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instead. During the rest of the three weeks, Jeffrey gave me lessons every day. We bonded a lot—he usually kept to himself, like Claire. It was the first time we shared common ground. We ended the three-week stay with a big birthday BBQ for Claire and me. Jeffrey bought me a Music Theory for Young Beginners book. My parents, who'd come over to celebrate, spend the weekend, and drive us home, were surprised. They'd never though I'd want to learn an instrument. I was supposed to go to a Science and Discovery day camp with Claire during the month of August. They signed me up for beginner cello at Music camp instead. I didn't really tell any of my friends when school started again. There were “cool” instruments like guitar and piano, but cello definitely wasn't one of them. So I didn't talk about how I sometimes spent up to two hours practicing—which, when you're 10, feels like a lot. I kept at it even when my leg healed. I dreamed of being a professional cellist. I imagined sitting on stage with an orchestra. I imagined being a soloist. Recording albums. I started thinking about going to music school instead of normal high school. The summer after 7th grade, I got into a really intense music camp near one of the Finger Lakes in New York. The camp awarded top students entry and scholarships to music schools in the Northeast. I was determined to get into one of the schools. Eventually, I thought, I'd audition for Julliard. At camp, though, I quickly realized that, though I was good, I wasn't good enough. I thought maybe I didn't work hard enough. Maybe I'd started learning too late. Yet there were students who'd started at the same age as me or even after and

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2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

Profile for cusoa