonio River Foundation for enhancements at Confluence Park in memory of Sally Buchanan.

Elmendorf Lake – This project will provide for water quality improvements to the lake, as well as flood control enhancements in the portion of the lake between 24th and Commerce Streets adjacent to Elmendorf Lake Park. The project will result in shoreline restoration along with water quality improvement. This project is intended to complement the San Antonio River Authority’s Westside Creeks Restoration project, which is focused on environmental restoration and recreational opportunities. The total estimated cost of this project is $7,500,000.

High Water Detection System Phase III – This project provides for additional installations of the high water detection systems at various locations around the County. The systems warn drivers of high water at selected locations. This is a continuation of the Bexar County Flood Control Phase II project. Approximately 121 units will be installed through the County and City limits. The total estimated cost of this project is $6,200,000.

Jefferson H.S Drainage - This project is located at the SAISD Thomas Jefferson High School in southwest Bexar County. The project scope included improvements to components of the new site work in order to provide regional flood relief for the surrounding area. The installation of new site work drain lines and asphalt paving portions of the proposed improvements provided surface capture and conveyance of potential flood water into the underground drain system and surface detention facilities. The project is being managed by SAISD. The total cost of this project is $750,000.

LC 5 S. Hausman Road LWC – This project provides for the construction of a culvert and a bridge on S. Hausman Road between Prue Road and Baumberger Trail. There are currently two low water 101-3


crossings on S. Hausman Road. This will also include improvements to S. Hausman Road north and south of the two structures. The proposed upgrade will increase public safety for this area. The total estimated cost of this project is $11,346,800. •

LC 6 Prue Road LWC at French Creek – This project provides for the construction of a bridge at French Creek over Prue Road. The existing multi-barrel box culvert is undersized and must be replaced with a bridge. This also includes improvements east and west of the bridge. The total estimated cost of this project is $5,780,900.

LC 9 Hausman Drainage Project Phase I - This project replaces three low water crossings with bridges and downstream channel improvements to provide unflooded access during the 1 percent chance storm event along Hausman Road between Babcock and Huntsman. This also includes buyouts downstream of the three crossings in the existing Valley View Subdivision for mitigation and channel improvements purposes. The estimated cost of this project is $12,145,638.

LC 15 Huebner Creek at Prue Rd RSWF – This project will alleviate flooding downstream of Prue Road and provide a Regional Storm Water Detention Facility to reduce flow rate by approximately 10 percent. Prue Road crossing has been constructed as an all-weather crossing at Huebner Creek. This project requires obtaining regulatory permits such as United States Army Corps of Engineers permits, local floodplain permit, and a potential dam permit. The estimated cost of this project is $4,349,495.

LC 17 Huebner Creek Enhanced Conveyance – This project includes the analysis of Leon Creek starting at Loop 410, and following Leon Creek to Huebner Creek just upstream of Bandera Road. This study will determine the possible channel improvements and the alternatives to reduce structural flooding for Leon Valley and the City of San Antonio. The project will be divided into three phases. Phase I will be from Loop 410 upstream to Ingram Road. Phase II will be from Ingram Road upstream to the city limit line between Leon Valley and San Antonio. Phase III will be from the city limit line between Leon Valley and San Antonio upstream to Bandera Road. A Cost Benefit Study, coordination with Leon Valley, City of San Antonio, San Antonio River Authority, Corps of Engineers, and possible buyouts are part of this project. The total estimated cost of this project is $41,690,494.

LC 18 Boerne Stage Road – This project provides un-flooded access (25 year storm event) to area residents and businesses. Reconstruction includes raising the roadway, improvements to the pavement section, increasing roadside bar ditch capacities, and drainage system improvements. The total estimated cost of the flood portion of this project is $9,908,802, and construction has been completed. There is also a budgeted road component that improves the roadway and shoulder lanes. The total road project budget is $745,000 and can be found in the County Road and Bridge Multi-Year Road Projects Fund.

LC 19 Whisper Creek – This project is located on Huebner Creek downstream of Hollyhock Street in northwest Bexar County and in the northwest area of the City of San Antonio. Bexar County proposes to alleviate flooding in the Whisper Creek subdivision during an Ultimate Development (UD) 100-year storm event by constructing a concrete drainage wall and a concrete channel. The total estimated cost of the project is $1,916,246, and construction has been completed.

LC 23 French Creek Tributary NWWC Environmental – This project will remove multiple residential properties from the floodplain located in the Cedar Springs Subdivision and the Evans Valley Subdivision. Improvements to existing low water crossings in Evans Valley Subdivision and the intersection of Diamond K and Bar X Trail will also be considered. The estimated cost of this project is $5,382,889. 101-4


LC 26 N. Verde Road LWC – This project provides for the construction of a bridge at French Creek over North Verde Road. The existing culvert is undersized and needs to be replaced. This will also include improvements to North Verde Road and west of the bridge. North Verde Road is the only way in or out of the existing residential subdivision during flood events. The construction of this bridge will increase public safety for this area. The total estimated cost of this project is $3,235,000.

LC 27 Old Fredericksburg Road LWC – This project will replace the current low water crossing near Old Fredericksburg Road and Lost Creek Gap Road with a structure capable of withstanding a100year storm event. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,528,846, and construction has been completed.

SARIP - San Pedro Creek Restoration - This project will widen and deepen the San Pedro Creek channel, increasing its carrying capacity. This project will remove 41.8 acres and 38 adjacent structures from the 100-year flood plain. This project also replaces a network of unsightly drainage with approximately 22 acres of parkland, hiking and biking trails, and other recreational amenities. The following are the project limits and estimated costs: Villa Lagunilla (Inlet to Travis), Salon De Alameda (Travis to Alameda Theatre), Agua Antigua (Alameda Theatre to Dolorosa), El Merodeo (Dolorosa to Cesar Chavez), Canal Principal (Cesar Chavez to Guadalupe), Campo Abajo (Guadalupe to South Alamo), and Alamo Street to Confluence. The total estimated cost of the project during FY 2014-15 was $174,600,000. The County has identified $127,931,074 as its portion of the project. Additional funding will need to be identified.

Toutant Beauregard LWC - This project is located along Toutant Beauregard in northeast Bexar County. The project will replace two low water crossings on Toutant Beauregard near Anaqua Springs Road and west of Lost Valley Road with bridges or culverts capable of passing the 100-year storm. Channel grading upstream and downstream of the culverts will also be required as part of this project. Improvements to these three low water crossings will allow un-flooded access to approximately 320 homes. The total estimated cost of this project is $6,450,000.

Martinez Dams - This project provides for the rehabilitation of three Martinez Creek Dams. The dams are owned and operated by the San Antonio River Authority (SARA). The improvements will be to Federal Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) standards. SARA is the project manager. The estimated cost of this project is $5,316,060.

Medio Creek NWWC Sunset Subdivision – This project provides for the channelization of Medio Creek upstream of Ray Ellison Drive for additional storm water conveyance. The approaches to Ray Ellison Road bridge crossing will be upgraded, if needed and the viability of a detention pond near this location will be studied. The results of this project will remove over 100 homes in the Sunset Subdivision from the floodplain. The total estimated cost of this project is $9,404,000.

Pearsall Road at Elm Creek – This project provides for the replacement of the inadequate existing multiple box culvert with a bridge capable of withstanding a 1 percent chance 100-year storm event. There is currently a curve in the road that will be straightened to accommodate the proposed bridge. The total estimated cost of this project is $5,445,000.

MR 30 Grosenbacher LWC - This project will provide improvements for two low water crossings on Grosenbacher Road. This project will increase the size of the culvert and look at drainage channel improvements to improve flow through the culvert and avoid damage to residences upstream and downstream of the crossing. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,514,341, and construction has been completed. 101-5


MR 31 Elm Forest at Turtle Cross Street - This project provides for improvements to the low water crossing at the entrance to the subdivision. It will also provide additional capacity at several inadequate drainage outfalls to Medio Creek. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,544,971.

MR 33 North Talley Road LWC - This project is located along Cartwright Trail and Talley Road in northwest Bexar County. There are two Talley Road low water crossings southeast of the Geronimo Village Subdivision and the Cartwright Trail Street entrance to this subdivision. These two crossings will be upgraded to be able to pass a 100-year flood event. There are also two low water crossings along Cartwright Trail that are undersized and will be replaced to allow the residents within these subdivisions access to Talley Road. Improvements to these four low water crossings will allow unflooded access to approximately 300 homes. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,800,000.

Project Management (FY 2013-2017) - These funds will cover all program management expenses through the completion of the flood control program. The total estimated cost is $19,220,865.

Salado Creek - This project includes master planning efforts for a new County park on an approximately 200 acre site located on Southton Rd. south of Farm Rd. The total estimated cost of this project is $250,000.

SA 2 Laddie Place RSWF – This project is located between Fredericksburg Road and Gardina St. The purpose of this project is to remediate flooding at and downstream of the Northwest Center by constructing a regional storm water detention pond. It will remove over 30 structures from the 100year floodplain. The total estimated cost of this project is $27,491,524, and construction has been completed.

SA 3 Barbara Drive Drainage – This project replaces the concrete lined open channels between McCullough and the confluence of the box culverts located approximately 800 feet east of McCullough. This project will also reconstruct McCullough Street from Barbara to Sharon Street with an underground storm sewer system with curb inlets to eliminate the low water crossing at Barbara Drive and McCullough. The total estimated cost of this project is $9,200,000 and is coordinated through a joint effort with the City of San Antonio.

SA 6 Rock Creek Outfall Improvement – This project is located between Rock Creek at Interstate Highway 10 and Dudley Drive. The project removes 16 structures from the 100 year floodplain and improves the outfall at confluence with Olmos Creek. Improvements will be made to the Rock Creek waterway, between IH-10 and Dudley Drive, from a natural, rocky channel to a more engineered flood conveyance waterway. The wider, grass-lined channel will have the general effect of lowering the 100 year floodplain elevation. Stabilization of the channel slopes from approximately 800 feet upstream of Callaghan Road to IH-10 will also be considered. The project does not include any roadway repairs or relocations. The total estimated project cost is $3,400,000, and construction has been completed.

SA 17 Real Road – This project will replace the existing low water crossing at Real Road and Chupaderas Creek with a structure capable of withstanding a 100-year storm event. Real Road will be reconstructed with bar ditches and the channels upstream and downstream will all be re-graded. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,727,605, and construction has been completed.

SA 22 San Pedro Huisache Phase III – This project is the third phase of the San Pedro Huisache project. This phase is intended to construct a storm drain system east of San Pedro between Agarita 101-6


Street and Elsmere Place. The intent of this project is to prevent San Pedro Avenue from flooding and to keep the neighborhoods on both sides of San Pedro Avenue safe from flooding. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,523,912, and construction has been completed. •

SA 43 Six Mile Creek Drainage Improvements – This project constructs a Regional Storm Water Facility on Six Mile Creek to reduce flow in the existing channel. The intent is to place a detention pond or ponds along the creek to reduce the flows and reduce the draft digital Flood Insurance Rate Map (DFIRM) floodplain in the residential area between S. Flores Street and W. Petaluma Blvd. The total estimated cost of this project is $28,588,748.

SA 45 Cacias Road LWC – This project will replace the two low water crossings on Cacias Road with culverts capable of withstanding a 25-year storm without overtopping the road. Both culverts are to be replaced with multiple box culverts with headwalls upstream and downstream. Channel grading will be done upstream and downstream of these two culverts. Right-of-way (drainage easements) will have to be obtained to accommodate the drainage channels. The estimated cost of this project is $1,444,640.

SA 46 Kirkner Road LWC – This project will improve the four low water crossings on Kirkner Road between Zigmont Road and Stuart Road in eastern Bexar County. This location will also receive a High Water Detection System. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,026,080.

SA 47 Henze Road LWC – This project will improve the existing low water crossing at Henze Road in South Bexar County to meet a 25-year storm event. The project will replace the existing low water crossing, where there is no culvert, with appropriate culverts with parallel wing walls upstream and downstream of Henze Road. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,821,974, and construction has been completed.

SC 4 Knoll Creek – This project involves a drainage study to determine the best option for improving Knoll Creek. The goal is to remove homes from the 100-year floodplain just downstream of Classen Road without adversely impacting commercial properties downtown. The total estimated cost of this project is $9,860,700.

SC 5 Mid-Beitel Creek Channel Restoration - This project provides for the design of the channelization of a section of Beitel Creek. Beitel Creek has been channelized from N.E. Loop 410 upstream to an area just south of Garden Court East Subdivision. The project will also include construction of an earthen channel from the existing channel, upstream approximately 4,000 feet. The channel will be adjacent to the Garden Court East Subdivision within the City of San Antonio. The project cost is estimated at $2,816,645.

SC 9 Perrin Beitel Bridge Expansion – This project includes the design and construction to elevate the roadway and bridge on Perrin-Beitel Rd at Beitel Creek. The improved bridge on Perrin-Beitel will withstand a 100 year storm event and minimize flooding in the Briar Glen subdivision. Some channel improvements and re-grading will be required. The total estimated cost of this project is $11,215,775.

SC 15 Rosillo Creek RSWF – This project will alleviate flooding on the tributary to Rosillo Creek downstream of F.M. 78 in the City of Kirby. It will provide runoff control and reduce the floodplain along one tributary to Rosillo Creek. The total estimated cost of this project is $10,416,372.

SC 18 Roland Avenue Bridge – The project will raise Roland Avenue above the 100-year water surface elevation crossing over Salado Creek. It also provides two separate bridges and 1,450 feet of 101-7


roadway approaches. Roland Avenue will be re-aligned to improve the sharp curves through the low water crossing. The total estimated cost of this project is $7,773,979, and construction has been completed. •

SC 27 Bulverde and Jung Mud Creek Trib A – This project provides improvements to the low water crossing at Bulverde Rd and Jung Road at Tributary A to Mud Creek. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,033,573.

SA 41 Salado Creek Tributary D at Ira Lee – This project includes 800 feet of earthen channel improvements just north of Garner Middle School. The Ira Lee low water crossing will be improved and 20 facilities will be removed from the 100 year floodplain. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,204,068.

Seeling Channel Phase II - This project is an extension of the City of San Antonio’s Seeling Channel II bond project and includes improvements to the channel further upstream. These additional channel improvements will remove approximately 48 homes as well as Morning Glory and W. Mulberry streets from the floodplain. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,000,000.

Woodlawn at 36th Street Drainage – This project consists of the construction of two barrels of culverts at Woodlawn and 36th Street. These two culverts will take the flood waters that currently flood the adjacent subdivision west of the two streets into the existing St. Mary’s University drainage channel. There are currently 134 homes in the floodplain adjacent to this project. The total estimated cost of this project is $19,975,000.

101-8


Closed Projects The following is a list of Flood Control projects that have been completed by Bexar County, transferred to the City of San Antonio for completion, or not recommended for construction. The total amount expended can be found in parentheses next to the project name. In some cases the project was not recommended for completion or alternative sources of funding were used, therefore, the amount expended is zero. Benton City Road Low Water Crossing ($540,038) Bulverde Road Phase V ($2,200,000) CB 18 Smithson Valley LWC ($166,625) CB 19 Schaefer Road Drainage Phase I ($8,967,844) CW 00 Project Management ($16,126,423) CW 01 High Water Detection System ($852,808) CW 05 Program Controls System ($355,140) Galm Road Phase I ($2,257,360) Helotes Creek RSWF ($0) High Water Detection System Phase II ($3,000,000) LC 10 Hausman Road Phase II ($8,408,659) LC 14 Chimenea Creek RSWF ($269,990) LC 22 French Creek Drainage Study ($167,676) LC 8 Ingram Road LWC ($9,572,879) Medina Lake Dam ($3,000,000) Mid-Beitel Creek Channel Restore Phase II ($100) Millrace and Mulberry ($1,100,000) MR 8 Shepherd Rd at Elm Creek & Black Hill Branch ($3,316,675) MR 13 Live Oak Slough Quintana to I-35 ($327,058) MR 27 Live Oak Slough Overflow ($308,112) MR 28 Briggs Road ($141,906) MR 29 Luckey Road ($362,224) MR 9 Robert Glen at Live Oak Slough ($302,856)

SA 14 Science Park ($376,782) SA 22 San Pedro Phase II ($10,741,295) SA 33 Olmos Dam ($5,991,128) SA 38 Balcones Heights RSWF ($184,221) SA 4 Shane Road LWC ($2,131,920) SA 40 Calaveras Dam 6 ($1,000,000) SA 41 Calaveras 8 Increase Detention ($1,661,370) SA 42 Broadway Drainage Improvements ($911,900) SA 44 VFW Boulevard Drainage ($9,981,045) SA 48 Concepcion Creek Drainage ($447,240) SA 6 Rock Creek Outfall Phase II ($540,587) SA 8 S. New Braunfels LWC ($1,254,397) SARIP – Eagleland Reach ‘Plunge Pool’ ($763,253) SARIP – Eagleland Reach ($3,123,292) SARIP – Mission Reach ($175,410,032) SARIP - Museum Reach ($10,681,187) SC 12 Menger Road LWC ($379,179) SC 2 Evans Road LWC ($3,825,488) SC 28 Jones Maltsberger at Elm Creek ($1,318,174) Sixmile Creek Drainage CCR 2 and Bridges ($0) St. Mary’s University Drainage ($1,735,789) Trainer Hale LWC ($428,842) Wilderness Oak Bridge ($1,400,000)

101-9


Bexar County Capital Improvement Program FY 2016-17 Project

Budget

Financial Management System Juvenile Justice Academy Improvements Park Improvements â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Rodriguez Park Central Magistration Improvements Criminal District Courts - Video Teleconferencing Camp Bullis Easement

Activity to Date

Available

$7,188,841

$7,025,100

$163,741

1,501,637

2,088

1,499,549

75,634

41,874

33,760

4,813,860

2,044,535

2,769,325

187,491

0

187,491

1,000,000

1,349

998,651

Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS)

400,000

262,406

137,594

Juvenile Campus Improvements

197,352

180,475

16,877

Enterprise Data Center Power Upgrade

386,415

364,096

22,319

Elections Equipment - Battery Replacement

244,038

185,064

58,974

County Parks - Parking Lot Overlay

558,126

172,502

385,624

Courthouse South Annex (Federal Reserve Building)

10,000,000

8,702,854

1,297,146

Alameda Theatre Renovations

12,500,000

1,138

12,498,862

Law Enforcement Substations

17,551,048

4,804,685

12,746,363

Bexar County History Center

2,000,000

485,106

1,514,894

County Parks - Restroom Renovations

103,500

101,452

2,048

Adult Detention Center - Cell Renovations

537,108

367,483

169,625

1,406,896

1,036,314

370,582

Interactive Voice Response (IVR) System

150,000

26,665

123,335

CHRIS Hardware Refresh

250,000

162,258

87,742

23,600,000

25,360,912

(1,760,912)

BCIT - zServer Tape Upgrade

Bexar County Integrated Justice System (CIJS) CIJS E-Discovery System

600,000

548,492

51,508

CIJS District Attorney Case Management

8,000,000

7,951,269

48,731

CIJS Jail Management System

7,000,000

2,751,265

4,248,735

800,000

744,399

55,601

2,000,000

329,598

1,670,402

67,019

67,000

19

CIJS Peripherals

647,693

52,422

595,271

Courthouse Office Relocation

637,417

347,025

269,392

Justice Center Courtroom Suite Renovations

3,050,000

2,887,332

162,668

South Flores Parking Garage Improvements

1,000,000

995,565

4,435

County Facilities Fiber Upgrades

1,537,941

876,922

661,019

20,633

0

20,633

Automated Fingerprint Identification System

2,700,000

2,616,420

83,580

Hot Wells Interpretive Center and Public Park

4,469,066

568,008

3,901,058

Adult Detention Center Systems Replacement

18,445,000

1,613,407

2,386,593

738,300

547,351

190,949

Justice Center/PET Improvements

3,525,250

418,440

3,106,310

Federal Reserve Building - Child Support Courts

4,435,500

69,928

4,365,572

CIJS Jury Management System CIJS Juvenile Case Management System CIJS Storage

Court Kiosks System

Courtroom Restoration - FY 2013-14

102-1


Project

Budget

Precinct 1 Facility Upgrades

Activity to Date

Available

$608,000

$80,770

$527,230

350,000

0

350,000

4,500,000

2,992,168

1,507,832

Orion System - Sheriff Time and Attendance Software

500,000

348,495

151,505

Wireless Infrastructure

947,485

947,485

0

Countywide Technology System Upgrades

99,185

74,708

24,477

Digital Signage

69,306

44,215

25,091

9,909,600

839,189

9,070,411

County Parks - Portable Stage and Equipment Law Enforcement Records Management System

Radio System Infrastructure and Equipment Upgrade Voice Infrastructure Upgrade

790,775

0

790,775

Infor Financial System Upgrade

754,083

754,077

6

Google Search Appliance - Law Enforcement

225,000

0

225,000

1,009,375

135,614

873,761

Bexar County Facility ADA Improvements

100,000

86,131

13,869

Krier Center - Weatherproofing & Repair

237,600

15,624

221,976

County Office and Department Relocation

173,282

27,433

145,849

Bexar County Park Master Plan

157,500

1,187

156,313

County Parks - Restroom Modifications

146,750

135.188

11.562

Bexar County Civic Centers - HVAC replacement

122,500

90,546

31,954

Juvenile Tejeda Courts Program

290,675

290,670

5

10,005,000

2,333

10,002,667

3,500,000

3,402,726

97,274

736,500

287,141

449,359

82,000

0

82,000

820,500

820,499

1

1,880,000

1,239,039

640,961

Fleet Facility Improvements

265,000

11,802

253,198

Fleet Management Information System

217,473

217,473

0

Criminal Laboratory Equipment - FY 2015-16

323,044

291,343

31,701

Criminal Laboratory - Compliance Management System

37,840

0

37,840

Medical Examiner - Telephone System Upgrade

95,422

91,221

4,201

150,000

12,500

137,500

Bexar County Precinct 3 Facility

7,132,216

3,286,215

3,846,001

Bibliotech East

1,657,431

46,890

1,610,541

Fire Marshal & Emergency Management Facility

4,879,050

385,880

4,493,170

18,250,000

2,009,428

16,240,572

Bexar County Precinct 4 Facility

5,000,000

0

5,000,000

Public Safety Communications Center

2,061,220

365,673

1,695,547

Law Enforcement Vehicle - Digital Video Cameras - Phase II

818,623

702,815

115,808

SAS Upgrade

335,127

0

335,127

87,000

0

87,000

Adult Detention Center - Main Jail Elevator Replacement

Tobin Performing Arts Center - Parking Garage Menger Creek Linear Park Bexar County Security Enhancements Law Enforcement Radio Upgrades Bexar County - City of Kirby - Animal Control Center County Park Equipment & Improvements

Tax Office - Vista Verde Modifications

Bexar County Public Works Facility

Workstation Software 102-2


Project

Budget

Bexar County Wireless Network Access

Activity to Date

Available

$1,250,000

$377,845

$872,155

Infor System Enhancements

580,000

0

580,000

Bexar County Credit Card & Tokenization

710,000

25,200

684,800

2,787,087

330,292

2,456,795

Courthouse Basement and Corridor Restoration

590,000

0

590,000

Courthouse Children's Court Technology Improvements

375,000

0

375,000

Courthouse Courtroom Technology Improvements

267,500

0

267,500

Bexar County Downtown Signage

214,000

102,807

111,193

Bexar County Facility Improvements

250,000

0

250,000

Forensic Science Center - Emergency Generator Replacement

750,000

0

750,000

Juvenile - Krier Center Master Control Improvements

311,000

0

311,000

Firing Range Improvements & Deck Separator

160,727

96,726

64,001

Vista Verde Improvements

365,000

25,000

340,000

190,000

41,255

149,645

4 Court of Appeals Build Out

180,488

171,012

9,476

Paul Elizondo Tower Elevator #4

248,680

248,678

2

10,000,000

9.217.912

782,088

Family Service Center Association - Facility Acquisition

1,500,500

0

1,500,000

JBSA Mission Preparedness Initiative

4,500,000

0

4,500,000

900,000

0

900,000

32,396,730

5,141,144

27,255,586

3,000,000

0

3,000,000

22,000,000

0

22,000,000

1,850,000

0

1,850,000

Raymond Russell SAWS Connection & New Restroom

600,000

0

600,000

Tree Replacement & Oak Wilt Defense

100,000

0

100,000

Sheriff Equipment & Machinery

396,685

0

396,685

20,000,000

0

20,000,000

1,750,000

0

1,750,000

I.T. Security Software

357,122

0

357,122

County Network Hardware Refresh

650,000

0

650,000

Countywide Video Surveillance Refresh

490,000

0

490,000

Microsoft Automated Digital Evidence Ingestion System

813,000

0

813,000

DNA Technology Upgrade Phase II

102,920

0

102,920

Bexar County Public Works Facility

16,050,000

0

16,050,000

Tax Office Veteran Memorial

770,000

0

770,000

Tax Assessor South Side Drive-Thru

695,000

0

695,000

Facilities Management & Security Software

605,000

0

605,000

Adult Detention Center Improvements and Modifications

rd

Courthouse 3 Floor Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Court Renovations th

Toyota Field

Commemorative Tricentennial Artwork Adult Detention Center Annex Conversion CentroMed Facility County/Center for Health Care Services Mental Health Clinic County Park Improvements & Renovations

Data Center Relocation Centralized/Dense Computing Environment

102-3


Project

Budget

Firing Range Enhancements FY 2016-17

Activity to Date

Available

$603,750

$0

$603,750

415,000

0

415,000

55,000

0

55,000

UPS Replacement

265,000

0

265,000

Justice Center Maintenance & Improvements

183,500

0

183,500

Adult Detention Center Maintenance & Improvements

2,900,600

0

2,900,600

Juvenile Detention Center Maintenance & Improvements

1,075,000

0

1,075,000

Juvenile Probation Maintenance & Improvements

460,000

0

460,000

BCSO Move to Adult Probation

400,000

0

400,000

CIVIQ Touch Screen Kiosks

498,977

0

498,977

Botanical Garden Expansion

500,000

0

500,000

1,500,000

0

1,500,000

$361,263,593

$100,844,291

$236,258,395

Courthouse Renovations th

166 District Court Renovations

Brooks City Base Mission Reach Portal Grand Total

102-4


FUND: 700

BEXAR COUNTY CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT FUND Program Description: The County Buildings Capital Improvement Fund is used to fund improvements to County buildings as well as major capital equipment and information technology purchases. Examples of major projects that have been budgeted in this fund include the Historic Double–Height Courtroom, the Elections and Purchasing Facility, and the Adult Detention Center Annex Conversion project. Funding for these projects is derived from a number of revenue sources, to include property tax revenue and parking garage revenue. During the budget process, Offices and Departments submit capital project requests to the Budget Department. Each County Office and Department requesting an appropriation of capital funds is responsible for preparing a project application on a standardized form, which includes a general project description and justification of its importance or need. Program Justification and Analysis: The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget appropriates a total of $95,931,268 for the following projects: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Center for Health Care Services Facility - $22,000,000 County Park Improvements & Renovations - $1,850,000 Raymond Russell SAWS Connection & New Restroom - $600,000 Tree Replacement & Oak Wilt Defense - $100,000 Sheriff Equipment & Machinery - $396,685 Data Center Relocation - $20,000,000 Centralized/Dense Computing Environment - $1,750,000 I.T. Security Software - $357,122 County Network Hardware Refresh - $650,000 Countywide Video Surveillance Refresh - $490,000 Microsoft Automated Digital Evidence Ingestion System $813,000 DNA Technology Upgrade Phase II - $102,920 Bexar County Public Works Facility - $16,050,000 Adult Detention Center Systems Replacement - $14,445,000 Law Enforcement Substations - $3,246,998 Bexar County Precinct 3 Facility - $2,152,216 Tax Office Veteran Memorial $770,000 Tax Assessor South Side Drive-Thru $695,000 Facilities Management & Security Software - $605,500 Firing Range Enhancements FY 2016-17 - $603,750 Courthouse Renovations - $415,000 166th District Court Renovations $55,000 UPS Replacement - $265,000 Justice Center Maintenance & Improvements - $183,500 Adult Detention Center Maintenance & Improvements - $2,900,600 Juvenile Detention Center Maintenance & Improvements - $1,075,000

102-5


• • • • •

Juvenile Probation Maintenance & Improvements - $460,000 BSCO Move to Adult Probation - $400,000 CIVIQ Touch Screen Kiosks $498,977 Botanical Garden Expansion $500,000 Brooks City Base Mission Reach Portal $1,500,000

On–going Projects The following is a list of all active Bexar County Projects. Financial Management System: A new financial management system has been implemented to meet the County’s growing needs specifically in the areas of financial accounting, purchasing and budgeting. It enables County users to have access to better management information through reports and queries regarding requisitions, financial cost and accounting information, and the impact on annual budget appropriations. The FY 2010-11 Adopted Budget included an additional $888,841 for implementation of the financial management system. The total estimated cost of this project is $7,188,841. Juvenile Justice Academy: This project provides for a contribution to the Juvenile Probation Department for infrastructure and equipment related to the Bexar County Juvenile Justice Academy. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,501,637. Park Improvements - Rodriguez Park: This project provides funding for the provision of playground equipment and perimeter fencing. This project replaced outdated playground equipment with equipment that meets ADA, Federal, and local guide lines for safety and security. The replacement of the perimeter fence is to ensure security of the park after hours. Also included is funding for the renovation of restrooms. The total estimated cost for this project is $75,634. Central Magistration Improvements: This project provides for upgrades and renovations to the existing Central Magistration Facility that will accommodate an open booking process. An assessment of the existing facility was conducted. New process flow improvements were identified by all stakeholders and this project will integrate those requirements as it relates to building improvements. The estimated cost of this project is approximately $4,813,860. Criminal District Courts - Video Teleconferencing: The Criminal District Courts have requested three video teleconferencing systems. These systems will be portable units located on each of the three Justice Center floors where Criminal District Courts preside. The estimated cost for this project is $187,491. Camp Bullis Easement: The purpose of this project is to study the easements of Camp Bullis for the Habitat Conservation Plan. Habitat Conservation Plans (HCPs), also known as Regional Habitat Conservation Plans (RHCPs), can be designed to cover one or more endangered species for portions of the county, entire counties, or multiple counties. The estimated cost for this project is $1,000,000. Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS): This project enhances and speeds up the identification of individuals processed and placed in custody at the Adult Detention Center, Central Magistration and Courthouse Booking Station. This project provides the capability to aid in the identification of offenders at crime scenes. This total estimate project cost is $400,000.

102-6


Juvenile Campus Improvements: This project provides for the following improvements to the Juvenile Campus. The total combined budget for this project is $197,352: • Washer and Dryer Set for Juvenile Detention • Livescan Unit for Juvenile Probation • Juvenile Courts A/C Chiller • Smoke Control System Replacement Enterprise Data Center Power Upgrade: This project will upgrade the power in the Enterprise Data Center in order to meet existing demands and provide for future demands. This upgrade is based on a Power Infrastructure Upgrade Assessment done by Cleary Zimmerman Engineers. The estimated cost of this project is $386,415. Elections Equipment – Battery Replacement: This project funds the replacement of approximately 2,400 batteries for the iVotronic Machines that are used during elections. The total estimated cost will be $244,038. County Parks – Parking Lot Overlay: This project provides for the re-asphalting and re-striping of the parking lots at Raymond Russell County Park, Rodriguez County Park, Comanche County Park, Pletz Park, Mission County Parks I, II, Padre Park, as well as certain County facilities. The total estimated cost of this project is $558,126. Courthouse South Annex - Federal Reserve Facility: This project provides for the purchase of the Federal Reserve Facility located south of the Bexar County Courthouse and for improvements to the facility. The total estimated cost of this project is $10,000,000. Alameda Theater Renovations: This project provides for the design and construction of renovations planned for the Alameda Theatre. The total estimated cost of this project is $12,500,000. Bexar County Law Enforcement Substations: A total of $1,500,000 was appropriated during FY 2012-13 to study and provide preliminary design for law enforcement substations in Bexar County. The goal of the project was to determine the best location and design of substations to provide the most efficient and effective law enforcement services to Bexar County citizens. The FY 2014-15 Adopted Budget appropriated funding to purchase property and construct substations on the East and West side of Bexar County. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget appropriates funding to install utilities at the East side location for a total estimated cost of $3,246,998. The total estimated cost of the project $17,551,048. Courthouse History Center: This project provides funding for the construction of a Bexar County History Center for displaying exhibits and artifacts. The total estimated cost of this project is $2,000,000. County Parks - Restroom Renovations: This project will renovate and construct restroom facilities at Comanche and Raymond Russell parks. The restroom facilities require new partitions and ADA compliance renovations. The total estimated cost of the project is $103,500. Adult Detention Center – Cell Renovations: During FY 2011-12, the following projects were approved for improvements to the Adult Detention Center. The total combined cost of this project is $537,108: • Adult Detention Center Communications Room A/C System $123,000 • Adult Detention Center Door Slot and Bunk Storage Renovations: $102,503

102-7


• • •

Adult Detention Center Cell Renovations: $254,474 Adult Detention Center – Booking Break Room: $18,208 Adult Detention Center – Washing Machine: $38,923

BCIT - zServer Tape Upgrade: This project will upgrade the existing tape management system. The upgrade will deliver increased application productivity and data availability. A total of $530,000 was allocated during FY 2011-12. The FY 2012-13 Budget provided an additional $1,100,000 for components related to the overall Z-Server Upgrade. Savings from this project were reprogrammed during FY 201314 for other County capital projects. The new budget for this project is $1,406,896. Interactive Voice Response (IVR) Solution: This project provides for the implementation of interactive voice response technology in County offices and departments. The system will provide specifically tailored information to callers such as directions, hours of operation, court dates, etc. The total estimated cost of this project is $150,000. CHRIS Hardware Refresh: The project provides for the replacement of CHRIS hardware to include servers, SANs, and switches. The total estimated cost of this project is $250,000. County Justice Information System: The new justice information system will replace an outdated legacy system that has been in service for approximately 30 years. It will allow users to instantly update and exchange information and will have the flexibility to adapt to the changing needs of the County. During FY 2008-09 the cost of this project increased from $18,000,000 to $23,450,000. This amount includes the cost for the Central Magistration component and the Master Name Index component. The total estimated cost of this portion of the project is $23,600,000 Bexar County Integrated Justice System: The following components are to be implemented as part of the County Integrated Justice System: E-Discovery System ($600,000), District Attorney Case Management System ($8,000,000), Jail Management System ($7,000,000), Jury Management System ($800,000), Juvenile Case Management System ($2,000,000), CIJS Storage ($67,019), and CIJS Peripherals ($647,693). The total cost of these components is $19,114,712. Courthouse Office Relocation: Due to the renovation of the Double-Height Courtroom and Gondeck demolition, the relocation of staff in the courthouse is necessary. This project provides funding for office relocation costs associated with improving existing and vacated areas. The total estimated cost of this project is $637,417. Justice Center Courtroom Suite Renovations: This project provides for renovations to the courtrooms that were not recently constructed in the Cadena Reeves Justice Center. A total of 16 courtrooms require improvements. This project provides for 4 of the courtrooms to receive renovations beginning in FY 2012-13. The plan is to phase in courtroom renovations until all 16 have been completed. The total estimated cost for the four courtroom renovations is $762,500. The FY 2013-14 Budget appropriated an additional $2,287,500 to complete the project. The total estimated cost of this project is $3,050,000. South Flores Parking Garage Improvements: This project provides for the replacement of public elevators at the South Flores Parking Garage. The project also includes exterior improvements such as signage, and resealing/recladding the surfaces. The total estimated cost is $1,000,000.

102-8


County Facilities Fiber Upgrade: This project provides for the upgrade of fiber network for various Bexar County Facilities. Savings from this project were reprogrammed during FY 2013-14 for other County capital projects. The new budget for this project is $1,537,941. Court Kiosks System: This project provides for the purchase of a kiosk system to allow self-service capabilities in the courts system. This project allows for the purchase of one system as a pilot program. The total estimated cost of this project is $20,633. Automated Fingerprint Identification System: This project provides for upgrades and hardware replacement for the existing system. These enhancements will expand the existing database and replace critical hardware (servers, workstations, FastID, and MobileID). The total estimated cost of the project is $2,700,000. Hot Wells Interpretive Center and Public Park: This project redevelops the ruins at the site of the Historic Hot Wells Hotel and Bath House. The area will be re-purposed as a public park and historic site on the river trail of the Mission Reach of the San Antonio River. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,469,066. Adult Detention Center Systems Replacement: This project provides for the replacement of critical building systems including doors, cameras, mechanical, plumbing, and electrical systems at the Adult Detention Center Main Jail and Annex. The project will also address the long term plans and renovations requirements for Master Control. In FY 2016-16, funding was provided to cover the costs of construction documents including cost estimates and the preparation of a bid package. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget appropriates funding in the amount of 14,445,000 for the construction phase. The total estimated cost of this project is $18,445,000. Courtroom Restoration - FY 2013-14: This project restores two Historic Courtrooms located in the Bexar County Courthouse. The Courtrooms, known as rooms 2-6 and 2-7, will be restored following the 5-Year Courthouse and Justice Center Restoration Master Plan. The budget for this project is $738,300 and will cover the costs of design only. Justice Center/PET Improvements: The following list of items is included within the scope of this project. The total combined cost is $3,525,250. • Renovation of the 4 public elevators in the Cadena Reeves Justice Center, modifications to the tunnel ceiling, and improvements to the restrooms to meet new ADA requirements. • Painting Common Areas: This project includes repainting the common public areas of the Paul Elizondo Tower. • Duct Detector Access: This project provides for safe access to duct detectors by way of a small lift and reconstruction of current double height ceilings to be lowered at the duct detector access points. • Replacement of the existing entry vestibule doors to the first floor and basement of the Paul Elizondo Tower with new electronic mechanized sliding glass doors. • Replacement of existing entry vestibule doors to the First Floor and Basement of the Cadena Reeves Justice Center as well as the connecting doors that access the Second thru Fifth floors of the Paul Elizondo Tower with new Electronic Mechanized Sliding Glass Doors. • Installation of a sidewalk drain outside the Paul Elizondo Tower

102-9


Federal Reserve Building - Child Support Courts: This project provides for the construction of two Child Support Courts on the second floor of the former Federal Reserve Building. The project will accommodate staff from the State Attorney General’s Office, Child Support Probation Staff, two new courtrooms, Judge’s chambers, support staff, and waiting/conferring areas. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,435,500. Precinct 1 Satellite Office Upgrades: This project provides for upgrades to the HVAC controls, access card system and exterior improvements to properly secure the ground mounted units. This will also include the purchase and installation of an emergency generator for the facility. The total estimated cost of these improvements is $585,000. This project also provides for the construction of a corridor which connects the existing Tax Office and Justice of the Peace/Constable areas. The total estimated cost for this corridor is $23,000. The combined project total is $608,000. County Parks - Portable Stage and Equipment: This project provides for the purchase of sound equipment and a mobile stage unit for use at County Parks. The total estimated cost of this project is $350,000. Law Enforcement Records Management System: This project provides for the purchase and implementation of an enterprise-wide system allowing for storage, retrieval, retention, manipulation, archiving, and viewing of information, records, documents, or files pertaining to law enforcement operations. The total estimated cost of this project is $4,500,000. Orion System - Sheriff Time and Attendance Software: This project provides for the purchase and implementation of time and attendance software for the Sheriff’s Office. The total estimated cost of this project is $500,000. Wireless Infrastructure: This project provides for the purchase and implementation of wireless network capabilities for all Bexar County buildings. This network will allow for both public and private access. The budget for this project is $947,485. Countywide Technology System Upgrades: This project provides for the purchase of 12 units of RAM for the existing 12 SAN servers. The total estimated cost of this project is $99,185. Digital Signage: This project provides for the purchase and installation of digital displays at County Facilities. The signage will disseminate information pertinent to the specific location. The budget for this project is $69,306. Bexar County Radio System: This project provides for the purchase of radio replacement equipment including the Bexar County P25 Radio System upgrade. The total estimated cost of this project is $9,909,600. Overall, the County and City of San Antonio have invested $43 million towards the purchase and implementation of this new Radio System. Voice Infrastructure Upgrade: This project will fund the upgrade of the existing phone network infrastructure for Bexar County. The new network infrastructure will be designed to communicate with multiple and different SIP entities and to normalize those communications to the digital infrastructure, resulting in annual savings of approximately $100,000 for voice circuits and $90,000 for leased data lines. The total estimated cost of this project is $790,775.

102-10


Infor – Financial System Upgrade: This project provides for the upgrade of the County’s financial system from the existing software, Infor 9.0, to Infor 10.X. The Infor 9.0 software expired in May of 2016. The total estimated cost of this project is $754,083. Google Search Appliance – Law Enforcement: This project will replace the current ROAM system which is the foundation for the BexarClaw law enforcement application. The new search appliance tracks mug shots, evidence, warrants, active and closed cases, data from the Fusion Center, and extends its use to complete complex crime analytics and profiling for ongoing criminal activity and cold cases. The total estimated cost of this project is $225,000. ADC - Main Jail Elevator Replacement: This project provides for the replacement of three passenger elevators and one freight elevator inside the ADC Main Jail. The replacement includes new driving machines or hydraulic pump units, power and logic controllers, conduit and wiring, hoist ropes, traveling cables, new cab enclosures car frames and platforms, door operators, and entrance doors and frames. Contracted work will include all engineering, labor, materials, tools, equipment, testing permits, inspections and commissioning. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,009,375. Bexar County Facility ADA Improvements: The results of a consultant study identified areas within Bexar County that require improvements for ADA compliance. This project provides funding to address the highest priority issues. The total estimated cost of this project is $100,000. Krier Center - Weatherproofing and Repair: This project provides for the replacement of window caulking, weather stripping and other components that have worn out or failed on all windows in the Krier Juvenile Treatment Facility. The total estimated cost of this project is $237,600. County Office & Department Relocation: This project provides for the relocation/purchase of office furniture, adding electrical and data connections, carpeting, furniture purchases, installation of access card readers, door hardware, and the installation of ceiling tile for Countywide projects. The total estimated cost of this project is $173,282. Bexar County Parks Master Plan: This project will evaluate the current conditions of Bexar County Parks, and update the 2006 Bexar County Park Master Plan. This is a requirement for submitting grant proposals. The total estimated cost of this project is $157,500. County Parks - Restroom Modifications: This project provides for the renovation of two restrooms at Raymond Russell Park. The project will replace fixtures, update handicap accessible partitions, and reseal the restroom floor. The total estimated cost of this project is $146,750. Bexar County Civic Centers - HVAC replacement: This project will provide for a new HVAC and ventilation system at the South San and Harlandale Civic Centers. It will include the appropriate controls for efficient environment control and the replacement of the ceiling grid. The total estimated cost of this project is $122,500. Juvenile Tejeda Courts Program: This project establishes funding to improve the space and security needs of the 436th District Courtroom located at 600 Mission Road. The total estimated cost of this project is $290,675.

102-11


Tobin Performing Arts Center – Parking Garage: This project provides funding for a portion of the total cost to construct a parking garage at the Tobin Performing Arts Center. The total estimated cost of this project is $10,005,000. Menger Creek Linear Park: Bexar County has appropriated $3,500,000 toward the Menger Creek Linear Park amenities that will eventually be tied into the City of San Antonio's Menger Creek Drainage project. This investment will help create a natural destination park for the EastPoint community and provide opportunities for recreation and physical fitness activities for healthier lifestyles. Potential amenities include fitness stations, multi-use trails and a group pavilion. Bexar County is also in discussions with Union Pacific Rail Road in an effort to enhance the footprint of the linear park by acquiring additional right of way. Bexar County Security Enhancements – Phase I: This project provides for an initial plan of action to resolve deficiencies identified by a security consultant The total estimated cost of this project is $736,500. • Access Control - Employee Entrance Turnstile $125,000 • Electronic Card Migration $150,000 • Elevator Modifications – Courthouse $411,500 • Door Core & Electronic Striking Improvements $50,000 Law Enforcement - Radio Upgrades: This project upgrades the 800 MHz and VHF radios in all Office of Emergency Management related vehicles and equipment. The total estimated cost of this project is $82,000. Bexar County - City of Kirby - Animal Control Shelter: Bexar County was approached by the City of Kirby regarding the possibility of providing animal shelter services. Under the terms of the proposal, Bexar County would build an animal care shelter within the City of Kirby to be operated by the City of Kirby. The County and the City of Kirby would each pay its share of operational costs. The facility will include approximately 100 kennels large enough to an additional 2,400 animals per year. The total estimated cost of this project is $820,500. Operational costs are currently projected to be $470,000, annually but will not be required until FY 2017 when the facility has been constructed. County Park Equipment & Improvements: This project funds the following equipment and improvements for County Parks for a total estimated cost of $1,880,000. • County Parks - ADA Improvements: This project will address the highest priority ADA compliance issues at Bexar County Parks. During FY 2014, a consultant conducted an assessment and provided areas that needed to be corrected. These improvements will include the installation of ramps and accessible amenities such as picnic tables and restroom facilities. The total estimated cost of this project is $300,000. • County Parks - Fall Zone Material Phase III: This project provides for fall zone material to be installed throughout Bexar County Parks. Previous phases of this project have replaced the areas at MacArthur and Rodriguez Park. This new funding will be used to address other parks requiring upgrades. The total estimated cost of this project is $300,000. • County Parks - Playscape Replacements: This project provides funding for the design, purchase, and installation of playground equipment throughout Bexar County Parks. The total estimated cost of this project is $780,000.

102-12


• •

County Parks - Signage Phase II: This project will consist of the design, fabrication, and installation of new countywide park signage. Phase I included Mission County Park and Bullis Park. This new funding will be used to address the remaining County Parks. The total estimated cost of this project is $275,000. County Parks - Basketball Court Improvements: This project provides funding to renovate, replace or repair damage to several basketball courts in various County parks. The total estimated cost of this project is $70,000. County Parks - Specialty Vehicle and Equipment: This project provides for the purchase of a truck-mounted bucket lift. This specialty equipment will allow Parks personnel to handle issues (tree-trimming, light fixture changing, etc.) that were previously contracted to vendors. The total estimated cost of this equipment is $155,000.

Fleet Facility Improvements: This project will address and correct issues at the Light Fleet Facility regarding the removal of exhaust fumes in administrative areas and expand the existing design to allow for up to 5 additional mechanic bay areas. The total estimated cost of this project is $265,000. Fleet Management Information System: This will provides for the purchase and implementation of software that will capture, store, and analyze data on all fleet management activities, such as fleet asset management, maintenance and repair management, and parts management. The implementation of this system was one of the highest priorities of a fleet study performed during 2014. The total estimated cost of this project is $217,473. Criminal Laboratory Equipment - FY 2015-16: This project provides funding to purchase new and upgraded equipment related to the Federal DNA Indexing System used by the County’s Criminal Laboratory. The total estimated cost of this equipment is $323,044. Criminal Laboratory - Compliance Management System: This project provides funding to acquire a compliance management system that will serve to maintain and track documents, process corrective actions, maintain training records, and prepare discovery packets. The total estimated cost of this software is $37,840. Medical Examiner - Telephone System Upgrade: This project will upgrade the Medical Examiner’s Office telephone system that is currently obsolete. The telephone system is a critical component to fielding calls by the general public and businesses. The total estimated cost of this equipment is $95,422. Tax Office - Vista Verde Modifications: This project provides funding for modifications to the restrooms for a wellness initiative established by the Tax Assessor-Collector. This project will also include improvements to vacated office area and the expansion of the break room. The total estimated cost of this project is $150,000. Bexar County Precinct 3 Facility: This project provides funding for the purchase of property and construction of improvements for a Justice of the Peace and Constable Precinct 3 Facility. In FY 2014-15, funding in the amount of $4,980,000 was provided for the facility. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget appropriates funding in the amount of $2,152,216 to complete construction of the facility. The total estimated cost of the project is $7,132,216. Bibliotech East: This project provides funding for the construction of a Bibliotech Facility in Precinct 4 located at the Wheatley Heights. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,657,431. 102-13


Fire Marshal and Emergency Management Office Facility: This project provides for the construction of a new facility for the Fire Marshal and Emergency Management Office. The total estimate cost of this project is $4,879,000. Public Safety Communication Center: This project provides funding for required furniture, technology, and equipment needed to build out and support a new Bexar County Public Safety Communications Center. The new Center is located within a brand-new, state-of-the-art, Regional Emergency Operations Center that is in the process of being built by the Bexar Metro 9-1-1 Network District. The FY 2014-15 Adopted Budget appropriated $500,720 to address the initial costs associated with the facility. An additional amount of $1,560,500 was appropriated in FY 2015-16 to facilitate the completion of the project. The total estimated cost of the project is $2,061,220. Law Enforcement Vehicle - Digital Video Cameras - Phase II: This project provides for the purchase of digital video cameras for the Sheriff’s Office vehicles. This includes 190 vehicle units and 15 motorcycle units. The total estimated cost of this project is $818,623. SAS Upgrade – FY 2015-16: This project provides for an upgrade to the existing SAS software. The funds will be used to implement a development environment for use by the Bexar County Information Technology Department and purchase necessary hardware upgrades. Staff training and development assistance was requested and funded within the Information Technology General Fund. The total estimated cost of this project is $335,127. Workstation Software: This project provides funding for software that will replace the Mocha 3270 Mainframe Access. After several decades the software requires a replacement to access the historical data and this project will provide an enhanced and secure connection to maintain and access the data. The total estimated cost of this project is $87,000. Bexar County Wireless Network Access: This project provides funding to continue deploying Wi-Fi throughout the county. This would expand Wi-Fi access to other county-owned facilities and areas providing wireless access to both the county private network for employees and public access as a general use offering. The total estimated cost of this project is $1,250,000. Infor System Enhancements: This project provides for the following software enhancements to the Infor System for an estimated cost of $580,000: • Asset Management: This project will allow the County to integrate the asset management process into the procurement processes. The total estimated cost of this project is $130,000. • Contract Management (Punch Out): This project will centralize all County contracts and its related information onto the existing system digitally. The total estimated cost of this project is $150,000. • Purchasing and Travel Cards: This project will automate processes and procedures related to the P-Cards and T-Cards, including tracking and making payments. The total estimated cost of this project is $150,000. • Supply Order Management: This project will make supplier management fully electronic, providing suppliers and purchasing access to accounts, invoices, purchase orders, etc. via the Infor System. The total estimated cost of this project is $150,000.

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Bexar County Credit Card & Tokenization: This project is a continuation of the original credit card implementation program that was piloted with the Adult Probation Department. This will expand the credit card access to other areas of cashiering to the County. The tokenization aspect is required for processing credit card voids and refunds. The total estimated cost of this project is $710,000. Adult Detention Center Improvements and Modifications: The following projects are budgeted within the ADC Improvements and Modifications project with a combined estimated cost of $2,787,087: • Electrical Improvements: This project provides funding to address electrical modifications or improvements to the Motor Control Center. The total estimated cost is $250,000. • Plumbing Improvements: This project provides funding to address plumbing systems improvements at the Main Jail (B & C Towers) and Subbasement Kitchen areas. The total estimated cost is $440,000. • Security/Electrical Improvements: This project provides for the installation of replacement access control systems in units BC & BD. The total estimated cost is $360,000. • Parking Lighting: This project provides funding to properly light the perimeter parking area of the ADC. The total estimated cost is $525,000. • Annex Security Improvements: This project provides for the installation of razor wire at the Annex Facility. The total estimated cost is $25,000. • Cell Renovations: This project provides for the replacement of cell window covers. The total estimated cost is $396,000. • Window Covers: This project removes all blinds from double pane windows at the Main Jail. The total estimated cost is $35,000. • Living Unit Improvements: This project will replace sinks and cabinetry with detention grade units. The total estimated cost is $65,000. • Flooring Improvements: This project will replace the flooring area of Match/Patch Program. The total estimate is $15,000. • Storage Modifications: This project will construct wire cages and partitions for the areas of Jail Industries and Main Jail Kitchen to properly store kitchen items and tools. The total estimated cost is $26,000. • Roof Replacement: This project will re place the Jail Industry Workshop Roof. The total estimated cost is $30,000. • Low Risk - ADA Upgrade: This project provides for ADA improvements to the Low-Risk Medical Unit area. The total estimated cost is $60,000. • Flooring Improvements: This project will replacement the flooring areas of booking. The total estimated cost is $276,000. • Laundry Equipment: This project will replace one washer unit. The total estimated cost is $36,187. • ADC Campus Improvements: This project will establish speeds bumps on Comal Street and provide ADA Striping and allow for repairs to curbs and walkways near the entrances of the Facilities. The total estimated cost is $180,000. • Secure Door Replacement: This project provides funding to replace the secure doors located inside the basement of the Main Jail. The total estimated cost of this project is $67,900. Courthouse Basement and Corridor Restoration: This project provides funding to refurbish the existing terrazzo flooring, install new terrazzo flooring at the south half of the corridor, refurbish and replace wall finishes to match, clean up abandoned utilities above ceiling tile, replace ceiling tiles and grid, and new lighting fixtures and air diffuser devices. The total estimated cost of this project is $590,000. 102-15


Courthouse Children's Court Technology Improvements: This project provides funding to upgrade the analog video system at the Children’s Court. During 2012, the audio systems were replaced and the video system has not been upgraded since 2003. The total estimated cost of this project is $375,000. Courthouse Courtroom Technology Improvements: This project will upgrade antiquated video systems in the Courthouse Courtrooms. The total estimated cost of this project is $267,500. Bexar County Downtown Signage: This project provides funding to study and install directional and ADA compliant signage to the County Downtown Campus. The total estimated cost of this project is $214,000. Bexar County Facility Improvements: This project provides for the renovation, modification, or repurposing of existing spaces in every County-owned facility to comply with state and federal legislation requiring a secure space for breast-feeding. The total estimated cost of this project is $250,000. Forensic Science Center - Emergency Power Generator Replacement: This project provides funding for the replacement of the Emergency Power Generator located at the Forensic Science Center. The new generator will be capable to support the needs of the 24/7 operations by the Medical Examiner and Criminal Laboratory Departments. The total estimated cost is $750,000. Juvenile - Krier Center Master Control Improvements: This project provides for an upgrade to the electrical and secure systems of Master Control at the Krier Center. The system was installed more than 20 years ago and requires an update. The total estimated cost of this project is $311,000. Firing Range Improvements & Deck Separator: This project will add a walled-off separation between two shooting decks to provide safe operation between both decks. This modification will prevent a person from crossing into the adjacent facility. This project will also complete certain maintenance requirements at the facility to include the replacement of a backstop area, installation of lighting electrical panels, repair of emergency electrical systems, installation of a lightning protection system, and the repair of security cameras. The total estimated cost of this project is $160,727. Vista Verde Improvements: This project provides funding for renovations to the first floor areas of the Tax Office to include cabinetry and electrical system installations. This project also includes ADA improvements necessary in the areas. The total estimated cost of the project is $365,000. Courthouse 3rd Floor Children’s Court Renovations: This project will renovate and remodel space on the 3rd floor of the Courthouse to accommodate Children’s Court staff and Special Program staff for a total estimated cost of $190,000. The renovations will include wall constructions, HVAC modifications, painting, and carpet. 4th Court of Appeals Build Out: This project will build out new offices for the 4th Court of Appeals located in the Justice Center for a total estimated cost of $180,488. The scope of work includes the construction of walls, modifications to file shelving, installation of data/phone lines, and modifications to lighting, sprinkler, and electrical systems. Paul Elizondo Tower Elevator #4: This project will repair and modernize elevator #4 at the Paul Elizondo Tower for a total estimated cost of $248,680.

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Toyota Field: This project provides funding for the County’s contribution for the purchase of Toyota Field for a total estimated cost of $10,000,000. Family Service Center Association - Facility Acquisition: This project provides funding for the purchase of a facility for the Family Service Center Association for a total estimated cost of $1,500,000. JBSA Mission Preparedness Initiative: This project provides funding to acquire certain properties in and around Randolph Air Force Base for Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA) for a total estimated cost of $4,500,000. The properties to be acquired are located at the end of two runways on the Base. Once acquired, the County will prevent development of the areas, thereby creating a “safety zone” around the two runways. Commemorative Tricentennial Artwork: This project provides funding for the procurement and installation of public art along San Pedro Creek to commemorate the County’s upcoming Tricentennial Anniversary Celebration for a total estimated cost of $900,000. Adult Detention Center Annex Conversion: This project will fund the required renovations needed to reallocate available bed capacity at the Adult Detention Center (ADC), enhance detention operations and re-entry initiatives, and allow for a more efficient use of downtown facilities. The project will accomplish the following for a total estimated cost of $32,396,730. • Vacate and reallocate space in the one-story ADC Annex • Renovate the two-story portion of the ADC Annex to house female inmates • Create 512 “Program” focused beds at the ADC • Consolidate laundry and kitchen services • Create a secure campus perimeter • Create a 140-bed Work Release Center adjacent to the Re-Entry Center • Relocate Sheriff’s Administration staff New Projects FY 2016-17 County/Center for Health Care Services Mental Health Clinic: This project will fund the County’s contribution to the Center for Health Care Services for construction of an Inner City Center for $22,000,000. The debt service for the construction of facility will be paid by the Center for Health Care Services. County Park Improvements & Renovations: This project funds the following improvements and renovations to County Parks for a total estimated cost of $1,850,000: • ADA Improvements Phase II: This project will continue to address ADA compliance issues at Bexar County Parks. During FY 2014, a consultant conducted an assessment and provided areas that needed to be corrected. This project will continue the work that was started with ADA Improvements Phase I and will include the installation of ramps, parking lot striping, and accessible amenities such as picnic tables and restroom facilities. The total estimated cost of this project is $300,000. • Pletz Park Restroom Improvements: This project will construct restroom entry ramps that are ADA-compliant as well as make certain needed renovations in the interior of the restrooms. Two

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• • •

out of the three restrooms are currently within the flood plain and these improvements will minimize the impact of flooding events. The total estimated cost of this project is $540,000. Parks Signage Phase III: This project will fund the installation of monolithic signs at Raymond Russell, Rodriguez, and Commanche County Parks. The total estimated cost of this project is $300,000. Mission County Park Restroom Renovations: This project will renovate the restroom at Mission County Park #2. The restroom is in need of new fixtures, handicap accessible water fountains, and new partitions. The total estimated cost of this project is $460,000. Low Water Crossing Shoring: This project will provide for the shoring up of low water crossings at Pletz, Raymond Russell, and Commanche County Parks. Current water crossings are failing during flooding events and it is a patron safety issue. The total estimated cost of this project is $250,000.

Raymond Russell SAWS Connection & New Restroom: This project will construct a new restroom at Pavilion #1 at Raymond Russell County Park as well as install the necessary infrastructure to connect to a new SAWS utility line. SAWS will be extending a sewer line adjacent to the park, giving the County an opportunity to permanently resolve certain sewer violations that are ongoing while at the same time replacing a restroom that has outdated infrastructure. The total estimated cost of this project is $600,000. Tree Replacement & Oak Wilt Defense: This project will provide funding for the planting of new trees as part of the effort to comeback Oak Wilt within the County. Trees currently affected by Oak Wilt will be removed and new trees will be planted in their place. The total estimated cost of this project is $100,000. Sheriff Equipment & Machinery: This project funds the following equipment and machinery for the Sheriff’s Office for total estimated cost of $396,685. • Touchprint Livescan 5900 Upgrade: This project will replace four fingerprint scanning machines that are out of warranty for a total estimated cost of $186,698. • Mobile Data Computer Mounts: This project represents Phase I of funding to replace mobile data computer mounts in the Sheriff’s Office vehicles. The existing mounts are no longer compatible with new replacement vehicles that are purchased. The total estimated cost of this project is $115,000. • Court Services X-Ray Machines: The project will replace two HI-Scan 6040C X-Ray Inspection systems that are non-operational for the Court Services Division for a total estimated cost of $94,987. Data Center Relocation: This project will fund the relocation of the County’s Data Center. Pursuant to the recommendations set forth in the IBM Study that was conducted during FY 2015-16, all current and in-development workloads will be relocated to locations outside of the current data center facilities. This will include relocation of certain workloads to the Cloud where support is available. The total estimated cost of this project is $20,000,000. Centralized/Dense Computing Environment: This project will design and build a simplified, manageable core infrastructure for the County’s network in order to improve Countywide performance and establish firm and visible security. Older and decentralized hardware exposes the County to certain security risks. The total estimated cost of this project is $375,000.

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I.T. Security Software: This project will fund the following Information Technology Security Software for a total cost of $357,122: • Citrix: This software will replace the dial-up modems and laptop software that is currently used for BCPIN. The software will allow BCPIN users to bypass the old modem polls and connect by way of a URL. This will provide additional security by preventing users from screen printing or saving information to hardware that is accessed from BCPIN. The total estimated cost of this software is $175,532, not including maintenance and support, which will be funded in Information Technology’s General Fund. • Fire Eye Endpoint Security: The software will extend the protection to the County’s endpoints that currently exists for the County’s perimeter. This software will isolate compromised devices and prevent the spread of an attack from that particular endpoint. The total estimated cost of this software is $101,760. • Shavlik: This software will provide for automated desktop and server patching solution that will address security vulnerabilities, fix bugs in the code, and enhance the overall security of the County’s environment. The total estimated cost of this software is $79,830. County Network Hardware Refresh: This project will replace over 150 of the County’s endpoints that have reached their end-of-life with new hardware and proper cabling. The total estimated cost of this project is $650,000. Countywide Video Surveillance Refresh: This project will replace twenty six older security cameras Countywide to ensure that these cameras can be supported and serviced on a standardized basis moving forward. The total estimated cost of this project is $490,000. Microsoft Automated Digital Evidence Ingestion System: This project will fund an agreement with Microsoft for the purchase of software development services to build an automated ingestion system for digital evidence, as well as funding for the increase in data storage that will result. The automated ingestion system will allow law enforcement agencies to submit digital evidence into the District Attorney’s VeriPic digital evidence manager. Currently, law enforcement agencies must deliver all needed evidence to the District Attorney’s Office. This solution will provide a mechanism by which evidence is automatically imported from a repository (provided by the County) to the VeriPic system. The total estimated cost of this project is $813,000. DNA Technology Upgrade Phase II: This project will fund the purchase of a second DNA Analyzer for the Crime Lab. The first Analyzer was already purchased and the laboratory requires a second for use in regular casework. The two Analyzers are replacing older versions that are technologically outdated. The total estimated cost of this project is $109,920. Bexar County Public Works Facility: This project provides funding for the construction of a new Public Works facility located along the San Antonio River in the amount of $16,050,000. Funding for the purchase of property and the design of the facility was provided for in FY 2015-16. Including construction, the total estimated cost of the facility is $18,250,000. Tax Office Veteran Memorial: This project will design and construct a Veteran Memorial in front the Tax Office located on Pleasanton Road. The total estimated cost of the project is $770,000.

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Tax Assessor South Side Drive-Thru: In FY 2014-15, funding was provided for the installation of a pilot program for vehicular drive-thru service and a feasibility study to determine the value that is provided by drive-thru service. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget provides $695,000 in funding for the design and construction of a drive-thru window at the Pleasanton Road Tax Office location. Facilities Management & Security Software: This project provides funding in the amount of $605,000 for the following software: • Archibus: This software will provide the Facilities Department with new facilities management software for space management, work orders, preventative maintenance, move management, energy management, and capital projects in one solution. Currently, a limited work order system is being utilized and the new system will allow the Facilities Department to better control County spaces and track costs related to each facility. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget appropriates $355,500 for Phase I of this project. • IP Camera Video Management System: This project will convert the County’s security and access systems to a Hirsch system for a total estimated cost of $250,000. This upgrade will provide the County with an updated and more secure video management system. Firing Range Enhancements FY 2016-17: This project provides funding for the following improvements to the Firing Range for a total estimated cost of $603,750: • Steel Range & Scheduling Software: This project will install a steel range and implement scheduling software for a total estimated cost of $115,000. • Classrooms and Armory: This project will construct a building with two training classrooms, two restrooms, and a secure armory with ammo storage, work benches, and an office for the range master. The total estimated cost of this project is $488,750. Courthouse Renovations: This project will complete the following projects at the Courthouse for a total estimated cost of $415,000. • Restroom Renovations: This project will renovate four public restrooms for a total estimated cost of $235,000. The renovations will ensure the restrooms are ADA-compliant, updgrade plumbing fixtures, and install auto-flush. • 4th Court of Appeals Renovations: This project will fund renovations to the 4th Court of Appeals Courtroom located on the 5th floor to include the build out of a temporary ADA-complaint jury box, a witness stand, and a Court Reporter station, as well as the relocation of historic benches. The total estimated cost of this project is $180,000. 166th District Court Renovations: This project will fund improvements to the 166th Civil District Court to include the replacement of chairs with benches, repair/repainting of the witness stand, addition of a new jury box, and repair/replacement of damaged wood on the walls. The total estimated cost of this project is $55,000. UPS Replacement: This project will replace old and obsolete universal power systems (UPS) through the County for a total estimated cost of $265,000. Justice Center Maintenance & Improvements: This project funds the following projects at the Justice Center for a total estimated cost of $183,500: • Justice Center Central Plant Commissioning: This project will commission the central plant in order to gain full control of central plant chiller pumps and valves to allow for automated

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control of their efficiency. This will save allow the County to better control energy usage efficiently. The total estimated cost of this project is $58,500. 5th Floor Air Handling Units – This project will replace the motor and motor starters for two suspended air handling units. The total estimated cost of this project is $125,000.

Adult Detention Center Maintenance & Improvements: This project will fund the following maintenance and improvements at the Adult Detention Center (ADC) for a total estimated cost of $2,900,600: • Relocate Utility Pole: This project will relocate an existing CPS high line from its current location on Comal Street to the adjacent San Marcos Street for a total estimated cost of $585,000. This will allow for construction of additional facilities in conjunction with the Adult Detention Center Annex Conversion project. • Kitchen Drains: This project will repair over thirty broken down floor drains at the Main Jail for a total estimated cost of $355,000. The amount of water that is generated by these leaking drains causes soil erosion and pest infestation. • Air Compressors: This project will remove and replace three pneumatic air compressors (one each for Towers A, B, & C) that operate security doors for a total estimated cost of $146,250. The current compressors are original equipment that have reached the end of their life cycle. • Transfer Switches: This project will replace a transfer switch for Towers B and C that is 15 years old and nearing the end of its life cycle for a total estimated cost of $292,500. • Refrigerant Detection System: This project will install a refrigerant detection system at the Main Jail for a total estimated cost of $115,000. The detection system is needed to monitor for leaks on central plant chillers, which can release highly toxic chemicals. • Copper Pipe Replacement: This project will repair plumbing at various locations inside the Main Jail for a total estimated cost of $438,750. Existing copper lines are vulnerable to failure due to corrosion. • Chiller Replacement: This project will replace two chillers with more energy efficient models, in in Tower A and one in Tower B. The total estimated cost of this project is $465,000. • Cooling Tower Replacement: This project will remove and replace cooling towers at Towers B and C as well as perform maintenance repairs on the walkways and internal structures. The total estimated cost of this project is $503,100. Juvenile Detention Center Maintenance & Improvements: This project will fund the following maintenance and improvements at the Juvenile Detention Center for a total estimated cost of $1,075,000: • Replace Relays: This project will replace an old PLC programmable logic controller and G71 relay at the B Building for a total estimated cost of $1,075,000. • Upgrade HVAC Controls: This project will replace the existing HVAC controls system at Building B with a new DDC HVAC system as well as replace the existing smoke evacuation control system in Building B with a stand-alone fire alarm control system. The total estimated cost of this project is $442,000. • Emergency Generator: This project will replace the emergency generator and transfer switch at Building A for a total estimated cost of $236,000. • Mission Road Lighting: This project will upgrade the lighting in Buildings A and B of the Juvenile Detention Center for a total estimated cost of $100,000. The existing lighting is insufficient and does not provide adequate lighting in the housing units.

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Juvenile Probation Maintenance & Improvements: This project will fund the following improvements and modifications for Juvenile Probation for a total estimated cost of $460,000: • Krier Chiller Replacement: This project will replace an inoperative chiller at the Krier Center for a total estimated cost of $125,000. • Krier Lightning Protection System: This project will install a lightning protection system at the Krier Center for a total estimated cost of $260,000. Recurring storms or heavy thunderstorms can cause panels to short circuit and affect the master control system. • Krier Center Pavilion Project: This project will provide for the purchase and installation of an allsteel single roof square pavilion at the Krier Center for a total estimated cost of $75,000. BCSO Move to Adult Probation: The Sheriff’s Office is relocating Administrative and Law Enforcement offices to the Adult Probation Building on the same street. This project will fund this move of required assets (furniture, PC’s, etc.) for a total estimated cost of $400,000. CIVIQ Touch Screen Kiosks: This project will fund the installation of four outdoor touch screen kiosks as part of a pilot program to showcase various smart technology applications and their benefits to the community. In addition to other features, these devices will bring high-speed municipal WiFi to Bexar County residents, small businesses, and visitors. The total estimated cost of this project is $498,977. Botanical Garden Expansion: This project will fund the County’s contribution of an 8-acre expansion of the Botanical Garden for a total cost of $500,000. Brooks City Base Mission Reach Portal: Brooks Development Authority broke ground on The Greenline, a $10 million, 43 acre urban linear park that links Brooks City Base to the Mission Reach of the San Antonio River. Currently a flood channel, the project will transform the area stretching from Southeast Military Drive southward to the San Antonio River bringing recreational amenities while adding flood control improvements. Brooks is partnering with the San Antonio River Authority to extend the project from Old Corpus Christi Road, where Brooks’ jurisdiction ends, to the river. The County’s contribution to this project is $1,500,000. Closed Projects The following is a list of projects that have been completed or reprogrammed. The total amount expended can be found next to the project name. In some cases the project was not recommended for completion or alternative sources of funding were used, therefore, the amount expended is zero. Flores Street Parking Garage Addition $15,116,218 ADC Heat Recovery System Replacement $319,131 County Building Roofing Improvements $1,476,089 ADC Electrical Power Supply Modifications $1,450 Re-Entry Facility $1,051,400 Forensic Science Equipment & Facility Repairs $433,757 ADC Inmate Recreation Area Flooring $15,816 WOW Project Phase II $193,683 County Parks Signage – Phase I $292,750 Video Visitation ADC South Annex Facility $5,718,066 FSC Repairs and Maintenance $5,530,345 DT Central Control - Relocation & Expansion $87,460 102-22

Elections and Purchasing Facility $9,978,954 WebCRD System $89,910 Courtroom Technology $169,960 Forefront Identity Manager Enhancements $63,288 ADC Kitchen & Laundry Equipment $311,345 Law Enforcement Technology Upgrades $164,996 Mission Road Campus Functional Program $85,853 County Park - Bullis SAWS Water Extension $199,409 County Parks - Fall Zone Material Phase II $345,467 Inmate Mgmt System - Handheld Devices $249,688 Sheriff Tactical Equipment $610,486 L.E. Vehicle - Digital Video Cameras - Phase I $296,024


Sheriff's Technology Upgrades $292,910 Omnixx Force Web System $147,850 Bexar Business Continuity $1,376,860 PC Replacement 2012 through 2014 $4,191,213 Countywide Storage - 2 Petabytes (Tier 3) $346,062 Tax Office Equipment and Improvements $150,895 Countywide Data Storage $499,424 Notebook Tech Upgrade 2015 $569,748 Constable Precinct 3 - LPR System $39,750 Criminal Laboratory Equipment $278,550 ADC - Sewer and Grease Line Replacement $135,614 Southton Road Building Abatement $262,298 Central Jury Room Renovation $214,277 Sheriff’s Office Training Academy Program $3,042

ADC - Roof Accessibility Modifications $0 Juvenile Campus - Tejeda Courts Entry Mod. $61,789 Pleasanton Precinct 1 Facility – Improvements $68,597 Sheriff Vehicles and Equipment - FY 2015 $609,281 Tax Office Drive-Thru Study $70,000 Sheriff Program Change Vehicle Upgrades $512,420 Bibliotech - San Juan Gardens $721,017 Juvenile - Mission Rd Campus Improvements $244,359 Juvenile - Krier Dormitory Modifications $95,000 JP 1- Conference and Training Room $27,888 District Clerk - Paperless Project $232,582 Medical Examiner Equipment - FY 2016 $299,483 Public Safety Portable Radio Equipment $100,000 Comal Parking Garage – Glass & Frame $19,866

Personnel: The following is a list of capital-funded personnel: Facilities and Parks Management (Capital Projects Division) The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes two program changes within the Facilities Capital Projects Division for a total cost savings of $170,140. The first program change is the addition of one Project Manager (E-07) and the deletion of one Senior Construction Coordinator (E-06). The total cost savings of this program change is $26,245, including salary and benefits. The second program change is the deletion of one County Architect (NE-12). The total cost savings of this program change is $143,917, including salary and benefits. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds the following positions from various capital projects for the Facilities – Capital Projects Division. • One Assistant Project Manager (E-6) • One Capital Projects Manager (E-11) • Two Project Managers (E-7) County Manager The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds the following positions from various capital projects: • One Senior Analyst (E-7) • One Contract Analyst (E-5) • One Assistant to the County Manager (EX-1), of which 50% is funded from the County Capital Improvement Fund and 50% is funded from the County General Fund. This position can be found in the County Manager Authorized Position list. Sheriff’s Office The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget funds the following positions to assist with capital projects to include fleet projects, body camera implementation, records management system implementation, and Adult Detention Center (ADC) projects. • One Public Safety Analyst Programmer II – RMS (E-9) • One Deputy Sheriff Detention Captain (DT-09) • One Deputy Sheriff Detention Sergeant (DT-05)

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One Deputy Sheriff-Law Enforcement Lieutenant (LE-08), of which 50% will be funded from the County Capital Improvement Fund and 50% will be funded from the County General Fund. This position can be found in the Sheriff – Law Enforcement Authorized Position list.

Authorized Positions:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Assistant Project Manager Capital Projects Manager County Architect Public Safety Analyst Programmer II – RMS Project Manager (Facilities) Senior Analyst Senior Construction Coordinator Contract Analyst Deputy Sheriff Detention Captain Deputy Sheriff Detention Sergeant Total – Capital Improvement Fund

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1 1 1 0 1 1 1 0 0 0 6

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 0 1 1 9

1 1 0 1 2 1 0 1 1 1 9


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DEBT SERVICE FUNDS


-

Bexar County, Texas Debt Service Company 400 Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance

$ 50,695,263 $ 50,695,263

$ $

31,967,770 31,967,770

Revenue Property Taxes Intergovernmental Revenue Proceeds from Sales of Assets Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfers Total Revenues

$ 65,965,134 $ 150,000 $ 10,875 $ 207,635,057 $ 5,157,857 $ 278,918,923 $ 9,852,329 $ 288,771,252

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

93,118,758 395,168,555 5,064,047 493,351,360 15,304,334 508,655,694

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$339,466,515

$ 540,623,464

$ 160,038,789

Debt Service Subtotal TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$ 307,498,745 $ 307,498,745 $ 307,498,745

$ 501,376,734 $ 501,376,734 $ 501,376,734

$ 108,878,852 $ 108,878,852 $ 108,878,852

Appropriated Fund Balance

$ 31,967,770

$

$

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$ 339,466,515

$ 540,623,464

$ $

39,246,730 39,246,730

$ 98,720,000 $ $ $ $ 4,758,149 $ 103,478,149 $ 17,313,910 $ 120,792,059

APPROPRIATIONS

103-1

39,246,730

51,159,937

$ 160,038,789


FUND: 400

DEBT SERVICE FUND Program Description:

The Debt Service Fund accounts for the accumulation of ad valorem taxes collected for the purpose of paying principal and interest on long-term and short-term debt. The County issues General Obligation Bonds, Certificates of Obligation, Flood Control Certificates of Obligation, PassThrough Revenue Bonds, Refunding Bonds, and Limited Tax Road Bonds. The proceeds from the issuance of these instruments fund capital improvement projects such as road construction, flood control projects, county buildings, improvements to county facilities, and countywide technology. The County sells bonds once Commissioners Court approves the issuance of bonds or after the successful completion of a General Obligation Bond Election. The bonds are purchased by investors and the funds generated from the sale are allocated to support specific projects or to pay debt service on existing bonds at lower interest rates. It should be noted that this fund does not include revenue bonds issued by the County to fund the design and construction of the Visitor Tax Projects (described later in this document). The bonds issued for those projects are Venue Project Revenue Bonds and are supported solely by Hotel/Motel Occupancy Tax and Motor Vehicle Rental Tax revenues. No other County revenues are pledged to support those revenue bonds. The budgeted appropriation amounts reflect the actual principal and interest payments on all outstanding debt. Other funding sources, such as parking revenue and fire code fees, support the Debt Service Fund.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Debt Service Bond Issuance Costs Refunding Payment Banking â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Administrative Fees SARA Requirements Total

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$96,524,866 2,604,219 205,501,225 22,027 2,846,408

$103,302,125 2,565,116 392,499,089 16,900 2,993,504

$104,478,253 1,319,479 0 0 3,081,120

$307,498,745

$501,376,734

$108,878,852

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x20AC;˘

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget for all debt service payments totals $107,559,373 (banking fees not included). These payments include the debt service for bonds issued by the San Antonio River Authority (SARA), which is a contractual requirement between Bexar County and SARA. Prior to FY 2004-05, funding for these debt service payments was forwarded to SARA and the debt service payments were made directly by SARA. Because these payments reflect actual debt service paid by

103-2


-

Bexar County, they are more accurately reflected in the Debt Service Fund as payments required by Bexar County. The FY 2016-17 SARA debt service requirement is $3,081,120. •

The County’s credit rating of AAA by Fitch, Aaa by Moody’s, and AAA by Standard and Poors was reaffirmed in FY 2015-16. During FY 2014-15, the County was upgraded to AAA by Standard and Poors. Maintaining these ratings will continue to allow the County to borrow at favorable interest rates based on its credit rating level. The County has a true AAA credit rating from all three major credit rating agencies.

Debt service payments scheduled in FY 2016-17 include: •

A payment of $3,081,120 for the FY 2016-17 SARA debt service requirements.

Payments totaling $22,648,687 to pay for General Obligation Bonds and Limited Tax Bonds.

Payments totaling $3,268,388 for Unlimited Taxable Road Bonds.

Payments totaling $45,440,605 for Certificates of Obligation. o A total of $5,100,298 is included for payments to Build America Bonds. The federal government subsidizes approximately 33 percent, or $1.7 million, towards repayment of these bonds.

Payments totaling $17,813,094 for Flood Control Certificates of Obligation. o A total of $3,355,094 is included for payments to Build America Bonds. The federal government subsidizes approximately 33 percent, or $1.1 million, to the County towards repayment of these bonds.

Payments totaling $15,307,479 for Pass-Through Revenue Bonds.

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VENUE PROJECT FUNDS


Bexar County, Texas Community Venue Company 507 (Cash Basis) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$113,164,397

$170,195,064

$155,919,121

$113,164,397

$170,195,064

$155,919,121

Revenue Venue Taxes Intergovernmental Revenue Service Fees Proceeds from Debt Other Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues

$26,142,792 13,856,375 1,300,000 75,210,000 60,208 $116,569,375 $116,569,375

$26,214,968 2,915,698 1,300,000 333,836 $30,764,502 $30,764,502

$25,500,000 6,000,000 1,300,000 25,000 $32,825,000 $32,825,000

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$229,733,772

$200,959,566

$188,744,121

$960,727 37,457,204 21,120,777 $59,538,708 $0

$2,154,657 16,572,272 26,313,516 $45,040,445 $0

$1,996,016 10,000,000 25,537,981 $37,533,997 $0

$59,538,708

$45,040,445

$37,533,997

Appropriated Fund Balance

$170,195,064

$155,919,121

$151,210,125

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$229,733,772

$200,959,566

$188,744,121

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Capital Expenditures Debt Service Subtotal Interfund Transfers TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

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- FUND: 507

COMMUNITY VENUE PROGRAM OFFICE Mission: The Community Venues Program Office’s (CVP) mission is to oversee and implement the four

Initiatives approved by Bexar County Citizens during the May 2008 election. The CVP Office will provide quality oversight, effective quality control and responsive service to all 24 approved projects, the Bexar County citizens and Commissioners Court in a fair and equitable manner.

Vision: The CVP Office is committed to providing oversight of planning, construction and stability for

all 24 projects to insure fiscal responsibility, quality management, and provide advice for continued success. The Office strives to develop trust within the community, while expanding convention and tourism activity, through timely completion and successful longevity of projects.

Goals and Objectives: • • • • • • • • •

Provide oversight on planning and hiring of CVP projects. Provide quality control throughout the construction phase. Ensure fiscal responsibility of the CVP Office and all projects. Provide leadership and insight into the sustainability of projects. Restore and enhance the San Antonio River to its natural habitat and flow. Enhance local arts and culture. Increase quality of life for Bexar County Citizens. Create first class facilities. Enhance tourism activity.

Program Description: The CVP Office serves as the County’s point of contact regarding the venue

projects that were approved by voters on May 10, 2008. The Director will oversee the development of contracts and inter-local agreements as well as oversee the development and implementation of all 24 contracts. The Bexar County Commissioners Court unanimously approved 24 agreements with various organizations to develop athletic, performing arts, cultural arts, and San Antonio River projects. The Community Venues project are funded by the visitor tax which is a combination of a 1.75% levy on hotel rooms and a 5% levy on short-term car rentals, and are divided into the following funding and initiatives: PROPOSITION 1 San Antonio River Improvements: Improvements to the San Antonio River were allocated $125 million. Of that amount, $70 million in flood control taxes was allocated to advance-fund the Federal share of costs associated with the project. In 2009, the project received $25.3 million in stimulus funding as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and of that amount $10 million was allocated to reduce the County’s commitment to advance the Federal share. This reduction has allowed for a small amount of additional capacity in the Visitor Tax Finance Plan and the additional capacity will be used to pay for costs associated with constructing portals from the river to the new Performing Arts Center with no impact to any other Visitor Tax projects. The FY 2011-12 Budget included funding for the Veterans Plaza / Performing Arts Center and for the County / City History Center in the Briscoe Heritage Museum. The budget includes $8 million for the Veterans Plaza Portal and $2 million for the County / City History Museum, for a total of $10 million. 104-2


-

These improvements will connect the river from Brackenridge Park to Mission Espada. Other aspects of these projects will restore the natural course of the river south of downtown to Mission Espada and restore the natural ecosystem by planting thousands of native trees and grasses. In addition, hike and bike trails, pedestrian footbridges, recreational amenities and river access points will be added to the river. PROPOSITION 2 Amateur Sports Facilities: Funding in the amount $80 Million has been allocated for Proposition 2 which provides for the purchase, acquisition, construction and equipping of Youth and Amateur Athletic Facilities in Bexar County. This proposition consisted of a total of 13 projects. All projects are now complete. PROPOSITION 3 Community Arenas and Grounds $100 Million has been allocated for Proposition 3. Bexar County residents own the Freeman Coliseum, the AT&T Center, and the Exhibition and Stock Show Facilities. The goal of this Proposition is to be a responsible landlord, good community leader, and keep these facilities up-to-date and viable for our tenants and citizens. • Freeman Coliseum Improvements include replacing the lower seating section, upgrading to Americans with Disability standards, heating, ventilation and air-conditioning upgrades, a new sound system and stage, and other building improvements. The total project budget is $10,000,000. This project is now complete. • Exhibition and Stock Show Facilities This project will enable the facility to be renovated into a multi-purpose and climate controlled agricultural facility. The total project budget is $15,000,000. This project is now complete. • AT&T Center This project will enhance the arena’s technology and mechanical systems and will provide for expanded/increased flexible meeting space to allow the building to compete for and attract more events and functions. The total project budget is $75,000,000. This project is now complete. PROPOSITION 4 Performing Arts Facilities $111 Million has been allocated for three projects to construct and improve Performing Arts Facilities in Bexar County. The following two projects remain, as the Briscoe Western Art Museum has been completed. • Alameda Theater This project includes renovation, restoration, and expansion of The Alameda. This is part of the Alameda National Center for Latino Arts and Culture. The total project budget is $7,000,000. • Performing Arts Center This project included a 1,700 seat, 180,000 gross square foot multiple purpose, variable acoustic hall with a double pit lift, a 350-seat capacity, multiple purpose, multiple form, acoustically sound Studio Theater, a 3,000 square foot rehearsal hall, lobby space that allows for 8-10 square feet per person, an educational facility, and administrative and resident company offices. The total project budget is $100,000,000. The project is now complete.

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-

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel and Remunerations Operational Costs Supplies and Materials Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$203,208 0 757,516 3

$205,236 500 2,001,500 500

$209,072 0 1,939,443 6,142

$211,166 0 1,784,350 500

$960,727

$2,207,236

$2,154,657

$1,996,016

Program Justification and Analysis: •

Overall, the Community Venue Fund FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group maintains funding for the Program Director and salary supplements for two attorney positions who work on contracts associated with Venue Projects.

The Operational Costs group decreases slightly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is appropriated for facility usage and performance costs associated with venue facilities. Additionally, $1,000,000 in funding is proposed to support capital improvements at the Witte Museum.

The Supplies and Materials group includes a nominal amount of funding for supply needs throughout the fiscal year. The large amount included in the FY 2015-16 Estimates was for expenses related to moving furniture from the AT&T Center during its renovation.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Director Attorney III* Total - Community Venue Program Office

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1 2

1 2

1 2

3

3

3

*The two Attorney III positions receive a salary supplement for the services they provide to the Venue Program. Their regular salaries and benefits are paid for from the General Fund. Once the program is complete they will no longer receive the salary supplement provided by this fund.

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ENTERPRISE FUNDS


Bexar County, Texas Self-Insured - Health and Life (Fund 501) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimates

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfers Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$1,616,948

$3,724,843

($85,295)

$1,616,948

$3,724,843

($85,295)

$0 39,083,237 $39,083,237

$276,696 40,312,073 $40,588,769

$0 41,099,458 $41,099,458

$3,249,511 $42,332,748

$2,997,205 $43,585,974

$4,113,683 $45,213,141

$43,949,696

$47,310,817

$45,127,846

$40,224,853 $40,224,853

$47,396,112 $47,396,112

$42,595,849 $42,595,849

$40,224,853

$47,396,112

$42,595,849

$3,724,843

($85,295)

$2,531,997

$43,949,696

$47,310,817

$45,127,846

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Subtotal TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS Appropriated Fund Balance TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

105-1


FUND: 501

SELF-INSURED – HEALTH AND LIFE FUND Program Description: Self-Insurance is an alternate financing system in which an employer remits

only a portion of the conventional premium to an insurer to cover the cost of administering the benefits program and of providing specific and aggregate stop-loss insurance. The employer, usually referred to in this case as the self-insured, funds a "bank account" that the insurance company draws upon for the payment of claims. Employee and County contributions as well as payments from retirees and COBRA participants are deposited into the account. Each year Bexar County examines the health insurance plans offered to employees to determine if the benefits plans offered are consistent with those being offered by other employers in Bexar County, if the premiums required of employees is competitive and financially responsible, and if the overall cost of the plan meets the demands of the County’s budgeting requirements. The County also provides life insurance that is equal to the employee’s annual salary up to a maximum of $200,000. There is a double indemnity accidental death and dismemberment clause, which provides for additional coverage equal to the employee’s annual salary with a maximum of $200,000 in the event of the employee’s accidental death.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Operational Expenses Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$271,046 39,953,807

$294,642 42,651,471

$284,663 47,111,449

$295,761 42,300,088

$40,224,853

$42,946,113

$47,396,112

$42,595,849

Program Change

$0 Total

$40,224,853

$42,946,113

$47,396,112

$42,595,849

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The Self-Insured Health and Life Fund Proposed Budget for FY 2016-17 decreases by 10.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

105-2


The Personnel Services group increases by 3.9 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to turnover experienced during FY 2015-16. Full year funding is provided for all authorized positions.

The Operational Expenses group decreases by 10.2 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget includes $7 million in savings to the Health Insurance Fund. Options to achieve the $7 million in savings will be presented to Commissioners Court during budget deliberations prior to adoption of the budget. Options will include changes to premiums (for both employees and retirees under the age of 65), out-of-pocket expenses, and plan design and coverage. This appropriation also includes expenses associated with the County’s Third-Party Administrator and Stop Loss Insurance premiums. Stop Loss insurance limits the County’s total liability for health insurance claims. Should the County’s liabilities exceed a specified amount, the County is refunded the amount over the Stop Loss ceiling. The current Stop Loss ceiling is $350,000 per claimant.

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Assistant County Manager* Benefits Coordinator Human Resources Administrator Human Resources Technician I Human Resources Technician II** Total-Health and Life Fund

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

0.25 1 1 1 0.5

0.25 1 1 1 0.5

0.25 1 1 1 0.5

3.75

3.75

3.75

* This position is 25% General funded in each of the following departments: Human Resources, Budget, Management & Finance, and 25% funded out of Fund 501 Self-Insured – Health and Life. ** This position is 50% General funded in Human Resources and 50% funded out of Fund 501 Self-Insured – Health and Life.

105-3


Bexar County, Texas Self Insured - Workers Comp (Fund 502) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimates

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Service Fees Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$835,325

$486,925

$222,753

$835,325

$486,925

$222,753

$15,750 1,745,946 $1,761,696

$16,067 2,209,655 $2,225,722

$16,000 2,222,443 $2,238,443

$1,761,696

$2,225,722

$2,238,443

$2,597,021

$2,712,647

$2,461,196

$2,110,096 0 $2,110,096

$2,375,142 114,752 $2,489,894

$2,509,526 0 $2,509,526

$2,110,096

$2,489,894

$2,509,526

$486,925

$222,753

($48,330)

$2,597,021

$2,712,647

$2,461,196

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Capital Expenditures Subtotal TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS Appropriated Fund Balance TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

106-1


FUND: 502

SELF INSURED – WORKERS COMP Program Description:

The goal of the Workers Compensation Self-Insurance Program is to ensure that employees who are injured or disabled on the job are provided with adequate monetary compensation, eliminating the need for litigation. The Bexar County Management and Finance Department administers the County’s Workers Compensation Program. Numerous measures to control workers compensation related expenses have been established. The Workers Compensation Program will continue to increase the review of outstanding workers compensation claims and to monitor decisions regarding claims. Strong support from adjusters, supervisors, and managers working with the staff of Management and Finance, employees, and medical groups has created a team approach to manage workers compensation. Early intervention assists employees in returning to work more quickly either through modified duty programs or full duty return to work. Several years ago the Workers Compensation Program was expanded to provide increased training for employees and supervisors in an effort to prevent accidents resulting in workers compensation claims. Classes are conducted in CPR and first aid, ergonomics, back lifting, defensive driving, fire extinguisher training and fire evacuation procedures. Workers compensation training is also offered to supervisors and employees. The Sheriff’s Office, Public Works and Facilities Management Department have provided modified duty jobs that have resulted in reduced indemnity and medical claims. Workstation evaluation has resulted in minimized occupational repetitive motion trauma and has helped reduce high cost claims for upper extremities. Education and evaluation continues with all offices and departments. Early intervention by case managers has resulted in returning injured employees back to work – often in less than seven days. This has also reduced indemnity and medical costs. All lost-time cases are assigned case managers who work directly with the employee and the medical provider to provide the best quality medical attention and assist the employee in returning to work in a more timely fashion. Through open discussions with offices and departments, the Third Party Administrator and staff have developed better understanding of work requirements, causes of injuries, and remedies. Peer reviews are utilized to challenge cases taken to the Workers Compensation Commission, making it more difficult for one medical provider to keep an employee off work unnecessarily.

106-2


Appropriations:

Personnel Services Travel, Training, and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$72,713 0 2,034,065 3,318 0

$73,385 1,000 2,334,636 6,000 125,000

$74,552 500 2,294,914 5,176 114,752

$75,276 500 2,427,450 6,300 0

$2,110,096

$2,540,021

$2,489,894

$2,509,526

Program Change

$0 Total

Program Justification and Analysis: •

$2,110,096

$2,540,021

$2,489,894

$2,509,526

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates as described below.

The Personnel Services group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is provided for the authorized position in this budget.

The Travel, Training, and Remunerations group provides $500 for training costs related to Workers Compensation laws.

The Operational Expenses group increases by 5.8 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates due to contract requirements associated with the Bexar County Health Clinic and an estimated six percent increase in workers compensation claims.

The Supplies and Materials group increases by 21.7 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This is primarily due to additional funding in the Tools and Hardware and Office Supplies account for the Bexar County Health Clinic.

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget does not include funding for Capital Expenditures. Capital Expenditures for FY 2015-16 included funding for the remodeling of existing space in the County-owned Flores Parking Garage for the relocation of the Employee Health Clinic. This fund will no longer be paying rental fees for leased space.

106-3


Policy Consideration:

Offices and departments are charged a workers compensation fee for each of their employees. The standard fee is $400 per employee. Offices and departments with higher than average workers compensation claims are charged a higher rate. Below is a table reflecting the rates for those offices and departments. Office/Department County Parks Juvenile Detention Road & Bridge Sheriff LE Sheriff Detention

Premium $450 $500 $450 $500 $500

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Workers Compensation Specialist Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Workers Compensation Fund

106-4

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

1

1

1

1

1

1


-

Bexar County, Texas Records Management Center (Fund 505) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actuals

FY 2015-16 Estimates

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance

$397,496 $397,496

$335,677 $335,677

$246,158 $246,158

Revenue Service Fees Subtotal

$214,095 $214,095

$229,388 $229,388

$100,000 $100,000

$99,531 $313,626

$99,531 $328,919

$214,531 $314,531

$711,122

$664,596

$560,689

$327,697 47,748 $375,445

$369,418 49,020 $418,438

$358,739 24,600 $383,339

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$375,445

$418,438

$383,339

Appropriated Fund Balance

$335,677

$246,158

$177,350

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$711,122

$664,596

$560,689

Interfund Transfers Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Capital Expenditures Subtotal

107-1


FUND: 505 ACCOUNTING UNIT: 3142

RECORDS MANAGEMENT CENTER FUND Mission:

The Records Management Committee will provide leadership through the Records Facility Manager in the development, allocation and management of resources to meet County office records storage and document conversion needs while securing and preserving the records of Bexar County in accordance with the Local Government Records Act of 1989.

Vision:

We envision the Records Management Committee to have a state-of-the-art Records Management Facility that will meet the records storage needs of all County offices and departments, be in compliance with the Local Government Records Act of 1989 for the preservation and maintenance of local government records, and provide convenient access and retrieval of County records to County offices and the general public.

Program Description:

The Records Management Facility Fund is an enterprise fund created to provide space to County offices and departments for the storage of records. The facility, located at 232 Iowa Street, allows the County to consolidate all its records in one facility. In the future, the facility will also become a records technology center where records currently stored on paper can be microfilmed for storage or imaged into an appropriate format so they can be electronically delivered to the offices or departments requesting them.

Performance Indicators:

FY 2014-15 Actual

Work Load Indicators: Daily Training Room preparation Number of daily phone calls Number of Training classes held Efficiency Indicators: Monthly Bulletin board preparation Weekly Requisition Creation Daily P-Card balance and paperwork Daily entry of data into computer Effectiveness Indicators: Daily Security Monitor Daily interoffice copies

107-2

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

2 17 156

2 16 160

2 10 185

12 3 6 14

12 3 6 15

12 4 7 16

100% 100%

100% 100%

100% 100%


-

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Personnel Services Travel, Training and Remunerations Operational Expenses Supplies and Materials Capital Expenditures Subtotal

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$182,181 449 140,609 4,458 47,748

$187,636 760 152,858 23,470 25,577

$193,546 449 153,126 22,297 49,020

$195,717 2,000 152,908 8,114 24,600

$375,445

$390,301

$418,438

$383,339

Program Change

$0 Total

$375,445

$390,301

$418,438

$383,339

Program Justification and Analysis: •

The FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget decreases by 8.4 when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates primarily due to the Supplies and Materials group and the Capital Expenditures group as described below. •

The Personnel Services group increases by 1.1 percent when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Full funding is proposed for all authorized positions within this fund for FY 201617.

The Travel, Training and Remunerations group increases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding is proposed for attending continuing education courses on managing electronic records and emergency preparedness.

The Operational Costs group remains relatively flat when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding for electricity and gas services is proposed in this group.

The Supplies and Materials group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. During FY 2015-16, a one-time expenditure to purchase a floor scrubber was expensed and is not anticipated for FY 2016-17.

The Capital Expenditures group decreases significantly when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. Funding was provided for facility renovations in order to obtain a certificate of occupancy and meet other City of San Antonio and Fire Marshal’s Office building requirements codes. The work began in FY 2014-15, but was not completed until FY 201516. Funding is proposed for the installation of a carport at the Records Storage Center.

There are no program changes in the FY 2016-17 Proposed Budget.

107-3


-

Authorized Positions: FY 2014-15 Actual Records Management Center Manager Maintenance Mechanic I Office Assistant II

1 1 1

Total â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Records Management Center Fund

107-4

3

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed 1 1 1

3

1 1 1 3


Bexar County, Texas Other Post Employment Benefit (OPEB) (Fund 506) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15

FY 2015-16

FY 2016-17

Actuals

Estimates

Proposed

$233,873

($523,384)

($1,402,205)

$233,873

($523,384)

($1,402,205)

$10,284 2,444,223 $2,454,507

$10,427 2,532,189 $2,542,616

$10,000 2,576,184 $2,586,184

Interfund Transfers

$4,812,102

$5,064,408

$8,025,721

Total Revenues

$7,266,609

$7,607,024

$10,611,905

$7,500,482

$7,083,640

$9,209,700

$8,023,866 $8,023,866

$8,485,845 $8,485,845

$9,288,097 $9,288,097

TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS

$8,023,866

$8,485,845

$9,288,097

Appropriated Fund Balance

($523,384) ($1,402,205)

($78,397)

TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

$7,500,482

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Other Revenue Insurance Premiums Revenue Subtotal

TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS APPROPRIATIONS General Government Subtotal

108-1

$7,083,640

$9,209,700


FUND: 506

OTHER POST EMPLOYEE BENEFIT FUND Program Description: GASB Statement 45 was issued in 2004 as a result of a growing concern that

state and local governments were not recognizing the liability of post-employment benefits, such as retiree health benefits, in their annual financial statements. The Statement requires that these liabilities now be reported. Bexar County is required to recognize other post-employment benefits (OPEB) earned by employees during the time they were actually employed. In order to comply with GASB 45, Bexar County has established an OPEB fund.

Appropriations: FY 2014-15 Actual Retiree Medical Expenses Retiree Administration Fees Total

FY 2015-16 Budget

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

$7,652,445 371,421

$7,576,893 302,400

$8,220,424 265,421

$9,009,405 278,692

$8,023,866

$7,879,293

$8,485,845

$9,288,097

Program Justification and Analysis: â&#x20AC;˘

The total budget represents an overall 9.5 percent increase when compared to FY 2015-16 Estimates. This increase is due to an anticipated 10 percent increase in healthcare costs associated with retirees and a 3 percent increase in retiree administration fees.

108-2


Bexar County, Texas Firing Range (Fund 512) Fiscal Year Ending September 30, 2017 FY 2014-15 Actual

FY 2015-16 Estimate

FY 2016-17 Proposed

AVAILABLE FUNDS Beginning Balance Undesignated Funds Total Beginning Balance Revenue Other Revenue Subtotal Interfund Transfers Total Revenues TOTAL AVAILABLE FUNDS

$2 $2

$31,911 $31,911

$6,214 $6,214

$504 $504

$809 $809

$20 $20

$214,653 $215,157

$177,269 $178,078

$220,576 $220,596

$215,159

$209,989

$226,810

$183,248 $183,248

$203,775 $203,775

$226,810 $226,810

$183,248

$203,775

$226,810

$31,911

$6,214

$0

$215,159

$209,989

$226,810

APPROPRIATIONS General Government Subtotal TOTAL OPERATING APPROPRIATIONS Appropriated Fund Balance TOTAL APPROPRIATIONS

109-1<