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1. SMALL HOUSE

My dad’s house is too big. I know they say it’s good to have a big house. My mom says it’s good. Your father is lucky, she says. But I don’t think it’s necessary. It’s not necessary to have a big house if it’s just going to waste. My dad has a big empty house. He doesn’t get attached to stuff—that’s what he says. He’s practicalactical—that’s what my mom says. Practical-actical. I don’t really know what that means. I bet it’s a word for people who don’t have time for anything because they only ever do what’s practical, and that’s why my mom says it double. Not only is my dad practical, he does nothing but practice. He practices practical things, so he’s practical-actical. Okay, I admit, having a big house is sometimes practical. Practical for owning stuff. Like big animals that no one else can have, for example. Like elephants. Or beluga whales. My dad swam with belugas once and I said to myself, finally, for once he likes something enough to put it into practice—to get big aquariums, giant aquariums for belugas. For example. Now that would be practical. I don’t like empty houses, especially when they’re big, because I feel smaller inside them. I’m not growing—that’s what the doctor says. I’ll be small. So what’s the use of having a house for giants? It’s not practical. I’ll get lost in here. Lucky for me I’m my dad’s daughter. I’m practical, I’m creative— that’s what my mom says. Because, thanks to being practical, I can build a me-sized house. And lucky for me, my dad goes to Ikea, my favorite store. I’m entitled to a special bunk bed—two super imposing beds (sure, Dad says, it’s like that)—because I think Ikea stores (stores for Swedish people) are the only ones to

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2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

Profile for cusoa