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journal a two-week trial period. Get yourself a fresh notebook, one compact enough so that you can carry it everywhere, and write something down at least once a day for fourteen days, starting tonight. Forget the anger-management terminology if it makes you that uncomfortable. Pretend you’re starting from scratch. Just write what you’re feeling and what you’re experiencing, regardless of how repetitive or duplicative it strikes you, and we’ll talk about how that went two weeks from today.” I said fine. SEPTEMBER 19, 2014 – FRIDAY, NEW YORK

Good thing Dr. D didn’t ask what made me read all those travel diaries last month, because then I’d have had to tell him how worked up I’d gotten at the hospital. After hearing that story, I doubt he’d have been willing to suspend the anger-management diary, and now I’d be writing three pages in the red book about what just happened at the cleaners (“Triggering Event: Went to pick up laundry this morning, woman at counter asked why my socks are always so sticky,” etc.) instead of focusing on more important things. Not that I ever really lost it at the hospital—I kept it together for the sake of the family. My family, obviously, not the Kovacs, who shared our room in the oncology ward for three weeks. I’d have happily not kept it together for the sake of that family. They invaded a few days after we arrived: a Zagreb businessman in need of a stem-cell transplant; his Greek-American wife; their

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2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

Profile for cusoa