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Curtin Student Guild

Annual Report 2005

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Contents Chapter P. 3 Chapter P. 4 Chapter P. 5 Chapter P. 8 Chapter P. 14 Chapter P. 18 Chapter P. 23 Chapter P. 26

Intro

Guild President & General Manager intro

Look at us now - Changes in the Guild

We’re listening - Members always come first

Catering to student tastes It doesn’t stop with events, sport and recreation

A nose for business strategic planning for success

Guild Financials

Vission, Mission and Values The Curtin Student Guild is a not-for-profit organisation which aspires to the following:

Vision The vision of the Curtin Student Guild is to be an independent organisation which is highly valued by all of the University community, especially our members, through the active provision of services and benefits, encompassing all aspects of student life.

Mission Statement The mission of the Curtin Student Guild is to provide a range of services to the students of Curtin University helping them to have a fulfilling university experience through: • Actively representing Curtin University students; • Encouraging and facilitating student participation in University decision making; and • Advocating on behalf of and providing services, facilities and activities for our members.

Values In working towards its vision and mission the Curtin Student Guild subscribes to the following values and principles: Autonomous & Democratic Student control of student affairs, underpinned by democratic decision making; Ethics & Integrity Acting at all times with integrity and ethical consideration based on open and honest behaviour and mutual trust; Service Providing service in an atmosphere of understanding and commitment to our Guild members; Community Demonstrating a sense of community with respect for and acknowledgment of diversity; Communication Open communication and consultation; Responsibility and Accountability We will be responsible and accountable to our members, ensuring transparency of actions, with the resources of the Guild applied for the maximum long-term benefit of our members; Initiative and Development An attitude of welcoming change and growth with an emphasis on best standards and continuous improvement in our services and staff ; encouraging individual and organisational development and creativity in all that we do; and

hen you look around the Curtin University of Technology campus, you will notice the varied faces that make up the student population. “The Many Faces of Curtin” was the theme of Curtin Student Guild for 2005. This theme was chosen to celebrate the diversity of Curtin University. A face adds character to a person, in the same way the Guild adds character to Curtin University. The Guild is responsible for much of what goes on around campus, including events, clubs and societies, recreation and sport, adding colour, vibrancy and culture to the campus. The Guild also works to protect the rights of every student through representation and advocacy. Now more than ever, the Guild has a more visible presence on campus. The recent face-lift of our retail area is testament to Guild’s promise to enhance the environment and experience for all students at Curtin University. In keeping with our “face” theme for 2005, it is true that the Curtin Student Guild has something to stimulate all the senses: Eyes: The Guild looks towards the future to secure the best possible environment for a student studying at Curtin University. Ears: The Guild ensures that students are heard. Our Representation arm and many specialised student-run Departments provide a platform for student rights and issues. Our Student Assist Department listens to student concerns and problems, whether personal or academic, and helps the student work towards a solution. Mouth: The Guild caters to student’s tastes, responding to requests for oncampus activities and large and small-scale events. The Guild is an important and essential ingredient in Curtin University’s culture. Nose: The Guild has a nose for business. It operates the majority of the commercial, retail and food and beverage services, including the Guild Tavern, the Guild Copy and Design Centre and the Secondhand Bookshop. The Curtin Student Guild has grown stronger in 2005. The organisation is ready to face a future of new challenges, new students and changing political environments.

Co-operation Active co-operation with both internal and external organisations and groups, who have similar goals and values, offering benefit to our Guild members.

Council Governance

About the theme of this annual report: The concept ‘ Curtin Student Guild – representing the many faces of Curtin’ was used in 2005 to brand Curtin Student Guild publications.

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Chapter

Design + Layout:

Michael Nicholas Ron Schop

Photography:

Jemma Keech Dustin Voggenreiter

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Welcome to the 2005 Guild Annual Report. The Guild exists to provide students at Curtin University representation in all things related to their University life. In addition to representation we, the Guild, also provides a range of services, activities and food! This report will hopefully show you all that the Guild does for you as a member of this student run organisation. Heading into a Voluntary Student Unionism (VSU) environment will give the Guild some new challenges. The students who are members of Guild Council are committed to ensuring that all students are represented while at Curtin and this will continue even under VSU. The Guild will need support from students so that we can continue to function as we do today, we are in a much better position than when state VSU came into effect in 1995 and we have learnt from that experience. Representation is why the Guild exists however it always hard for the Guild to ‘advertise’ just how valuable this representation is. In simple terms the Guild is the Universities conscience. When decisions are being made that will affect students be it in the hip pocket or their education, we will be there to represent students and to make sure that you are not disadvantaged. Over the last few years the Guild has grown, we are an important part of Curtin and contribute to the culture and life of this University. And while the Guild facilitates activities and recreation on campus, it is you, the students, who have made the Guild what it is today. By participating in sports, clubs, rallies, by using student assist, emailing your divisional representative, using the departments and drinking at the tavern you show that the Guild is valuable and is needed by students.

Kate Meenan Guild President 2006

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Chapter As a member of the Curtin Student Guild you are a part of an organisation that has existed for over 35 years. Very soon after its establishment in 1966, the organisation now known as the Curtin University of Technology (formerly called the WA Institute of Technology) acknowledged that there was a lack of ‘community’ amongst its student population. In a spirit of cooperation, staff and student representatives worked together to develop a proposal for a student organisation that could enrich the lives of the students as they pursued their academic goals. After some heated debate in State parliament, agreement was finally reached on the form of the proposed student organisation and in 1968 the Curtin University of Technology Act 1966 was amended so as to establish the Student Guild. The first Student Guild took office on the 11th February 1969. While the face of the Guild has changed since these early days and the wording of our constitution has also changed, we continue to work towards the objectives established for the first Student Council, which can be summarised as being: • To provide for and encourage the meeting together of our members in matters of common interest; • To promote the general extra curricular activities and well being of our members; • To represent our members whenever such representation is necessary or desirable; and • To be the recognised means of communication between our members and the University. As an enrolled student you are part of the community of over 35,000 people that is Curtin University. Your ongoing support of the Guild will help us to continue to support a spirit of community amongst the students of Curtin University.

Jeanette Bosci Guild Managing Director

Look at us now The Curtin Student Guild is a member-based organisation that has served students at the Western Australian Institute of Technology (WAIT) and members of the Curtin University community for over 35 years. During this time it has grown and increased the level of services and amenities that it provides to the community it was developed to serve. The Guild is the peak representative student body at Curtin University. The Guild is independent of the University and acts to protect the interests and welfare of the students. We have a long-term focus and we intend to continue building the organisation for future generations of Curtin University students. To those who ask ‘what’s in it for me?’, the answer is ‘you get back from life what you put into it’. The more involved you are with the Guild and what it offers, the more you will get out of being a member.

Things were looking unclear for our members… The Voluntary Student Unionism (VSU) vs. Amenities and Services Fee (ASF) debate has been a topic of high priority and discussion in 2005. As a result, there was and still is, confusion amongst students about what a reintroduction of VSU in 2006 would actually mean. This confusion arises partly because of existing misconceptions about the ASF and its relationship to Guild membership. In recent years, the Curtin Student Guild had not charged students a membership fee. The Guild was able to waive this fee because Curtin University was required under State legislation to pass on the ASF to the Guild, so that the Guild could provide free services and amenities to students. Due to new Federal legislation, implemented July 1 2006, the University is prohibited from charging compulsory fees not related to education, such as the ASF. The Guild will need to reintroduce membership fees in 2006 so that it can continue to provide essential free services. There is evidence emerging that some student organizations in Australia will not cope with the introduction of Voluntary Student Unionism (VSU) and may need to significantly reduce the scope of their operations. Some student organisations do not have any trading operations to provide ongoing cash flow. Therefore, if they do not have their current level of membership fee income, they will not be able to afford to pay for the existing services they provide to their student populations.

Getting clearer… Some other States currently have compulsory membership of Student Associations. Federal legislation will result in a big change. However, it is important to understand that Western Australia already has voluntary membership of student organisations. Students enrolled in award courses at Curtin University automatically become members of the Guild on enrolment, but they already have the ability to ‘opt out’ of their membership at any time. Therefore the introduction of Federal VSU will not change student rights in Western Australia in regard to voluntary membership of the Guild. The other misconception is about what the ASF is for and who charges it. The ASF is not a Guild imposed cost and it is not a Guild membership fee. It is a charge levied by the University. The ASF is charged to cover the cost of providing some of the services and amenities enjoyed by all students on campus. Because the Guild was provided with an income from ASF, the organisation was in a position to be able to waive the usual Guild membership fee.

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Under the new legislation, students will be able to choose whether or not they want to pay ASF, depending on whether or not they think they will need to access a specified range of amenities and services. Neither the Guild nor the University has previously needed to restrict the use of ASF to only those services or amenities that could be made available on a ‘user pays’ basis (e.g. how do you restrict access to a park bench in an open courtyard so that only student who have paid the ASF can use it?). Under the new legislation the type of amenities and services provided by the ASF must change so that at only people who have paid the ASF can access it, or the person who has not paid ASF must pay to use it. Most importantly, the Guild will need to reintroduce a separate Guild membership fee. This will enable the Guild to continue to provide the same range of free services, amenities and activities that all students currently enjoy. However, some of these benefits will be restricted so that they are only available to those members who have paid the Guild membership fee. Reactions to VSU have been mixed throughout 2005 and early 2006. The Curtin Student Guild has invested much time and effort in looking towards the future, to ensure that this Federal legislation does not affect the high standards of service for students.

Looking back… The Guild has existed in a VSU environment before. When VSU was first introduced in Western Australia in 1995, the Guild undertook some major changes to its mode of business and put effort into building up its trading operations. This was to secure a source of cash flow from which it could guarantee to be able to provide services to students. While it wasn’t easy at first, the Guild has managed to build a sound financial base to ensure the organisation’s long-term survival. Ten years later, despite affecting political climates, these efforts have paid off for the Curtin Student Guild. The reintroduction of VSU in 2006 does pose concerns as far as the possible immediate decline of membership numbers and a loss income from the ASF model. However, due to a solid foundation it is assured that changes in services from the Guild will not be dramatic when VSU returns Semester Two in 2006. This has enabled the Guild to concentrate on other services and issues that remind students at Curtin University why they need their Guild.

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Despite the attention that the VSU vs. ASF debate demanded, there were other projects on the table for 2005 Guild President Patrick Gorman. Gorman also had to make the argument to keep Common-Free-Time (Wednesday 12.00 noon until 2.00 pm) for all Curtin students a priority, when the University had run out of space and was going to schedule up to 6000 classes during this time. The University’s attempt would solve their timetabling problems, however it would restrict a student’s time to explore, enjoy, participate in activities and relax in their campus environment. The Guild argued that this time was an advantage to a student’s development in socialising with students from an array of backgrounds and dissolving an unhealthy attitude that a university is solely academically orientated.

Meenan, successfully lobbied to keep Common-Free-Time available to all students across campus. Meenan has also continued to uphold the Guild’s responsibility to ensure that students who study performance studies are not disadvantaged by the close of the Hayman Theatre.

Improving Security on campus was another issue for Gorman, who with the Guild Council conducted an expansive security audit and various talks with University security to keep students safe.

However, the biggest concern for Meenan and the Guild Representatives has been preparing and educating students, as well as controlling students reactions, towards VSU. This has been one of the most challenging years for a Guild President, as Meenan had to balance student concerns of the day with strategic planning for the Guild that exists after 2006.

In other projects, the Guild attempted to secure the same Transperth 50 cents bus fare rate for tertiary a student that is paid by primary and secondary education students. The Curtin University and Murdoch University merger was another issue that affected all facets of Curtin University and the Guild. The Guild had to think about potential scenarios and possible solutions for a functioning Guild in a “super-university” where the established culture of Curtin University could transform into another environment. The merger would have had the potential to jeopardise the service that Guild members were used to and relied upon. Plans for the merger were dissolved in the second half of 2005. Gorman with Rikki Hendon (EVP) spoke on behalf of students at a VSU Senate hearing, arguing the need for student organisations on University campuses.

Keeping an eye on things… Kate Meenan became the new Guild President in 2006. However, her involvement in the Guild began in 2004, when she participated in a student rally opposing the Federal governments decision to allow Universities to increase fees by 25%. In 2005, Meenan became a part of the Student Representation arm of the Guild when she was elected as the Divisional Representative of Engineering, Science and Computing.

The president works in association with many areas of the University, State and Federal Government as well as student guilds from other Universities to ensure that Curtin students are well represented. Heading into VSU Meenan has been an active contributor to the ‘4 Guilds Meeting’ which has members from other Western Australian guilds. Meenan voiced student concerns at the Department of Education, Science and Training (DEST) VSU Transitional Funding Focus Group.

Gorman and Meenan were student members of University Council, Curtin’s governing body.

Looking towards the future The Guild started to prepare for the introduction of the Federal VSU legislation as soon as it became apparent that the Liberal Government would hold a majority in both houses of parliament. It was highly likely that VSU would be introduced and therefore the Guild began planning nearly two years ago. The major anticipated change is that as a result of State and Federal legislation being out of sync with each other, students may automatically become a Guild member on enrolment, but may choose not to pay a membership fee to the Guild. The Guild will therefore have both financial members (who have paid a Guild membership fee so they can have the full range of benefits offerd by the Guild) and non-financial members (who haven’t paid a membership fee and have access to a small range of services).

Centre) as well as in service roles (Student Assist, Events & Promotions, Marketing & Publications and Recreation) and support roles (Finance & Administration and IT). The Guild constantly monitors and plans for all aspects of the operations to ensure optimal structure to meet the needs of the Curtin community. This monitoring and planning was especially important in the lead up to the implementation of VSU. In addition, the Guild had also closed down some of the enterprises that were not profitable, altered others and opened new ventures. The Guild has reviewed all service areas to make sure that services that are in high demand are kept and reduce spending to sustainable levels in other areas. The Guild must now concentrate on effective communication to students so that they may appreciate what Guild membership offers. As a member-based organisation the Guild has to demonstrate to members that it offers value for money. People will only join an organisation if they see a potential benefit flowing back to them (or to the community of which they are a part) from being a member. Managing Director Jeanette Bosci, draws the analogy that “joining the Guild is a bit like taking out membership of a health fund”. You weigh up whether or not you think that the potential benefits of being a member are worth more than the potential risks of not being a member”. If the Guild wants students to become members, the Guild needs to inform students of what benefits they have access to as a result of their membership.

President 2005 Patrick Gorman

President 2006 Kate Meenan

The Guild is hoping that at least 30% of students will choose to pay a Guild membership fee and become ‘financial members’ in Semester One 2007. The Guild believes that this is a realistic and achievable level of ‘financial members’. If for any reason this target is not reached in 2007, the Guild will need to reassess the level of free services and sponsorship that it can afford to provide in subsequent years.

So that objectives are met, the Guild employs a sizeable workforce of staff, which includes students. These staff members work in a variety of different business operations (Guild Tavern, Café’s, The Secondhand Bookshop, Guild Copy Centre and Guild Child Care

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Resources & Environment 2005 Reece Wheadon

The Curtin Student Guild represents students at Curtin University through it’s elected body consisting of a President, Education Vice president, Activities Vice President, General Secretary, Divisional Representatives, Councillors, CUPSA and ISC. Curtin University students elect these representatives annually. These Representatives are responsible for being the voices of all of the Guild’s members. Upon joining the Guild, members are ensured that the University will hear their concerns and opinions. The key to a successful Student Guild has always been “listening to students”. The Guild’s Student Assist Department, in the Operations arm of the Guild, offers students one-on-one consultations with Student Assist Officers, regarding personal and confidential welfare, academic and legal assistance. In 2005, it was apparent that Student Representation, in some small sectors of the University, was one of those ‘invisible benefits’ that members were not fully aware of. One of the Guild’s main initiatives set for 2006, was to make Student Representative more visible to students. By ensuring that student representatives are recognisable enables students to identify whom they need to approach when they have an issue or a problem to discuss. One of the other initiatives is to actively approach students, particularly those involved with academic clubs for comment on a whole range of issues that come up in the course of the year. This consultation is then directly passed on to the university for action and consideration.

Education Vice-president 2005 Rikki Hendon

Through research and ‘reaching out’ to the student community, through forums, surveys, face-to-face interaction, meet and greets and email, to name a few communication

channels. The Guild’s representatives and the Student Assist department obtain a clear understanding of the objectives that need to be achieved to secure the best possible environment for a quality tertiary education. Education Vice-President 2005 – Rikki Hendon 2006 – Laura Stevens The role of the Education Vice President (EVP) was first introduced in 2003. Three years later, it is a very important role within the Guild’s executive structure. The EVP works in association with many areas of the University to ensure that all students have equal access to quality education and support for financial, social or educational issues they face during their studies. The EVP also directly represents students, with consultation from equity groups on many University committees ensuring that students’ interests are protected. The role of an EVP in a large University filled with diverse students is a challenging one. Those who have excelled in this position do so because they have a vested interest in student rights and student life. As history would have it, and to the Guild’s advantage, the individuals that have stepped into these positions had been involved in the Guild on other levels before their Vice-Presidency. This has provided them with a comprehensive understanding of the Guild, the University and it’s operations. Rikki Hendon, a social work honours student, became involved in the Guild through the 2002 Student Anti-War Movement where she met 2002 Guild President Zaneta Mascarenhas, who encouraged her to run as a Guild Councillor. From that, Hendon ran as Education Vice-President in 2005.

We’re Listening… 2005 – Reece Wheadon 2006 - Emma-Lee Dellar Education Vice-president 2006 Laura Stevens

Resources & Environment 2006 Emma-Lee Dellar

Laura Stevens, a fourth year Politics and Anthropology student, took up the role in 2006. Stevens became involved in the Guild when a friend informed her of the vacant position in the Guild’s Women’s Department. Stevens was accepted as Women’s Officer in 2005. Laura’s enjoyment in being involved with the Guild, particularly in issues concerning student representation, leads her to role of EVP in 2006.

Stevens worked with NUS West to help organise the National Day of Action Rally to The Honourable Julie Bishop, the Minister for Education’s, Office, in April 12, 2006. Students from around the nation collectively protested against the implementation of VSU and inadequate student financial assistance. The day received a lot of media attention around Australia and re-stated students’ continual opposition to VSU.

University scholarship program for school leavers, who choose to study at Curtin, is continuing. Stevens is currently involved in the expansion of the scholarship and financial assistance program provided by the University.

Listen up! – The fight against VSU

Steven’s said “the aim of the day was to draw the attention of the community to the plight of students who have systematically had their equitable access to tertiary education undermined by the Federal government. The combination of VSU, where student welfare and support services will be cut or reduced, and the inadequate provision of financial support from Centrelink for students, means students would find it harder to access education, need to work longer hours in order to support themselves and are increasingly living below the poverty line”.

Listening to students is a significant challenge for the Resources and Environment (R&E) Divisional representative. This is primarily because students studying within this division are located not only on the Bentley Campus, but also on regional campuses across Western Australia such as the Margaret River Campus and the West Australian School of Mines (WASM).

One of the major issues, high on the EVP’s list of priorities in 2005 and 2006, was the return of Voluntary Student Unionism (VSU). The snowball of VSU related events had it origins in the re-election of Liberal Federal Government, who introduced VSU in form of the Higher Education Support Amendment (Abolition of Compulsory Student Union Fees) Bill to parliament on December 9, 2005. In relation to this involved topic of debate and discussion, a major project for Hendon was the organisation of the National Union of Students: National Education Conference, held at Curtin University during July 2005. This event saw students from all over the nation gather to discuss student issues including, at the time, the possibility of the implementation of VSU and past Western Australian experiences with the legislation. There was also a snap action held at Edith Cowan University Mount Lawley Campus during a trip by 2005 Minister for Education, The Honourable Brendan Nelson to the campus. This action saw the student movement receive media attention. In Semester Two 2005, a ‘Guild Shut Down’ was held to demonstrate to Curtin University students the possible impact VSU would have on the student experience. The Guild shut down all of its operations on the Bentley campus, including Representation, Student Assist and all of the Guild Food and Beverage outlets. With no activity on campus, students who attended classes during the shut down were quick to notice the reality of a University without Guild presence. As a result the Guild received hundreds of signatures for a petition against VSU to the Minister for Education. Hendon’s involvement and organisation in these courses of actions was in effort to empower students to continue to fight for student rights in 2006. Even though the inevitable return of VSU in July 2006, past Guild efforts left Stevens with much ammunition as the continuing EVP.

Meanwhile, on campus… While demonstrations and conferences concerning VSU had dominated much of the EVP’s project planning in 2005 and 2006, Hendon and Stevens did not ignore the EVP’s goal to ensure a quality campus environment. In 2005, the EVP had been active in improving the quality of teaching and learning on campus. Hendon presented research findings to the University Teaching and Learning Committee (UTLC), which resulted in a comprehensive review of University policy. The EVP in both 2005 and 2006 have been heavily involved in the development of the eVALUate tool as part of the Student Evaluation of Teaching and Learning (SELT) project. This tool enables students to anonymously provide feedback to their teachers, and the University, about their units. The Guild has constantly pushed for these semester results to be made consistently available to students so they can see how other students regarded the unit and that their comments have been acted on by the University. Some other project highlights have been the development of a new plagiarism policy, which included new procedures and levels for dealing with incidents of plagiarism. Stevens helped to develop new staff and student booklets on plagiarism. In addition, the implementation of a new

Resources & Environment 2005 – Reece Wheadon 2006 - Emma-Lee Dellar

2006 R&E Divisional Representative EmmaLee Dellar, known informally as ‘Dells’ among staff and students involved in the Guild, described her division as being the most assorted body of students to represent.: “ We have the geologists who look at tearing up the land, alongside the ‘enviros’ who want the complete opposite. We have wine makers and fisher people, miners and explorers”. Reece Wheadon, 2005 R&E Divisional Representative, directed his concentration on strengthening the communication channels between the Guild and its R&E members. This included the development of committee structures at regional campuses to improve regional students input in the University structure and the encouragement of more social interaction on these campuses Another goal for 2005, was to advocate for equitable access to resources and information for regional students including library and computer services. The concept of a library for the Margaret River Campus unfortunately has not had progress in 2006 due to combined University and Town Council issues. The priority of communicating to students, and the provision of these services, has continued with Dellar in 2006. Dellar took up the role with enthusiasm and describes herself as a “spritely 21 year old that loves rocks”. 2006 Guild President Kate Meenan encouraged Dellar to run in the 2005 Guild elections in August, as her studies in Geophysics and mining town upbringing made her a perfect candidate for a representative who would understand the demands of a University student in remote,


Business 2005 Esther Low rural or regional environments. For R&E students attending classes on the Bentley Campus, they have full access to all the Guild’s services. Aside from the Bentley campus, the division is so widely dispersed that the Guild cannot cater for the entire division with one function. Dellar tackled this issue by addressing groups separately. This involved trips to remote campuses, such as attending the Kalgoorlie Campus 2006 Graduation Ceremony with Guild President Meenan and Activities Vice-President Wheadon. More trips are scheduled in the remainder of 2006. Most communication in this division is maintained via email, however Dellar feels that an objective for the Guild would be to extend the channels of information so that all R&E students are well informed of all the services the Guild can offer them. In 2006 Dellar has been involved on the Academic Services Committee, Divisional Teaching & Learning Committee (DTLC), Membership Committee, Education Board, Guild Council and been involved in and attended events such as O-Week, O’Day and Beach Bash. Business 2005 Esther Low 2006 Emily Cotton With approximately 15,000 students in studying business at Curtin University, the Business Division is the biggest division on Campus. Spoken in true ‘business student style’, 2006 Business Divisional Representative, Emily Cotton said, “ It is my job to represent all those budding accountants and economists out there”. Cotton actually began her studies in the Humanities Division of Curtin University concentrating on performance studies, but later moved over to Bachelor of Commerce degree, majoring in Tourism Management and Public Relations. In 2005, the Business Divisional Representative Esther Low, was involved with investigations into academic procedures and supplementary exams. A major goal was a review of departmental photocopying and printing machine costs to ensure the lowest price possible is offered to students for these on-campus services. A continuing issue from 2005 was discrepancies regarding the Group

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Business 2006 Emily Cotton

Health Sciences 2005 Holly Cameron

Assessment Policy. Curtin Business School academics acknowledged this is a serious problem for their students. This topic in particular was Cotton’s number one objective coming into the position as Business Divisional Representative, she aims that by the end of 2006, there will be new and improved formal guidelines for tutors and lecturers to follow when conducting group work. In 2006, one of the primary concerns for Cotton and the Curtin Business School Academic Forums was the student feedback tool eVALUate, specifically working on a solution as to how the Curtin Business School can improve the student response rate. Cotton stated that, “as a student and an employee of the Guild, I can now recognise the primary importance of communication between the Guild and the University”. Cotton utilised the Guild influence within the University structure in response to a specific incident whereby a student had contacted her office with issues about a particular Business unit the student was studying. Cotton told the student to urge fellow students to email her office about the situation and Cotton was swiftly inundated with complaints regarding the unit. Cotton was able to bring the issues to the attention of the Unit Controller and the department and currently the issue is being put forward to the Board of Examiners. Cotton involved other Guild Departments and Representatives in the process in order to provide an effective response, namely the Student Assist Department, Education VicePresident and the Guild Research Officer. In 2006 Cotton has been involved on the Curtin Business School (CBS) Board, the CBS Courses Committee, CBS Teaching and Learning, Academic Services Committee. Activities Committee, and the Education Board. Cotton is involved in the Guild’s Campus Sport Programme and runs a Guild social club. Additional tasks include writing press releases and for Grok Magazine Health Sciences 2005 Holly Cameron 2006 Steve Brockman The Health Sciences division at Curtin University’s Bentley Campus spans seven major schools dealing with the behavioural, physical and educational sides of healthcare. To date there are close to 6,000 students in these courses at Curtin University. Currently,

Health Sciences 2006 Steve Brockman

Humanities 2005 Rebecca Higgie

Humanities 2006 Lennard Bailey

studies in Health Sciences is experiencing strong growth reflecting the demand for health professionals in today’s society.

Humanities 2005 Rebecca Higgie 2006 Lennard Bailey

The Guild is very active within the Health Sciences Division. Orientation lectures and barbeques, Guild events and services in common rooms, Guild affiliated Health Science clubs and vending machines within the division are some of the services Health Science student can benefit from.

2005 Humanities Divisional Representative, Rebecca Higgie humorously describes the students of the Humanities Division as “the students that everybody picks on”. This is due to the misconception that Arts degrees are unspecialised and theory-based. However, for Humanites students at Curtin University, who include budding film-makers, writers, anthropologists, architects, artists, teachers, journalists, politicians and performers to name a few, their degrees lead to the most interesting, and most sought after careers in Australia.

A priority for Holly Cameron, 2005 Health Science Divisional Representative, was to ensure that students were not disadvantaged due to the closure of the Podiatry course mid2005. Her goals for the year also included the review of equipment and resources offered by the Division of Health Sciences, to make sure that they match the equipment students will use in the workplace once they graduate. Cameron was also successful in gaining the ‘healthy option’ vending machines for the Nutrition building. Steven Brockman was elected to the role of Health Science Divisional Representative in 2006. A Medical Science student, Brockman has an “all-rounder” approach to his Guild commitments, participating in many other areas of the Guild, including the Sport and Recreation Program and running a Guild affiliated social club. Brockman has noted that the Health Sciences students in 2006 have been responsive to calls for involvement in Guild events; “I also personally found a large number of Health Sciences students came along to Guild events such as Beach Bash and the weekly Wicked Wednesday student nights held at the Tav”. Health Science is a growing division at Curtin University The responsibilities of the Guild and the Divisional Representative to act in these students best interest will be more demanding. Brockman has observed, “this growth is a double edged sword stretching the division to class capacities in aging buildings which are relics from WAIT times”. This leaves a new issue for the 2007 Health Science Divisional Representative. In 2006 Brockman has been involved on the Divisional Academic Board, Divisional Teaching and Learning Committee, Education Board, Activities Committee, and the Membership Committee. Brockman has also played a valuable role in social activities of the Guild.

One of the most controversial University issues of 2005 was affecting Humanities students. Hayman Theatre, the focus point of the Curtin Performance Studies Course, was under threat of closure. Many students who seek to study performance at Curtin University do so because they know they will be gaining experience from a working theatre, therefore Higgie and the Guild felt that representation for these students was of primary importance. The Guild fought with students and staff, spoke to numerous media outlets, organised a petition and participated in rallies. The 2005 Guild President Patrick Gorman and Higgie also put much effort into a presentation to a Rotary Club. It was thought after all efforts, the University had changed their minds about closing the Hayman Theatre. However, in 2006 Hayman is said to be unsafe and there are unconfirmed plans to turn it into a flat teaching space. 2006 Humanities Divisional Representative, Lennard Bailey, along with other Representatives from the Guild, continues to fight these plans on behalf of students. The Guild’s efforts in this matter include signing petitions, informing students, rallying with students, putting out media releases, meeting with numerous staff members and creating numerous documents for University committees. The matter is still unresolved and the Guild is continuing the fight for Hayman Theatre. For the Guild, communication with Humanities students is challenging because of their location on campus. With popular Guild outlets near the Humanities Division Buildings, such as the Vege Patch, The Basement Café and the Bookmark Café in the

Eng., Science & Comp. 2005 Eng., Science & Comp. 2006 Kate Meenan Troy Astle Library, it is possible for a Humanities student to attend classes, enjoy lunch and oncampus activities without regularly visiting the ‘central hub’ of the University, where the Guild offices and most Guild activities take place. Bailey has strived to reach out to this south end of campus by distributing information and materials in the Vege Patch and in the Humanities Common Room. Higgie secured the new Common Room for Humanities students in 2005. In 2006, Bailey has been involved on Guild Council, Activities Committee, Education Board, Humanities Teaching and Learning Committee, Academic Services Committee, Humanities Management Board, FELSSW Teaching and Learning Committee, Humanities International Committee and the Humanities Information and Communication Technology Committee. Bailey has also played a valuable role in social activities of the Guild, organisation a successful Pool Competition for Curtin University students in the Guild Tavern in June 2006. Engineering, Science And Computing 2005 Kate Meenan 2006 Troy Astle Troy Astle, 2006 Engineering, Science & Computing (ES&C) Divisional Representative, said “in the same way that a Humanities graduate will forever be unemployed and a Business graduate will be forever in search of a more powerful ‘power-suit’, Engineering, Science and Computing graduates will forever be geeks”. These descriptions are typical of the shared student humour that exists on campus when students discuss their careers. The sincerity in Astle’s ‘geek’ label is in the fact that for ES&C students, the more difficult and bizarre the subject matter of their studies, the more interesting they find it. The ES&C division is currently dispersed across the southern half of the Bentley campus, which means the ES&C Divisional Representative is usually a mobile member of the Guild who has to tour around where these students ‘hang out’. This Division has a diverse range of courses divided under comparatively different departments including Chemical Engineering, Civil and Construction Engineering, Mathematics and Statistics, Medical Imaging and Computing. These students are diverse and furthermore they usually have a lot of on-campus contact hours in their course timetable. Therefore, the ES&C Divisional Representative has the task of catering to this diverse group while

ensuring that the environment, that they spend so much time in, is maintained and meets their needs. Kate Meenan was the Divisional Representative for ES&C in 2005. The projects for Meenan included seeking resolutions for ongoing timetable issues on behalf of students in the ES&C division. Meenan also represented students on a Divisional working party discussing appropriate investigating student behaviour in lectures, labs and tutorials. Meenan was a member of the working party that drafted ES&C guidelines for boards and examiners to ensure consistency across the division when awarding supplementary examinations. In 2006, Astle was elected to ES&C Divisional Representative while Meenan moved into her role a 2006 Guild President. Astle’s interest in taking on an active role in the Guild stemmed from the same motivation which encourages students to become basic members, to get more out of his university experience. Early in 2006, Troy was successful in encouraging the Guild to make the Guild precinct area (which encompasses the Guild office complex, the Guild Courtyard and its surrounding outlets) to become a smokefree zone. A main focus for Astle has been an attempt to have policy put in place in ES&C to make peer evaluation component mandatory for all team-based assessments. This plan was started by Meenan in 2005 and has now come to fruition in sorts. The division is currently reviewing the number of units with team-based assignments and looking to make guidelines for a peer assessment component in these assessments. In 2006, Astle has been involved on the Guild Council, Library & Information Service Advisory Committee, Academic Services Committee, ESC Teaching & Learning Committee, ESC Divisional Board of Study and Education Board. Astle is also involved in activities on-campus and runs a Guild affiliated social club.

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Listening to all the different voices Departments The Guild supports departments that cater for specific groups including indigenous, queer, female, part-time & mature Age, international students and postgraduate students. It’s fair to say that the Guild hears everyone’s voice on campus. Sexuality Department The Guild’s Sexuality Department and associated CLAG Collective are an invaluable service for any gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgendered, intersex, queer or questioning (GLBTIQQ) student studying at Curtin. The Sexuality Department seeks to ensure that GLBTIQQ students are well represented within the University, and that any problems that may arise for them are quickly sorted out. The department also aims to work very proactively to ensure that Curtin is a safe and accepting place for all students. Individuals can use the department to obtain information on any sexuality-related questions or issues they may have. Indigenous Department The Indigenous Department aims to ensure that Indigenous students at Curtin University are well represented and supported. The main goal of the department is to continue to advance social, economic and educational access for Indigenous Students as well as maintaining racial equality on campus. Women’s Department The Women’s department provides representation for the concerns of female students both on and off campus. The department office, which doubles as a women’s common room, can be found next to CUPSA in the old guild precinct. The Women’s room is a safe space for female students to relax, plan activities, hold small meetings and get information on women’s issues. The Women’s department room is not only a safe space for women but also a safe space for women to study on campus with their children. At the moment there is a computer available for use by parenting students as well as a nappy change table, some books and toys and TV facilities for use by mothers with children up to the age of 10 years. CUPSA CUPSA (Curtin University Postgraduate Student Association) is the only officially recognized University body representing postgraduate students. As such, elected CUPSA committee members

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provide postgraduate representation on University and Guild Committees and serve to link with the national Council of Australian Postgraduate Associations (CAPA). CUPSA promotes quality coursework and research, and provides additional services to postgraduate students such as information, seminars, workshops, social events, support, advocacy, bookshop grants and a postgraduate reading room. The CUPSA office is situated in Building 106 next to the Guild Reception.

Listening to Guild members in need student Assist Curtin University is the largest University in Western Australia. It is no wonder that a holistic service such as Student Assist has proven popular amongst students and has since become an effective and relevant ‘first port of call’ for students in need. This department provided assistance with 624 student issues throughout the year. Student Assist is the welfare arm of the Member Benefits Department at Curtin Student Guild. This department exists to support all student Guild members, both postgraduate and undergraduate, with any academic, personal or welfare issue they may be experiencing. There are currently three Student Assist Officers providing holistic welfare support to students, as well as a comprehensive advocacy and referral service which makes a positive contribution to students’ knowledge about their rights and responsibilities. Student Assist believes in the rights of all students to be heard and to be able to voice their concerns issues and grievances. Internally, assistance was provided to students with issues ranging from academic appeals, general grievances, allegations of academic misconduct, and enrolment issues. Externally, students received help with issues such as tenancy matters, Centrelink enquiries, career and resume/job searching assistance, as well as budgeting and financial concerns. The following examples are some specific Student Assist enquiries, which occurred in 2005. The names used in these examples are not the real name of the student: Trouble with the landlord ‘Brett’ contacted Student Assist as he had just received a letter from his landlord / Real Estate Agent asking him to clean some areas of his house as a result of an inspection conducted

last week. Brett was unaware that an inspection was to be carried out last week, and was angry the Real Estate Agent had not notified him of their intention to conduct an inspection. Brett was unsure what his rights were in this situation and requested this information from the Student Assist Officer. The Officer explained his rights as a tenant under the Residential Tenancies Act, and provided options available to the student. The Student Assist Officer offered Brett support through the process, however he declined saying he felt confident dealing with it on his own. The student was welcomed to recontact Student Assist if he required further assistance. Unfairly terminated ‘Katherine’ made an appointment with Student Assist when she received a letter from the University advising her that her enrolment has been cancelled and she had been terminated from her course. ‘Katherine’ explained she had difficulties last semester because her mother passed away and she was diagnosed with a mental health condition. She explains she just wasn’t able to focus and concentrate on her study, so things slipped away from her and she failed all her units. The Student Assist Officer explained to Katherine her right to appeal in this situation, and assisted in helping Katherine with her appeal letter. Katherine’s status appeal was successful and she was allowed to re-enrol and continue in her course. The Student Assist Officer also linked Katherine in with the Counselling Service to access ongoing therapeutic counselling around her grief and loss issues. Stressed student life ‘Matthew’ advised that he has been feeling extremely stressed all semester and had been having great difficulty with the work required in his units. Matthew is currently studying three units and feels that this is above his coping threshold. As a result he found himself overwhelmed, procrastinating and getting nothing done. The Student Assist Officer helped Matthew to explore aspects of his study that he was finding most difficult. He described one particular unit that was causing the most hardship, and explained that it was the essay writing involved that was the most stressful aspect. Matthew is repeating this unit because he failed it last semester. Matthew went on to explain that he had never been able to write essays and failed English in his TEE, and that the reason he undertook this particular university course was because he thought there would be no essay writing involved. Matthew had no confidence in his ability to write essays and this is causing him to avoid writing them and hence he was falling behind in the unit.

The Student Assist Officer discussed options available to Matthew and after much deliberation and investigation of the pros and cons of various courses of action, Matthew decided that the best thing to do would be to withdraw from the difficult unit and focus his energies on the other two units, and on improving his skills and confidence with essay writing. The Student Assist Officer provided the student with information on essay writing courses held by the Learning Support Network, as well as the Overcoming Procrastination Workshop held by the Counselling Service. The Student Assist Officer explained to Matthew the procedure for withdrawing from the unit, and offered further assistance if required.

Student Assist Projects in 2005 Bookshop Grants Student Assist recognises that many students experience financial hardship whilst studying. The Bookshop Grant equity project, run in conjunction with the Curtin University Bookshop, is a way in which Student Assist responds to this need and provides financial assistance. The Bookshop Grants were again a success, and emphasis was placed on making all Curtin students aware of the program so they had the opportunity to apply. These methods of communication used included the Guild website, in the Guild Diary and in the Student Assist Brochure. In 2005, 593 students applied for a grant, and 520 students successfully secured a grant worth $150.00 to spend on texts at the Curtin University Bookshop. Tax Help Service Once again throughout August, September and October, Student Assist facilitated the free tax help service available to student members on low incomes. There has been increasing demand for this service over the years and the Guild was able to accommodate this by negotiating with the Australian Taxation Office to provide an additional volunteer. In 2005 Student Assist accommodated and organised four volunteers, providing a tax help service to 16 students each week. Personal Accident Insurance Coverage Student Assist managed the claim process for the Guild’s Personal Accident Insurance Policy. This provides coverage for student members whilst engaged in a University, course, sport related activity, as well as any necessary direct travel to and from such activities. Student initiated work experience is also covered by the policy to enable

students to undertake work experience in their field to help with future job prospects. In 2005 the Guild provided work experience accident insurance coverage to 68 students wanting to get ahead in their field. Explore Tours Explore Tours were once again an important part of new-to-Curtin student’s orientation program. The tour route and content was updated and improved, and Semester Two saw the introduction of a free drink for all tour participants at the completion of their tour. In collaboration with Guild Councillors and volunteers, Student Assist ran seven tours during Semester One O-Week, touring just under 600 students. In Semester Two we ran five tours, touring a total of 115 new-toCurtin students. New service – Legal Assist Semester Two in 2005 saw the introduction of a new and exciting Legal Assist service for all Guild members. The professional legal services of MinterEllison Lawyers were contracted to provide free legal advice to Guild members on the Wednesday of each week. Members took up this new service with great enthusiasm resulting in the service being booked out for many weeks. Legal advice is very expensive to acquire in the community, so this new service has benefited numerous students in contact with the legal system who otherwise would not have been able to afford to access this vital service, or who would have been placed in great financial difficulty as a result. After the introduction of the service in August 2005, MinterEllison lawyers provided free legal advice to 81 Guild members. This valuable service will continue in 2006.

In 2005 work was started on a new project, writing a series of information sheets for student members to access, providing information around a wide area of issues and options for how students can attempt to resolve the problems they might be experiencing. There are four broad categories which each contain a number of information sheets, and these include; Academic Issues, Handy Information relevant to Curtin; General Handy Hints (non-Curtin specific, more welfare related issues); and Finding Work Whilst Studying. The information sheets will be made available in 2006 in hard copy format in Guild Reception and on the Guild website. Relationships As always, Student Assist made it a priority in 2005 to maintain and further build relationships with key Curtin University staff. In particular, Student Assist has a strong working relationship with the University Counselling Service including Disability Counsellors, the Conflict Resolution Manager, Careers at Curtin, the First Year Experience Coordinator, the Learning Support Network, and staff at Campus and Community Life. Externally, Student Assist also maintains contact and membership with the WA Welfare Rights Network to keep abreast of Centrelink issues and information relevant to students, as well as Tenants Advice Service to allow Student Assist to continue providing an effective, knowledgeable and useful service in the area of tenancy matters. These relationships helped greatly in service delivery as they assisted the Guild in building on our knowledge of the University and in providing a more effective information, advocacy and referral service to students.

Listening to students is an important part of this department. In addition, communicating to students so they are aware of what services are available to them is equally as important. Student Assist utilises a vast array of methods to communicate with Curtin students to try and make them aware of the services we provide. These methods include: • Guild Diary; • Student Assist brochure, which is sent to all divisions and regional campuses; • Guild website; • Regular Grok Magazine contributions; • Regular Grapevine email-out contributions; • Participation in International Students Orientation Expos; • Regular email-outs of Student Assist brochures to Distance Education (external students).

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5

Chapter

Catering to Student’s Tastes

Big Menu For many Curtin Student Guild members, the attraction of joining the Guild is usually sparked by the Guild’s contribution to campus life and culture. The Guild is responsible for most of the activities on campus and since the student body of Curtin University is so diverse, the Guild is aware that if it wants to cater for all students’ tastes then a “big menu” of activities would have to be on the table. With the smorgasbord of large and small scale events, club and societies, market days, recreation courses, sporting activates it is assured that every student will have a positive University experience no matter what their background or past-time preferences. Head Chef…cooking up new ideas for students! The Guild has it own Activities Vice-President (AVP). This primary role of the AVP is to oversee all Guild events and activities. This person is also the chief supporter of the activities of the Guild clubs and societies. The AVP relies on the feedback of the students on-campus, in order to provide effective and enjoyable activities throughout the year. Numerous emails and survey results from enthusiastic students flood the AVP office with ideas for on-campus entertainment. Members of the Guild’s Activities Committee develop these ideas thereon. In Semester One, 2006 there have been many different initiatives that the Guild has tried in relation to activities in 2005:

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Activities Vice-President 2005 Katie McGregor

Activities Vice-President 2006 Reece Wheadon

On the menu for 2005… With assessments, exams, assignments and group projects on the agenda all year, the academic side of student life can leave a student feeling mentally stressed. In comparison, the appetite for recreation, relaxation and fun is usually healthy. The Guild has a long history of helping all students find enjoyment in Curtin University’s social sphere by hosting some of the best activities, recreation courses, sport and social events around. Clubs & societies 2005 The Guild Clubs were very active on–campus throughout the year, holding numerous events, fundraisers and activities. Almost all Clubs participated in Orientation-Day where most of the clubs recruited their new members for the year. Thirty clubs attended Clubs & Societies Day in Week Three of Semester One. This day gave Clubs another opportunity to showcase themselves to prospective members in the hope they attract more sign-ups for the year. This year, the Guild provided a considerable amount of funding to Clubs, which contributed to relevant expenses associated with: • Holding Clubs events (venue hire, printing, entertainment costs) • Purchase of new Club equipment • Purchase of Club uniforms / Club shirts • Purchase of Club banners • Stall set up for O-Days, Club Days • Set up of individual Club websites

Successful new initiatives • Grill the Guild, a free barbeque where students can meet and talk to Guild Representatives, has increased in size to incorporate musical entertainment and a larger amount of free food for students during Common-Free-Time. • The Guild news column in Grok Magazine was a strong communication channel, letting students know what was happening on campus more effectively. • The creation of a dedicated Activities Office and Clubs Room in the Guild Tavern Courtyard. • Activities, games and themed costumes at the Guild Tavern’s Wicked Wednesdays have attracted more students to the venue. • New Events: 2005: Wine Appreciation Night Beer Appreciation Night, O-Week Movie for first year students Unsuccessful new initiatives • The Home-base concept of a free bus, taking people from campus to Fremantle after Friday nights at the Guild Tavern proved unpopular and was subsequently cancelled. This initiative incurred very little costs for the Guild. • The 2006 Mocktail Night (alcohol free event) was cancelled due to lack of interest.

The Guild also purchased new Club equipment at the conclusion of 2005 for Clubs to use, including a fairy floss-making machine, popcorn making machine and marquees, a PA System and ice bucket. The Guild advocated on behalf of Clubs for barbeques to be able to continue on campus and reinforced correct preparation and cooking procedures for barbeques.

Guild Recreation courses 2005 Guild Recreation remained a popular choice of activity amongst the Curtin community in 2005. The courses available continued to offer participants a chance to learn new skills, or brush up on old skills, at very affordable prices. Guild Recreation had nearly 600 sign ups for courses throughout the year. A number of new courses were introduced including a Singing workshop, a Wine Appreciation Tour and a trip to Exmouth. The ‘old favourites’ were back and classes for Hip

Hop Funk and Yoga continued to be those in highest demand.

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REGISTERED CLUBS & SOCIETIES 200 SPORTS: Curtin Kung Fu Club Curtin Karate Club Curtin Baseball Club Curtin Women’s Soccer Club Curtin Men’s Soccer Club Wesley Curtin AFC (AFL) Curtin Netball Club Curtin Shootwrestling Club Curtin Trinity Pirates Hockey Club Curtin Rugby Union Football Club Curtin Athletics Club Curtin Tennis Club Curtin University Boat Club Curtin Cricket Club

RELIGIOUS: Curtin Buddhist Wisdom Society Alzahraa Youth Association Passion Curtin Buddhist Association - CBA Christian Campus Movement – CCM Chinese Christian Club A-GENT Curtin University Bahai Society - CUBS Overseas Christian Fellowship - OCF GONZO Curtin Christian Union - CCU – AUJS Australasian Union of Jewish Students A CMS – n ciatio Asso ents Stud Curtin Muslim Curtin Students Catholic Association The Rocks Club Bibles for Australia - BfAus INTERNATIONAL: Maldivian Students Association DESI – Indian Students Association Indonesian Students Club - InSeC n - CSSA Chinese Students & Scholars Associatio n ciatio Asso ents Taiwanese Stud Asian Students Society - ASIA AMS Association of Malaysian Students – PNGSA Papua New Guinea Students Assn – Singapore Connection

ACADEMIC CLUBS: SCUM Student of Curtin University Maths Curtin Commerce Club - CCC Psychology Student Iniative - PSI Environmental Health Club Health Promotion Students AIESEC Curtin Marketing Association - CMA Student University Nurses - SUN Students Information Technology Systems n Associatio Therapy Students Association Division Physical Sciences Social Entertainment

SPECIAL INTEREST: Curtin Imagination Association - CIA Country Students Club Curtin Go Club Curtin Japan Club Tunes Music Club Curtin Meditation Club Curtin Wine Club – CWC Curtin Mahjong Club

&

- PHYSSED ciation Computer Science Students Asso SSA COM Student Journalists Association - SJA Asian Studies Society Public Relations Student Chapter - PRSC trical & Curtin IEEE Student Branch (Elec eers) Engin ronic Elect - APA Australian Physiotherapy Association Curtin Engineers Club ciation Nutrition and Dietetics Student Asso ADSA ciation Information Studies Student Asso – ISSA ) Vinous (Margaret River Viticulture Club ents Stud g eerin Engin ical Chem of Association - ACES Curtin Architecture Students Assn - CASA Curtin Film Club Social Work Students Assn – SWSA GEOS (Geological Society) Curtin Chemistry Club Curtin Craft Club p Fashion & Textile Design Student Grou ) Town Planning Student Association (TPSA Club llery Curtin Jewe Milan Fundraising Club A) Curtin Financial Analyst Association (CFA p Grou n Actio Drug l Curtin Student’s Loca Exhibition Design Club BIOSTAS Social Education Students (SES) ESCAPE

SOCIAL: Curtin Social Club – CSC ANTICS Beer Appreciation Club Persians ISSUES BASED CLUBS: nal Group Curtin University Amnesty Internatio

RECREATION COURSES 2005

ng, Dinghy Water Sports – Rowing, Wind-surfi surfing, Keel Boat Sailing, Surfing. – Swedish Certificate Courses – Bar Service – Senior age Mass Foot Massage – Reflexology and . Aid First i Iaido & Martial Arts – Fencing – Kendo - Seite eira Jodo – Self-Defence – Kickboxing – Capo – Gold s) inner (Beg Golf – is Sport – Tenn (Intermediate) g – Learn to Outdoor Adventures – Scuba Divin Surf Day Trip - Margaret Trips & Tours – Big Sky Tours Wine Tour uth 7 Day Exmo aloo/ Ning Trip) Day (2 i River Safar Tour – Albany/Pemberton Day Trip ing – Salsa Dancing – Hip Hop Funk – Belly Danc Ballroom g Swin & Latin rican Cuban Style – Ame Dancing – Yoga Health & Fitness – Yoga Beginners Intermediate - Tai Chi – African Music – Didgeridoo – Singing Drumming & Sketching Art & Craft – Painting – Drawing ng Maki – Jewellery se – Leaving Really Handy Workshops – Bar Cour Maintenance Car – on mati Infor ncy Tena & e Hom PowerPoint– Resume Writing – Introduction to Stress Management

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EVENTS 2005

ubs & Societies Beach Bash – Cl – y Da Day n tio ta Orien Show – Guild Semester Tav Beer – n io tit Day – End of pe m Curtin DJ Co (Semester 2) – ‘An Evening of t - Guild Ball gh Ni n io iat s Competition Apprec nd Ba s nal Campu Elegance’ – Natio n night - Pasar Malam – iatio – Wine Apprec k – Oktoberfest. ee W l ra tu Multicul

Events 2005 In addition to the traditional Guild Tavern events such as Beach Bash and Oktoberfest, some great new initiatives were introduced and tried to accommodate the wider membership base. The focus for events in 2005 was to consider new activities and initiatives that would cater to a large, diverse audience rather than isolating efforts into pure Guild Tavern style drinking events. Overall that focus was largely successful as new and exciting events were introduced and strengthened, ensuring that Guild members have choice when it comes to social and recreational life at Curtin University. O-Day (23 February) Orientation Day (O-Day) 2005 was the perfect introduction to the Guild and student life at Curtin University. With over 6000 people in attendance and approximately 140 stalls, this was the biggest O-Day to date. Non-stop entertainment from three stages, plenty of free food and drink giveaways from official suppliers and other fun activities ensured O-Day appealed to everyone. The Tav Show was very well represented, attracting people of all ages and demographics. The entire day proved to be cost neutral after some great planning and booking of off-campus stalls and promotions. Rivercruise (cancelled) Despite cancelling the 2004 Rivercruise in the final week due to a lack of interest and ticket sales, it was decided to persevere with the event for a following year and focus on offering a cost friendly ticket package price. Whereas the tickets in 2004 were selling for $25.00 without the inclusion of drinks, the aim of 2005 was to package a ticket price with drinks included on the boat as well as finger food and entertainment. Despite timely and effective promotion of the event, it once again failed to attract significant interest from the Curtin students and only a handful of tickets were sold in the lead up to the event. Therefore, it was necessary to cancel the evening once again and refund those tickets purchased. It has been decided to not persist with organising a Guild Rivercruise in future years as this is a type of event best left to individual clubs and societies who also have access to great hire rates from the Perth cruise boats. Cocktail Night (20 May) After being introduced as a new event in 2004, the Cocktail Night was again on the social line-up for 2005. After planning with

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RT CAMPUS SPO

2005

Mixed Netball ll 3-on-3 Basketba is nn Te Team

the Marketing Department, the Activities Vice-President was the sole organiser and promoter. The venue, Base Lounge was again selected due to being located in Northbridge and being one of the premier cocktail lounge bars in Perth. It is also a popular club for the younger market and Base offers attractive function packages to student groups / parties and was a great venue for the previous year event. The event again had great ticket sales and may require future events of this nature to be held in larger venues. This should be an exciting annual event for years to follow. National Campus Bands Competition (August) This annual August event was a great success and was an exciting on campus spectacle. There were enough entrants to ensure there were four Curtin heats as per 2004. Approximately 20 plus acts battled it out, striving to win the heats and then represent Curtin in the semi-finals. Due to the tight time schedule of the event with the semifinal and final dates, it is still of benefit to maintain the heats on Wednesday and Friday over two weeks. A pleasing aspect of the event in 2005 was the lack of noise complaints, which posed a problem the previous year. Guild Ball: Evening of Elegance (27 August) The Guild Ball in 2005 was a special night to remember. It was the second sell-out in as many years and all measures were taken to ensure its tremendous success. The Ball was held in the newly renovated Argyle Ballroom of the Events One Floor within the Parmelia Hilton Hotel. The service on the night was perfect and the food and drink package was exceptional and enjoyed by all. All guests loved the hotel and the location, especially the improvements over the Hyatt’s Terrace Ballroom the year before. The main positives of the Guild Ball were: • 260 Tickets sold (Event sell-out approx. 1 week beforehand) • Sponsorship support to the total of $6000.00 • Low cost tickets for Guild members of $75.00 • New Ballroom allowed for reduction in themeing budget, yet just as effective Oktoberfest The most anticipated and highly celebrated event of the calendar year is Oktoberfest. The amazing culture and loyalty shown to this Curtin beer festival ensures this is the biggest

annual on-campus event. The exciting news for Oktoberfest 2005 was maintaining event capacity to 1600 people, up from 1000 historically. Therefore, the added challenge from the promotional side of things was to ensure that this event remained a sell-out. The main positive of the success of the promotion and marketing of Oktoberfest in 2005 was timing. Building on the great reputation that the event had in recent years, promotional strategies were applied very early and ensured that ticket sales were also consistent and positive in the early weeks and not just the last few days (as is historically the case). This goal was achieved and the event sold out even earlier than in 2004, on the Monday of the event week. The event was once again a spectacular affair with an awesome entertainment mix and terrific organisation, which lead to almost no incidences among the 1600 strong crowd. Guild Day Guild Day 2005 was a fantastic success and the perfect way to introduce and celebrate the beginning of Semester two at Curtin. Once again the focus of the day was to promote the importance of the official Guild Clubs and Societies to returning students and new-to-Curtin students commencing their studies in Semester Two. The recent wet weather held off and the numbers of students attending the day was definitely up on 2004. By 11.45am, the promenade and the tavern courtyard were very busy. The main activities were wrapped up by 2.00pm and the day culminated in the Tavern show, with three live Perth acts. Stalls presenting at his event included: Guild Membership Stalls, Student Assist, Activities, Sport & Recreation, Curtin University Postgraduate Students Association (CUPSA) International Student Committee (ISC) Women’s Departments, Queer Department, Legal Assist (MinterEllison Lawyers), BankWest, Schweppes, Smiths Chips & Lipton Ice Tea. As per 2004, approximately 10 discount providers attended the day to promote their businesses including; Fitness First, Metro City, Eftel Internet, Black Betty’s, Big Sky Tours to name a few.

Sport & Recreation 2005 Campus Sport 2005 saw Campus Sport enjoy a third year of growth. The Campus Sport programme was created in 2003 as way of providing friendly sporting competitions to those students who like to use sports to socialise and exercise. The Guild observed a market for students who enjoyed sport but did not wish to compete at the level that athletes do for the University Games. Team Tennis, Mixed Netball and 3-on-3 Basketball were the sport competitions on offer in the Campus Sport programme. In 2005, the growth of Campus Sport was largely due to its success in 2004 which increased demands for student participation. In Semester One, Team Tennis joined the social sporting programme with 9 Men’s teams competing. In Semester Two, Team Tennis had a change in format with an individual competition introduced. In Mixed Netball, a record 18 teams registered in Semester One. Fifteen teams signed up for the competition in Semester Two and despite the occasional wet weather the programme continued to prove it was the most popular campus sport on offer. 3-on-3 Basketball also continued in 2005 with ten teams making up the competition across both Semesters. 3-on-3 Basketball was played each Wednesday in the CommonFree-Time of 12.00 noon to 2.00 pm. All games were held in the modified Squash Courts, which deceived several players on how much running was actually involved. Overall some 50 teams, comprising some 400 participants competed in the Campus Sport programme throughout 2005, which was a significant increase to the 2004 total of 30 participating teams. Regional Intervarsity AUSWest Sports The AUSWest sports program provides Curtin University students the opportunity to represent Curtin University on a regional level. Up to 500 students represented the University throughout 2005. This figure was a definite increase on the number of students who participated in these competitions on 2004. Curtin maintained its position as the second strongest sporting university in the State. In the local regional competition, the following teams finished in either 1st or 2nd place and qualified to compete at the Australian

University Games hosted in Brisbane in September 2005: Basketball (Men’s) – 2nd Soccer (Women’s) - 2nd Touch Football (Women’s) - 2nd Badminton (Men’s) - 2nd Badminton (Women’s) – 1st Netball (Women’s) - 1st Volleyball (Men’s) - 2nd Volleyball (Women’s) - 2nd Squash (Women’s) - 1st Squash (Men’s) - 2nd Hockey (Men’s) - 2nd Hockey (Women’s) - 2nd Beach Volleyball (Men’s) – 1st Beach Volleyball (Women’s) - 2nd Beach Volleyball (Mixed) - 1st Super 8’s cricket - 1st Australian University Games In 2005, 15 teams consisting of a total of 130 athletes from Curtin University qualified to compete in the Australian University Games. In addition to this achievement, Curtin University also had a number of individuals join the team to compete in events such as Tae Kwon Do, Cycling and Athletics. Unfortunately the high level of expenses needed to travel to Brisbane to compete resulted in a few teams not being able to financially commit themselves. A total number 48 students attended the Games. This total was still nearly double the squad size of the last eastern states hosted Games in Newcastle in 2003. Whilst many Curtin University students spent the ‘class free week’ in September catching up on assignments and essays, these 48 students were representing their University at the Games. They went on to finish 21st out of 47 Universities. The final results were as follows: Netball (Women’s) – 2nd (Jasmine Keene selected in to Green & Gold Netball team) Beach Volleyball (Men’s) – 6th Beach Volleyball (Women’s) - 6th Soccer (Women’s) - 12th Basketball (Men’s) - 11th Beach Volleyball (Women’s) - 6th Tae Kwon Do – Alison Hansen Gold Medal Winner Rowing (Women’s) – 1st in B-FINAL of Women’s Coxless Pairs: Grobicki and Ashbolt 4th in B-FINAL of Women’s Double Scull: Grobicki and Ashbolt Athletics 12th place in Men’s 1500m th & 10 place Men’s 5000m: Shaphan Cox: 4th place in Men’s 400m: Thierry Xavier 9th place in Women’s Discus Throw: Michelle

Trinca Cycling - 4th place in Men’s Criterium & 7th place Men’s Individual Time Trial: Joshua Dawkins: 9th place in Men’s individual Time Trial: Elliott Wells:

Australian University Golf Championships Curtin entered the AUS Golf event, which was hosted by AUSwest in Perth in the first week of December 2005. The Curtin teams put in a huge effort to finish in fifth place out of the eleven Universities that competed. Rachel Millverton was selected into the Women’s Green & Gold Golf Team. Indian Rim Asian University Games The Indian Rim Asian University Games is a friendly celebration of sport. The inaugural Games in 2005 featured over 800 competitors from 26 universities in 10 countries, the largest international university sports competition ever hosted in Australia. Curtin fielded teams in 7 out of the 8 sports on offer. Results Badminton (Men’s) – 5th Cricket – 10th Hockey (Men’s) – 2nd Hockey (Women’s) – 1st Judo – 5th Soccer (Women’s) – 4th Soccer (Men’s) – 7th Tennis (Men’s) – 8th Volleyball (Women’s) – 4th

Conclusion The ongoing efforts for 2006 have been focused on delivering the best possible standard of entertainment and recreation for maximum value as we strive to leave a lasting memory and maintain the positive image of Guild membership as we move into a voluntary Guild membership environment.

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6

Chapter

decided that to develop a new business that could be run by the students for the benefit of the students. The name Curtin Concept is non-specific. This is meant to represent the vast array of services that we currently have and/or could provide in the store. The store is meant to be very transient, meaning that if one area of the business does not work we will easily be able to re-assess our operations and change direction if need be. When developing the business elements were taken of existing businesses and new concepts/product lines were introduced that would complement these existing elements.

A Nose for Business Over the last few years, the Guild’s firm position within the University, even with changing political climates, has been attributed to the Guild’s successes in strategic planning and commercial interest in Curtin University. In response to growing student demands and in preparation for Voluntary Student Unionism, 2005 saw many new business developments take place with renovations, revamps and reconstructions. In the assessment of the student markets, and in response to our members, the Guild closed two of it long-term operating outlets and replaced them with new services more suitable for on-campus University life. Out of all notable differences in the Guild since 2005, the retail arm of the Guild has transformed most significantly, and in doing so, the Guild has also changed the landscape of Curtin University for 2006. At the beginning of 2005, the retail outlets and ventures were as follows: • The Curtin Sports Store sold sports equiptment, clothing and footwear to students. Three staff members were employed at this store. • Megazone, was a video arcade. Complete with pool tables, video games and pinball machines. Megazone was run through the Curtin Sports store and had no specific staff members. • The Guild Secondhand Bookshop employed two casual staff members but also had up to seven casual staff members that worked during the busy times of the year, namely the beginning of both Semesters. • Vending operations were organized through

18

the Guild’s Operations Manager, but it were outsourced to third party Vending partners. There were a total of 88 vending machines on campus. This included 44 cold beverage machines, 27 snack machines and 17 hot beverage machines. The Guild’s Vending partners were Coca Cola, Smith’s and Nestlé. Vending contributed significant income to the Guild.

difficult to direct external consumers to our store.

The Curtin Sports Store was purchased off Curtin University in 1993. Over the last three years the store has experienced significant losses. The Guild could not continue to subsidise this business.

A New Concept

Traditionally the Curtin Sports Store was one of the major sports retailers in Western Australia. Its success could be attributed to its highly discounted prices. This was achieved because the store never used to pay wholesale tax, which was charged at 22% of the wholesale price. In 2000, wholesale tax was abolished when GST came in.

The Guild could not rationalise the operation of the Curtin Sports Store. The Guild could not continue to absorb significant losses, nor tie up operating capital in stock. The Guild had to provide services that will be accessed by a larger percentage of our members.

If you came to Curtin University looking for the Curtin Sports Store today, you would find the Curtin Concept store in its place. This newest edition to the Guild services facilitates the sale of coffee, pastries, juices, shakes and ice-cream through its beverage division. The retail area facilitates the sale and new and second-hand CD’s, Curtin memorabilia (from clothing to stress balls), posters, jewellery and tickets sales to both internal and external events. The store currently employs up to four people in its café area and one in the retail area, however this will increase due to a recent significant increase in turnover.

The advent of multinational retailers entering the WA market also contributed to the demise of the Curtin Sports Store. Their buying power usually meant that they could buy product cheaper and as a result could sell it cheaper.

The timely opening of this store in February 2006 was not without intensive planning and development, and a review of Guild retail processes in 2005.

Another factor contributing to its poor performance was the relocation of the store from the Recreation Centre into the Building 106 Precinct. Prior to the relocation (and before Bldg 408 was built) the store had a visitor’s car park directly out the front, which enabled easy access for external people. The new location of the store made it very

The Curtin Sports Store was not contributing a net profit to the Guild therefore making it necessary to dissolve the business. The decision faced by the Guild was to either sub-lease the area to a third party or develop a business that would be patronized more successfully by the Curtin community. Although the prime location would attract top money from a potential business it was

When developing the café side of Curtin Concept, consideration was given to two of the Guild’s existing businesses: Café AngaZi and the Bistro (in the Guild Tavern). The Café AngaZi was struggling to efficiently serve its patrons, particularly during the morning coffee period. It was necessary to direct some of their coffee trade to a conveniently close location without compromising the other products and services that they provide. The Bistro was open for morning trade but due to its proximity, next to the Guild Tavern, which opened at 10am, it was not sufficiently busy to warrant the employment of a barista and a chef during the early morning period. With this in mind, it was decided that coffee would be sold through the Curtin Concept store. Café @ Concept needed some points of difference to ensure that it was different to the other cafes we had on campus. Over recent years the café market has seen a huge swing towards juice products and premium ice cream. This is evident by the success of chain stores like Boost Juice and Gelati. It was decided that to provide these products. For twelve months a juice bar was successfully trialed through the Bistro before committing it to Curtin Concept.

Store was underperforming as a business, the Curtin branded merchandise aspect of the store was returning positive results. The other business Concept was modeled on was the Guild Secondhand Bookshop but with focus on CD sales instead of textbooks. The Curtin Sports Store used to sell only a limited range of Curtin branded merchandise. This was limited to one male and one female T-shirt design in four different colours. The new Curtin Concept store now provides a variety of clothing, accessories and memorabilia that are branded with Curtin University of Technology and also the Curtin Student Guild. For people who are proud of where they learn, Curtin Concept has a piece of memorabilia that will suit every budget. The CD aspect of the store facilitates the sale of second-hand CD’s on behalf students. Like the Secondhand Bookshop, students and Curtin University staff can lodge CD’s on consignment with the store and collect the proceeds of the sale (minus the administration commission) when the CD’s have sold. The store also sells new CD’s in order to cater for all consumer tastes. When developing the store, consideration was given to the future of music sales in Australia. Market research suggests that there will be a huge consumer swing towards digital music downloads over the next ten years. It is expected that the sale of CD’s versus digital music will be equivalent to the current market for movies, where DVD’s grossly outweigh the sales of VHS. For this reason Concept will provide a digital music download system.

During the design phase of the Café @ Concept, the Guild ensured that the layout and the design of equipment could be easily changed if any aspects of the operation did not work. We will continue assess of products and services and although results thus far have been successful, we have the ability to easily adapt if consumer behaviour changes.

The retail store also facilitates the sale of both Curtin University specific and external events. Tickets will be sold on behalf of the Guild’s Clubs & Societies if they have organised an event that is catering to more than 80 people. Tickets to Guild organised events will also be sold. It was important to relocate this service from Guild reception because big events like Oktoberfest and the Guild Ball can create huge queues in Guild Reception. Recently the Curtin Concept store has become an agent for BOCS ticketing. This should compliment the external tickets, like Ministry of Sound, that are currently sold through the store.

When developing the retail side of the business, two performing aspects of the current operations were looked at. The first being the popularity of Curtin branded merchandise. Although the Curtin Sports

The Curtin Concept store has performed well above expectations in the first four months of operation. In 2006, Café @ Concept has achieved coffee sales that are in excess of up to five times the amount of coffee served

through the old Bistro, while Café AngaZi has not seen a decline in coffee sales. Juice and ice-cream sales have performed

Guild Tavern With trade up 33% in Semester 1 2006, it cannot be argued that the Guild Tavern’s extensive renovations in 2005 have made this popular spot more attractive to the Curtin community. The Guild Tavern was renovated primarily to offer a more inviting space for students and more importantly an efficient service. The new layout encompasses the beer garden into the main bar area offering an alfresco style, where the previous layout saw many small areas and a separate outside space. The construction changes that took place at the beginning of 2005 were to replace the old circular bar with a long bar. This provided a direct line of service whereas the previous design, with refrigeration placed high in the middle of the bar, interrupted the line of sight. As all bifold doors could not be opened unless there was a minimum three staff in the bar at anyone time, this directed patrons into a small service area. The old design also did not provide any display shelving which inhibited us displaying products for sale. The new design provides staff with more room behind the bar offering a faster and more efficient service to patrons. Changes to the layout were made with more serviceable needs in mind. By removing the coffee bar, students are provided with a much-requested casual pool lounge pool to relax and mingle within the social aspects of the University. Students were also consulted when upgrading the audio availabilities within the Guild Tavern where it was chosen to upgrade the exhausted system and replace it with a music video selection providing a greater variety for the changing needs of the students and business. Within the new renovation the Guild Tavern extended it’s range of tap beers poured at the bar to eleven varieties. The new style of the Tavern Bistro in 2006 saw a menu developed encompassing cheaper snack style foods along with wholesome choices. The Tavern Bistro also operates extended hours during Semester giving a range of food until 7.00pm in the evening. Coffee, drinks and meals are all ordered from the one bar area and an automated buzzer is received which is activated when

19


meals are ready for your collection from the kitchen. This gives much greater flexibility for students to sit where they wish throughout the Guild Tavern and surrounds. The Tavern Bistro is also available for function hire. The new layout of the Guild Tavern has been accepted extremely well by the Curtin community, with patrons servicing the establishment in a social manner later in the evening than previous years. Events held in the Guild Tavern in 2005 Beach Bash Wine Appreciation Night End of Semester Tav Show (Semester One and Two) Oktoberfest Club & Societies Event nights

Food & Beverage Department The Curtin Student Guild runs the majority of Food and Beverage outlets at Curtin University. During the on-campus class weeks, a visitor to Curtin would find these outlets busy with students and staff, with queues of consumers at every outlet strategically plotted about the campus. The growing patronage from Curtin University staff and students has been due to Guild management and staff, responding to the wants of consumers and by offering high quality services at ‘student-friendly’ prices. There are seven Guild operated food and beverage outlets on campus, each with it’s own distinct style to cater for all the niche markets of a culturally diverse University: The Main Café is a traditional universitystyle cafeteria. The café is home to the $3.50 lunch special, popular amongst consumers on student budgets. This outlet provides prepared hot food and sandwiches for three other outlets and all of the food for Kirribilli Catering. There are six to seven front of house staff and eight kitchen staff. Bookmark Café is located in the T.L Robertson Library. The Café specialises in home cooked meals made fresh while you wait. Bookmark Cafe is open seven days a week during the Semester and has 17 staff. The Vege Patch has a focus on healthy options and includes some specialty vegan/gluten free meals. This outlet attracts Humanities students whose classes, lecture theatres and film and art studios are a brief walk away. Five staff members work at this outlet. The Basement Café is located in the

20

Engineering Building on campus and has become a niche café for these students. This café serves a variety of Halal hearty meals and has six staff. Café AngaZi is a highly popular café with students and has a ‘hip’ and ‘funky’ vibe. This café has a prime spot on campus, surrounded by lecture theatres. It is neighbours to BankWest Curtin branch and is located near the Recreation Centre and Guild Reception. Café AngaZi has it’s own chef who prepares delicious hot meals, gourmet rolls, sandwiches, soups and salads. 13 staff members work at this café. The Kirribilli Café has á la carte dining in a relaxed and highly presentable atmosphere. This café is most popular amongst Curtin University staff that frequent Kirribilli for coffee, breakfasts and lunches and invite University clients and visitors to enjoy scenic and impressive views of the John Curtin Centre. Not exclusive to corporate Curtin, many students enjoy gathering at Kirribilli for relaxed class breaks or to discuss group projects. This Café is located near the John Curtin Art Gallery and Prime Ministerial Library and the Curtin University Bookshop. Menus change every fortnight allowing chef’s to feature the best of seasonal fare. 9 staff members work at this café. Takeaway is also available from this outlet. Café at Concept, whilst not operating in 2005, is the newest food and beverage outlet on campus. The Café began its operation in Orientation week in February 2006 and has since developed it’s own distinct personality. With a serving window in prime position in the Sir Charles Court Promenade, this café has two staff members serving coffee, smoothies, juice and ice cream. Developments for the Food and Beverage Department of the Guild in 2005 included a reduction in the average price of meals at Kirribilli in June. This was in effort to attract more students to the café. The menu also changed from a seasonal menu, which altered its meals four times a year, to changing every fortnight and capitalising on fresh seasonal ingredients Regular customers would have noticed some changes in the Bookmark Café in Winter, with a new walk-in cool room and drinks display fridge allowing for more storage and a larger range of drinks on hand. There was also a layout redesign, with new counters in the till area to ease the flow of traffic to the tills and speed up service.

In Semester Two 2005, in keeping with the Guild’s commitment to cater for students both local and international, the Basement Café’s menu and all suppliers were changed to Halal. The Guild outlets are all quality-assured environments. In order to upkeep all high standards, the Food & Beverage Department introduced a full induction day for all staff members which covered an overall introduction to the Guild and it’s missions, specific information about the Food & Beverage Department and its structure, coffee training, Food Safe training and Occupational Health & Safety training.

Statistics 2005 sold on 43 thousand Cans of Red Bull were Campus excess of 4176kg of coffee beans used = an ee coff of cups 576,000 Promotions in 2005 Cadbury Schweppes: r • Two for the price of one Coolridge wate weeks • Two for $5 Red Bull cans during study & exams including • Scratch & win – with instant prizes y vouchers one laptop computer, six ipods, Sanit & movie tickets free on • Loyalty cards – buy eight get the ninth 600ml soft drink Peters & Brownes ember • $1.50 flavoured 600ml milk during Sept 2005 nth free on • Loyalty cards – buy six get the seve milk 600ml flavoured hers for The 2005 Guild Diary contained vouc year. the t ghou specials that ran throu 600ml February: • buy one get one free pet Trum s Peter $1.50 • r Coolridge wate l Coolridge March: • buy one get one free 600m pet Trum s Peter $1.50 • water April: • 50c off Berri products for $2.00 May: • Any two medium Cadbury bars ucts prod Tea Iced n • 50c off Lipto hers) June: • Red bull promo (not on vouc s (coffee) onicu Andr any off 50c • st: Augu purchase l range for September: • Buy two multi v 400m $3.50 October: • Coffee Chill $1.50 vouchers) November: • Red Bull Promo (not on

Guild Housing The Curtin Student Guild managed two housing complexes, Jackson Rd Complex (built in 1975) and the Kent Street Complex (built in 1996). Fully funded by the Guild (through bank loans, Government Grants and member funds) these two complexes were built in 1975 and 1996 respectively on land leased from the University. Collectively known as Guild House, they provided 210 beds and were the cheapest forms of accommodation on campus. Continuing refurbishments were the order of the day and enabled the Guild to provide a value for money housing solution that proved to be a popular choice with students seeking accomodation on campus. The target of full occupancy was again reached in 2005. The real strength of Guild Housing has been through offering more than just a place to sleep and study. A comprehensive activities program was in place as well as a full social calendar for the resident. Unfortunately the land lease agreement ended in June 2006. Though the Guild sought to set up a new lease agreement, the University deemed it necessary to bring these complexes under their housing arm. The Curtin Student Guild protested that the strength of Guild Housing (which has been in providing accommodation with a difference) would get lost in the University’s structure. The University however saw no need to renegotiate – and in ending the Guild’s lease of the land, assumed ownership of the buildingss constructed thereon, ending of Guild Housing per 1 July 2006.

Curtin University Guild Child Care Centre The number of new staff who came into the centre to fill parenting leave places, brought about some changes to the orientation process, which will produce benefits long term. It is now more diversified and spread amongst several specialised senior staff. The inclusion of senior staff was a great success, they were very positive about this change. According to the Centre plan for the year, staff education for specific qualifications was promoted as much as possible. We had identified the need to ensure that all Carers who were not Certificated needed to move in that direction in anticipation of industrial and regulatory changes. Those staff who were seeking to move from certificate to Diploma level needed strong support as the centre

had identified the future staffing needs in light of anticipated staff changes and centre growth. A number of staff had professional development goals that direct them toward specialisation in different areas of early childhood education and care. These each had a broad plan, which was fine-tuned during the year. The promotional positions in the Centre were redefined and their position descriptions were modified in April. This gave more staff career opportunities within the Centre, and contributes greatly to our staff recruitment and retention strategies. 2005 was an Accreditation year. As the Centre was in the middle of a redevelopment of the philosophy and programming processes, this years Accreditation initiatives were more challenging than perhaps they have been in the past. However, the centre was very successful in this process and gained its highest score ever. The consultation group of interested staff regarding our programming system review decided to consult with an external specialist to assist with the updating of the developmental database that we use. This was a small expense but will saved many hours of work by staff. Our programming and portfolios for the children in 2006 will again be at the leading edge of children’s documentation in Perth. The new Finance Officer has redeveloped the finance document storage and has ensured better control of cash flow. Food costs rose earlier than had been anticipated due to increasing fuel costs. We are watched the Victorian wages case closely and participated in the negotiations for the WA wage case in September to December. More information is due in February 2006. The start of the year saw a series of successful parent meetings in-room with their Care teams. We have had strong positive feedback on this. Parents have given feedback on all aspects of centre life through our quality assurance program. For 2005 Child Care had a comprehensive series of professional practice plans. They worked steadily through these and are on track for a positive 2006 with the centre maintaining and improving its standards of care for the children and further developing its services to the campus community.

Guild Copy & Design Centre Prior to 1995, a small office called the Guild Front Office offered faxing, multiriders, postage stamps, book binding and ID card laminating, coin operated and over-thecounter copying, and guild administrative services. Between 1995 and 1996, when compulsory union membership was abolished, the Guild Front Office was closed and The Guild Copy & Design Centre (GC&DC) started with the inherited basic services. The rest is history and ten years later, GC&DC has expanded to include a variety of services and off the shelf products. The GC&DC offers, as much as possible, affordable and essential services/products for students so they can have the convenience of an on-campus print and retail shop. The outlet includes recreational products and services like the heat transfer products for personalised t-shirts, mugs, plaques and stubby holders, bearing in mind the social aspect of University students. Guild Management supports this outlet’s need to keep the equipment and services up-to-date in relation to fast growing trends in copy print finishing and technology. The latest upgrades included a high volume/ light production multi-function peripheral (Fuji Xerox DC 900), a perfect solution to the needs of a light production market oncampus. Added services included: fast blackand-white printouts (single and double sided); booklet (A5 or A4 finish) functions; convert documents to PDF formats for digital storage. Ever conscious of the students’ need for low cost but high quality colour prints for their assignments, we also purchased the Lanier LP 125cx desktop colour laser printer with low meter charges enabling us to offer this service at an economical price. The GC&DC’s popular service is the printing (colour/black-and-white), book binding and personalised heat transfer products (ranging from t-shirts, mugs, steins, plaques). The card operated book copiers are constantly used. Guild members are given a copy voucher ($10 for old cards or $8.50 for new cards), which is redeemed at the GC&DC. Prepaid phone cards, mobile recharge and start-up kits are hugely popular on-campus. Students are also beginning to appreciate the idea that they can scan their original documents to a PDF format and archive them on their flash drives. The continued growth of the Copy and

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7

Chapter As at 31 December 2005 General Secretary 2005 Alissa Sharples Design Centre operation has got to crisis point. The business could not be expanded effectively in 2005, as there is not enough space in the already crowded administration area. The area was beginning to create an Occupational Health and Safety Risk for the staff. GC&DC must relocate part of this service to ensure its future success. The only potential space that the Guild had available was the Megazone area. Over recent years this games room, complete with videoarcade-games and pool tables, has had a significant downturn in trade. This is directly related to the affordability of home gaming consoles such as X-Box and Playstation, as well as the consumer switch to LAN gaming centres. The recent closures of numerous Timezone centres are an example of this diminishing arcade games industry. Early in the second semester of 2006, the centre will be transferring the design aspect of the GC&DC into the Megazone complex. There will be a large production area that will allow for potential growth. The range of printing and design capabilities will be increased over the latter half of 2006. All these new services will be accessible from a small foyer shop front just off the Guild Courtyard. Currently the Copy and Design Centre offers a vast range of retail products however space constraints have not allowed to properly display all of these items. With this relocation of the printing services we will have greater ability to make these products accessible to the Curtin community.

the IT department of the Guild has its benefits due to the risk associated with securing data and the cost effectiveness in maintenance. The Guild IT-Department provides full support to the catering departments and staff using the specialised catering applications. These applications have significantly increased staff productivity in 2005 allowing catering staff to organise and coordinate function books easier. With the introduction of the new catering Till system that have been rolled out in almost all of the catering outlets, catering staff can view sales stats as they happen. This system also allows catering staff to make changes to pricing on the fly and add or remove products with ease. Part of the 2005 strategic planning was a redevelopment of the Guild Website. Which included a complete overhaul of the website not just only the look but all the features built into it. The focus was on a system that could be easy to use and update at the same time, this was accomplished by using a content management system (CMS), which allows any staff member with permission to contribute content on the web. This feature now allows information to be posted faster than before and Guild members now have access to Guild news and events information on the fly.

Looking past the end of your nose…

Some of the most prominent features of the new website include a Secondhand Bookshop search, Curtin Concept store CD catalogue search, a complete Clubs and Societies listing and a fast updated news section and events calendar.

At Curtin University, subtitled the University of Technology, it is necessary for the Guild to make sure that its services to students does mature and adapt with evolving technology and the computer and media related habits of out student market. In 2005, the IT department of the Guild felt the demand from it members to update, upgrade and upload.

Other features that will be rolled out in 2006 are, online shopping for Guild retail outlets, Guild member’s only section that will allow all registered guild members to receive extra benefits by using the web site. These features will include point’s schemes, new forums, and faster access of guild information, online booking Guild services and more.

The strategic planning for 2005 was to focus on the Guild IT infrastructure and how to support the Guild better with new technologies. The Guild IT-Department manages and maintains a total of six servers and 60plus workstations, which makes up the core infrastructure of the Guild’s IT support. With two full time staff members the Guild IT Department can provide a comprehensive support structure and in-depth future planning that complements the Guild’s overall strategic planning. The presence of

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The web site is a very important marketing tool used to distribute information to all students and also prospective students. According to web site traffic reports 46% of prospective International student that view the Curtin University website also view the Guilds Website. This indicates that students are generally concerned about what social aspects are available on Campus even before they even become Curtin student. The web site is also a form of information to all about the Guild, what it does, who are the current council members and how they can be contacted. - www.guild.curtin.edu.au -

2005

General Secretary 2006 Rebecca Higgie

The General Secretary When the 2006 General Secretary was aksed to describe her role at the Guild, she laughed. “The Gen Sec is the boring rep!”When Rebecca Higgie says the ‘boring’ rep, she means that the General Secretary is more involved with the administration side of the Guild. The General Secretary is responsible for the Rules and Regulations of the Guild, and ensuring that all the Student Representatives are abiding by them. The Rules and Regulations are the governing rules of the Guild, so they serve a vital role in the Guild and what it does. The General Secretary is also the ‘Student Rep of Finances;’ she makes sure that the Student Representatives are using their budgets correctly, slapping them on the hand if they overspend, or helping them if they are unsure what they can spend their budget on and how they can do it. “It’s all about student control of student money,” Rebecca says. This year, Higgie has focused on rewriting the Guild’s Rules and Regulations to ensure the Guild is ready for Voluntary Student Unionism (VSU). VSU will place the Guild in a radically different environment, and this ‘revamping,’ as Rebecca calls it, is being made so that the Rules and Regulations are more application to the new environment. “We need to make sure the Guild can function efficiently under VSU, so we can still supply students with all the vital services and representation that they need. We’re all working hard to do that, and this is just the part that I’m focusing on.” The 2005 General Secretary, Alissa Sharples, was passionate about ensuring the efficient and equitable expenditure of student funds. She saw an inequity in the distribution of money between sporting activities and artistic activities. She established a strong relationship with the John Curtin Gallery, and later proposed a $15,000 scholarship program for artistic students at Curtin. Guild Council accepted the program, and it is currently functioning in 2006, with grants of $2000 to each student or student group to create a set of works and then exhibit it. Students from all divisions are encouraged to apply for the grants, not just Art students.

Statement of Financial Performance

$

$

2,362,279

2,216,024

Receivables

436,240

282,964

Inventory

203,479

420,175

Other

110,623

25,885

Total Current Assets

3,112,621

2,945,048

Receivables

0

0

Property, Plant & Equipment (nett)

3664883

3755948

Total Non-Current Assets

3,664,883

3,755,948

Total Assets

6,777,504

6,700,996

Trade and other payables

579,098

515,677

Short -term borrowings

58,214

57,805

Short -term provisions

247,169

241,532

Total Current Liabilities

884,481

815,014

Long -term borrowings

38,348

38,348

Long -term provisions

115,631

44,571

Total Non-Current Liabilities

153,979

82,919

Total Liabilities

1,038,460

897,933

Nett Assets

5,739,044

5,803,063

Accumulated Surplus

5,739,044

5,618,063

Reserves

0

185,000

Total Guild Equity

5,739,044

5,803,063

Current Assets Cash

Non-Current Assets

Current Liabilities

Non-Current Liabilities

Guild Equity

Statement of Cash Flows Year ended 31 December 2005

With the work of her predecessor, and her own current work, Rebecca believes that the General Secretary isn’t really boring. “Being the person of admin and finance for the student reps is all about ensuring that the Guild functions financially for the benefit of all students at Curtin. And for me, writing Regulations, or going over budgets to make sure that happens, is pretty fun for me!”

2004

2005 $

Cash at Bank (at the beginning of the financial year)

2,216,024

plus Deposits

12,270,422

less Drawings

-12,124,167

Nett Cash Flow for Year Cash at Bank (at the end of the financial year)

146,255 2,362,279

23


Statement of Financial Performance Year Ended 31 December 2005

Operating Expense - Student Services 2005 2005

2004

$

$

Income from Sale of Goods

6,950,142

6,149,350

less Cost of Goods Sold

-3,275,806

-2,786,495

less Other Costs of Sales

-2,301,438

-2,559,682

Gross profit from Sales

1,372,898

803,173

plus Services Income (ASF)

2,462,531

2,172,114

less Cost of Services

-3,342,032

-3,189,925

plus Student Housing Rental Income

741,162

731,041

less Costs of Student Housing

-789,261

-778,755

plus Finance Income

127,774

100,768

plus Other Income

153,364

268,865

less Other Costs

-790,455

-385,742

Surplus / (Deficit) before Tax Expense

-64,019

-278,461

10. Other Student Support Costs $591,907 - 14%

1. Representation, Advocacy & Advisory $517,220 - 13% 2. Student Support (Student Assist) $226,804 - 5%

9. University ASF Admin Fee $142,588 - 3% 3. Membership Services $384,296 - 9% 8. Second Hand Bookshop $701,907- 18% 4. Student Discounts $293,001 - 7% 5. Student Publications $140,541 - 3%

Operating Expense 2005

Operating Revenue 2005 Amenities & Services Fee $2,457,874 - 23%

Student Council & NUS $148,515 - 1%

Guild Administration $641,940 - 6%

7. Student Housing $789,261- 20%

6. Sport & Recreation $343,768 - 8%

Student Services $4,131,293 - 39%

Interest Revenue $127,774 - 1%

Student Service Expenses – what does this actually pay for? See chart for further detail of student service expense

Gain on Asset Disposal $35,219 - 0.5%

1. Representation & Advocacy - these costs are directly associated with the running of the departments dealing with issues relating to disadvantaged and special interest equity groups (CUPSA, International Students Committee, Women, part-time & mature aged, Indigenous, Sexuality) and includes funding provided to Regional Centres and covers the cost of projects such as the ‘Excellence in Teaching Award’, the ‘Alternative Handbook’ and student surveys. 2. Student Support – covers costs for delivering welfare and grievance appeal support including the Guild’s Legal Assist service.

Sales Revenue $7,814,106 - 73.5%

Other $162,993 - 2%

Trading Services $5,577,244 - 54%

Details of Operating Expenses 2005 Student Services Representation, Advocacy & Advisory

$517,220

Student Support (Student Assist)

$226,804

Membership Services

$384,296

Student Discounts

$293,001

Student Publications

$140,541

Sport & Recreation

$343,768

Student Housing

$789,261

Second Hand Bookshop

$701,907

University ASF Admin Fee

$142,588

Other Student Support Costs

$591,907

sub-total Student Services

4. Student Discounts - this is the value of discounts claimed by students at Guild outlets. 5. Student Publications - costs of the producing student publications such as ‘Grok’ 6. Sport & Recreation – expenses include: a. Costs from ‘O’ Day and other orientation week activities and events b. Grants and sponsorship provided to clubs and societies. c. Costs associated with campus and intervarsity sports d. Costs associated with the Guild’s recreation and activities programme.

$4,131,293

7. Student Housing – these are the expenses of running the Guild House accommodation complex (which are mostly offset by rental income). 8. Second Hand Bookshop – represents the money paid back to students who have sold their books through the shop, as well as the costs of running this service (this cost is matched by income from the sales).

Trading Costs & Overheads Trading services

$5,577,244

Student Council & NUS

$148,515

Guild Administration

$641,940

9. ASF Admin Fee – while the University pays most of the ASF money it has collected to the Guild (so that we can pay for student services) they also charge the Guild the costs they incur in collecting this money.

sub-total Student Services

$6,367,699

Total Expenditure

$10,498,992

24

3. Membership Services - expenses in this category include: a. Student Accident Insurance b. Costs associated with running Guild membership stalls c. Student diary. d. Welcome pack which includes, carry bag, pen, pencil and other items.

10. Other Student Support Costs - this includes the cost of providing finance, administration, IT & C support services to the above areas as well as other infrastructure costs such as public liability and other insurance.

25


8

University Boards and Councils

Chapter Name

Position Held

Patrick Gorman

Council Governance Eligible to attend

Attended

Eligible

Attended

12

12

Patrick Gorman

16

16

Rikki Hendon

Education Vice President

12

12

Rikki Hendon

16

12

Katie McGregor

Activities Vice President

12

12

Katie McGregor

16

13

Jackie Teo (retired)

General Secretary

8

4

Esther Low

16

Alissa Sharples

General Secretary

4

4

Phillip Dundas Alissa Sharples

Executive Officers (voting)

Divisional Representatives (voting) Esther Low

Business

12

7

Kate Meenan

Engineering, Science and Computing

12

12

Holly Cameron

Health Sciences

12

8

Lana Colley (retired)

Resources and Environment

1

0

Reece Wheadon

Resources and Environment

10

10

Rebecca Higgie

Humanities

12

12

Guild Councillors (Voting) Grant Pusey (resigned)

8

4

Nigel Ngo Quo Ern

3

2

Yen Zhang Pang

3

2

Ruben Franke

12

10

12

11

Vilayvanh Phonepraseuth

11

5

Yeong Tat Weng

12

4

Alissa Sharples

8

4

Kevin Jarrett (removed)

3

1

Marcus Chew

12

8

Phillip Dundas

12

10

Department Officers (Voting) Tanya Vernon

CUPSA President

12

9

Tiffany Soh

ISC Convenor

12

8

Other Officers (non voting) Kristal Mihal

Immediate Past-President

12

0

Department Officers (non voting)

Humanities Information and Communication Technology Committee

Facilities Committee Fees and Charges Committee

Department of Media and Information Board of Study

Higher Education Support Act Implementation Steering Committee

Guild Membership Committee

Humanities Teaching and Learning Committee Humanities Ethics, Equity and Social Justice Committee

E-Services Committee

Guild President

Chair

Rebecca Higgie

Access and Parking Advisory Committee

Patrick Gorman

Jason Hall

Academic Board

Student Progress Committee

Information Communication Technology Strategic Planning and Policy Committee

Faculty of Education, Language Studies and Social Work Faculty Board

Information Plan Advisory Committee

Humanities International Committee

OASIS Steering Committee

Humanities Divisional Promotions Committee

9

Occupational Health and Safety Policy Committee

Humanities & EESJ Committee

16

7

Online Class Registration Project Committee

Media, Society and Culture Teaching and Learning Committee

16

5

Student Progress Committee University Prmotions Review Committee

Guild Access and Equity Board Eligible

Attended

Patrick Gorman

6

6

Rikki Hendon

6

6

Kris Thackray

5

5

Tanya Vernon

6

6

Marcus Chew

6

2

Tiffany Soh

6

4

Paul Marter (retired)

2

0

Laura Stevens

6

3

Rebecca Sprylan

4

2

University Council University Strategic Plan Working Party

Rikki Hendon

Academic Board

Ruben Franke

Jason Hall

Vilayvanh Phonepraseuth

University Teaching and Learning Committee

Katie McGregor

4

1

Student Progress Committee

1

1

Curtin Environment Awareness Team

Yvonne Frewen

4

0

Jackie Teo (resigned)

Esther Low

Yeong Tat Weng

Alissa Sharples

Attended

Patrick Gorman (Chair)

7

6

Holly Cameron

7

1

Esther Low

7

7

CBS Scholarship and Prize Administration Committee

Rebecca Higgie

7

7

CBS Promotion Committee

Kate Meenan (minute taker)

7

5

CBS Teaching and Learning Committee

Reece Wheadon

7

Student Progress Committee

John Curtin Gallery Advisory Board Artist in Residence Committee

Marcus Chew

CBS Courses Committee

Kate Meenan

Cultural Projects Committee Curtin Environment Committee

CBS Board

Eligible

Curtin Radio Advisory Board Bookshop Advisory Committee

Kevin Jarrett (removed)

Alissa Sharples

Ethics, Equity and Social Justice Library and Information Service Advisory Committee

Curtin Activities Team

Yen Zhang Pang

Health Service Advisory Committee Occupational Health and Safety Representatives Committee

Student Progress Committee

Student Evaluation of Learning and Teaching Steering Committee

University Development Board Human Research Ethics Committee

Admissions and Matriculations Committee

Courses Committee

Health Service Advisory Committee Healthy Lifestyle Management Committee

Library and Information Services Committee

Liam McDermott

Guild Education Board

Grant Pusey (resigned)

Ethics, Equity and Social Justice University Ethics Committee

Phillip Dundas

Curtin Environment Committee Hazardous Chemicals Committee

Tanya Vernon

Student Progress Committee Academic Board

7

Engineering, Science and Computing Divisional Board

Fees and Charges Committee

Patricia Ryder (acting) (removed)

Indigenous Department

2

0

Rikki Hendon

7

5

Student Progress Committee

University Council

Yvonne Frewen

Indigenous Department

7

0

Ruben Franke

7

1

Engineering, Science and Computing Promotions Committee

University Research and Development Committee

Paul Marter (removed)

Part Time and Mature Age Department

3

0

Tanya Vernon

7

3

Rebekah Sprlyan

Part Time and Mature Age Department

7

2

Chia Hui Lin

5

4

Kris Thackray (resigned)

Queer Department

7

3

Liam McDermott

Queer Department

4

4

Laura Stevens

Women’s Department

11

10

Guild Legal Committee

Guild Activities Committee

Engineering, Science and Computing Teaching and Learning Committee

Eligible

Attended

Science Faculty Board

Patrick Gorman (Chair)

3

3

Department of Mechanical Engineering Staff Student Liaison Committee

Jacky Teo

3

2

Holly Cameron

Health Sciences Divisional Academic Board

Attended

Yeong Tat Weng

3

2

Student Progress Committee

Patrick Gorman

8

7

Jie Tang

3

3

Health Sciences Teaching and Learning Committee

3

Katie McGregor

8

8

Grant Pusey

3

1

3

3

Rebecca Higgie

8

8

Matthew Ho

3

2

Nicole Davey

3

1

Grant Pusey

7

3

Jane Gibson

3

2

Resources and Environment Teaching and Learning Committee

Emma Davies

3

2

Kate Meenan

8

5

3

2

Student Progress Committee

Marcus Chew

8

5

Micky Phoneprasueth

Attended

Jason Hall

3

3

Patrick Gorman

3

Jackie Teo

26

Student Progress Committee

ESC Divisional Board of Study

Guild Finance and Planning Board

Eligible

Eligible

Tiffany Soh

Physiotherapy Advisory Committee Reece Wheadon

27


Curtin Student Guild, Curtin University of Technology Bentley WA 6102 TELEPHONE: (08) 9266 2900 FACSIMILE: (08) 9266 2996 EMAIL: reception@guild.curtin.edu.au

www.guild.curtin.edu.au

28

2005 curtin Student Guild Annual Report  

The Annual Report of the Curtin Student Guild 2005

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