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If Alice and I were identical, I thought, I wouldn't be the baby version of her. We'd be equals. We could prank people, like Mimsy and Auntie Elsa did when one pretended to be the other. We'd be as close as they were. Then, one day, Mimsy and Auntie Elsa told us the story of how they'd convinced their parents to let them travel to England by themselves when they graduated high school. They worked odd jobs and saved money. Mimsy planned an itinerary while Auntie Elsa went over budgeting. They researched hostels for young, single women. They showed their parents that they had everything planned out; their parents agreed to let them go. I'll never forget how Alice and I looked at each other at that moment. We'd both begged for a puppy for the past three birthdays, yet our parents refused to get us one. Mimsy and Auntie Elsa's story was a source of inspiration. We made lists of pros and cons and practiced debating with our parents, alternating roles. While I researched how much owning a dog would cost (luckily, being 21st century kids made it easier to find information than if we'd grown up in the 50s like our grandmothers), Alice made preparations for a lemonade/cookie/iced tea stand. She attracted customers by cartwheeling down the street. When we were out of anything, she'd dash back inside the house. To our third-grade selves, it felt like Alice's speed made us really efficient. Meanwhile, I kept track of all the money we spent on the stand and all the money we were able to save for our puppy's future expenses. We got a Border Collie for our ninth birthdays. We named him Balto because, like the famous sled dog, we'd combined smarts, teamwork, and speed to get him. Working together made us

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2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

Profile for cusoa