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into a smaller apartment. Then I got my first dog – my mother, her first diagnosis. We thought, This time, we know what it means. But it was more complicated this time and our experience was useless. I looked for a job near the hospital. My father and I met only at the station or late at night in our dark kitchen, between the half-packed moving boxes of our permanently makeshift living arrangements. For over half a year, the only light in our kitchen was a small reading lamp, illuminating the stove. When my father did come home, I fried potatoes and eggs, and he ate in silence. While he chewed and chewed, I sat across from him, looking at his paper-thin, violet eyelids, thinking that with age, mine too would become like his. When my mother returned home she no longer had cancer, but the formidable side effects of her therapies were irreversible. It was demoralizing. Everything seemed too surreal to be true. There was a vaccine against the type of cancer my mother had and I never got it. I don’t remember exactly why anymore. It wasn’t out of protest, just stupidity: I felt guilty but indestructible. Unbreakable. As if death had skipped me. Because it was so unlikely to happen a third time. Elevated cancer rates are additionally observed in workers processing industrial chemicals such as aniline, tar, nickel, cobalt, and chromium. Likewise for farmers working with certain fertilizers, because there is reasonable evidence that the agricultural pesticide glyphosate induces cancer. Winemakers, carpenters, and copper and tin foundry workers are at higher risk of cancer. The likelihood of developing cancer increases when you eat processed meats preserved with sodium nitrate; in general, red meat is thought to encourage the growth of cancer. Without exception, you must avoid the ethanol contained in alcoholic beverages. In large quantities, caffeine promotes cancer

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Profile for cusoa

2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

2017 Word for Work Workshop ebook  

Profile for cusoa