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Serving Communities in Northwest Washington Since 1967

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Vol. XLVI, No. 9

The Northwest Current

Spring Valley family seeks relocation

I ’ L L F LY AW AY

By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

A Spring Valley family is filing a last-ditch petition for relocation before the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers excavates for toxic chemicals on a property directly across from their Glenbrook Road home — in a neighborhood where chemical weapons were tested during World War I, and quietly buried after the war was over. The couple, Rogerio Zandamela and Christine Dieterich, have repeatedly asked the Army to relocate their two children before major excavation begins this spring. Now, after a final rejection last week, they are petitioning the regional administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, which has authority to order the relocation on the basis of health and safety. The petition cites “imminent and substantial endangerment” to the children — one 22 months old, the other 5 years old — once excavation begins “less than 15 yards See Glenbrook/Page 18

Bill Petros/The Current

The Army believes there are munitions buried at 4825 Glenbrook Road. Residents across the street want to be relocated during excavation work.

Graham draws reprimand over contract ■ Council: Ward 1 legislator

loses oversight of ABC issues By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

Bill Petros/The Current

The Sidwell Friends Dance Ensemble presented a program Sunday at the Atlas Performing Arts Center as part of the fourth annual Intersections Festival. The performers set out to define through dance what the word “home” means to them.

In a dramatic dressing-down of one of its own, the D.C. Council Monday reprimanded Ward 1 member Jim Graham for allegedly interfering in contract negotiations, then stripped Graham of his longtime

oversight of the city’s alcohol beverage control system. On an 11-2 vote, the council agreed that in a 2008 incident, Graham showed “a complete lack of impartiality” and undermined the public’s confidence in integrity of the District government. In that case, Graham allegedly hinted that he would support a contractor’s bid to run the lucrative D.C. lottery if the same contractor, Warren Williams, dropped out of contention

for a Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority land development project. At-large member Vincent Orange, who chairs the Committee on Business, Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, will take over oversight of city alcoholic beverage regulation. Chairman Phil Mendelson, chief sponsor of the measure, was both somber and eloquent in explaining See Graham/Page 10

Liquor sales on Sunday prompt license requests

Local principals coordinate to ease transition to Wilson

By DEIRDRE BANNON

■ Schools: ‘Feeder pyramid’

Current Staff Writer

A new alcohol rule allowing liquor stores to open on Sundays has left more retailers looking to add liquor to their beer and wine sales. In Northwest, two such applications are in the pipeline: Trader Joe’s at 1101 25th St. in the West End, and Tenley Mini Market at 4326 Wisconsin Ave. near American University. When the D.C. Council passed the omnibus alcohol bill in December, it contained the new provision allowing liquor stores to open on Sundays — just as retailers selling beer and wine are allowed to do. That change has prompted an increase in applications from establishments seeking “Class A” licenses that allow sales of liquor in addition to beer and wine, according to

NEWS

aims to boost students’ skills

Bill Petros/The Current

Tenley Mini Market is seeking to add liquor in the wake of a new city law that allows Sunday sales.

Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Administration spokesperson William Hager. There are some parameters for operating a liquor store. First, there are a limited number of Class A licenses available for off-premises consumption — 215 are active now throughout the city, and another 35 could be issued. Such establishments can’t be within 400 feet of a See Licenses/Page 7

SPOR TS

Chevy Chase ANC pushes for shared driveway at corner — Page 3

St. John’s girls win WCAC crown over rival Good Counsel — Page 11

By DEIRDRE BANNON Current Staff Writer

Inside a trailer classroom at Lafayette Elementary School Monday morning, a group of D.C. Public Schools principals gathered over coffee to talk shop as part of the “Wilson feeder pyramid.” Wilson High School principal Peter Cahall came up with the idea to bring together the principals from all 14 elementary and middle schools

that ultimately feed into Wilson to open the lines of communication between the schools and to enhance student readiness. “One of our values as a group is to come up with a strategy on how to prepare our kids for Wilson and beyond,” said Hyde-Addison Elementary School principal Dana Nerenberg, “and what we want our kids to get in a vertical way, as well as how we can help apply that vertical thinking across the entire school system.” It’s the first group of its kind created within D.C. Public Schools. See Wilson/Page 16

INDEX

NEWS

Cleveland Park gym hosts photo exhibit on senior athletes — Page 5

Calendar/20 Classifieds/29 District Digest/4 Exhibits/23 In Your Neighborhood/19 Opinion/8

Police Report/6 Real Estate/17 School Dispatches/15 Service Directory/26 Sports/11 Theater/23

Tips? Contact us at newsdesk@currentnewspapers.com


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The Current

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Settles removed from ballot in at-large special election, but Zukerberg stays Current Staff Report In the aftermath of recent petition challenges, John Settles has been deemed ineligible as a candidate for the at-large D.C. Council race, while Paul Zukerberg will remain on the April 23 special election ballot. The D.C. Board of Elections requires candidates to collect 3,000 signatures from registered voters.

The board ruled Monday that Zukerberg met that rule — with exactly 3,000 — but Settles didn’t. Both candidates have criticized the election board for database problems and other issues that complicate verification of registered voters, which the board vehemently denied. A statement from Zukerberg described how his campaign proved

the validity of contested signatures by hand-matching them to voters who had changed their addresses. Settles this week also criticized the elections board for “faulty data” and procedures that “disenfranchise homeless individuals, seniors, low income individuals and minorities.” In a statement, Settles said his campaign “collected well over the

required number” of signatures, but more than 675 were contested. Settles, who lives in Logan Circle, left his position as branch manager of a Wells Fargo Home Mortgage to dedicate himself to his campaign. The challenges to both Settles’ and Zukerberg’s ballot petitions came from a supporter of at-large

candidate Elissa Silverman, a former reporter and DC Fiscal Policy Institute staffer. The heated at-large council race now includes seven candidates total. Zukerberg, a sole practitioner attorney who lives in Adams Morgan, has vowed to explore how his own case might help Settles get back on the ballot.

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The CurrenT

ANC seeks shared driveway on Aberfoyle By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

Where Aberfoyle Place makes a 90-degree turn to become 31st Street in Barnaby Woods, two driveways sit just a few feet apart on opposite sides of a storm drain, on the outside of the corner’s L. But the new owner of a vacant lot right at the corner, 3033 Aberfoyle, intends to build a new house there for his family. He’s seeking a third curb cut for the corner — between the other two, and directly atop the storm drain. The Chevy Chase advisory neighborhood commission on Monday grappled with the balance between overloading the blind turn and protecting the rights of landowners to access their properties. Kaveh Shirazi, who recently purchased 3033, said he doesn’t want a third driveway at the corner, either. He wants the owner of neighboring 3045 Aberfoyle to connect their driveways and share the existing curb cut. That owner, developer Mohammed Sikder, said no. “We think the only sensible option and viable option is a shared driveway,� one neighbor said. Commissioners ultimately voted not to object to the curb cut application under the conditions that drainage isn’t affected (plans call for a

grate to connect water to the storm sewer), that there be no impact on traffic or safety, and that Shirazi continue working with Sikder toward sharing a curb cut. Residents interested in a shared driveway do have some leverage: The public space permit granting a curb cut is revoked when a property

â??I don’t want the outcome to be three driveways.â?ž — Gary Thompson is razed or even substantially altered, requiring a fresh approval. Sikder, who has done several recent teardown projects in Northwest, said he intends to demolish and replace 3045 Aberfoyle. The commission rejected a proposal by commissioner Gary Thompson, whose single-member district includes the property, to deny a public space permit to 3045 Aberfoyle if Sikder continues to oppose a shared driveway. But Thompson said the incident will nonetheless be fresh in the mind of neighborhood commissioners and the Public Space Committee — the D.C. Department of Transportation

panel with authority over curb cuts — when Sikder comes before them with his own application. “I don’t want the outcome to be three driveways,â€? Thompson said. Indicating Shirazi and Sikder, he said, “Either you’re going to get a driveway or you’re going to get a driveway, but not both. ‌ What goes around comes around.â€? Several of Thompson’s colleagues balked at his idea, which commissioner Randy Speck called “Solomonic.â€? Though he encouraged the two property owners to collaborate, Speck said that “if both of you have buildable lots, you both have a right to have access.â€? Another option, Thompson said, would be requiring Sikder to relocate his driveway farther from the corner when he seeks a renewed public space permit, if he doesn’t go along with the shared driveway. “The idea of there being three driveways around there is I think the worst possible solution for that neighborhood,â€? Thompson said. The 3033 Aberfoyle property has a narrow strip connecting it to the street, and widens out as the land slopes downhill toward a stream below. Shirazi is planning a fourlevel house — with two levels above the street level — that will be built on stilts, according to Thompson.

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Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The week ahead Wednesday, Feb. 27

The Transportation Plan Advisory Committee — convened by the D.C. Department of Transportation as part of the moveDC planning process — will meet from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Reeves Center, 2000 14th St. NW.

Thursday, Feb. 28

The D.C. Alcoholic Beverage Control Board will hold a public hearing on a proposed definition of a full-service grocery store. The hearing will be held from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. in the Board Hearing Room, 4th Floor South, 2000 14th St. NW. ■ The Ward 3 Democratic Committee will hold a forum for candidates running for an at-large D.C. Council seat in the April 23 special election. The forum will begin at 7:30 p.m. at St. Columba’s Episcopal Church, 4201 Albemarle St. NW.

Saturday, March 2

Politics and Prose will sponsor a Wilson High School book fair. The Wilson Parent Teacher Student Association will receive 20 percent of revenue from all book fair purchases Saturday and Sunday at the store, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. Patrons may also donate items to the school library and classrooms. â–  The West End Citizens Association will hold a membership meeting, which will feature presentations by Darrin Sobin, director of government ethics for the new D.C. Board of Ethics and Government Accountability, and Robin McElhenny-Smith, manager of station area planning for the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. The meeting will begin at 2 p.m. at the Hotel Lombardy, 2019 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.

Monday, March 4

The Tenleytown Neighbors Association will meet at 7 p.m. in Room 220, St. Columba’s Episcopal Church, 4201 Albemarle St. NW. Lon Anderson from AAA Mid-Atlantic will speak.

Tuesday, March 5

The Palisades Citizens Association will hold its monthly meeting, which will feature an update on the Palisades Village’s aging-in-place programs and activities. Speakers will include Palisades Village executive director Peggy Newman and president Phil Potter. The meeting will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the Palisades Recreation Center, Sherier and Dana places NW.

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The Current

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District Digest Woman charged in two bank robberies

A Northwest woman has been arrested and charged in connection with two Feb. 4 bank robberies, the Metropolitan Police Department announced Friday. Mercedes Idalia Romero, 36, allegedly demanded money from PNC Bank in the 4200 block of Wisconsin Avenue at 9:13 a.m. and Bank of America in the 3400 block of Connecticut Avenue 16 minutes later, according to a news release from the department. The suspect did not display a weapon and

The Current

Delivered weekly to homes and businesses in Northwest Washington Publisher & Editor Davis Kennedy Managing Editor Chris Kain Assistant Managing Editor Beth Cope Advertising Director Gary Socha Account Executive Shani Madden Account Executive Richa Marwah Account Executive George Steinbraker Advertising Standards

Advertising published in The Current Newspapers is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services as offered are accurately described and are available to customers at the advertised price. Advertising that does not conform to these standards, or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any Current Newspapers reader encounters non-compliance with these standards, we ask that you inform us. All advertising and editorial matter is fully protected and may not be reproduced in any manner without permission from the publisher. Subscription by mail â&#x20AC;&#x201D; $52 per year

Telephone: 202-244-7223 E-mail Address

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received an undisclosed amount of money, police said.

Revenue projection rises by $190 million

The Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s projected revenue for the 2013 fiscal year is up $190 million, to $6.06 billion, according to a Friday letter from the Office of the Chief Financial Officer. Estimates for the 2013 through 2016 fiscal years are in total up nearly $745 million compared to the most recent prior projection. Economic growth is expected to continue, despite the expected federal sequester; even counting the newly projected increases, the growth rate is lower than it had been in some recent years, the letter states. According to the letter, economic growth has come largely from a burgeoning population that has boosted income tax revenues and raised property values.

LaBelle to perform at Ellington fundraiser

Award-winning performer Patti LaBelle will headline a benefit concert for the Duke Ellington School of the Arts next month, as part of the magnet schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Performance Series of Legends.â&#x20AC;? The concert, which will include performances by Ellington students, is scheduled to take place March 25 at 7:30 p.m. in the Kennedy Center Concert Hall. The Legends concert series, which the Ellington school launched in 2008, has raised more than $2 million for its arts curriculum, according to a news release from the school.

Tickets for LaBelleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance range in price from $50 to $500 for a VIP package, and are available at kennedy-center.org. Other sponsorship opportunities are available through The Ellington Fund, at info@ellingtonarts.org.

AU names new dorm for donor Cassell

American University will name its newest dormitory Cassell Hall in honor of a $3 million gift from trustee and 1977 graduate Jack Cassell and his family, according to a university news release. The building is now under construction behind the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office Building near Massachusetts Avenue. The eight-story building will accommodate 360 students in suite-style rooms, and it will include an 8,000-square-foot fitness center. The Cassellsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; gift, which will support the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Department of Athletics and Recreation as well as the dormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s construction, is the first naming gift for a residence hall at the university, according to the release. The new building, however, is not the first on campus to bear the familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name. The multipurpose Cassell Center â&#x20AC;&#x201D; named for Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father, Stafford H. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Popâ&#x20AC;? Cassell â&#x20AC;&#x201D; previously occupied the site of the Katzen Art Center. The universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball court is also named for the elder Cassell, who was a longtime coach, athletic director and vice president at the university.

Corrections

As a matter of policy, The Current corrects all errors of substance. To report an error, call the managing editor at 202-567-2011.

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The Current Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Cleveland Park gym spotlights senior athletes in photo display By ALIX PIANIN Current Staff Writer

A new photography exhibit at Cleveland Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s City Fitness Gym shines a light on athletes who have come into their own in their golden years and draws attention to new senior initiatives in the community launching this spring. A collection of photographs featuring older athletes participating in highly competitive track and field events drew a small crowd to the fitness center Saturday night, where British photographer Alex Rotas displayed a collection of 16 portraits she completed at the 2012 European Veterans Athletics Championships. The exhibit dovetailed with the gymâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s long-standing efforts to appeal to older members of the neighborhood, as well as the upcoming launch of the Cleveland Park Village for residents wishing to â&#x20AC;&#x153;age in placeâ&#x20AC;? in their own homes. Since taking over the City Fitness Gym in 1996, co-owners Lucinda LaRee and Dega Schembri have expanded the senior population there by offering early morning and midday classes such as yoga and body sculpting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all of which are typically fully booked. Participants are usually nearby residents in their 60s, 70s and 80s, Schembri said. City Fitness also created a daytime membership pass, which offers discounted rates for those who choose to use the gym on weekdays between 6 a.m. and 6 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They felt comfortable in this setting,â&#x20AC;? Schembri said, adding that she sees â&#x20AC;&#x153;a lot of potentialâ&#x20AC;? for fitness work with aging neighbors and future Cleveland Park Village members. Cleveland Park Village board member Minturn Wright was on hand at the exhibition opening to discuss the options and goals of the

future aging-in-place village, part of his ongoing outreach to encourage older citizens to join and interested neighbors to volunteer at the organization. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the big things that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve found is the people most in need of village services are the ones less likely to hear about them,â&#x20AC;? he said. The nationwide aging-in-place village movement got its start in Boston, but Washington provides a special market for this type of organization, Wright said. In D.C., he noted, â&#x20AC;&#x153;a whole lot of people are from somewhere else. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have family that you can just call up and ask your nephew to come over and cut down that tree, or something like that. â&#x20AC;Ś Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tremendous market for the village movement here.â&#x20AC;? The Cleveland Park Village board is currently exploring ways to provide seniors with rides to social events and medical appointments, as well as services that would provide snow and leaf shoveling, and computer setup and assistance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They are all designed to enable people who are getting up in years to stay where they want, because poll after poll has shown â&#x20AC;&#x201D; particularly in this neighborhood â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that people want to stay in their homes,â&#x20AC;? Wright said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to leave simply because they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t change the light bulbs or rake the leaves.â&#x20AC;? The board is interviewing possible executive directors, with a decision likely in March, and is aiming to launch the village in April. While City Fitness does not have a formal relationship with the Cleveland Park Village, the gym hosted a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet and Greetâ&#x20AC;? for interested neighbors with representatives of the village last week. Around 50 people attended â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a number of whom already belonged to the gym, See Seniors/Page 16

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The Current

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Police Report This is a listing of reports taken from Feb. 17 through 24 in local police service areas.

PSA PSA 101 101

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■ DOWNTOWN

Theft ($250 plus) ■ 1300 block, New York Ave.; 11 a.m. Feb. 19. ■ 1200 block, Pennsylvania Ave.; 1:44 p.m. Feb. 20. Theft (below $250) ■ 13th and F streets; 5:20 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 1300 block, F St.; 1:30 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ 800 block, 14th St.; 1 p.m. Feb. 21. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1200 block, K St.; 12:01 a.m. Feb. 19. BUILD Also Providing Complete Design/Build Services

PSA 102

■ GALLERY PLACE PSA 102

PENN QUARTER

Robbery (attempt) ■ 6th and F streets; 9:45 p.m. Feb. 22. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 600 block, F St.; 9:20 p.m. Feb. 20. Theft (below $250) ■ 1000 block, 5th St.; 11:10 a.m. Feb. 20. ■ 700 block, D St.; 2 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ 800 block, 9th St.; 7:25 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 800 block, H St.; 9:20 a.m. Feb. 22. ■ 700 block, H St.; 12:30 p.m. Feb. 23. Theft (bicycle) ■ 800 block, E St.; 3 p.m. Feb. 17. Theft (shoplifting) ■ 800 block, 7th St.; 3:08 p.m. Feb. 19.

PSA PSA 201

201

■ CHEVY CHASE

Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 3500 block, McKinley St.; noon Feb. 21. ■ 3300 block, Legation St.; 8 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 5500 block, Broad Branch Road; 10:05 a.m. Feb. 22.

PSA 202

■ FRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS PSA 202

TENLEYTOWN / AU PARK

Theft (below $250) ■ 5300 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 3:30 p.m. Feb. 24. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 5300 block, 43rd St.; 8:30 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 4300 block, Harrison St.; 10:10 p.m. Feb. 19.

PSA 203

■ FOREST HILLS / VAN NESS PSA 203

CLEVELAND PARK

Theft ($250 plus) ■ 3000 block, Veazey Terrace; 9:17 a.m. Feb. 19. Theft (below $250) ■ 36th and Ellicott streets; 9 p.m. Feb. 17. ■ 3500 block, Connecticut Ave.; 11:55 a.m. Feb. 20.

Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 4800 block, 36th St.; 7 p.m. Feb. 17. ■ 3600 block, Everett St.; 9 p.m. Feb. 17. ■ 3500 block, Davenport St.; 12:59 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 3600 block, Connecticut Ave.; 10 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ Connecticut Avenue and Rodman Street; 5 p.m. Feb. 22.

PSA 204

■ MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE

HEIGHTS / CLEVELAND PARK WOODLEY PSA 204 PARK / GLOVER PARK / CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS

Theft (below $250) ■ 3600 block, Woodley Road; 5 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 3000 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 10:52 a.m. Feb. 23. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 3800 block, Porter St.; 3:30 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ 39th and Porter streets; 6 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 38th and Porter streets; 7 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 3800 block, Porter St.; 7 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 3600 block, 39th St.; 8 a.m. Feb. 22. ■ 3600 block, 39th St.; 5 p.m. Feb. 22.

PSA 205

■ PALISADES / SPRING VALLEY PSA 205

WESLEY HEIGHTS / FOXHALL

Burglary ■ 1900 block, 47th St.; noon Feb. 20. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 3600 block, 49th St.: 3:45 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 2100 block, Dunmore Lane; 10:06 a.m. Feb. 20. ■ 4400 block, Lowell St.; 8:43 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ Sedgwick and Tilden streets; 12:21 a.m. Feb. 22.

PSA PSA 206 206

■ GEORGETOWN / BURLEITH

Theft (below $250) ■ 3200 block, M St.; noon Feb. 19. ■ 3000 block, M St.; 4:21 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 1200 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 7:35 p.m. Feb. 22.

PSA PSA 207 207

■ FOGGY BOTTOM / WEST END

Robbery (purse snatch) ■ 800 block, New Hampshire Ave.; 3:53 p.m. Feb. 24. Assault with a dangerous weapon (miscellaneous) ■ 1100 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:10 p.m. Feb. 20. Burglary ■ 1600 block, K St.; 10:31 a.m. Feb. 18. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 1900 block, Pennsylvania Ave.; 9:56 a.m. Feb. 19. ■ 1000 block, Connecticut Ave.; 6:08 p.m. Feb. 22. Theft (below $250) ■ 1400 block, I St.; 1:10 a.m. Feb. 18.

■ 1100 block, 15th St.; 8:50 a.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1100 block, 17th St.; 9:44 a.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1000 block, Connecticut Ave.; 11 a.m. Feb. 18. ■ 2200 block, I St.; 9:37 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 1100 block, Connecticut Ave.; 10:30 a.m. Feb. 20. ■ 2000 block, L St.; 2:34 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ 2000 block, M St.; 5:08 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 1200 block, 24th St.; 6:15 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 1800 block, K St.; 1:50 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1600 block, L St.; 8:56 a.m. Feb. 23. ■ 1000 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:30 p.m. Feb. 23. Theft (bicycle) ■ 22nd and I streets; noon Feb. 18. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 26th and L streets; 2 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1900 block, K St.; 4:404 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 2600 block, L St.; 5 p.m. Feb. 23. ■ 2600 block, L St.; 7:45 p.m. Feb. 23.

PSA 208

■ SHERIDAN-KALORAMA PSA 208

DUPONT CIRCLE

Burglary ■ 1500 block, 17th St.; 9:38 p.m. Feb. 23. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 1600 block, Connecticut Ave.; 10:35 a.m. Feb. 21. ■ 1200 block, 18th St.; 1:35 p.m. Feb. 23. Theft (below $250) ■ 1200 block, New Hampshire Ave.; 6:45 a.m. Feb. 20. ■ 1700 block, N St.; 11:29 p.m. Feb. 20. ■ 1300 block, Connecticut Ave.; 3 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1600 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:30 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1600 block, Connecticut Ave.; 9:27 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1200 block, 18th St.; 11:30 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1800 block, Connecticut Ave.; 1:46 a.m. Feb. 24. Theft from auto ($250 plus) ■ 1800 block, N St.; 4 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1400 block, Massachusetts Ave.; 2:04 a.m. Feb. 24. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1800 block, N St.; 4 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 16th and O streets, 5:30 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1300 block, 14th St.; 4:22 a.m. Feb. 19. ■ 16th and O streets; 10:18 p.m. Feb. 23.

PSA PSA 301 301

■ DUPONT CIRCLE

Burglary ■ 1700 block, R St.; 8:45 a.m. Feb. 21. Stolen auto ■ 1600 block, 14th St.; 12:01 a.m. Feb. 22. Theft (below $250)

■ 1600 block, 14th St.; 9:20 p.m. Feb. 22. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1700 block, 16th St.; 10 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1400 block, T St.; 12:30 a.m. Feb. 23. ■ 1700 block, T St.; 3:13 p.m. Feb. 23. ■ 16th and S streets; 10:55 a.m. Feb. 24.

PSA PSA 303 303

■ ADAMS MORGAN

Robbery (force and violence) ■ 2800 block, Adams Mill Road; 9:55 p.m. Feb. 23. Burglary ■ 1700 block, Columbia Road; 10:44 a.m. Feb. 23. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 1800 block, Clydesdale Place; 2:25 p.m. Feb. 24. Theft (below $250) ■ 1700 block, Columbia Road; 2:50 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 2200 block, Champlain St.; 3:37 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 2400 block, 18th St.; 12:56 a.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1800 block, Connecticut Ave.; 5:30 a.m. Feb. 22. ■ 2400 block, 18th St.; 1:30 a.m. Feb. 23. Theft (bicycle) ■ 18th Street and Columbia Road; 8 p.m. Feb. 21. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1600 block, Belmont St.; 5 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 2800 block, Ontario Road; 7 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ Kalorama and Ontario roads; 11 p.m. Feb. 19. ■ 1800 block, California St.; 1:25 a.m. Feb. 20. ■ 1900 block, Belmont Road; 2 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ 1600 block, Crescent Place; 1:44 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1600 block, Euclid St.; 6:15 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1900 block, Kalorama Road; 9 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 2100 block, Connecticut Ave.; 7 p.m. Feb. 23.

PSA PSA 307 307

■ LOGAN CIRCLE

Assault with a dangerous weapon (miscellaneous) ■ 1200 block, 10th St.; 10:09 p.m. Feb. 23. Stolen auto ■ 1500 block, 10th St.; 9:30 p.m. Feb. 20. Theft (below $250) ■ 1300 block, 14th St.; 10:33 a.m. Feb. 21. Theft from auto ($250 plus) ■ 900 block, L St.; 4 p.m. Feb. 17. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 900 block, M St.; 2:37 a.m. Feb. 18. ■ 1100 block, 13th St.; 11 p.m. Feb. 18. ■ 900 block, L St.; 6:30 p.m. Feb. 21. ■ Kingman Place and Q Street; 11 p.m. Feb. 22. ■ 1500 block, Kingman Place; 7:27 p.m. Feb. 23. ■ 1700 block, 11th St.; 10:15 p.m. Feb. 23.


The Current Wednesday, February 27, 2013

7

LICENSES: ABC reform bill prompts some beer and wine stores to seek to add liquor

From Page 1

school or city recreation area; nor can they be within 400 feet of another liquor store. Annual license fees also double from $1,300 to $2,600 with the conversion of the Class B license for beer and wine sales into a Class A to add spirits. Though there have been recent debates over other license changes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as whether stores like CVS and Walgreens should qualify to sell beer and wine under the exception for â&#x20AC;&#x153;full-service grocery storesâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the Class B to Class A changes have no far not proved controversial. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personally Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be supportive so long as the applicant has a responsible track record currently (e.g., no underage issues), the plans donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take away from providing critical groceries and any other issues are addressed appropriately for the direct neighbors (e.g., loading hours etc.),â&#x20AC;? West End neighborhood commissioner Rebecca Coder wrote in an email to The Current. The Trader Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s corporate office didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t respond to questions about why it wanted to expand its offerings to include spirits. The owner of Tenley Mini Market wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t available for an interview before The Currentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s deadline, but an employee at the market said the ability to sell liquor on Sundays prompted the owner to apply for a change in the license. But itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all rosy for market owners who decide to expand their inventory to include liquor sales. William Kim, who has owned Mac Market at 5185 MacArthur Blvd. in the Palisades for eight years, decided to apply for a change in his license from Class B to Class A this past summer when Town Square Market just up the street was in jeopardy of losing its license after the owner was found guilty of selling alcohol to minors. Kim was granted the new license and started selling liquor in July, and in early February he was given permission to stay open on Sundays. But so far Kim says the new prod-

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ucts and new hours of operation havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t translated into profit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was a business decision to sell liquor,â&#x20AC;? Kim said in an interview. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If Town Square was closed, then residents in the neighborhood wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a liquor store to go to; there would be a void in the neighborhood.â&#x20AC;? Kim hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t seen results yet,

though. The product is expensive and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a very small profit margin â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sometimes as low as $1 on a $25 bottle of vodka, he said. Foot traffic on Sundays so far hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t drummed up enough business to make it worth his while; additionally, until this month, the license conversion meant the store could not sell beer and wine on Sundays.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s unlikely that retailers such as CVS or Walgreenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s would apply for a Class A license to get around obstacles in obtaining a Class B license. According to D.C. alcohol regulations, if a chain store is granted a license to sell liquor, it could do so only in one of its locations, and it would have to give up any other liquor licenses it might have, includ-

ing all Class B licenses. Restaurants and bars are also unlikely to be impacted by Sunday liquor store sales, according to Andrew Kline, representative of the Restaurant Association Metropolitan Washington. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a completely different business model,â&#x20AC;? Kline said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Restaurants and bars are providing customers with an experience.â&#x20AC;?


8

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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The Northwest

Current

Davis Kennedy/Publisher & Editor Chris Kain/Managing Editor

Moving deliberately

During the D.C. Council’s session this week to reprimand Ward 1 member Jim Graham for inappropriate conduct, only one of his colleagues criticized the resolution — in fact, even Mr. Graham himself did not speak out initially. His only comments came after the vote, when the council was considering stripping him of oversight duties over alcoholic beverage control. In the days leading up the meeting, Mr. Graham had said he wanted a hearing and investigation before the council acted. He ultimately decided otherwise, he said from the dais, after being told that his colleagues would act Monday on the reprimand even if they were to set up a special committee to look into the matter. He opted to avoid the “double whammy,” he said. It’s hard to argue with the case laid out in the nine-page resolution introduced by Chairman Phil Mendelson and adopted on an 11-2 vote. In 2008, Mr. Graham involved himself in a contractor’s bid to run the D.C. lottery, pushing the contractor — a longtime political foe — to drop out of a land development project with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, upon whose board Mr. Graham then served. Whether that was a quid pro quo for support on the lottery contract is disputed, but even Mr. Graham’s account does not vindicate him from the behind-the-scenes wrangling that besmirched the council. The appearance of impropriety is clear. Ward 8’s Marion Barry — himself the subject of a censure a few years ago — alone argued against voting on the reprimand, arguing that the council would be depriving Mr. Graham of due process. But it’s important to note that the council was not conducting a criminal proceeding; it was acting to protect confidence in the council as an institution. As Mr. Barry noted, members were making a political decision, not rendering a legal verdict. That said, we believe the reprimand process should have included a hearing. It would have given Mr. Graham a chance to face his accusers and lay out his case, and it also would have allowed the public an opportunity to better understand the complex allegations. There are three written reports examining the matter, but that does not obviate the value of a public airing. Sad to say, it’s quite possible that the council will need to consider a resolution of reprimand in the future. Now is the time to alter procedures to require a public hearing. Though protecting the rights of the accused is certainly one reason to do so, an equally compelling consideration is protecting the public interest. A hearing might show the reprimand to be undeserved, but it might also show it to be inadequate. In such a well-publicized, thoroughly investigated case, “moving on” — as Mr. Graham and others want to do — is not equivalent to sweeping the matter under the rug. Depending on the circumstances, that might not always be the case. The requirement for a public hearing could prevent future officeholders from seeking to close the book too early on a colleague’s missteps.

Smoke-free playgrounds

Some six years after D.C. expanded its workplace smoking ban, the sights and smells of smoked-filled bars and taverns grow increasingly remote. Indeed, it’s hard to recall why there was so much fuss about the idea of banning smoking in bars — or restaurants, or airplanes, or movie theaters. Two newly introduced D.C. Council bills would add new prohibitions — this time outdoors, within 25 feet of a playground or play area. The science as to the health effects of secondhand smoke outdoors is certainly not settled, but we don’t see that as a reason to hold back given the bills’ tight focus on areas set aside for children. Play areas ought to be free of annoying smoke in the air and cigarette butts on the ground. For children with allergies or asthma, the issue is not only annoyance but their very ability to enjoy playtime. Some jurisdictions have gone further, banning smoking in all public parks. That’s worth considering but would necessitate much more scrutiny. It appears to reach too broadly, particularly if it were to extend to a 25-foot buffer around the city’s many pocket parks. In other places, critics have decried such proposals as the product of a nanny state gone wild, and argued that enforcement would waste police resources. But neither argument is compelling when it comes to playgrounds. Whether Mary Poppins or the D.C. Council is the one telling you not to smoke next to children at play, it’s a worthwhile rule to follow. And widespread enforcement has not proved necessary to gain general compliance with no-smoking rules elsewhere; they quickly become the norm. There are certainly details to work out in committee, such as whether the rules would apply to playgrounds on private space. The matter now rests with the Committee on Transportation and the Environment, chaired by Ward 3’s Mary Cheh. We commend the authors for introducing their measures, and hope to see a consensus version advance.

The Current

Ethics, say it again, ethics …

A

nd on Monday, the D.C. Council solemnly gathered to render its verdict on Ward 1 member Jim Graham. But before it did, Council Chairman Phil Mendelson was remarkably blunt. In something that amounted to a soliloquy about how political bodies work, particularly the 13-member council, Mendelson pretty much said such bodies are go-along-to-get-along societies. “And so it’s not ordinarily constructive to criticize one another, which is why there is a lot of reluctance to do that and why today is an uncomfortable day for the council,” Mendelson said, barely looking up as he read his statement. “We cannot get to the issues, the important issues of policy, if we spend our times disciplining each other.” Anyone who didn’t know Mendelson might think the chairman was foolish, or didn’t think Graham really needed to be reprimanded. How could Mendelson be so honest about how political bodies work — compromise, vote-trading and dealmaking? But Mendelson was just laying the groundwork. In the real world of politics, you have to do something really out of line, Mendelson said, to draw rebuke from the full council. “The situation has to be extraordinary,” he said. And at that point, Mendelson laid out a sevenpoint resolution that detailed how he thought three investigations had shown Graham had improperly co-mingled political consideration of developers vying for a city contract and a separate contract with the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. “While it may be appropriate for a council member to publicly express a preference,” Mendelson read, “it is not appropriate for a council member to attempt behind the scenes to say who may win a [contract] bid.” Mendelson then read from the council rules about ethical behavior, how the members had to hold themselves to “a high level of conduct,” and how they “shall refrain from taking, ordering or participating in any official action which would adversely affect the confidence of the public in the integrity of the District government.” Only Ward 8’s Marion Barry spoke up for Graham. He said Graham deserved a council hearing on all the allegations. And then Barry himself was blunt about politics. “Everybody on this council on a daily basis, a weekly basis, makes arrangements to trade votes on this or that because that’s how the process works,” Barry said. “I’ve done it. Everybody on this council has done it.” Outside of the council chamber, two potential can-

didates for mayor disagreed with Barry. “It goes to the heart of what’s going on with the city council in terms of a crisis of ethics and trust in the community,” said Ward 6’s Tommy Wells, who has formed an exploratory committee for mayor. “The idea that there’s horse trading around contracts and public land should never be acceptable.” Ward 4’s Muriel Bowser helped write the city’s new ethics law. Although there are criticisms that it doesn’t ban corporate donations, among other issues, Bowser is making ethics a key part of her preparations — private so far — for her own mayoral bid. “We’re going to apply the highest standards of ethics to all of our actions,” she told NBC4 in her office. “In every election that I’ve ever been involved in, we talk about open and transparent government and leading with integrity. And should I be in another election, it won’t be any different.” ■ Now what, Jim? Graham last week was vowing to fight a council reprimand. He was insisting that there be a full council hearing so he could defend himself. But over the weekend, Graham apparently decided that the reprimand was the better way to go, to get the issue behind him. In the end, Graham voted against his reprimand but extravagantly praised Mendelson. “You are thoughtful, you are fair, you are determined to do the best thing in your mind by the council. … And while I disagree with the conclusions you’ve reached, I certainly … respect the process you followed.” Translation: It could have been worse. Graham later released his own written statement, saying in part, “It’s time to move on.” Graham lost oversight of alcohol issues as part of his punishment, but he remains chair of the expansive Human Services Committee. There is no fine or other punishment. “I will continue to represent the people who elected me to serve with the same passion and fervor as I have from my first day in office,” the statement reads. ■ D.C. vote push. Last week Mendelson kicked off a campaign to get voters to approve a referendum on April 23 to free the city’s budget from congressional oversight. The D.C. Budget Freedom Committee hopes to persuade Congress to allow the city to spend its own local revenues without congressional approval and to be exempt from federal shutdowns. One drawback is that Mayor Vincent Gray and D.C. Attorney General Irving Nathan think the ballot measure potentially violates the home rule act and could aggravate Republicans who control the House rather than persuade them. Tom Sherwood, a Southwest resident, is a political reporter for News 4.

TOM SHERWOOD’s

Notebook

Letters to the Editor ‘Urban park’ would benefit Garrison

The community stood up for Garrison Elementary, argued numbers, and saved the school from closure. The community also argued that to become a first-class school Garrison must offer the programming that parents in this neighborhood want (language immersion) and, crucially, must be fully modernized. Garrison sits smack in the middle of the intersection between Logan Circle, Dupont Circle and the U Street Corridor. Garrison’s 4.5 acres of land have a history that goes back to the Civil War —

150 years of uninterrupted educational and communal use. This land and the school building that stands on it have been neglected for decades — slides are boarded up and recurring sinkholes open up whenever it rains. The latest sinkhole reappeared on Sunday. This is unacceptable. Last year, the community engaged in a participatory process to determine the best use for this space. The concept drawings that resulted from this process can be seen at garrisonelementary.org. They include a running track, multipurpose field (Little League baseball and soccer), basketball court, spray park, early childhood playground, regular playground, community square, farmers market, outdoor performance space and a nature trail.

The beneficiaries of Garrison’s “Urban Park” would be current and prospective students, their families and our entire community — gathering spaces and a strong school will help create a more anchored community. The developments along 14th Street and U Street will attract thousands of additional residents. Where will we all go for recreation space? Rock Creek Park? The waterfront? We need an urban park in our neighborhood! Now is the time for us to stand up and demand that Garrison’s grounds be made into a usable space, and an integral part of the Sustainable D.C. policy. Mayor Gray, make this happen! Roheena Trehan Parent, Garrison Elementary School


The Current

Council office has worked to address project VIEWPOINT mary cheh

L

ast weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Viewpoint concerned the proposed project at 5333 Connecticut Ave. in Chevy Chase. I completely understand the concerns and anxieties that the nearby neighbors have about a project of this size and design, and I share those concerns. But, unfortunately, those worries have infected the tenor of rhetoric surrounding the project so that the reality and facts of what has happened and what can be done is clouded. So I would like, here, to try to clarify matters. My office has been actively pursuing this project from the moment we became aware of it, when The Current reported on it on Nov. 28, 2012. That very day, my chief of staff reached out to Eric Colbert & Associates, the proposed buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s designer. Soon after, we were able to identify the permits that had been applied for and where they were in the review process. Concerned because of the scope and scale of the project, we reached out to the director of the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, who assured us that the process would extend beyond the holiday season and that no permits were expected to be issued before late January at the earliest. My office then began planning for a community meeting to address the concerns that had begun to surface and scheduled it for Jan. 3. We again reached out to the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect, hoping to secure the developerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s presence at the meeting. Around the same time, in late December, my office met with a group of concerned citizens, many of whom are now on the steering committee of the 5333 Connecticut Neighborhood Coalition. They laid out a host of concerns, which ran the gamut from the permitting process to the aesthetics to the environmental impact. We informed them of the January meeting and indicated that the relevant agencies would be present to answer many of their questions. We secured the location at the Chevy Chase Community Center and began advertising the meeting. On the afternoon of New Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Eve, we finally received word from Mr. Colbert that the Cafritzes both were willing to be a part of the meeting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which we were certainly glad to hear, as

Letters to the Editor Court ruling wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t kill EastBanc projects

I would like to clarify several issues relating to The Currentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb. 20 piece on the West End Library project appeal since I attended the Zoning Commission hearings, read the briefs and sat through the interminable oral argument in the D.C. Court of Appeals. (I favor the project, but that doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t influence my analysis.) As the article pointed out, the primary issue raised by the D.C. Library Renaissance Project was whether the Zoning Commission had improperly refused to re-examine the economic merits of the transfer of D.C. land to the developer EastBanc. The commission had not done so because the mayor had proposed the terms of the transfer and the D.C. Council had legislatively approved those terms. The commission believed its jurisdiction

many of the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerns can only be remedied by them â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but that they would be unable to attend on Jan. 3. That very evening, in an email to constituents and in a posting on the Chevy Chase listserv, we announced that the meeting would be postponed and rescheduled to allow the community to speak, not only with the relevant government agencies, but also with the developer and architects. Contrary to Daniel S. Greenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s assertions last week, the Jan. 3 meeting was never canceled, nor was the meeting called only â&#x20AC;&#x153;after much prodding by constituents.â&#x20AC;? The rescheduled meeting was very well attended with many, many residents able to ask questions directly of the developers and relevant government officials. After the meeting, I created a Web page for this project (tinyurl.com/marycheh5333). There, I have posted relevant information and communications about the project with city officials, the Cafritzes and the commuity. That process continues, and I expect later this week to be posting the traffic analysis that I asked the D.C. Department of Transportation to conduct. Finally, when a recent community meeting with the Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs was canceled, I intervened to get it back on track I am troubled, then, by Mr. Greenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thesis that I am shirking my responsibilities as the elected representative of Ward 3 by not using my â&#x20AC;&#x153;political clout to halt the Cafritz project as now designed.â&#x20AC;? I believe that the facts above reflect far from a passive role as â&#x20AC;&#x153;neutral conciliator.â&#x20AC;? But I have to make something clear: I cannot and will not use political pressure to stop executive agencies from properly issuing permits to any citizen who is entitled to them, whether that citizen be an individual homeowner or a large developer. There are legal tools to prevent projects that residents find aesthetically undesirable or contrary to the character of a community â&#x20AC;&#x201D; tools such as historic-district designations â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but, unfortunately, none of those tools is present here. Therefore, I will continue to urge the Cafritzes to reconsider their project and its design, continue to remind agencies that permits must comply with the law, and continue to represent my constituents with the same enthusiasm that I have for six years. Mary Cheh represents Ward 3 on the D.C. Council.

was to consider the zoning issues, and not to determine whether the mayor and council had made a bad economic decision. The Library Renaissance Project, on the other hand, believed that the commission was required to consider the economic terms of the transfer since the commission was required to and did quantify the community benefits of the new library and the new fire station which EastBanc would build in exchange for D.C. land. The court, however, will not decide the fate of the project or examine the merits of the land transfer. If the court decides that the Library Renaissance Project had the right to bring the appeal and that the commission should have re-examined and balanced what the mayor and council did against the project benefits, the court will simply send the matter back to the commission with instructions to do so. Presumably, the commission would do so quickly and then issue a revised opinion. It is almost certain that the court decision will merely address the procedural necessity of

9

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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the Zoning Commission considering the matter further. Frederic W. Schwartz Jr. Foggy Bottom

Too many politicians remain out of touch

Details in Daniel Greenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb. 20 Viewpoint about apartment plans for 5333 Connecticut Ave. are absolutely fascinating. He informs us, concisely and clearly, about systemic realities and actions (and nonactions) affecting local residents. Do some D.C. Council members want to emulate the isolation and apartness of some politicians on Capitol Hill? Mr. Greenberg is aware of the lack of concern of some project promoters and politicians for the needs and desires of neighbors in the vicinity. I have a suggestion for council members. One day a week, they and only they should answer their phones. They might be enlightened about constituentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; concerns. Bob Jones Glover Park

Letters to the editor The Current publishes letters and Viewpoint submissions representing various points of view. Because of space limitations, letters should be no more than 400 words and are subject to editing. Letters and Viewpoint submissions intended for publication should be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Current, Post Office Box 40400, Washington, D.C. 20016-0400. You may send email to letters@currentnewspapers.com.



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10 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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The Current

GRAHAM: Council member stripped of alcoholic beverage oversight after reprimand

From Page 1

the reprimand â&#x20AC;&#x201D; only the second in the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I do not relish this situation,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We learn as council members not to criticize each other, so the situation has to be extraordinary to come before us.â&#x20AC;? Mendelson said Graham had violated both ethics rules and the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s code of conduct. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Procurement is always a source of corruption in government. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

why we have a procedure in placeâ&#x20AC;? to shield contracting decisions from politics, he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not appropriate for a council member to work behind the scenes to influence the outcome,â&#x20AC;? the chairman said, though he added that there was â&#x20AC;&#x153;no indication of a criminal violation.â&#x20AC;? At issue is a 2008 private meeting where Graham â&#x20AC;&#x201D; then chair of the Metro board â&#x20AC;&#x201D; allegedly suggested Williams drop out of the bidding to redevelop Metro-owned

land on Florida Avenue, in return for Grahamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support on the city lottery contract. Graham has called it ordinary political â&#x20AC;&#x153;horse-trading,â&#x20AC;? but two investigations found the â&#x20AC;&#x153;quid pro quoâ&#x20AC;? improper. Other council members made clear that a series of ethical crises over the past two years spurred them to act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to preserve and keep the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confidence. To obtain contracts for friends, and deter them for enemies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we have

to stop it,â&#x20AC;? said Ward 3 member Mary Cheh. At-large member David Grosso said residents are particularly disturbed at manipulations of the contracting process, and argued the council should give up its role in approving contracts over $1 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This wheeling and dealing in the contracting process has shaken votersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; confidence,â&#x20AC;? Grosso said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a crisis of ethics and trust,â&#x20AC;? said Ward 6 member Tommy

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Wells. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To suggest â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;horse-tradingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is standard â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who will invest here, if we say in backrooms who are the winners and losers?â&#x20AC;? Wells walked away without commenting when a reporter asked him whether Graham should resign. Only Ward 8 member Marion Barry joined Graham in voting against the reprimand, saying his colleague was denied due process since neither the Board of Ethics and Government Accountability, nor the council, had conducted a full investigation, giving Graham a chance to call witnesses and make his case. Barry is still protesting the fact that he was censured by the council three years ago for steering earmarked dollars to a former girlfriend. Graham declined to speak on the reprimand, saying only that it is â&#x20AC;&#x153;time to move on.â&#x20AC;? But on the alcohol oversight issue, Graham argued vehemently that the punishment is unfair. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is an area where, for fully eight years, now my ninth year, I have been very diligent, dedicated. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve tackled every issue â&#x20AC;&#x201D; single sales, sales to minors, problems with fake IDs, nude dancing, noise, violence,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Losing this particular responsibility under these circumstances is very painful to me. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m proud of my record on alcohol, my highly honorable record,â&#x20AC;? Graham said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no relationship between this reprimand and my oversight of alcohol.â&#x20AC;? But, he repeated, it is â&#x20AC;&#x153;time to put this behind us. My hands are full.â&#x20AC;? He noted he will still serve as chair of the Committee on Human Services as well as serving constituents in Ward 1. He also faces a reelection fight if he decides to run for a fifth term next year. Orange told The Current he has given little thought to how he will oversee alcohol issues, but noted that Graham is still a member of his regulatory committee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I will sit down with him and draw on his expertise,â&#x20AC;? Orange said.

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Athletics in Northwest Washington

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February 27, 2013 ■ Page 11

Maret boys basketball wins its first-ever outright MAC title By BRIAN KAPUR Current Staff Writer

Brian Kapur/The Current

Maret senior guard Marlon Beck, left, embraces senior forwards Ture Lawrence, middle, and Tre Bowens after the Frogs knocked off Sidwell to win the MAC championship outright Sunday at Potomac School.

After being swarmed by the Maret student section and his teammates, Marlon Beck took a seat on the Frogs’ bench on Sunday. The senior buried his face in his hands as tears filled his eyes. Then, after composing himself, Beck rejoined the celebration. It was a moment and the achievement he promised at the start of the season and delivered at the Potomac School, when the Frogs cruised past Sidwell 74-65 to win their firstever unshared Mid-Atlantic Conference championship. “It was a great feeling,” said Beck. “I never thought I would achieve something like this. ...To win a school tournament, it’s just the ultimate feeling. We put in the hard work, and we got it.” The Frogs were led by senior forward Tre Bowens’ 17 points, while junior guard Steffen Davis had 16, Beck had 13, and senior guard Adam Zeitler had 10. For Sidwell, guard Josh Hart had a game-high 28 points and senior guard Phillip McGloin had 12. The opening quarter was a battle between the two squads, with both hitting big-time shots. The period ended with Maret clinging to a 19-18 lead. But in the second quarter, the Frogs took control of the game. Maret got hot

shooting and finished the game with 11 threepoint buckets as Davis and Zeitler caught fire from long distance. Meanwhile Sidwell struggled on offense and only mustered eight points in the quarter. The difference in the game was Bowens, who dominated the two regular-season meetings between the squads. On Sunday, Bowens controlled the post once again, but also showed off his range by hitting a trey. “We call him Mr. Steady,” said Maret coach Garrett O’Donnell. “He calms us down on offense and leads our defense, provides our physicality. His ability to play inside and outside is huge.” By halftime the Frogs seized the momentum, and their lead was 37-26. After the break Sidwell showed why it had won at least a share of the last three MAC championships, making a furious rally behind Hart. The Quakers cut the lead down to four after Hart scored on a three-point play, which energized Sidwell’s student section. But the Frogs quickly regained control and stomped out the run with a trey by Davis, who scored four three-point buckets in the game. “It’s a great moment for the kids,” O’Donnell said. “They’ve worked so hard. Sidwell is a great team. ... To be able to do this three times against them is a tribute to what our kids have done.”

Lady Cadets edge Falcons to win WCAC championship By BRIAN KAPUR Current Staff Writer

After a hard-fought battle in last year’s Washington Catholic Athletic Conference title game, Lindsay Allen could only watch as Good Counsel enjoyed the championship celebration and posed for photos with the trophy. That feeling motivated the St. John’s senior coming into this year, and last night the Cadets avenged the loss, beating Good Counsel — their biggest rival — 67-66 at American University’s Bender Arena. “It’s not fun watching another team getting a championship right in front of your face,” said Allen. “We worked hard all season; our motivation was to get here and win the championship.” It was another thrilling chapter to the fierce championship rivalry between St. John’s and Good Counsel. The Cadets fell to Good Counsel in last year’s championship game 79-76. But, back in 2011, the Cadets got the better of the Falcons when they won 62-54.

This season the two powerhouses split their season series, with both teams winning on their respective home courts. Both teams made it to the finals, setting up the rubber match in the championship game at a neutral site. In last night’s title game, Allen led the team with 28 points, while sophomore Amari Carter stepped up with 19, and senior Tori Oliver brought eight. The contest game down to the fourth quarter. On the biggest stage with the highest of stakes, Allen hit four critical free throws in the final two minutes to help the Cadets close out the game. “It’s just ridiculous,” Cadets coach Jonathan Scribner said of Allen’s play. “There’s nothing else to be said. She just refuses to lose — it’s that simple.” Though the Cadets came out as winners, they struggled early in the game and quickly fell into an 11-2 hole. “We came out with no energy and basically gave them everything we said not to do,” said Scribner.

Brian Kapur/The Current

Cadets senior Lindsay Allen, middle, scored a team-high 28 points in St. John’s title win last night. “We did everything the game plan said not to do. But we kept it close, and Lindsay gave us a spurt.” Allen quickly sparked a rally and scored six straight points, while Carter came up with two clutch buckets to cut the deficit to 16-10 by the end of the first quarter. They kept up the momentum, and Carter drained a three-pointer

with 2:04 to go before halftime, giving the Cadets their first lead of the game at 22-20. The team came out of halftime aggressively, as Allen took a fast break down the court to score, and freshman forward Kayla Robbins followed it up with a three-point play to put St. John’s up 27-23. The close battle continued

through the third period as Good Counsel retook the lead with a 9-6 run to make it a 46-41 lead going into the final quarter. In the fourth quarter, with the game on the line, Allen put together a masterful clutch performance. The senior scored two straight baskets to put the Cadets ahead 51-49. But the See St. John’s/Page 12


12 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

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The Current

Northwest Sports

National Cathedral cruises to ISL A title By BRIAN KAPUR Current Staff Writer

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Nancy Feldman, a long-time DC resident and community leader, formed her law firm 15 years ago for the benefit of people facing important life issues or needing to formalize recent transitions. Planning ahead for family, friends, and bequests to non-profits; forming new households or parting ways; considering business and personal changes? Work with an attentive, knowledgeable advisor to assist with your legal needs -- give us a call.

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Before the season started, Marta Sniezek outlined the goal of National Cathedralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s girls basketball team â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to get out of the Independent School Leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lower division. On Sunday, the Eagles did more than that. They dismantled Holy Child 57-44 to complete a perfect run through the ISL A, and secured an unshared league championship. By winning the regular-season title earlier in the week, the team had already clinched a spot in the AA division next year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was our No. 1 goal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to move up into the upper division,â&#x20AC;? said Eagles coach Brittany Mitch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have expected to sweep the whole lower division and then win this championship today. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what their goal was, and they did it.â&#x20AC;? Before the game Sniezek was honored for reaching the 1,000-point mark as merely a sophomore. On the championship stage at Sidwell, Sniezek made sure to add to that total with a dazzling performance that included a game-high 36 points. Meanwhile National Cathedral freshman Eva Snaith added 10 more points. Sniezekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s development was a major factor in the Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; championship season. Mitch has known Sniezek since she was 10 years old and has had a hand in her progression as a player over the years as her Amateur Athletic Union team coach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just through this season she has become more of a leader both vocally and through her actions,â&#x20AC;? said Mitch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She is a positive leader; she picks her teammates up. She knows when to step her game up.â&#x20AC;? The Eagles set the tone for the game early with Sniezek hitting shots from all over the floor to soften up

By BRIAN KAPUR Current Staff Writer

Cubs fall in title game

Visitation, the reigning Independent School League AA champion, was unable to retain its title Sunday at Sidwell. Bullis controlled the title game from the opening tipoff, cruising past the Cubs 60-39. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had a great season with a young team,â&#x20AC;? said Cubs coach Mike McCarthy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bullis is just a really talented team. They came to play, and we looked tired.â&#x20AC;? Senior guard Taylor Delgado led the Cubs in scoring with 17 points. Bullis jumped out to a quick 22-9 lead and took advantage of strong

post play from junior Lynee Belton, who scored a game-high 21 points. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of the top post players in the county probably,â&#x20AC;? said the Visitation coach. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can only do so much. Some of it was her, and we had some lapses where we let her get the ball too easily.â&#x20AC;? Visitation freshman Alexis Gray hit a big basket, followed up by a tough bucket from Delgado to cut the Bulldogsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lead to 12. But the Cubs couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t come any closer. Although Visitation lost the tournament championship game, it did win a share of the ISL AA regularseason crown. The Cubs will participate in the Bishop Walsh Tournament in Cumberland, Md., from March 7 to

9. The teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s prior commitment to this event will keep it from participating in the new D.C. basketball city title tournament.

Gonzaga stunned in the WCAC first round

After a perfect regular season in Washington Catholic Athletic Conference games, Gonzaga was shocked by Bishop Ireton 67-58 in the first round of the conference playoffs at Gallaudet University Saturday. Senior forward Kris Jenkins led the team with 18 points, senior guard Charles Glover had 16, junior Jordan Abdur-Raâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oof had 10, and sophomore guard Bryant Crawford had 10.

ST. JOHNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Lady Cadets win, boys team falls From Page 11

SJC boys fall in WCAC title game

 



    

the defense. With the team up 18-10 in the closing moments of the first quarter, Holy Child had no answers for the sensational sophomore. The Tigers tried to double-team Sniezek, but she made them pay by dishing the ball to open teammates. Snaith, in particular, came up with two huge shots, including a buzzer beater to give the Eagles a 20-10 advantage at the close of the first period. Holy Child was able to hang around and chip the Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lead down to eight midway through the third quarter, but Sniezek came up with a momentum-killing play. Stealing the ball, she hit a floater to balloon the lead back to 37-27. In the final period the Eagles cruised as Sniezek piled in 12 more points to seal the championship win.

Visitation, Gonzaga fall in hoops playoffs

Falcons answered by retaking the lead 55-54. Allen stepped up by stealing the ball away from a Good Counsel player and racing coast-to-coast to hit a layup. Ahead by 56-55, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trail again.

          

Brian Kapur/The Current

National Cathedral School won its second straight ISL A tournament championship Sunday.

With a roster of mostly juniors and a first-year head coach in Sean McAloon, St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expected to be at the top of the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference. But the Cadets made an incredible run through the WCAC playoffs, reaching the championship game at

American Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bender Arena. The trophy, though, proved out of reach last night when the St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fell 58-53 to Bishop Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connell. The impressive playoff run began Saturday, when junior forward Darian Anderson hit a half-court buzzer beater to knock off perennial power DeMatha 57-55 at Gallaudet University. The Cadets then defeated Bishop Ireton Sunday to advance to the title game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t play to anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expectations; we play to our own,â&#x20AC;? said McAloon. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We set a goal, and it was to get to here and win it. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re disappointed.â&#x20AC;? St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s had 16 points from junior guard Darian Bryant, 11 points from junior guard Tre Campbell and nine points from Anderson.


The CurrenT

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 13

Aidah Sabir-Jenkins


14 Wednesday, February 27, 2013 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The CurrenT Serving D.C. residents who are age 18+ with a disability or age 60+ and their caregivers

Dc loNg-tErM carE oMbuDsMaN PrograM (DcltcoP) — hoME aND coMMuNitY-basED sErvicEs PrograM EffECtivE OCtObEr 1, 2012 legal Counsel for the Elderly District of Columbia long-Term Care Ombudsman Program operates the District of Columbia long-Term Care Ombudsman Program in conjunction with the District of Columbia Office on Aging Senior Service network. On October 1, 2012, the DClTCOP expanded its advocacy services to include residents living in their homes in the community receiving long-term care services through the DC Medicaid Elderly and Persons with Physical Disabilities (EPD) Waiver Program. The home and Community-Based Services Ombudsmen serve as advocates for residents living in their homes in the community, protecting residents’ rights and promoting the highest possible quality of life and quality of care. home and community-based ombudsmen advocate for elderly individuals and persons with physical disabilities, 18 years of age and older receiving community-based services through the EPD waiver. home and community-based ombudsmen advocate for residents living in the community understand their rights, voice their concerns, find solutions to problems, and obtain legal services. The ombudsmen are responsible for: n visiting residents to monitor the quality of life and quality of care n investigating and resolving complaints for or on behalf of residents n resolving issues with home health care providers n Ensuring that residents’ rights are protected n reporting violations of federal and District of Columbia law specific to home health care and related services to appropriate agencies n Educating residents, their families, and significant others; and n Monitoring and making recommendations on District of Columbia laws, rules, regulations, and policies that affect DC Medicaid beneficiaries living in the community receiving longterm care services through the Elderly and Persons with Physical Disabilities Waiver. To date, we have received thirty-four (34) complaints for investigation. We have found multiple issues regarding Durable Medical Equipment (DME). Our safety concern regarding durable medical equipment thus has far been to ensure that residents have equipment that has been deemed medically necessary as well as equipment that is appropriate in size, in good repair and is safe for resident use.

Vol 1, No 5

DCOA Ambassador Program Keeping District Seniors and Caregivers In Touch with Services

The D.C. Office on Aging (DCOA) Ambassador Program is a FREE, interactive, member-based program designed to reach out to older adults and their caregivers to help them learn about the services and resources available to them through DCOA. If you are interested in expanding your network and educating older adults about the services and resources available to them, join us for our next Ambassador Training Workshop to learn about all of the programs and services that DCOA offers to the community and how you can become an Ambassador.

Thursday, February 28, 2013

10:00 a.m. – 12 p.m.

Thursday, March 28, 2013 Wednesday, April 17, 2013

10:00 a.m. – 12 p.m. 10:00 a.m. – 12 p.m.

All workshops are held at DCOA Headquarters and include: an overview of Office on Aging programs and services, information on how to access resources, and guidance on your role as an advocate. To register and for more information, call (202) 724-5622.

For ombudsman assistance contact the DCLTCOP Home and CommunityBased Services Program Hotline at (202) 434-2160.

crFs aND NursiNg hoMEs

For complaints of abuse and neglect for persons residing in community residential facilities (CRFs) or nursing homes, call the Long-term Care Ombudsman Hotline at (202) 434-2190

Community EvEnts CalEndar March

6th • 1:00–3:00pm

6th • 9:00am ThE SEABury WArD 5 ADviSOry COunCil will hold a meeting at 2900 newton Street, nE. For more information, contact vivian Grayton (202) 529-8701

ThE 2013 SEniOr WEllnESS CEnTEr Financial Fraud Prevention Presentations with panel presentations by DiSB, uS Attorney’s Office-DC and AArP legal Counsel for the Elderly at Model Cities Senior Wellness Center, 1901 Evarts Street, nE, Washington, DC

sPotlight oN coMMuNitY liviNg Spotlight on Community Living is published by the External Affairs and Communications unit of the D.C. Office on Aging. Advertising contained in the Current is not endorsed by the D.C. Office on Aging or by the publisher. The D.C.Office on Aging is responsible for developing and carrying out a comprehensive and coordinated system of health, nutrition, education, employment, training, and social services for the District’s elderly population, who are 60 years of age and older. The Office on Aging also administers the Aging and Disability resource Center, a one-stop shop resource center, designed to assist seniors, persons with disabilities 18 years of age and older and family caregivers navigate the long-term services and supports system. 500 K Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20002 202-724-5622 • www.dcoa.dc.gov John M. Thompson, Ph.D., FAAMA Executive Director In accordance with the D.C. Human Rights Act of 1977, as amended, D.C. Official Code Section §§2-1401.01 et seq.,(Act), the D.C. Office on Aging does not discriminate on the basis of actual or perceived: race, color, religion, national origin, sex, age, marital status, personal appearance, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, familial status, family responsibilities, matriculation, political affiliation, genetic information, disability, source of income, or place of residence or business. Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination which is prohibited by the Act. In addition, harassment based on any of the above protected categories is prohibited by the Act. Discrimination in violation of the Act will not be tolerated. Violators will be subject to disciplinary action.

20018. For more information, contact Stacie Thweatt at (202) 635-1900.

For more information, contact vivian Grayton at 202-529-8701.

7th • 10:30am

21st • 10:30am

FAMily MATTErS OF GrEATEr WAShinGTOn, inC Ward 8 Senior Programs will celebrate national nutrition Month 2013 with a nutrition Film Festival at 4301 9th Street, SE. The film will be Soul Food Junkies. For reservations call Evelyn Minor 202-562-6860.

FAMily MATTErS OF GrEATEr WAShinGTOn, inC Ward 8 Senior Programs will Celebrate national nutrition Month 2013 with a nutrition Film Festival at 4301 9th Street, SE. The film will be Food Matters. For reservations call Evelyn Minor 202-562-6860.

13th • 11:30am

26th • 11:30am

SEABury WArD 5 AGinG SErviCES will host “u.S. Attorney Office – An Age for Justice Film” Ft. lincoln 3 3298 Ft. lincoln Drive, nE. For more information, call vivian Grayton (202) 529-8701.

SEABury WArD 5 AGinG SErviCES will host a “Diabetes Seminar” at Ft. lincoln 1, 3001 Bladensburg rd, nE. For more information, contact vivian Grayton at 202-529-8701.

14th • 10:30am

FAMily MATTErS OF GrEATEr WAShinGTOn, inC Ward 8 Senior Programs will Celebrate national nutrition Month 2013 with a nutrition Film Festival at 4301 9th Street, SE. The film will be Food inc. For reservations call Evelyn Minor 202-562-6860.

FAMily MATTErS OF GrEATEr WAShinGTOn, inC Ward 8 Senior Programs will celebrate national nutrition Month 2013 with a nutrition Film Festival at 4301 9th Street, SE. The film will be Super Size Me. For reservations call Evelyn Minor 202-562-6860.

20th • 11:30am SEABury WArD 5 AGinG SErviCES will host a “Diabetes Seminar” at Edgewood Terrace Senior nutrition Site, 635 Edgewood Street, nE.

28th • 10:30am

28th • 11:30am SEABury WArD 5 AGinG SErviCES will host a “you are never Too Old…hiv & AiDS Presentation at Ft. lincoln 1, 3001 Bladensburg rd, nE. For more information, contact vivian Grayton at 202-529-8701.


The Current

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

15

Spotlight on Schools British School of Washington

Year 8 recently went on a ski trip. After a six-hour bus ride, we arrived at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. A tour guide told us about the history about radio astronomy. We saw the Green Bank Telescope, which was the biggest and tallest of its kind. Next we headed off to the Snowshoe Mountain Ski Resort and started skiing the following day. The first day of skiing ended shortly after it started because the weather was so bad that Snowshoe closed the mountain for the day. Fortunately in exchange we got an extra day of skiing! During the trip, I learned how to ski and now I would say I am pretty decent at skiing. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Khairul Asyraf, Year 8 Plymouth, seventh-grader

Edmund Burke School

In early February, our sixthgrade class went to the National Gallery of Art and to the National Museum of the American Indian, to â&#x20AC;&#x153;gain a deeper understanding of mythology by seeing how the European cultures envisioned it,â&#x20AC;? says Sean, our sixth-grade teacher. At the National Gallery of Art, we saw many Roman, Greek and mythological paintings and sculptures. We were mesmerized by a sculpture that was of the Roman messenger god, Mercury. He was pointing to the light beaming through the glass above. There was also a beautiful painting of Pandora with the box of evil. Our class went then went on to the American Indian Museum. One group completed a quiz game while going through the museum; others saw many kinds of spiritual clothing and masks, as well as foods eaten at tribal events. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Elya Baker and Jad Diouf, sixth-graders

The Field School

Students returned to Field last

School DISPATCHES

week after their two-week internship period. Seventh- and eighthgraders interned around the city, while sixth-graders participated in group activities. For the first week, one group took cooking classes at Hillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Kitchen. They made doughnuts, lasagna, salad, ginger ale and more. The other group did art and music activities at Field, such as puppetry, ceramics and playing music. The next week, the groups switched. Overall, most sixth-graders preferred the cooking to the art, but all had a great time. Seventh- and eighth-graders took a field trip last week to the Washington Harbour ice rink. They had the rink practically all to themselves and had a great time. Before leaving, a group of students and teachers made a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Harlem Shakeâ&#x20AC;? video on ice. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jana Cohen and Lila Bromberg, eighth-grader; and Adam Bressler, Revbekah Trigo, Jack MacIsaac and Nina Gutzeit, sixth-graders

Georgetown Day School

Students are looking forward to spring sports, warm weather and spring performances and concerts. In the meantime, winter sports teams are wrapping up their seasons. Last Friday, the boys varsity basketball team played St. James in the first round of the Mid-Atlantic Conference championships. The girls varsity basketball team played Holton-Arms last Friday in the first round of the Independent School League championships, after finishing the regular season with a 10-game winning streak! MAC wrestling champion Julia Ernst finished her season with a fourth-place finish at the St. Albans Tournament and a first-place finish at the DC Classic, and she went on to compete in the National Prep Wrestling Championships this past weekend. Also, 64 art students recently won multiple Scholastic Art-

Regional Awards, nine current seniors have been named finalists in the National Merit Scholarship Competition, and nine students placed in the top 5 percent of students nationwide in the American Mathematics Competition. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Carlton Marshall II, 11th-grader

Jewish Primary Day School of the Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Capital

For Art and Science Night, the fifth grade displayed inventions, the

sixth grade did experiments, one kindergarten class made a bridge you could walk on and the other made its own Empire State Building, and the fourth grade had an exploding volcano. People could go to each classroom and answer questions on a quiz sheet to get a prize. For their inventions, the fifthgraders began with learning a bit about simple machines and brainstorming for ideas. Students then

created their inventions, wrote about them, created a diagram or sketch, and then (if they could) made an actual model. There was also a market research element of this project. Each student interviewed about 20 to 50 people and asked them if they would buy his or her invention and how much they would be willing to spend. Some of the inventions included shoes with attachable and See Dispatches/Page 25

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For :8#|hduv,#weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been innovating with local businesses for a more modern DC. To learn more about how DC can become a world-class technology hub, check out the Chamber's Policy Forum on Feb. 28.

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16 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Current

Northwest Real Estate SENIORS: Gym, photo exhibit promote health and fitness as part of aging in place

From Page 5

Schembri said. Schembri said that once the village launches, she would like to organize special fitness events for village members at City Fitness â&#x20AC;&#x201D; such as tai chi classes, which she said may improve both physical and emotional health, as well as mental acuity. This year, Schembri and LaRee will celebrate the 20th anniversary of the gym as well as the 30-year anniversary of the founding of its parent company Fit Physique.

Tamsy Blumer, a Forest Hills resident and member of City Fitness, said she can attest to the benefits of added physical training in her life. An avid tennis player, she started to work with a trainer after struggling with neck and knee pains in her later years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;[The trainer] is very good at figuring out how to work out old ladies who have various problems,â&#x20AC;? Blumer said. Rotas, herself a tennis player in her 60s who is ranked in the International Tennis Federation, became interested in documenting older athletes while participating in the

Wentworth Architects & Builders

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architecture | interior design | construction | remodeling

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European Masters Games, where athletes up to (and sometimes older than) 100 years old compete. She watched men in some events run 100-meter races in 12 seconds â&#x20AC;&#x201D; less than three seconds off the pace set by track legend Usain Bolt. An academic with a degree in visual culture, Rotas had long been dismayed at the widespread portrayal of aging. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was partly motivated by the images that circulate in our culture â&#x20AC;&#x201D; theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re so awful, so ghastly â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about old people,â&#x20AC;? Rotas said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You just get this image of being old meaning that

youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just going to decline.â&#x20AC;? But at the games, Rotas was â&#x20AC;&#x153;blown awayâ&#x20AC;? by the raw athleticism of the competitors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not used to seeing women in their 70s in little shorts and stuff like that, so you see what an older womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s body looks like,â&#x20AC;? Rotas said. Gesturing toward a portrait of septuagenarian track runner, Rotas added, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s got great muscle tone. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just radiant.â&#x20AC;? Rotasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 16-photograph exhibition exhibit will remain on display for the next two months at City Fitness, located at 3525 Connecticut Ave.

WILSON: Principals group enhances student readiness From Page 1

The principals started meeting at the beginning of the 2012â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2013 school year, and get together quarterly. In part, they tackle administrative issues like coordinating school calendars to make sure events such as back-to-school nights and graduations are scheduled on different days, so parents with kids at multiple schools donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a conflict. The group also shares resources â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for instance, when Cahall brings in a consultant for teacher training, faculty from any of the other schools are welcome to attend. And when Hearst Elementary School was looking for a space to hold its school play in May â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this year it will be â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Lion Kingâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Cahall offered Wilsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newly renovated theater. The group also gives the principals a forum to discuss best practices and common challenges, like how to handle growing enrollment at schools that are already over capacity and tight on funds.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re on our own so much of the time; thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no other high school principal I can go to and say, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This is what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m experiencing,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; because thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no other high school like Wilson â&#x20AC;&#x201D; itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the largest and the most diverse,â&#x20AC;? Cahall said Monday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I feel isolated. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why I love this group: because we share some of the same challenges.â&#x20AC;? The 14 schools that feed into Wilson are Deal and Hardy middle schools; Oyster-Adams Bilingual School (pre-kindergarten through eighth grade); and Eaton, Bancroft, Lafayette, Murch, Janney, Shepherd, Hearst, Hyde-Addison, Key, Mann and Stoddert elementary schools. The group has made a concerted effort to enhance the effectiveness of the core curriculum for its students. On Monday, Deal principal James Albright reported on the first of a series of meetings he held with pyramid-school faculty on math curriculum to help ensure that middleschoolers are prepared for high school coursework.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was an opportunity for math teachers to express their issues and concerns about the curriculum and interim assessments, and for us to get a sense of the kind of pressure going on around testing,â&#x20AC;? said Albright. Next monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting will commence a similar focus on writing. An instructional coach and faculty members will attend to lay out the groundwork for future discussions. There is a real need to improve writing skills at the high school level, according to Cahall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the thing we work on the least, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the skill students will need to use the most as adults,â&#x20AC;? he said. The principals are also working to make the school enrollment period, which begins April 1, easier for parents. Deal will coordinate with its feeder elementary schools to hold registration days there so parents donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to trek to the middle school to submit paperwork. Once finalized, dates will be announced in advance so parents can plan ahead. There will also be buddy days for students transitioning from middle school to Wilson to foster familiarity with their new school. Wilson also sends its students to the lower schools to help with tutoring, in what Cahall calls a â&#x20AC;&#x153;win-winâ&#x20AC;?: The highschoolers are able to fulfill community service hours, and it helps strengthen relationships among the feeder schools. The principalsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; group is also looking at bringing parents into the fold, particularly those interested in looking at the Wilson feeder schools more broadly as well as across the entire school system. Since many parents have expressed to Cahall an interest in better understanding the implications of the No Child Left Behind waiver, he suggested that subject could be a starting point for future meetings. The principals in the group are also interested in introducing themselves as a team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It would be great to share with parents what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been talking about and to set goals together,â&#x20AC;? said Stoddert principal Patricia Pride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And they may have some goals that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know about or ideas we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t thought of.â&#x20AC;?


A Look at the Market in Northwest Washington

February 27, 2013 â&#x2013;  Page 17

Renowned architectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home features modernist design

T

ucked at the end of a cul-desac in Woodland Normanstone is the midcentury modernist home of the late

ON THE MARKET DEIRDRE BANNON

Arthur Keyes, a renowned D.C.based architect. Located at 2605 31st St., the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s simple exterior opens up into an expansive contemporary living space with an open floor plan, clean lines and floor-toceiling windows that seamlessly bring the outdoors in. Keyes studied under Frank Lloyd Wright as well as Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus School. He co-founded the firm Keyes Condon Florance, and his work includes the National Gallery of Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s West Building renovation, the Torpedo Factory Art Center in Alexandria, and several modernist residential homes. Keyes designed the home on 31st Street for his own family in 1950 and has been its only owner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not just a house of its time, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a case study in the Bauhaus influence,â&#x20AC;? said Realtor John Mahshie of TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty.

Keyesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; grandson, Jesse Keyes, remembers that even as a child he knew the house was special. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a flow from the interior to the exterior, and an inherent sense of design that kids can pick up on,â&#x20AC;? he said in an interview. Now a designer in New York City who also studied architecture, the younger Keyes said the house â&#x20AC;&#x153;embodies the essential modernist tenet of building what you need and nothing more, and with this house, my grandfather did that.â&#x20AC;? Taking an elongated, triangular plot of land, Arthur Keyes built the house using what has been called an upside-down design. The splitlevel home expands upward and outward, with the top level serving as the main living space, bedrooms on the middle level, and a den on the lower level, which now also includes a 1990s addition Keyes designed that added a guest suite as well as a solarium, indoor pool and sauna. The upper level takes advantage of treetop views with floor-to-ceiling as well as clerestory windows that draw the eye upward. The open and airy L-shaped living and dining area with a wood-burning fireplace extends out to a large terrace that spans the width of the room. Keyes

Photos courtesy of TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty

Designed by renowned architect Arthur Keyes, this midcentury home is listed for $2,995,000. designed the space to take visitors from the inside to the outside in phases: the doorway in the dining area leads to a covered and screened-in porch with unobstructed views of the trees that surround the property, and an adjacent door brings one to a more intimate space that is completely outdoors, with only balustrades to define the area. Also on this level is a rectangular study that incorporates brick walls and built-in bookcases, and overlooks a large oak tree just outside the window. The adjacent kitchen faces 31st Street, and here again the focal point is a large box window, this one with a deep copper planter at its base. The updated kitchen features a Viking range with four burners, a grill and a microwave oven. Stainless-steel counter-

SELLING THE AREAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FINEST PROPERTIES 1

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tops with natural wood and white cabinets as well as a tile floor bring a modern flair into this space. Three of the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s four bedrooms are on the middle level, including the master with en suite bath. In all of the rooms Keyes incorporated built-in bureaus, closets and shelving, which minimizes the need to furnish the rooms, while maintaining the clean lines that are evident throughout the home. On the lower level is a den Keyes used as a sort of home office â&#x20AC;&#x201D; his drafting table is placed next to a large window that peers up to the roots of a tree in the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s front yard. The room also features a wood-burning fireplace. The new

solarium faces the backyard, and its exterior glass walls and terra-cotta tile floors create a soothing indoor environment. Even more luxurious is an indoor wave pool with a glass roof above and an adjacent sauna. An early 20th-century sculpture of a female figure overlooks the pool. A guest suite and full bath can also be found on this level. Rounding out the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s amenities is a large two-car garage. This four-bedroom home with three full and two half baths at 2605 31st St. is offered for $2,995,000. For details contact John Mahshie of TTR Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s International Realty at 202-2713132 or jmahshie@ttrsir.com.

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Elegant Classic

Spring Valley. Light filled updated Colonial w/5 BRs, 4.5 BA on 4 finished levels. Gourmet kit w/island opens to breakfast rm. Lge family rm w/cathedral ceiling. Patio, attached garage. $1,695,000 Laura McCaffrey  202-641-4456

Tradition Upheld

Chevy Chase, MD. Fantastic renovated 1918 farmhouse. 5 BRs, 4.5 BAs on 4 finished levels includes spacious MBR suite. Open floor plan, white kitchen, w/marble accents. Fenced yard. $1,675,000. 3718 Williams Lane Laura McCaffrey  202-641-4456

1

Charm & Style!

Town of Chevy Chase, MD. Main level living at its best. Updated & expanded bungalow. 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs, Large unfinished loft. Walkout LL w/au-pair suite. On street pkg for 3 cars Walk to dwntwn Bethesda. $1,295,000 Eric Murtagh 301-652-8971 Karen Kuchins 301-275-2255

CHEVY CHASE 4400 JENIFER STREET NW 202-364-1700

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Sophisticated Flair

Mt. Pleasant. Majestic, sunny & spacious 3 BR, 3 BA home. Absolutely smashing kitchen w/ Viking, SubZero, Bosch. Fin. LL w/built in bar. Deck, front porch, gar + 2 off st spaces. $900,000

Leyla Phelan   202-415-3845

Stately Elegance

Brinklow, MD. Stone country Colonial blt in 2005 by Mitchell & Best on 2 acres. 7 BRs, 5 BAs include MBR on 1st flr. 2 story family rm, chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kit, library. Walk out LL. Minutes to ICC & DC. $1,350,000 Delia McCormick  301-977-7273

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Wesley Heights.Dazzling, bright & spacious 1 BR penthouse at The Towers, a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Addressâ&#x20AC;? bldg. Classic kitchen, lge tile floored balcony. Amenities include pool, tennis cts, sauna. Walk to shops, restaurants. $295,000 Maryam Hedayati  301-367-7921

DUPONT 1509 22ND STREET NW 202-464-8400

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ER CT! D A UNNTR CO

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List Price: $775,000 Under Contract in 5 days!

from where the children live and play.â&#x20AC;? It cites a long list of materials already found at the excavation site, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;mustard and lewisite nerve agents, arsine gas-filled projectiles, munitions/explosives, vomiting chemical agent,â&#x20AC;? and argues the Army could be â&#x20AC;&#x153;fatally underestimating the explosive blast and fragmentation risks.â&#x20AC;? Last week they won backing from D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, who wrote top Army Corps officials that she was â&#x20AC;&#x153;genuinely shockedâ&#x20AC;? that officials are ignoring the â&#x20AC;&#x153;elevated riskâ&#x20AC;? to young children, who research shows are â&#x20AC;&#x153;more vulnerable to various toxins and pollutants.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The cost of relocating this family is small compared to the overall cost of this years-long project,â&#x20AC;? Norton wrote. But a reversal seems unlikely, since both federal agencies signed off on a protocol for demolishing the house at 4825 Glenbrook Road and excavating what is believed to be a major burial pit for chemical weapon materials and explosives. With a tent-like â&#x20AC;&#x153;engineering control structure,â&#x20AC;? air filtration systems and backup systems to be erected on site, the feds have deemed the work to be â&#x20AC;&#x153;without significant riskâ&#x20AC;? to homes. The Zandamela/Dieterich family live at 4830 Glenbrook, just across the street, in the only home in the immediate area with young children. Andrea Takash, spokesperson for the Army Corpsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Baltimore office, said the house at 4825 was demolished late last year, with â&#x20AC;&#x153;low probability excavationâ&#x20AC;? now under way on areas of the property where the Army does not expect to find explosive material. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;high probabilityâ&#x20AC;? excavation will probably begin in May, she said. In an email, Takash said the Corps will be using â&#x20AC;&#x153;proven controls and precautions,â&#x20AC;? and noted that in 14 earlier major removal operations in Spring Valley, â&#x20AC;&#x153;there has been no documented release of concern to the community.â&#x20AC;? She said the Army has relocated a few families in Spring Valley, but only for a few weeks, and only while performing work at those familiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; houses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;An interdisciplinary team conducted a thorough review of the public health and safety aspects of the project work plans â&#x20AC;Ś [and] determined that the work will be accomplished without significant risk to Spring Valley residents, including those who reside immediately adjacent to the project area,â&#x20AC;? she wrote. But the Army has been wrong before. It began its cleanup of the former weapons testing area in 1993 after utility workers found bomb materials, but shut it down in 1995, saying no further work was needed. Then it reopened the project after a city environmental expert found evi-

dence that several pits used to bury toxic chemicals and weapons had still not been located. In total, the Army has spent more than $221 million and found literally thousands of chemicals, vials, shells and mortar under Spring Valley. When Zandamela and Dieterich bought their house in 2009, they were aware that the Corps was still cleaning up what is formally known as the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring Valley Formerly Used Defense Site.â&#x20AC;? Dieterich said she contacted the Corps, and was assured that soil testing on her property had come back negative, that the cleanup was slowly coming to an end, and that there was no risk to her family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Famous last words,â&#x20AC;? she said, in a phone interview last week. The couple did an extensive renovation, including an outdoor play area for the kids. Then driving home from work one day, Dieterich said she turned onto Glenbrook, saw TV camera trucks, and learned the Army had found chemical agents at the house across the street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They reassessed,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and eventually determined to demolish the house.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We told the Corps, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Fine, clean up the property, we would like to relocate,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? she continued. That was in early 2012, and she said the initial response was â&#x20AC;&#x153;quite positive,â&#x20AC;? with Corps aides looking at houses for the family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then hardliners at the Corps took over,â&#x20AC;? she said, and after three rounds of appeals, the relocation request was rejected last week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These people take forever for everything, and they never admit a mistake,â&#x20AC;? she said. Now Dieterich is wondering when the â&#x20AC;&#x153;high probabilityâ&#x20AC;? excavation will begin, and how long it will last. She said the Corps has assured her it will install a warning system in case any chemical fumes escape. The family is not banking on a positive response from the Environmental Protection Agency. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re now considering legal options. We think about how to get the kids out of the house at our own expense. I want them to be in a safe place. But we canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t pay rent for several years, and pay our mortgage,â&#x20AC;? she said. Attorney Buzz Bailey, who filed the petition and has represented several Spring Valley residents pro bono, said he lost an earlier attempt to protect a family from chemical weapon material in their backyard. But this is â&#x20AC;&#x153;a much stronger case,â&#x20AC;? Bailey said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;4825 has huge amounts of hazardous chemical weapons. The explosive risk is palpable.â&#x20AC;? Bailey said the Army â&#x20AC;&#x153;drew a circle â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a danger zoneâ&#x20AC;? around the excavation project, initially including only the house at 4830 Glenbrook. It has now expanded to circle seven houses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If they do something for Christineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kids, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a slippery slope for them,â&#x20AC;? Bailey said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pentagon wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do the right thing because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re concerned about precedent.â&#x20AC;?


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The Current

Northwest Real Estate ANC 1C ANCMorgan 1C Adams

â&#x2013;  ADAMS MORGAN

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, at Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center, 2355 Ontario Road NW. For details, visit anc1c.org. ANC 2B ANCCircle 2B Dupont

â&#x2013;  DUPONT CIRCLE

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 13, at the Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave. NW. For details, visit dupontcircleanc. net. ANC 2D ANC 2D Sheridan-Kalorama

â&#x2013;  SHERIDAN-KALORAMA

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Monday, March 18, at Our Lady Queen of the Americas Church, California Street and Phelps Place NW. For details, visit anc2d.org or contact davidanc2d01@aol.com. ANC 3B ANCPark 3B Glover

â&#x2013;  GLOVER PARK / CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, March 14, at Stoddert Elementary School and Recreation Center, 4001 Calvert St. NW. For details, call 202-338-2969, email info@anc3b.org or visit anc3b.org. ANC 3C ANC 3C Cleveland Park â&#x2013;  CLEVELAND PARK / WOODLEY PARK Woodley Park MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE HEIGHTS Massachusetts Avenue Heights CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS At the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feb. 19 meeting: â&#x2013;  resident Rick Gersten said a recent redo of Wisconsin Avenue in Glover Park â&#x20AC;&#x201D; reducing the number of through lanes in favor of a median and left-turn lanes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; slows traffic, endangers pedestrians and hurts local businesses. Gersten, founder of a Facebook page called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Glover Park Traffic Jam,â&#x20AC;? said the city plans to evaluate the lanes in a year, but he wants action sooner. Commissioner Nancy MacWood agreed that â&#x20AC;&#x153;the outcome [of the lanes] is terrible.â&#x20AC;? â&#x2013;  commissioners discussed ideas for the Oyster-Adams Bilingual School to possibly become a magnet school and/or consolidate its lower and middle schools to one campus. School officials have said that the school seeks an even mix of native speakers of English and Spanish; its Woodley Park lower school has a higher number of English speakers, while its Adams Morgan middle school has more Spanish speakers. Additionally, a policy of accepting all in-boundary students has pushed the popular school over capacity. Two Oyster parents said principal Monica Liang-Aguirre wants to consolidate the school to one building and possibly make it a magnet school without neighborhood enrollment responsibilities. They added

that there are four groups of parents working to find solutions, and they will present their work in an open meeting at the Oyster campus Feb. 27. They said Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson wants changes to be presented this spring, discussed this fall, and implemented in the next school year, though others envision a longer process. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 6-0, with Jeffrey Kaliel, Carl Roller and Catherine May absent, to support a Historic Preservation Review Board application for renovations to a home at 3200 Highland Place. Homeowners intend to remove a 1986 addition and make changes to the roof, front door and windows. Commissioners urged them to ensure that the changes reflect the original architecture. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 6-0 to support a Historic Preservation Review Board application from the owners of 3324 Newark St. to build a side addition, expand their deck and redesign steps to the back and side yards. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 6-0 to support a Historic Preservation Review Board application from the owners of 3635 Ordway St. to rebuild a wall that had been damaged by a fallen tree and widen the driveway. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 6-0 to support a public space application from the owners of 3528 Ordway St. to build a retaining wall, driveway, walkway and steps, and make a curb cut for driveway access. The commission encouraged the owners to minimize the width of the curb cut. â&#x2013;  commissioners announced that the Rock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Roll Marathon, to be held Saturday, March 16, will pass through Woodley Park. â&#x2013;  commissioner Margaret Siegel announced that a new traffic light being installed at the corner of Ordway Street and Connecticut Avenue is almost complete. â&#x2013;  commissioner Lee Brian Reba reported that the D.C. Department of Public Works has collected Christmas trees and leaves along Woodley Road and Woodley Place east of Connecticut Avenue and is aware there are more to be picked up in Woodley Park on both sides of Connecticut Avenue. Reba also reported that Accessible Crosswalk Signals for the visually impaired have been installed at Connecticut Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intersections with 24th Street, Woodley Road, Cathedral Avenue and the National Zoo entrance. Also, according to Reba, the D.C. Department of Transportation has addressed defective light boxes designating Connecticut Avenueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reversible rush-hour lane, replacing all missing or broken LED lights and ordering more LED lights so that they will be used in all the boxes. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 6-0 to hire Stephanie Zobay as the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new administrator. â&#x2013;  commission chair Victor Silveira announced that commissioners will meet privately with Ward 3 D.C. Council member Mary Cheh on

March 4. The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 18, at the 2nd District Police Headquarters, 3320 Idaho Ave. NW. For details, call 202-657-5725 or visit anc3c.org.

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Glover Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;3926 Benton St NW 'PS4BMFCZ0XOFSt0ĂŹFSFEBU 

Family-friendly semi-detached townhouse in premier neighbourhood. Living room with hook-up for gas fireplace, separate dining room, and large kitchen that opens onto 10x28-ft deck overlooking fenced backyard with parking space, lawn, perennial garden and raised-bed greenhouse. Second level includes master bedroom with full bath and walk-in dressing room, two additional bedrooms, and full bath. Bedroom, half bath, and large bonus room on finished third level. In-law suite on lower level includes wood-burning fireplace, full kitchen and bath, with separate entrance. 21 new windows on top three levels, new central AC system, new AC/heat system for lower level, walk-in closets, many amenities.

ANC 3D ANCValley 3D Spring â&#x2013;  SPRING VALLEY / WESLEY HEIGHTS Wesley Heights PALISADES / KENT / FOXHALL

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, March 6, in Room B108, West Hall, George Washington University Mount Vernon Campus, 2100 Foxhall Road NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013;  police report. â&#x2013;  community concerns. â&#x2013;  presentation by events coordinator Sandra Osborn-Peters on the 2013 Marine Corps Marathon on Sunday, Oct. 27. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application at 4624 Q St. to permit curbs, gutters and a porous driveway behind the sidewalk. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application to permit expansion of an existing rear deck at 1609 44th St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application to permit a one-story, 60-square-foot addition connecting the house and pool house at 5063 Overlook Road. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for paving and a new driveway at 5401 Hawthorne Place. â&#x2013;  discussion of D.C. Department of Transportation proposals for new traffic signals at Foxhall Road and W Street and at Dalecarlia Parkway and Loughboro Road. â&#x2013;  discussion of the location of future commission meetings. For details, call 202-363-4130 or visit anc3d.org. ANC 3E ANC 3E Tenleytown â&#x2013;  AMERICAN UNIVERSITY PARK American FRIENDSHIPUniversity HEIGHTS / Park TENLEYTOWN The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 14, in the library at Janney Elementary School, 4130 Albemarle St. NW. For details, visit anc3e.org. ANC 3F ANC 3F Forest Hills

â&#x2013;  FOREST HILLS / NORTH CLEVELAND PARK

The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 19, at the Methodist Home of D.C., 4901 Connecticut Ave. NW. For details, call 202-670-7262 or visit anc3f.us.

19

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ANC 3/4G ANCChase 3/4G Chevy â&#x2013;  CHEVYâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;CHASE

The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday, March 11, at the Chevy Chase Community Center, Connecticut Avenue and McKinley Street NW. For details, send an email to chevychaseanc3@verizon.net or call 202-363-5803.

202.256.7777 / www.GreggBusch.com

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20 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The CurrenT

Events Entertainment

Wednesday, Feb. 27

Wednesday FebRuaRy 27

Concert â&#x2013;  The Cathedral Choral Society will bring choirs from D.C. schools together with members of the DC Youth Orchestra for the eighth annual Celebrate Youth! high school choir festival, culminating in a public concert. 7 p.m. Free. Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-537-2228. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  American University of Afghanistan President C. Michael Smith and trustee Leslie Schweitzer will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;American University of Afghanistan: U.S.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Premier Legacy on Afghan Soil.â&#x20AC;? 5:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Rome Building Auditorium, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW. saiscaciforums@jhu.edu. â&#x2013;  Ingrid Anders will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kat Vespucci and the Renegade Province.â&#x20AC;? The event will include refreshments and a raffle drawing. 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Mount Pleasant Neighborhood Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-671-3122. â&#x2013;  Panelists Josefine Raab, Andrea Nelson, Laurie Snyder and Nate Larson will discuss trends in photography in conjunction with the opening of an exhibit on German photography. 6 to 8:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Goethe-Institut, 812 7th St. NW. 202-289-1200, ext. 165. â&#x2013;  Technology expert Phil Lapsley will share his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Exploding the Phone: The Untold Story of the Teenagers and Outlaws Who Hacked Ma Bell.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW.

202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  Danish performance artist Annika Lewis, director B. Stanley and members of Theater Du Jour will discuss the creative process, collaboration and the differing artistic climate in the United States and Scandinavia. 8 p.m. Free. District of Columbia Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. 202-462-7833. The discussion series will continue Sunday at 2:30 p.m. Films â&#x2013;  The Human Rights Watch Film Series will feature Lieven Corthoutsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Heaven,â&#x20AC;? about an orphanage for children living with HIV in Ethiopia. 7 p.m. $10.34. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202419-3456. â&#x2013;  The Reel Israel DC series will feature Arnon Goldfingerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Flat,â&#x20AC;? about the long-buried family secrets he discovered while clearing out the Tel Aviv apartment of his late grandmother. 8 p.m. $11.50; $9 for students; $8.75 for seniors; $8.50 for ages 12 and younger. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. Reading â&#x2013;  The Visiting Writers Series will feature poets Ishion Hutchinson and Valzhyna Mort reading from their works. 8 p.m. Free. Butler Board Room, Butler Pavilion, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-885-2908. Sale â&#x2013;  The St. Albanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opportunity Thrift Shop will hold a half-price sale. 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free admission. 3001 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-966-5288. The sale will con-

tinue daily through Saturday from 9:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.; there will also be a $7 bag sale on Friday and Saturday. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Wizards will play the Detroit Pistons. 7 p.m. $10 to $475. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-3977328. Thursday, Feb. 28

Thursday FebRuaRy 28

Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  The Jewish Social Services Agency will host a workshop about getting a job in the age of social media. 1 p.m. Free. Takoma Park Library, 416 Cedar St. NW. 202-576-7252. â&#x2013;  Capital Area Asset Builders will host a workshop on retirement planning as part of a series on personal finance. 6 to 9 p.m. Free. Suite 201, 1444 I St. NW. 202-4191440, ext. 109. Concerts â&#x2013;  Folk trio Skaran will play traditional Swedish tunes as well as its own compositions. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  National Symphony Orchestra conductor Christoph Eschenbach and Finnish violinist Pekka Kuusisto will present works by Lindberg, Sibelius and Saariaho. 7 p.m. $10 to $85. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. This concert will repeat Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  Students from the European Academy of Music and Art will perform romantic piano music. 7 p.m. $54. Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Court NW. thingstododc.com. â&#x2013;  Norwegian violinist, fiddler and composer Gjermund Larsen will perform with Andreas Utnem on organ and piano and Sondre Meisfjord on double bass. 7:30

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Wednesday, FebRuaRy 27 â&#x2013;  Concert: Singer-songwriter Eivør will perform rock, jazz, folk, pop and European classical music. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600.

and 9:30 p.m. $25. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Nine singer-songwriters will perform in rotation and with each other in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;9 Songwriterâ&#x20AC;? series. 8 p.m. $10 to $15; tickets required. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 800-745-3000. â&#x2013;  As part of the fourth annual Atlas Intersections Festival, the Great Noise Ensemble will perform musician Mark Sylvesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Banjo Chamber Concerto,â&#x20AC;? as well as the D.C. premiere of composer Ted Hearneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cantata â&#x20AC;&#x153;Katrina Ballads.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $15 to $25. Lang Theatre, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. The festival will continue through March 10. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Global Gender Program, the Institute for Global and International Studies and the National Democratic Institute will present a panel discussion about how to get more women in political office. 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free. Lindner Family Commons, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, 1957 E St. NW. bit.ly/WyKbzI. â&#x2013;  Tanya Lee Stone will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Courage Has No Color: The True Story of the Triple Nickles â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s First Black Paratroopers.â&#x20AC;? 10:30 a.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  The Embassy of Sweden will host a panel discussion on â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Prosperous Future for All â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Gender, Climate Change and Biodiversity in a Globalized World.â&#x20AC;? 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Embassy of Sweden, 2900 K St. NW. climategenderbio-eorg.eventbrite.com.

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â&#x2013;  Stephen Walt, professor of international affairs at Harvard University, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why American Foreign Policy Keeps Failing.â&#x20AC;? 4:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Room 806, Rome Building, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW. reischauer@jhu.edu. â&#x2013;  Peter Ackerman, founding chair of the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;No One Saw It Coming: Civil Resistance, the Arab Spring and the Conflicts That Will Shape the Future.â&#x20AC;? 5:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Kenney Auditorium, Nitze Building, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1740 Massachusetts Ave. NW. peterackerman. eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  Artist Tehching Hsieh will discuss his work, in which he uses his body as his medium â&#x20AC;&#x201D; for example, sealing himself in a cell for one year. 6 p.m. $10; free for students. Reservations required. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org/events. â&#x2013;  Scott Ruby, associate curator of Russian and Eastern European art at the Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, will discuss the Kremlin workshops and the emergence of Ottoman art in Russia. 6 p.m. $35 to $45; registration required. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-6670441, ext. 64. â&#x2013;  Activist Jody Williams will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Name Is Jody Williams: A Vermont Girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Winding Path to the Nobel Peace Prize.â&#x20AC;? 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. â&#x2013;  George Washington University professor and former U.S. ambassador Edward W. Gnehm will discuss the cost and consequences of U.S. intervention in Iraq. 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. Free. Harry Harding Auditorium, Elliott School of International Affairs, George Washington University, 1957 E St. NW. tinyurl.com/2013kcl. â&#x2013;  Seth Carmichael, co-owner of Carmichael Gallery in Los Angeles and New York and publisher of the contemporary art journal tasj, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Radiant Babies and Sidewalk Rebels: Inside Urban Art.â&#x20AC;? 6:45 to 8:45 p.m. $42. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Scholars Rick Potts, Anthony Barnosky and Emma Marris will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Human Touch: What Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Done to the Planet.â&#x20AC;? 6:45 to 8:15 p.m. $27. Rasmuson Theater, National Museum of the American Indian, 4th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Novelist Jamaica Kincaid will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;See Now Then.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. $12. Sidwell Friends School, 3825 Wisconsin Ave. NW. events@politics-prose.com. â&#x2013;  Editors Roy Scranton and Matt Gallagher and contributors Phil Klay and Siobhan Fallon will talk about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fire and Forget: Short Stories,â&#x20AC;? an anthology about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Parties Versus the People: How to Turn Republicans and Democrats Into Americansâ&#x20AC;? will feature former U.S. Reps. Mickey Edwards, R-Okla.; David Skaggs, D-Colo.; John Porter, R-Ill.; and Charlie Stenholm, D-Texas. 7 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013;  Polar explorer Børge Ousland will discuss his most recent expeditions to the planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s high latitudes. 7:30 p.m. $22. See events/Page 21


&

The CurrenT

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Events Entertainment Continued From Page 20 Grosvenor Auditorium, National Geographic, 1600 M St. NW. 202-8577700. Films â&#x2013;  The Noon Mystery Film Series will present John Guillerminâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death on the Nileâ&#x20AC;? as part of a spotlight on adaptations of Agatha Christie novels. Noon. Free. Room A-5, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;K-Cinemaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature Kang Je-kyuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 epic â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Way,â&#x20AC;? based on true accounts of a Korean man discovered fighting against the Allies in Europe during World War II. 6 p.m. Free; reservations required. Korean Cultural Center, 2370 Massachusetts Ave. NW. koreaculturedc.org. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Golden 60s of Czechoslovak Cinemaâ&#x20AC;? will feature JĂĄn KadĂĄr and Elmar Klosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1965 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Shop on Main Street.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Embassy of the Czech Republic, 3900 Spring of Freedom St. NW. czech_events@yahoo.com. â&#x2013;  The group HasNa will host a benefit screening of the 2011 Turkish film â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Grandfatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s People.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $20. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202478-1034.

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Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Wizards will play the New York Knicks. 7 p.m. $11 to $500. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-397-

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs â&#x2013;  In celebration of Dr. Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; birthday, the Tenley-Friendship Library will attempt to read 50 of his books at an all-day reada-thon. 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1488. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Saturday Morning at the Nationalâ&#x20AC;? will feature â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary Ann Jung: Pee Wee Pirates.â&#x20AC;? 9:30 and 11 a.m. Free; tickets required. Helen Hayes Gallery, National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202783-3372. â&#x2013;  Children ages 5 and older will learn about the winter night sky at the Rock Creek Park Planetarium. 1 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Park Nature Center and Planetarium, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202895-6070. The program will repeat See events/Page 22



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â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave.

Performance â&#x2013;  Edmund Burke School students will perform the hit musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pippin.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. $10; $5 for students. Samara Theater, Edmund Burke School, 4101 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-362-8882. The performance will repeat Saturday at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday at 5 p.m.

book sale â&#x2013;  The Janney Elementary School PTA will host a used-book sale. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free admission. Multipurpose Room, Janney Elementary School, 4130 Albemarle St. NW. 202-282-0110.

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Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Landscape architect Rodney Robinson and Hillwood executive director Kate Markert will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Behind Hillwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Changing Gardens.â&#x20AC;? 1 to 2 p.m. $20; $7 for students. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202-686-5807. â&#x2013;  Ernest Freeberg will discuss his book

Friday, maRCh 1 â&#x2013;  Performance: The In Series will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Berlin to Broadway With Kurt Weill, a Musical Voyage,â&#x20AC;? featuring a cast led by D.C. cabaret artist Sally Martin (shown). 8 p.m. $19 to $38. Source, 1835 14th St. NW. The performance will repeat March 2, 8 and 9 at 8 p.m. and March 3 and 10 at 3 p.m.

Saturday maRCh 2

Concerts â&#x2013;  The Friday Morning Music Club will present a concert of works by Beethoven and Brahms. Noon. Free. Calvary Baptist Church, 755 8th St. NW. 202-333-2075. â&#x2013;  Norwegian singer-songwriter Unni Løvlid will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Friday Morning Music Club orchestra Avanti and cellist Taeguk Mun will perform works by Tchaikovsky and Beethoven. 7:30 p.m. Free. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. 202-333-2075. â&#x2013;  The United Church will host a German jazz concert. 7:30 p.m. Free. The United Church, 1920 G St. NW. 202-3311495. â&#x2013;  The award-winning Danish group Yggdrasil will perform music that draws from ethnic material, and improvisation that ranges from free to classical style. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $25. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  As part of the Francophonie 2013 Cultural Festival, French cellist Vincent Segal and Malian kora master BallakĂŠ Sissoko will perform. 8 p.m. $15 to $28. Lang Theatre, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202399-7993. The festival will continue through April 13 at various venues. â&#x2013;  The American University Symphony Orchestra will perform works by Wagner and Ravel. 8 p.m. $10 to $15; reservations required. Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-8952787. The performance will repeat Saturday at 8 p.m.

Saturday, March 2

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Special events â&#x2013;  U.S. Rep. James E. Clyburn, D-S.C., will speak as part of a President Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cottage program celebrating Black History Month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washingtonâ&#x20AC;? will include poetry, a reading of President Lincolnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Emancipation Proclamation and music. 1:30 to 3 p.m. Free; reservations required. Scott Building, Armed Forces Retirement Home, Upshur Street and Rock Creek Church Road NW. 202-829-0436, ext.

Friday, March 1

Film â&#x2013;  The Korean Film Festival DC will begin with the area premiere of Park Chanwookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 mystery â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stoker,â&#x20AC;? starring Nicole Kidman and Dermot Mulroney. 7 p.m. Free. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-1000. The film will be shown again Saturday at 7 p.m., with the director in attendance.

7328.



Performances â&#x2013;  Comedian Benji Lovitt will perform stand-up about life in Israel as a Jewish American immigrant. 7 to 9:30 p.m. $18; tickets required. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org. â&#x2013;  D.C. storytellers will swap tales at the show â&#x20AC;&#x153;#LikeMe: Stories About Technology and Communication in the 21st Century.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. $20. Sprenger Theater, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. The performance will repeat Saturday at 7 p.m.

NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  The Party for Socialism and Liberation will present a community forum on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drones: Imperialismâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Secret Weapon.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Justice Center, 617 Florida Ave. NW. 202-234-2828.

31232. â&#x2013;  Philip Greene, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;To Have and Have Another: A Hemingway Cocktail Companion,â&#x20AC;? will sign copies of his book and host a happy hour. 6:30 p.m. $50 donation to the D.C. Public Library Foundation and Museum of the American Cocktail; reservations required. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-4943.

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22 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Continued From Page 21 Sunday at 1 p.m. â&#x2013;  At a tea time for kids and their favorite dolls, families can sample historic tea blends and desserts. Children will also learn early American dances, and make crafts for their dolls to wear home. 1 to 2:30 p.m. $20 to $25 for children; $10 for adults. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, 1644 31st St. NW. tudorplacedolltea.eventbrite.com. Class â&#x2013;  Icelandic designer Steinunn Sigurd will lead a hands-on workshop celebrating the value of knitting. 1 p.m. Free. Grand Foyer, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Concerts â&#x2013;  Pianist Paul Lewis will perform works by Schubert. 2 p.m. Free; tickets required. Coolidge Auditorium, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. 202707-5502. â&#x2013;  The Tara Linhardt Band will play oldtime, mountain and bluegrass music. 2 and 3:30 p.m. Free. Kogod Lobby, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. â&#x2013;  Norwegian violinists Ragnhild and Eldbjørg Hemsing will perform. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. $25. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Congressional Chorus will perform. 8 p.m. Free. Kogod Lobby, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. â&#x2013;  The Pacifica Quartet will perform works by Haydn, Shostakovich and Ravel. 8 p.m. $30 to $35. Kreeger Museum, 2401 Foxhall Road NW. 202-338-3552. â&#x2013;  Father and son Nasar and Kush Abadey â&#x20AC;&#x201D; along with their respective bands, Supernova and Kush â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will play classic jazz and original compositions. 8 p.m. $20 to $25. Lang Theatre, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Norwegian solar physicist PĂĽl Brekke utilizes photos and video footage from NASA satellites to discuss the visual phe-

The CurrenT

Events Entertainment nomenon known as the Northern Lights. 10:30 a.m. Free. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Persian rug dealer and collector David Zahirpour will explore regional rug types, structures and designs. 10:30 a.m. Free. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-667-0441, ext. 64. â&#x2013;  Russian scholars will participate in a symposium complementing the exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pageants of the Tsars: The Coronation Albums of the Romanovs.â&#x20AC;? 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. $65; $20 for students. Reservations required. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202686-5807. â&#x2013;  William Blum will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deadliest Export: Democracy â&#x20AC;&#x201D; The Truth About US Foreign Policy and Everything Else.â&#x20AC;? 1 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. â&#x2013;  Lawrence Kramer, professor of English and music at Fordham University, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Virtuoso Schubert.â&#x20AC;? 1 p.m. Free. Whittall Pavilion, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. 202-707-5502. â&#x2013;  Icelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HallgrĂ­mur Helgason and Swedenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Anne Swärd will discuss the internal dynamics of the family as explored in Nordic literature. 1:30 p.m. Free. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  John Douglas, former head of the FBIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Investigative Support Unit, and coauthor Mark Olshaker will discuss Douglasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; memoir â&#x20AC;&#x153;Law and Disorder: The Legendary FBI Profilerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Relentless Pursuit of Justice.â&#x20AC;? 3:30 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  Jeffrey Frank will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ike and Dick: Portrait of a Strange Political Marriage,â&#x20AC;? about the relationship between Dwight Eisenhower and Richard Nixon. 6 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  Nordic video game developers Kristoffer Touborg and Saku Lehtinen will discuss the creative process behind todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s popular games. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. Family programs â&#x2013;  The Corcoran Gallery of Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Family Day 2013 will feature face painting, gallery tours, arts and crafts, music and dancing. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free. Corcoran Gallery of

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THE LANTERN BRYN MAWR BOOKSHOP Used and Rare Books

Choose from our wonderful Books for All Ages! * Mystery * History * Military * Gardening * Politics * Art *Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s *Biographies * Foreign Languages and so much more! 3241 P Street NW, WDC 202-333-3222 lantern@hers.com Wednesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Friday 11-4; Saturday 11-5; Sunday 12-4 All proceeds are used to support Bryn Mawr College Scholarships ~ Since 1977

and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Responsible Realism,â&#x20AC;? about Belgium filmmakers Luc and Jean-Pierre Dardenne, will feature their films â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rosettaâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Son.â&#x20AC;? Film scholar Philip Mosley will introduce the series, and later sign copies of his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cinema of the Dardenne Brothers: Responsible.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215.

Saturday, maRCh 2 â&#x2013;  Concert: The Washington Performing Arts Society will present performances by singer-songwriter Suzanne Vega (shown) and local musician Justin Trawick. 8 p.m. $35. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 202-785-9727. Art, 500 17th St. NW. 202-639-1700. â&#x2013;  A family festival will commemorate the centennial of the 1913 National Woman Suffrage Parade with special displays, curator conversations, hands-on craft activities and oral history interviews. Noon to 4 p.m. Free. National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  Members of the Textile Museum will teach families how to make traditional Japanese kumihimo braids. 2 to 4 p.m. Free. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-667-0441, ext. 64. Films â&#x2013;  The Ballet in Cinema series will feature the Bolshoi Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Bayadère.â&#x20AC;? 11 a.m. $18.80. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202-419-3456. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Met: Live in HDâ&#x20AC;? will feature a showing of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Parsifal.â&#x20AC;? Noon. $18 to $24. AMC Mazza Gallerie, 5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW. fathomevents.com. â&#x2013;  The National Archives will screen the 2004 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iron Jawed Angels.â&#x20AC;? Noon. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th

meetings â&#x2013;  The Shaw Reading Club will meet to discuss the works of Nobel laureates. 10 a.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. â&#x2013;  The Knit & Lit Club will instruct beginners interested in learning to knit or crochet. 3 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. Performances â&#x2013;  The Silk Road Dance Company, classical Indian dance artist Jayantee PaineGanguly and soloist Ahmad Maaty will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bollywood Fever,â&#x20AC;? a celebration of dance scenes from Indian films. 1:30 p.m. $20; $15 for students and seniors. Lang Theatre, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. â&#x2013;  High school poets will compete in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Grand Slam Finalsâ&#x20AC;? for the 2013 DC Youth Slam Team. 4 to 6 p.m. $10 in advance; $15 at the door. GALA Theatre, 3333 14th St. NW. eventbrite.com/event/5484313730. â&#x2013;  Dancer Lionel Popkin will perform â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ruth Doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Live Here Anymore,â&#x20AC;? inspired by the career of Ruth St. Denis. 8 p.m. $8 to $22. Dance Place, 3225 8th St. NE. 202-269-1600. The performance will repeat Sunday at 7 p.m. â&#x2013;  The American University Players will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody Does It,â&#x20AC;? written and performed by Erin Hannigan. 8:30 to 10 p.m. Free. Kreeger Auditorium, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. auplayers@gmail.com.

â&#x2013;  The Friday Morning Music Club will present a solo recital by Matthew Lipman, winner of the 2012 Washington International Competition for Strings and the 2009 Johansen International Competition for Young String Players. 4 p.m. $20; reservations suggested. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org/music. â&#x2013;  The professional Choir of Christ Church will perform the music of Herbert W. Sumsion, George Dyson and John Goss. 5 p.m. Free. Christ Church, Georgetown, 31st and O streets NW. 202-333-6677. â&#x2013;  South Carolina-based organist Charles Tompkins will perform. 5:15 p.m. $10 donation suggested. Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-537-2228. â&#x2013;  The Vienna Piano Trio will perform music by Beethoven, Haydn and SaintSaĂŤns. 6:30 p.m. Free. West Garden Court, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-842-6941. â&#x2013;  Norwegian musical group Tord Gustavsen Ensemble will perform jazz infused with Scandinavian folk, gospel and Caribbean music. 7:30 p.m. $29. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Smithsonian Chamber Orchestra will perform works by Ravel, Copland and Shostakovich. 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. $22 to $28. Grand Salon, Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. 202633-3030. Demonstration â&#x2013;  Denmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mads Refslund, Norwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Morten Sohlberg and Swedenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ulrika Bengtsson will demonstrate â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Nordic Cuisine.â&#x20AC;? 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600.

Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Poet and essayist Gigi Bradford will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Faith and Poetry: Ordinary Special event Epiphanies.â&#x20AC;? 10 a.m. Free. St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x2013;  The Dance Institute of Washington Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, 16th will host a youth open house with workand H streets NW. 202-347-8766. shops, registration drives, small performances and more. 3 to 7 p.m. Free. Dance â&#x2013;  Swedish, Danish, Norwegian and Finnish crime novelists will discuss the Institute of Washington, 3400 14th St. Nordic noir genre and its characteristics. NW. 202-371-9656. An adult open house Noon and 3 p.m. Free. Terrace Gallery, will be held Sunday from 3 to 5:30 p.m. Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Sporting event â&#x2013;  Amanda JirĂłn-Murphy, director of â&#x2013;  The Harlem Globetrotters will show Hamiltonian Gallery, will discuss artist off their one-of-a-kind basketball skills. 1 Anna Ancher and D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s thriving contempop.m. $15 to $154. Verizon Center, 601 F rary art community. 1 to 2 p.m. Free. St. NW. 202-397-7328. National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. 202-783-7370. Sunday, March 3 â&#x2013;  Gerald Shea will share his memoir Sunday maRCh 3 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Song Without Words: Discovering My Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs Deafness Halfway Through Life,â&#x20AC;? about the â&#x2013;  A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lego Buildâ&#x20AC;? session will focus on ways he compensated for his hearing loss. how to make strong, tall towers (for ages 6 1 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 and older). 10:30 a.m. to noon. $15 to Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. $20 per child; free for adults. National â&#x2013;  Phillip F. Schewe, director of commuBuilding Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272- nication at Marylandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Joint Quantum 2448. Institute, will discuss his biography â&#x2013;  As part of National Invasive Species â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maverick Genius: The Pioneering Odyssey Awareness Week, a Kids Day at the U.S. of Freeman Dyson.â&#x20AC;? 5 p.m. Free. Politics Botanic Garden will feature hands-on activ- and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. ities, demonstrations, songs and stories. 202-364-1919. Noon to 3 p.m. Free. Conservatory West â&#x2013;  Nancy Thurston, author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big Gallery, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Topics at Midnight: A Texas Girl Wakes Up Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. to Race, Class, Gender and Herself,â&#x20AC;? will participate in a discussion about using Concerts memoirs as vehicles to tell personal sto â&#x2013;  The American Youth Chorus will perries about race. 5 to 7 p.m. Free. Langston form. 3 p.m. Free. Kogod Lobby, Atlas Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. NW. 202-387-7638. 202-399-7993. See events/Page 24


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The CurrenT

Events Entertainment

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

23

Galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s offerings include look at spirituality, identity

S

tudio Gallery will open three exhibits today and continue them through March 23. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hannaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tableâ&#x20AC;? features paintings by Chris Chernow of objects commonly found on kitchen tables. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Found Artâ&#x20AC;? presents drawings and paint-

On exhibit ings by Amy Davis meant to be displayed together. Works by Angelika Wamsler ask questions about identity and spirituality. A â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Fridayâ&#x20AC;? reception will take place Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., and an artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; reception will be held March 9 from 4 to 6 p.m. Located at 2108 R St. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Friday from 1 to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 6 p.m. 202-2328734. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little Theaters,â&#x20AC;? featuring wall-hanging sculptures in the form of assemblage shadow boxes by Foggy Bottom artist J. Ford

Huffman, will open tomorrow in the Modern Times Coffeehouse at Politics and Prose. The exhibit will continue through April 4. An opening reception will take place Saturday from 7 to 9 p.m. Located at 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW, the exhibit is open Monday from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., Tuesday through Saturday from 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. and Sunday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. 202-362-2408. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Through the Trees,â&#x20AC;? presenting new paintings by Virginia Commonwealth University art professor Kurt Godwin, will open Friday at Cross MacKenzie Gallery and continue through April 3. An opening reception will take place Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. Located at 2026 R St. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202-333-7970. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Calling,â&#x20AC;? featuring mixed-media artist Lien Yao, will open Friday at Parish Gallery and continue through March 13. An opening reception will take place Sunday from 2:30 to 4:30 p.m. Located at 1054 31st St. NW, the gallery is

open Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202-994-2310. â&#x2013;  Touchstone Gallery will open two exhibits Friday and continue them through March 30. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iconsâ&#x20AC;? presents paintings by Steve Alderton inspired by the stylized techniques found in Byzantine icons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greek to Meâ&#x20AC;? highlights Timothy Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reinterpretations of Greek mythology through classical portraiture with a 21stcentury twist. An opening reception will take place Friday from 6 to 8:30 p.m. Previews will take place today and tomorrow from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Located at 901 New York Ave. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. 202-347-2787. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diffusion,â&#x20AC;? featuring drawings by Amy Lin about cultural diffusion, will open Saturday at Addison/Ripley Fine Art and continue through April 27. An artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reception will take place Saturday from 5 to 7 p.m. Located at 1670 Wisconsin Ave. NW, the

Washington National Opera to stage â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Normaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

angelika Wamslerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;between heaven and earthâ&#x20AC;? is on exhibit at Studio Gallery. gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 202-338-5180. â&#x2013;  Marsha Mateyka Gallery opened an exhibit last week of white line woodcuts by Maryland artist Aline Feldman and will continue it through March 30. An artistâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reception will take place Saturday from 4 to 6 p.m. Located at 2012 R St. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202-328-0088.

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he Washington National Opera will stage Vincenzo Belliniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Normaâ&#x20AC;? March 9 through 24 in the Kennedy Center Opera House. In the midst of the Gallic-Roman wars, the Druid priestess Norma secretly carries on a love affair with

On StaGe her sworn enemy Pollione. When the younger priestess Adalgisa catches Pollioneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eye, the mystic Norma turns warrior, prepared to seek revenge for the betrayal. Soprano Angela Meade and mezzo-soprano Dolora Zajick star in the production, which is led by director Anne Bogart and conductor Daniele Rustioni. Performance times are 7 p.m. March 9 and 18; 7:30 p.m. March 12, 15 and 21; and 2 p.m. March 24. Tickets cost $25 to $300. 202-467-4600; kennedy-center.org. â&#x2013;  Productions from Norway, Denmark, Finland and Sweden will visit D.C. over the next two weeks as part of the Kennedy Centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Nordic Cool 2013 festival. Norwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Theatre will present Henrik Ibsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hedda Gablerâ&#x20AC;? Feb. 27. The emotionally potent drama portrays a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s alienation from â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and suffocation by â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the bourgeois society in which she takes part. Denmarkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Teatret Gruppe 38 will stage â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Sonatina,â&#x20AC;? a comedic take on the classic childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s story of Little Red Riding Hood, March 2 and 3. In this version, a chicken egg comes to the rescue. Finlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tampere Workersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Theatre will Studio theatre has present â&#x20AC;&#x153;The extended its run of Warmbloodedâ&#x20AC;? March 2 Stephen adly Guirgisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; and 3. Once the proud play through march 24. owners of a small farm, the Kotalas now live beneath the overpass of a forgotten highway alongside a motley crew of drunks and Romanian gypsies. Swedenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Royal Dramatic Theatre will stage â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fanny and Alexander,â&#x20AC;? its adaptation of Ingmar Bergmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oscar-winning film, March 7 and 9. Another Swedish troupe, Backa Teater, will round

Soprano angela meade stars in the Washington National Operaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Norma.â&#x20AC;? out the festivalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theatrical offerings with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Little King Mattiasâ&#x20AC;? March 9 and 10. In this U.S. premiere, an 11-year-old becomes king, gives his ministers the boot and transfers power to the children of his kingdom. Performance times vary. Tickets cost $18 to $80. 202-467-4600; kennedy-center.org. â&#x2013;  Georgetown University alumna Allie Villarreal will present her solo work â&#x20AC;&#x153;inFATuationâ&#x20AC;? March 2 through 7 as part of the fourth annual Intersections Festival at the Atlas Performing Arts Center. The piece invites audiences to step into the very big shoes of an array of engaging characters, all sharing the experience of living with fat â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and taking it in stride. Continuing through March 10, the centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s threeweek Intersections Festival will feature 600-plus artists in 100-plus performances. The diverse lineup is intended to show the collaborative energy of artists and audiences in boundary-crossing performances and events. Performance times for â&#x20AC;&#x153;inFATuationâ&#x20AC;? are 9:30 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday and 7 p.m. Thursday. Tickets cost $15 to $20. The Atlas is located at 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993; intersectionsdc.org. â&#x2013;  The Studio Theatre has extended Stephen Adly Guirgisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; quick-paced black comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Mother-----With the Hatâ&#x20AC;? through March 24. Performance times are 8 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday, 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $39 to $82. The theater is located at 1501 14th St. NW. 202-332-3300; studiotheatre.org.

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24 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Events Entertainment

Continued From Page 22 â&#x2013;  Margaret Brunson will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;New Growth: How My Hair Saved My Life.â&#x20AC;? 5:30 to 7 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. â&#x2013;  Recent winners of the Nordic Council Literature Prize will discuss the Nordic literary tradition. 6:30 p.m. Free. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Film â&#x2013;  The National Gallery of Art will screen Charles Burnettâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1983 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;My Brotherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Weddingâ&#x20AC;? and Robert Wheatonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1986 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Little Off Markâ&#x20AC;? as part of its series â&#x20AC;&#x153;L.A. Rebellion: Creating a New Black Cinema.â&#x20AC;? 4:30 p.m. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202737-4215. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Wizards will play the Philadelphia 76ers. 6 p.m. $10 to $475. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-3977328. Monday, March 4

Monday maRCh 4

Concerts â&#x2013;  Singer-songwritter Rasmus Lyberth and accordion virtuoso Greta SundstrĂśm will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Iceland Symphony Orchestra will perform a work by composer Sibelius, as

well as the U.S. premiere of two works by Icelandic composers Vilmarsson and Thorvaldsdottir. Pianist Garrick Ohlsson will join the orchestra to perform Griegâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Piano Concerto in A minor.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. $10 to $64. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Swedish mezzosoprano Anne Sofie von Otter (shown) will perform with pianist Bengt Forsberg. 7:30 p.m. $45. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Panelists will discuss the federal governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s role in charting the next era of affordable housing in the U.S. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Free; reservations required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. â&#x2013;  Karen Mapp and Mark Warren will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Match on Dry Grass: Community Organizing for School Reform.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. â&#x2013;  Historian Harry Butowsky will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Churchillâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Secret Army: Confusion Was Their Business.â&#x20AC;? 6:45 to 8:15 p.m. $18 to $25. Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Sarah Erdreich will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Generation Roe: Inside the Future of the Pro-Choice Movement.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free.

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Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  Former U.S. Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, will speak about his time on Capitol Hill, his presidential campaigns and the future of American liberties and fiscal policy. 7 p.m. $10. Lisner Auditorium, George Washington University, 730 21st St. NW. 202-9946800. â&#x2013;  Musicologist Saul Lilienstein will trace the evolution of Mozart from the wonder child of Salzburg to the final years of artistic triumph in Vienna. 7 p.m. $15. South Opera Tier Lounge, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Translators Steven T. Murray and Tiina Nunnally will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Classics to Crime â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Translating Nordic Fiction for American Readers.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Israeli Arab writer and satirist Sayed Kashua, creator of the popular Israeli television show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arab Labor,â&#x20AC;? will discuss the challenges and opportunities of being caught between two cultures. As part of the event, Kashua will show an episode from his showâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s third season. 7:30 to 9 p.m. $15 to $18; tickets required. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org. Films â&#x2013;  The Marvelous Movie Mondays series will feature â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizen Kane,â&#x20AC;? Orson Wellesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; classic film about a publishing tycoon. 2 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. â&#x2013;  A film series on important photographers will feature Heinz BĂźtlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2003 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Impassioned Eye,â&#x20AC;? with introductory remarks by Norbert Bärlocher of the Embassy of Switzerland. 6:30 p.m. $4 to $7. Goethe-Institut, 812 7th St. NW. 202-289-1200, ext. 160. Tuesday, March 5

Tuesday maRCh 5

Concerts â&#x2013;  The Washington Bach Consort will perform with organist Paul Skevington. 12:10 p.m. Free. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. 202-347-2635. â&#x2013;  Icelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Duo Harpverk will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  Zalmen Mlotek, artistic director of the National Yiddish Theatre-Folksbiene, will explore 100 years of Yiddish music with operetta arias, vaudeville ballads, klezmer music, a Yiddish-English version of Gilbert and Sullivan and more. 7 p.m. $12    

to $15. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org. â&#x2013;  Young Palestinian and Israeli musicians will perform together as part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heartbeatâ&#x20AC;? youth tour. 9 to 11 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at American University will present a talk by Daniel Rosove, J Street director of leadership outreach, on American politics, the Middle East and the importance of achieving a two-state solution. 12:15 to 1:15 p.m. Temple Baptist Church, 3850 Nebraska Ave. NW. 202-895-4860. â&#x2013;  Retired U.S. Air Force Col. Pat Webb will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Solving the Mystery of Amelia Earhartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crash.â&#x20AC;? Luncheon at 12:15 p.m.; program at 1 p.m. $10 to $30. Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Democratic Club, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-232-7363. â&#x2013;  Labor organizer Jane McAlevey will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raising Expectations (and Raising Hell): My Decade Fighting for the Labor Movement.â&#x20AC;? 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. â&#x2013;  Finnish author Monika Fagerholm and Icelandic novelist KristĂ­n Ă&#x201C;marsdĂłttir will join other panelists to discuss magical realism in Nordic literature. 7 p.m. Free. Terrace Gallery, Kennedy Center. 202-4674600. â&#x2013;  The National Archives and the National Capital Planning Commission will host a panel discussion on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heightened Conversations: Global Perspectives on the Impact of Building Heights in National Capitals.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Constitution Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. â&#x2013;  Ian MacKaye â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a D.C. native, musician, and co-founder of Dischord Records â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will discuss growing up in the capital, the culture of Washington in the 1980s, and the legacy of D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s punk rock music scene. 7 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. 202-639-1700. â&#x2013;  Author Jodi Picoult will discuss her novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Storyteller,â&#x20AC;? about painful family memories. 7 p.m. $15. Sidwell Friends School, 3825 Wisconsin Ave. NW. brownpapertickets.com/event/314440. â&#x2013;  Liz Lerman will discuss her book of essays â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hiking the Horizontal: Field Notes From a Choreographer.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Arts Club of Washington, 2017 I St. NW. 202331-7282, ext. 3. â&#x2013;  Boston Globe journalists Kevin Cullen and Shelley Murphy will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whitey Bulger: Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Wanted Gangster and the Manhunt That Brought Him to Justice.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Film â&#x2013;  As part of its Spy Movies series, the Georgetown Library will screen the 2011 Cold War thriller â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy.â&#x20AC;? 6 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Capitals will play the Boston Bruins. 7 p.m. $44 to $365. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-3977328.

tours â&#x2013;  A tour of Tudor Place will focus on the history and horticulture of the estateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trees, heirloom plants and flowers. 10 a.m. $10; reservations suggested. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, 1644 31st St. NW. 202-965-0400. â&#x2013;  A behind-the-scenes tour will allow visitors to view the rarely seen interiors of objects in the Dumbarton House and Tudor Place collections. 6:30 p.m. $20. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW. snoopingwiththecurators.eventbrite.com. The tour will continue March 12 at 6:30 pm. at Tudor Place Historic House and Garden. Wednesday, March 6

Wednesday maRCh 6

Concerts â&#x2013;  The Happenings at the Harman lunchtime series will feature a performance by opera company UrbanArias. Noon. Free. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. 202-547-1122. â&#x2013;  Flutist Bianca Garcia and organist Michael Lodico will perform the world premiere of a new work by Stephen Cabell. 12:10 p.m. Free. St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, Lafayette Square, 16th and H streets NW. 202-347-8766. â&#x2013;  Sousou and Maher Cissoko â&#x20AC;&#x201D; winners of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Newcomerâ&#x20AC;? prize at the 2010 Swedish Folk and World Music Gala, and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Band of the Yearâ&#x20AC;? at the 2011 event â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Author, researcher and neighborhood historian Mara Cherkasky will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mount Pleasant: An Historical Overview.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-671-3122. â&#x2013;  Principals and founders Andrea Leers and Jane Weinzapfel will discuss the work of Boston-based Leers Weinzapfel Associates. 6:30 to 8 p.m. $12 to $20; reservations required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. â&#x2013;  Chefs Todd and Ellen Kaskoff Gray will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The New Jewish Table.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. $15. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 877-987-6487. â&#x2013;  Rebecca Gale will discuss her novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trying,â&#x20AC;? about a relationship complicated by government secrets. 7 p.m. Free. Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1488. â&#x2013;  Susan Orlins will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Confessions of a Worrywart: Husbands, Lovers, Mothers, and Others.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202724-8707. â&#x2013;  Mohsin Hamid will discuss his novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;How to Get Filthy Rich in Rising Asia.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  A discussion series on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Home Sweet Homeâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about the notion of â&#x20AC;&#x153;homeâ&#x20AC;? as a place of nostalgia, security and betrayal â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will focus on Nell Freudenbergerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Newlyweds.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. Performances â&#x2013;  Dance company Furia Flamenca will perform. 5:30 p.m. Free. Sidney Harman Hall, 610 F St. NW. 202-547-1122. â&#x2013;  Carte Blanche, the Norwegian National Company of Contemporary Dance, will perform Sharon Eyal and Gai Bacharâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Corps de Walk.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. $29. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. The performance will repeat Thursday at 7:30 p.m.


The Current

DISPATCHES

wonder where we will land? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Oliver Chipman and Brandon Milligan, fifth-graders

From Page 15 detachable cleats, crutches with attachments, a microphone for costumes, warming bicycle handlebars, and light-up hiking boots! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ally Knapp and Eden Weinstein, fifth-graders

Key Elementary

On Feb. 1, Key students attended a World Family Passport Presentation as we traveled to Colombia. Mr. Bernado Alvarez, parent of kindergartner Martin Alvarez from Ms. Lindenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class, led the presentation. We learned many things about Colombia, including its geography, animal life, terrain and language. The presentation included a video, popular music, and photos of popular attractions such as Lake Guatavita, which spurred the legend of El Dorado. We also learned about animals such as the pink river dolphin and the Andean condor. Students and staff were also fascinated to learn Bogata is the third highest capital city in the world, rising 8,612 feet above sea level. Students are excited to travel to another continent for our next Passport Presentation in March! I

Mann Elementary

The first grade has been counting and marking the first 100 days of school. This year, we celebrated the 100th day of school on Feb. 11. Each first-grader was asked to make projects showing 100 objects arranged in groups of two, five, 10, 20 or 50. All of the objects had to be the same and put together at home. Some of the items that students collected and assembled were cereal, Legos, candy, seeds, nails and beads. On Feb. 11, the first-graders shared their projects and participated in different activities. Some of the activities were making necklaces out of 100 pieces of cereal, rolling die and writing down the number that came up most often, and creating a collage out of 100 pieces of construction paper. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Joseph Laroski, third-grader

Maret School

Every year in February, we have Intensive Study Week. We study one subject for the week. This year we studied â&#x20AC;&#x153;air and spaceâ&#x20AC;? and visited museums. At the Smithsonian, we watched

an IMAX movie about the Hubble telescope. We saw how a team of astronauts repaired it with lots of teamwork and courage. We saw how stars form in the Orion Nebula and how they die and sometimes form black holes. Another day we went to a planetarium. We looked up at a rounded ceiling that was covered with lights to represent the stars and planets. We saw Orionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Belt and the Milky Way. Lines drawn between the stars showed us what the whole constellation looked like in the minds of the people who named it. When we visited the UdvarHazy Center, we went into an airplane and see how to control it. We also saw the space shuttle Discovery and a workroom bigger than a gymnasium, where planes and space ships are repaired for display. We visited the observation tower and saw planes land and take off from Dulles Airport. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ms. Tomasi-Carrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first-graders

Murch Elementary

Our papier-mâchÊ planets started out a little rough. Our teacher, Ms. George, told us we were going to make a model of the solar system, so we headed to the science lab to begin. We first made a ball-like form out of paper and tape. Each

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 had to be in proportion to the sun. We next worked on the sun. The next day we started to papier-mâchÊ the planets. We massaged the planets with papier-mâchÊ and then put pieces of paper on the planet. The last color we did would be the base color of the planet! We added finishing touches. Mercury used paint. Venus used tissue paper and paint. Earth used tissue paper. Mars used paint and glit-

ter to make a terrestrial vibe. Saturn used paint and more paint. Jupiter used tissue paper. It really looked like it was moving! Uranus used paint and tissue paper. Neptune used cotton balls and pompom strings. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Annie Hedgepeth, third-grader

St. Albans School

In the winter sport of swimming, See Dispatches/Page 30

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26 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013

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â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;˘ Repair or New Work â&#x20AC;˘ Repairing & Replacing Storm Windows, Doors & Cabinets, etc. â&#x20AC;˘ Plaster & Drywall Repair â&#x20AC;˘ Painting & Finishing â&#x20AC;˘ Stripping Doors & Trim â&#x20AC;˘ Building Shelves, Storage & Laundry Facilities â&#x20AC;˘ Countertops â&#x20AC;˘ And Much More!

6HH 2XU &RPSOHWH %DWKURRP 6KRZURRP DW &RQQHFWLFXW$YH1::DVKLQJWRQ'& %$7+  Â&#x2021; ZZZ%DWK([SUHVVFRP %DWK([SUHVV LV D 'LYLVLRQ RI 7KH .LWFKHQ *XLOG ZKHUH ZHŇ&#x2039;YH EHHQ GHVLJQLQJ DQG EXLOGLQJ EHDXWLIXO EDWKURRPV DQG NLWFKHQV VLQFH 

LANDSCAPING

Garden Maintenance Zen Pruning Garden Maintenance

Christine E. S. Saunderson Kilby 1552 44th St., NW Washington, D.C. 20007

202-338-0454 202-669-4347

Stone and Brick, New and Repair, Walks, Walls, Patios, Fireplaces, housefronts, hauling and bobcat work. Historic Restoration Specialist RJ, Cooley 301-540-3127 Licensed & Insured

Free Estimates

P. MULLINS CONCRETE All Types of Concrete Driveways â&#x20AC;˘ Sidewalks â&#x20AC;˘ Floors / Slabs Wheelchair Ramps â&#x20AC;˘ Retaining Walls Step Repair/ New Steps â&#x20AC;˘ Brickpointing

Paul Mullins 202-270-8973 F re e E s t i m a t e s â&#x20AC;˘ F u l l y I n s u re d

Our craftsmen, who for 30 years have done quality work, would work on your project. Our shop can build or duplicate almost anything. We are a design & build firm. We are kitchen and bath designers. We cam bid on your plans.

Joel Truitt Builders, Inc. 734 7th St., SE

202-547-2707 Quality since 1972

APPALOOSA CONTRACTORS Drainage Problems â&#x20AC;˘ Timber â&#x20AC;˘ Walls â&#x20AC;˘ Flagstone â&#x20AC;˘ Walkways â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘ Patios â&#x20AC;˘ Fencing Landscape Design & Installation â&#x20AC;˘ Tree Service

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; With The Boss Always On The Job â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Say You Saw it in

THE CURRENT

Call 301-947-6811 or 301-908-1807 For FREE Estimate 30 years Experience â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Licensed & Insured â&#x20AC;&#x201D; MD Tree Expert #385

Say You Saw it in

THE CURRENT

THE CURRENT

THE CURRENT


28 WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013

THE CURRENT

THE CURRENT

Service Directory

WWW.CURRENTNEWSPAPERS.COM

â&#x2DC;&#x17D; 202/244-7223 (FAX) 202/363-9850

ROOFING

PAINTING

7:5RRĂ&#x20AC;QJ *XWWHUV

$OOW\SHVRI URRĂ&#x20AC;QJÂ&#x2021;1HZLQVWDOODWLRQDQGUHSDLUVÂ&#x2021;*XWWHU&OHDQLQJ DQG5HSODFHPHQWÂ&#x2021;$OO\RXUSDLQWLQJQHHGVÂ&#x2021;1RMREWRRVPDOO Â&#x2021;'HDOGLUHFWO\ZLWKRZQHUÂ&#x2021;/LFHQVHGDQG,QVXUHG # MHIC 127301

TENLEYTOWN ENLEYTOWN PAINTING AINTING â&#x20AC;&#x153;We grew up in your neighborhood â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ask your neighbors about us.â&#x20AC;?

Interior/Exterior Painting Power Washing â&#x20AC;˘ Deck Cleaning Gutter Cleaning â&#x20AC;˘ General Carpentry 202.244.2325

Bonded â&#x20AC;˘ Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Since 1980

Plumbing

Professional Plumbing Services

John A. Maroulis Painting Company 301-649-1097 email us at jampco@yahoo.com

â&#x20AC;˘ Interior & Exterior â&#x20AC;˘ Plastering â&#x20AC;˘ Drywall QUALITY isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t our goal, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our STANDARD! 3 year warranty 15% OFF WITH THIS AD LIC.# 23799 / Bonded / Insured

Weekend and Evening Hours For your Convenience

202-553-5019

â&#x20AC;˘ Flat â&#x20AC;˘ Rubber â&#x20AC;˘ Slate â&#x20AC;˘ Metal â&#x20AC;˘ Tiles & Shingles â&#x20AC;˘ Vinyl and Aluminum Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Skylights â&#x20AC;˘ Gutters & Downspouts â&#x20AC;˘ Chimneys â&#x20AC;˘ Waterproofing

HALLIDAY

ROOFING Stopping Leaks is our Specialty!

202.637.8808 We Do it All!! Our Guarantees â&#x20AC;˘ Our work comes with warranties covering workmanship and material. â&#x20AC;˘ Straight Forward pricing - No surprises. â&#x20AC;˘ 24-hour emergency response. â&#x20AC;˘ 100% satisfaction - We do not stop until you are happy!

Licensed, bonded & Insured, D.C.

500 off

FREE ESTIMATES LICENSED â&#x20AC;˘ BONDED â&#x20AC;˘ INSURED

ANY NEW SKYLIGHT

250 off

$

exp. 11/30/10

301-933-1247

Seamless Gutters Experts

New Roofs, Maintenance & Repairs

$ INTERIOR â&#x20AC;˘ EXTERIOR DC LIC. # 2811â&#x20AC;˘ MD LIC. # 86954



THE BEST VALUE FOR NEW ROOFS AND ROOF REPAIR IN DC

ANY NEW ROOF

â&#x20AC;˘ All plumbing Services Available â&#x20AC;˘ Good old-fashioned Service

Call Today

Free Estimates

exp. 11/30/10

HALLIDAY

HALLIDAY

ROOFING

ROOFING

2 202.637.8808

2 202.637.8808

ANY ROOF REPAIR

250 off

$

FULL GUTTER INSTALLATION

100 off

$

exp. 11/30/10

exp. 11/30/10

HALLIDAY

HALLIDAY

LQWHULRU H[WHULRU FXVWRP SDLQWLQJ FDUSHQWU\ SRZHU ZDVKLQJ VWDLQLQJ VHDOLQJ GU\ZDOO SODVWHU UHSDLU GHVLJQ FRQVXOWLQJ All advertising for the sale or rental of dwelling units herein are subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 which makes it illegal to indicate â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitations or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, national origin, handicapped, familial status or national origin, or any intention to make any such preferences, limitations or discriminations.â&#x20AC;? State law forbids discrimination based on factors in addition to those protected under federal law.



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Slate Shingle 5 YEAR LABOR GUARANTEE MHIC - 25881

ROOFING

ROOFING

2 202.637.8808

2 202.637.8808

Tile Tin

ROOFING SYSTEMS "-&*3 '& *12+', Roof Coatings #' #--3 ,) #2%%'/ #--(0

301-674-1991 MD OFFICE Residential

#--( #'.$*/0 !211'/*,)

202-828-0713 DC OFFICE

Serving the Entire Metro Area

Commerical

PLUMBING

The Current Newspapers will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised are available on an equal housing opportunity basis.

More Roofing Ads on the next Page Say You Saw it in

THE CURRENT


WWW.CURRENTNEWSPAPERS.COM

THE CURRENT

THE CURRENT

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 2013 29

Service Directory ROOFING

Over 50 years Experience â&#x20AC;˘ Featured on HGTV

202-276-5004 www.FamilyRoofingLLC.com â&#x20AC;˘ Serving DC & Surrounding Areas â&#x20AC;˘ Member NRCA

Domestic Available

WINDOWS & DOORS

We Take Pride in Our Quality Work!

Family ROOFING

â&#x2DC;&#x17D; 202/244-7223 (FAX) 202/363-9850

FreeEstimates

4 4 Emergency Service 4 Competitive Low Costs

Experts in: Slate and Flat Roofs Gutters Roof Coatings Shingles and Copper Member BBB Lic. Bonded Insured

4 4 4 4 4 4

Stopping leaks has been our specialty since 1962!

WINDOW WASHERS, ETC...

POSITION WANTED: After-school care, supervise homework. Shopping, cooking, housekeeping, Exper., excellent references. Call 301-674-7457.

Celebrating 15 years

Domestic Wanted

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALISTS

SERVING UPPER N.W.

202-337-0351 In the heart of the Palisades since 1993

Residential Specialists Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Gutters â&#x20AC;˘ Power Washing DC â&#x20AC;˘ MD â&#x20AC;˘ VA

F R E E E ST IM AT E S

Fully Bonded & Insured

IWCA

PART-TIME (20 hrs pr wk @ $22 hr) housekeeper wanted in Bethesda. Primary duties include housekeeping, laundry, walk dog, run errands, some cooking, and serve chef prepared meals. Must be able to work weekends/holidays, availability to travel in August, proficient in English and a safe driver with reliable transportation. If interested send a summary/outline of your experience and qualifications to attnprivatehousemanager@gmail.com, mail to Attn: Dayle, P.O. Box 30585, Bethesda, MD 20824 or fax 301-654-9251.

Member, International Window Cleaning Association â&#x20AC;˘ In the heart of the Palisades since 1993

Free estimates

Family owned & operated

HORN&COMPANY ROOFING and

New roofs Metal Rubber Copper Slate

GUT TERS

Shingle Roof repairs Roof coatings Gutters Skylights

Masonry work Tuck pointing Waterproofing Chimney repairs and more

202.696.3560

Call now mention this ad and save 20%

TREE SERVICES

Classified Ads Accounting

Computers

ROBERT BEATSON, II

Firewood Available for Residential deliveries or Commercial Firewood Pick up at Also Available 4521 Kenilworth Call Ave. 202.554.4100 Bladensburg, MD

FIREWOOD

Attorney/Accountant Floors

Former IRS Attorney Admitted to DC, MD, VA & NY Bars

Chevy Chase Floor Waxing Service

All Types of Federal, State, Local & Foreign Taxes Individual, Business, Trusts, Estates IRS & State Tax Audit Matters Retur Amended R eturns, Late Returns, Back Tax Taxes Business Law, Business Formation & Finance Contracts, Civil Litigation, Mediation Trusts, Estates, Wills, Probate, Real Estate

Polishing, buffing, waxing, cleaning, all types of floors, paste wax service for wood floors. Wall-to-wall carpet removal. Careful workmanship. Licensed Bonded Insured 301-656-9274, Chevy Chase, MD

Handyman Antiq. & Collectibles

Your Neighborhood

HANDYMAN

CHAIR CANING

Donald Davidson 202-744-3647

Seat Weaving â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All types

Cane * Rush * Danish * Wicker Repairs * Reglue

(

References

email: chairsandseats@aol.com

STEVE YOUNG â&#x20AC;˘ 202-966-8810

WINDOWS & DOORS

Furniture Repair & Refinishing Antique Restoration Please visit our website for more info www.bluemaplewoodworks.com 301-379-1240

     

               

     

(301) 642-4526

Cleaning Services A DEDICATED, honest woman needs to work one day a week. Good refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Please call Rosario 703-581-0769.

MGL CLEANING SERVICE Experienced â&#x20AC;˘ Same Team Everytime Lic. Bonded, Ins. Our customers recommend us

25% off your first clean! Mario & Estella: 202-491-6767-703-798-4143

THE CURRENT

MY EXCELLENT, reliable and thorough housekeeper is looking for daily work. Highly recommended. Call Jane, 202-494-0357.

THE CURRENT

Call Michael for estimate: 202-486-3145 www.computeroo.net New Computer? iPod? Digital Camera? NW DC resident with adult training background will teach you to use the Internet, e-mail, Windows, Microsoft Word, numerous other programs, or other electronic devices. Help with purchase and setup available. Mac experience. Call Brett Geranen at (202) 486-6189. ComputerTutorDC@gmail.com

THE CURRENT

Recommended in May â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03,â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washingtonian Magazineâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Small custom carpentry projects â&#x20AC;˘ Furniture repair & Refinishing â&#x20AC;˘Trimwork, painting â&#x20AC;˘ Miscellaneous household repairs Experienced woodworker Good references, reasonable rates Philippe Mougne: 202-686-6196 phmougne@yahoo.com

Hauling/Trash Removal

202-635-7860

Good References, Free Estimates

Computer problems solved, control pop-ups & spam, upgrades, tune-up, DSL / Cable modem, network, wireless, virus recovery etc. Friendly service, home or business. Best rates.

â&#x20AC;˘ Sash Cords, Glass, Wood Rot, Blinds â&#x20AC;˘ Doors, Locks, Mail-Slots, Shelves â&#x20AC;˘ Decks, Steps, Banisters & Moulding â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry, Tub Caulking & Safety Bars â&#x20AC;˘ Furniture Assembly & Art Hanging 23 years experience

Bulk Trash Low VPery ric Pick Up es â&#x20AC;˘ Sofas as low as $15.00 â&#x20AC;˘ Appliances as low as $25.00 â&#x20AC;˘ Yards, basement & attic clean-up â&#x20AC;˘ Monthly contracts available

Health MASSAGE THERAPIST Licensed & Board Certified Your Home or My Office 60 min = $95 90 min = $120 CALL LAURIE 202.237.0137


30 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The Current

Classified Ads Help Wanted

Moving/Hauling

Assistant Editor Biblical Archaeology Review is looking for an assistant editor to work at its office in Washington, DC. Some background in archaeology and/or in the Bible would be very helpful. Submit application and resumé to Bonnie Mullin 4710 41st NW, Washington, DC 20016 or by email to bmullin@bib-arch.org.

DISPATCHES From Page 25

Pets

GREAT SCOTT MOVING INCORPORATED

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Highly rated in Better Business Bureau, Consumer Check Book, Yelp and Angie’s List so call us for a Great Move at a Great Price.

‡ZZZJUHDWVFRWWPRYLQJFRP Need Assistance With Small Moving Jobs? Call…Your Man With The Van You Have It… We Will Move It! Call for Dependable, Efficient Service. 202-215-1237 “Not a Business, but a life process” Tax Deductible – Useable Furniture Donations Removed

FT Bookkeeper/ Admin Assistant 2 years accounting experience and Excel/ computer skills required. Send resume to info@latomatebistro.com

Personal Services Get Organized Today!

Hardware Store (multiple openings)

Annie’s Ace Hardware is looking for outgoing, energetic, detailed oriented individuals with exper. in electrical, gardening, or painting/paint mixing for FT/PT positions. Individuals must be avail. to work evenings and weekends and must have good computer and excellent customer service skills. Retail experience is a plus but not required. Annie’s offers pleasant working conditions, merchandise discount, and above average retail wages. Applications can be picked up at: 1240 Upshur Street, NW, DC 20011 during normal business hours. Retired tradespersons encouraged to apply.

Housing for Rent (Apts)

St. Ann’s Academy

Get "Around Tuit" now and organize your closets, basement, home office, kids' rooms, kitchens, garages and more! Call today for a free consultation! Around Tuit, LLC Professional Organizing

202-489-3660

www.getaroundtuitnow.com info@getaroundtuitnow.com

Pets CAT CARE Services Providing loving, attentive care for your cat(s) while you are away by doing more than just cleaning the box & filling the bowl. • Over 15 years experience. • Am/pm & weekend visits • Short term & long term. Will also take care of other small indoor pets, water plants & bring in mail. References available upon request. Great rates! Located in The Palisades. catcaresvcs@yahoo.com call 703-868-3038

AU / Cathedral Area

Mid Day Dog Walking Cat Visits/Medication Washingtonian Magazine Best Pet Care “A” Rating Angies List and Checkbook Magazine

In your neighborhood since 1996 202-547-WALK (9255) www.zoolatry.com

Idaho Terrace Apts – 3040 Idaho Ave, NW

Studio: $1250-$1380 All utilities included. Sec. Dep. $300 Controlled entry system. Metro bus at front door. Reserved parking. Office Hours: M-F, 9-5

Dog Boarding Susan Mcconnell’s Loving Pet Care. • Mid-day Walks • Home visits • Personal Attention

888-705-1347

202-966-3061

Bernstein Management Corp.

Instruction GUITAR LESSONS 202-234-1837 Enjoy your guitar. Play a song or begin improvising your first lesson. Experienced teacher with parking at NW DC studio near Metro.

EXPERIENCED PETSITTER/ Housesitter available. Responsible 32/F, seeking long or short-term opportunities. Employed non-smoker with car, can provide multiple references. Call 703-772-8848 or email kp105dc@gmail.com for more details.

Pressure Washing Chesapeake Power Washing, Co. Gentle, low-pressure, thorough turbo-

washing wand ensures no damage to clean brick, stone, slate, wood, and siding. Careful workmanship with 20 years exper. Lic. Bond Ins. 301-656-9274 Chevy Chase, MD

Senior Care ELDERLY CAREGIVER & companion and housekeeper. Compassionate, trust worthy, experienced, refs, CPR. Also clean houses $75/d. Help elders $15/h. Prefer area near public transport. in MC&NW. 202-710-1414. Cecy.

Upholstery

Private tutoring, Judy Kirkpatrick, M. Ed. Homework help, study skills, developing reading (decoding and comprehension) written language. Grades elementary-high school. Please contact 202-256-0551 jtkirkpatrick@hotmail.com

Positive Reinforcement Private Dog Training & Classes in Kensington, MD (301)565-3734 www.happyhoundpetcare.com

THE CURRENT Pets

Windows

[202] 277-2566 PO Box 25058 Washington, DC 20027 jule@julespetsitting.com www.julespetsitting.com

J ULE’S Petsitting Services, Inc. Setting the Standard for Excellence in Pet Sitting and Dog Walking Since 1991

• Mid Day Dog Walks • Kitty Visits • In-Home Overnight Pet Sitting and other Pet Care Services • Insured and Bonded

part of the time is used for water polo. Water polo is a contact water sport that is similar to handball, basketball and soccer. This curriculum helps introduce a more directly team-based element to the mainly individual sport of swimming. Throughout the season we have worked on different formations and tactics, as well as facing off against other schools, including Landon, St. Stephen’s & St. Agnes, Sidwell and Georgetown Day. Water polo has helped many of the swimmers develop better teamwork skills. — Collett Preston, Form II (eighth-grader)

Ace Window Cleaning, Co. Family owned and operated for over 20 years using careful workmanship 301-656-9274 Chevy Chase, MD Licensed • Bonded • Insured • We also offer glass, screen, and sash cord repair service

THE CURRENT

This week, in honor of African American History Month, the fifthgraders and their kindergarten reading buddies made a Freedom Quilt. They created quilt squares using different colors of felt, based on basic shapes and designs that were created in the late 1700s. Freedom Quilts were created by African slaves to provide clues for escaping slaves to reach freedom. Quilts would provide signals to escaping slaves or create maps. Legend has it that the quilts were hung from windows to “air out” during the day and escaping slaves would “read” the clues and make their way north to Canada. Slaves often traveled at night and hid out during the day. Members of the “Underground Railroad” would help escaping slaves make their way north by hiding them or providing supplies for their journeys. There are no known “Freedom Quilts” that remain for exhibit, but the legend of their existence and stories remain. The quilt squares from the fifth grade and kindergarten will be on display in St. Ann’s for the remainder of the month. — Kennith Brandon and Maeve Morris, fifth-graders

St. Patrick’s Episcopal Day School

Last Wednesday, St. Patrick’s seventh- and eighth-graders visited the Maryland Science Center in Baltimore. The seventh-graders took a class called “Dry Ice: How Cool Is That?” The eighth graders took a class about nanotechnology. The seventh-graders put small pieces of dry ice inside cups of water and saw the fog coming out. We hypothesized about what would happen if we put dry ice into liquid dish soap. We learned that fire extinguishers are filled with carbon dioxide, which cancels out the oxygen in the air to extinguish the fire, and how carbon dioxide affects our environment. During the nanotechnology class, the eighth-graders placed one drop of nail polish on a thin black piece of paper submerged in water. The nail polish drop spread out to produce a thin film that was only a

few nanometers thick! — Izzy Verdery, seventh-grader, and Anna Blair Poulson, eighth-grader

School Without Walls

The Home and School Association recently met with representatives from the Local School Advisory Team to discuss Walls’ proposed merger with Francis Stevens Educational Campus, located about a mile away. Mr. Thomas Anderson from D.C. Public Schools joined us clarify the plan. Mr. Anderson is the instructional superintendent for the School Without Walls cluster. The community is pleased to hear that options are available with the merger. On Feb. 10, the school held a town hall forum to discuss the merger. There was conflicting opinion, but many tried to look on the bright side by proposing advantages, including one joint budget. The LSAT and HSA provided feedback from the community and agreed to work on a plan with the principal. Most students acknowledge there will be change in the following years for Walls, correlating with steady increase in enrollment. — Eleonore Edgell, 11th-grader

Washington International On Feb. 11, the 10th-graders went to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum. We had begun learning about Germany before World War II, but nothing could prepare us for what we would see. One of the most impacting exhibits was a simple room filled with the shoes of those who had been murdered in the camps. The knowledge that this vast quantity of shoes represented a fraction of the total was mindboggling. Full of new ideas and thoughts, we separated into groups back in the classroom and created posters with what we took away from the museum. It serves as a potent reminder of what can happen when people, instead of speaking up against injustice, just watch and do nothing. — Leonardo Mendez and Vishal Ravi, 10th-graders

Washington Latin Public Charter School

The Arts Department raised $2,011 at a holiday dinner, which featured performances from jazz band, dance and choir. The dinner, held at the middle school Upshur campus, was the second arts concert of the year. Parents, faculty and students attended the event. The program included a Bhangra performance by the dance group, as well as holiday songs. As part of the event, Washington Latin paid its respects to the tragedy that occurred at Sandy Hook Elementary School. Brandi Clarke and Savannah Miller sang “Angel” together in dedication, which was an emotional moment. Washington Latin mailed cards to Sandy Hook, with each person in attendance given a chance to write a note to the victims’ families. — Cuneyt Dill, 11th-grader


The CurrenT

mcenearney.com

Wednesday, February 27, 2013 31

MCENEARNEY

ASSOCIATES, INC. REALTORS®

Chevy Chase, DC $1,595,000

Glover Park, DC $342,500

Cleveland Park, DC $270,000

Picture Perfect – Classic 1937 row house with four bedrooms and three full baths, nestled on a quiet one-way neighborhood street in charming Glover Park.

Beautiful new construction in great location with over 4,200 SF of finished space. Five bedrooms and five and a half baths. Four finished levels with high-level finishes throughout.

This stylish & move-in ready 700-SF condo offers 1 bedroom, 1 bath plus a 130-SF private patio. Close to Whole Foods, Washington Sports Clubs, and many other shops, great restaurants & public transportation.

In the Heart of it ALL! Spacious onebedroom in Wilshire Park Condo in Cleveland Park – fantastic location close to Metro, shops and dining.

Anslie Stokes Milligan 202.270.1081 www.StokesRealtor.com

Tom Williams 202.255.3650 www.TomWilliamsRealty.com

Catherine Czuba 202.549.6819 www.CzubaGroup.com

Frank Snodgrass 202.257.0978 www.SnodgrassGroup.com

Kent, DC $1,430,000

Silver Spring, MD $485,000

North Potomac, MD $1,050,000

Town of Kensington, MD $1,149,000

A Classic Beauty – Convenient and lovely six-bedroom Colonial with beautiful grounds expertly landscaped. Full of light, flexible floor plan is ideal for entertaining.

A Great Find! Simply stunning, lightfilled, four-bedroom split level with hardwood floors, huge formal living room, dining room with recessed lighting overlooking four-season sun room and parkland.

Stunning Colonial – Gorgeous, all-brick, Mitchell & Best, stately colonial on corner lot backing to farmland in Potomac Chase. Six bedrooms, four and one half baths on .86 acres.

Fabulous blend of old and new! Expanded period Colonial features 6 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, open floor plan, lower level living suite, and 2-car garage. Walk to EVERYTHING! WJ school cluster.

Katherine Martin 202.494.7373 Gilda Herndon 301.807.7884 www.HerndonMartin.com

Mark Hudson 301.641.6266 www.HudsonRealtyGroup.com

Katrina Schymik 202.441.3982 www.KatrinaSchymik.com

Kathy Byars 240.372.9708 www.KathyByars.com

Northwest, DC $599,000

Bethesda, MD $1,249,000

Chevy Chase, MD $879,500

Kensington, MD $499,000

The Cosmopolitan – Sitting high above 6th Street, you will love the city location, the convenience, and the sleek finishes. 2-bedroom, 2-bath unit with bamboo floors.

Sophisticated Treasure – Privately situated on a 23,085-SF lot, this elegant home features a kitchen with breakfast nook, family room, large sunroom overlooking pool and attached two-car garage.

Kenwood Courts – This quaint community of six spacious townhomes in a nook has the conveniences of shopping, restaurants, transportation, and more. 987 SF on each of 3 levels, plus garage on lower level.

Kensington Heights – Light-filled, updated & expanded Cape. This home has it all! Hardwood floors, formal living & dining rooms, brick fireplace & expanded beautiful kitchen. Absolutely stunning home.

Nora Burke 202.494.1906 www.NoraBurke.com

Alyssa Crilley 301.325.0079 www.AlyssaCrilley.com

Robert Shaffer 202.365.6674 www.RJShaffer.com

Mark Hudson 301.641.6266 www.HudsonRealtyGroup.com

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Glover Park, DC $800,000

®

Preferred Lender ®

202.552.5600

4315 50th Street NW • Washington, DC


32 Wednesday, February 27, 2013

The CurrenT

“How do Jim and I begin to thank you?  We have moved 13 times in our 31 years together and we both agree that our experience with you has been our best.  It was an absolute pleasure having worked with you.   Your attention to detail and willingness to assist us with everything and anything we asked, never ceased to impress and amaze us.  More often than not, you went above and beyond the call of duty and made us feel that we were always your top priority.  Steve, simply put, you are the best realtor we have EVER had!  We are so grateful and appreciative of all your hard work on our behalf......a simple ‘thank you’ seems inadequate.” Jim and Beth Schultenover

Great time to sell - Inventory remains at record lows!

Interested in selling but prefer to avoid public marketing while saving on transaction costs? Call us and we can explain how to make this happen.

4410 GARRISON STREET NW

New listing! Short walk to shops, restaurants and Friendship Heights Metro! 3BR, 2BA, new open-plan kitchen.   Three finished floors all done and ready for you.   Outside are two screened porches, fenced yard, and a garage.

Steve Agostino 202.321.5506

5310 CONNECTICUT AVENUE NW #16

Just Listed! Spacious, modern townhouse with 3 BRs & 3.5 BAs, less than a mile from Friendship Heights Metro. Great closets, cathedral-ceiling LR with fireplace & balcony plus main level powder room and 2nd entrance on Kanawha St, with attached garage & driveway parking.

Nancy Taylor Keene Taylor Jr. 202.997.0081 202.321.3488

Call or visit TaylorAgostino.com

OUR EXPERIENCE YOUR SUCCESS


NW 02-27-2013 1