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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Vol. XXIII, No. 3

The GeorGeTown CurrenT

D.C. unrolls citywide visitor passes

GOLDEN ANNIVERSARY

■ Parking: Critics say plan is

a poor fit for Ward 2 streets

By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

All residents of blocks with Residential Permit Parking can soon request a free visitor parking placard that will be good for a year starting Oct. 1, the D.C. Department of Transportation announced last week.

The program refines a system that was already in use in wards 1, 3, 4, 5 and 6, in which the one-year passes were mailed automatically to every eligible household. Now, residents must specifically order the passes, which waive two-hour parking restrictions within the boundaries of a particular advisory neighborhood commission. The Transportation Department had said last summer that it intended to roll out a version of the program

citywide this fall, when the alreadyissued passes are set to expire. But officials also indicated they wanted to make changes to protect against overuse or abuse, particularly before introducing the passes to the parking-starved neighborhoods of Ward 2. A popular proposal was a “coupon book” allowing for a set number of free uses while charging for additional days of guest parking. Last week’s announcement that See Passes/Page 7

West End projects advance after ruling By KATIE PEARCE Current Staff Writer

Brian Kapur/The Current

Mayor Vincent Gray declared Aug. 12 “Clyde’s of Georgetown Day” in honor of the restaurant’s 50 years of operation. He visited the M Street standby Monday and presented Clyde’s Restaurant Group president Tom Meyer with the proclamation.

The D.C. Court of Appeals has cleared the way for development to proceed at the West End library and fire station sites, after dismissing an activist group’s objections to the process. Developer EastBanc now plans to start construction at the start of next year, said company executive Mary Mottershead. The firm is working on construction financing and sorting out the details for interim facilities for the library and fire station, she said. They will be located at the Watergate and Stevens Elementary School, respectively. “We’re obviously happy with the Appeals Court decision; at this point it means we can keep moving forward as quickly as possible,” she said. The D.C. Library Renaissance Project, founded by Ralph Nader, had challenged last year’s zoning approval See Appeal/Page 7

Rendering courtesy of EastBanc

The D.C. Library Renaissance Project challenged various aspects of EastBanc’s plans, but the court upheld the Zoning Commission’s project approval.

GU student group tackles tenant-landlord relations

Renovation wraps up at Old Soldiers’ Home By KAT LUCERO

■ Rental housing: Effort

Current Staff Writer

The Sherman Building experienced plenty of drama in the past two years. When a 5.8-magnitude earthquake struck the District on Aug. 23, 2011, the historical landmark — housed within the confines of the Armed Forces Retirement Home property in the Petworth area — sustained major damage, especially to its iconic clock tower. A total of 200 stones fell from its parapets, chimneys, gables and the tower, damaging the exterior grounds, classrooms and the mess hall. The tower’s cracks were so prominent that they were visible more than 100 feet below. A few days later, Hurricane Irene swept through the area, bringing strong gusts of winds that threatened to

NEWS

may serve as pilot for city

By KAT LUCERO Photo courtesy of Armed Forces Retirement Home

After the 2011 earthquake, crews worked from crane baskets to strap the Sherman Building’s clock tower with custom nylon bands.

destroy more of the 160-year-old structure. “There was a lot of uncertainty,” said Carrie Burton of the first few days of disarray. Burton is the managing partner of Preserve Scapes, which oversaw the stabilization and recovery efforts at the retirement home. See Sherman/Page 12

SPOR TS

A school-by-school breakdown of 2013 DC-CAS test scores — Page 16

Gonzaga football comes into season with high hopes — Page 11

Current Staff Writer

Rat infestations. Flooded basements. Faulty smoke detectors. Mold in the ceilings. Broken front door locks. These are some of the problems many Georgetown University students say they’ve faced when it comes to their off-campus living situations in Georgetown, Burleith and other D.C. neighborhoods. The con-

ditions have frustrated not only students but also long-term residents who live alongside deteriorating rental properties. Alyssa Peterson, a rising Georgetown senior, struggled to find a livable apartment off-campus last year. Hearing of friends dealing with unresponsive landlords and more reports of problematic property owners from the university’s Office of Neighborhood Life — which advises students living off campus — inspired her to take matters into her own hands. “We finally need to stand up for See Tenants/Page 12

INDEX

NEWS

Group highlights Civil War heritage at Walter Reed — Page 3

Calendar/18 Classifieds/25 District Digest/4 Exhibits/17 In Your Neighborhood/10 Opinion/8

Police Report/6 Real Estate/15 Service Directory/22 Sports/11 Theater/17 Week Ahead/3

Tips? Contact us at newsdesk@currentnewspapers.com


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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

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The Current

Dupont community debates extension of 17th Street liquor license limits By KATIE PEARCE Current Staff Writer

There’s no clear consensus on what to do with the about-to-expire 17th Street liquor license moratorium, but the topic is inspiring some broader talk about the neighborhood’s direction. At a small forum last week, several Dupont Circle community members spoke of the need for studies on the economic and retail condi-

tions on 17th Street. As one resident suggested, it’s time “to look at that boring street and think about what we want.” The full Dupont Circle advisory neighborhood commission is slated to vote on the license moratorium tonight, after three recent forums where commissioners and residents have debated whether the city should preserve, modify or scrap it. At last Wednesday’s session, several commissioners recommended taking the middle

road — maintaining the 23-year-old moratorium, but tweaking it to allow new restaurants. But there were also some calls for the commission to avoid a vote on the moratorium and instead ask the D.C. Alcoholic Beverage Control Board for an emergency extension. The moratorium sets restraints on the number and types of liquor licenses in a radius around 17th and Q streets, for example prohibiting nightclubs and limiting taverns and liquor stores. Currently 16 restaurant licenses are

allowed — all of which are taken. “We’re not hearing that people are against having new restaurants come in, provided they can go through … [careful] vetting,” said commissioner Kevin O’Connor, who chairs the group’s alcohol policy committee. But commissioner Abigail Nichols pushed for a temporary extension, saying the commission doesn’t yet have enough information on the impacts of the moratorium. “We’re defiSee Licenses/Page 14

GWU defends coordination on its construction projects By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

George Washington University is tweaking aspects of its current construction work in response to complaints about traffic from Foggy Bottom residents. But university officials said at a community meeting last week that many disruptions in the area are inevitable as the school modernizes and upgrades its campus and streetscapes — at the same time as a major renovation takes place at the International Monetary Fund headquarters and a city project rebuilds New Hampshire Avenue. “Our impacts I can’t say are zero, but we’ve coordinated to reduce

what those impacts are,” university operations vice president Alicia Knight said at the meeting. The impacts include blocked sidewalks, parking prohibitions and travel lane closures at several sites on the campus. Construction of a new public health school is nearing completion between 24th Street, New Hampshire Avenue and Washington Circle, leaving 24th Street as one-way southbound. Renovations at Ross Hall, at 24th and H streets, and construction of a new Science and Engineering Hall one block east, involve their own lane and sidewalk closures. More work will soon affect the 2100 blocks of H and I streets for See Construction/Page 13

Adams Morgan group seeks look at median loading zones Current Staff Report A business group in Adams Morgan wants the city to establish formal loading zones in the medians on 18th Street and Columbia Road — where trucks already park while making deliveries — on a temporary basis to see if the arrangement is workable. The Adams Morgan Partnership Business Improvement District says a representative of the city Transportation Department suggested piloting new legal loading zones as a way to improve safety. The business group is asking for a 120-day pilot in the 2300 and 2400 blocks of 18th Street and the 1700 and 1800 blocks of Columbia Road. Last week, the group’s leaders presented the concept to the Adams Morgan advisory neighborhood commission, which voted to request a study of the issue but not necessarily to support establishing loading zones in the medians. The goal is to find spots “where commercial loading and unloading can be performed in a safe manner where pedestrian and vehicular sightlines are not obstructed,” the commission wrote in a resolution. At the commission’s meeting, several people said having trucks loading and unloading in the medians could be dangerous. Kristen Barden, the business

group’s executive director, said trucks are already parking in the medians, so temporarily legalizing that practice would help determine whether it can be done safely. She said a Transportation Department representative suggested allowing loading only between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., when traffic is at its lowest. Barden said her group wants the agency to test the zones during two different times in the year to get the most accurate results. Neighborhood commissioner Wilson Reynolds, who voted against the resolution, noted that the commission’s planning, zoning and transportation committee had already opposed the idea. “I’m scared to death of loading trucks in the middle of the street,” Reynolds said. “It’s not safe.” He made two motions to call for no parking in the street medians, but both failed for lack of a second. Arianne Bennett, the business group’s vice president, said the truck drivers are going to park in the medians even if they face a ticket. “They do it every day,” she said. And without regulation, she said, some park dangerously close to the crosswalk. Denis James, president of the Kalorama Citizens Association, said parking in the medians would increase the risk of truck drivers jaywalking with heavy loads.


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The Current

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Group highlights Civil War AU student fills vacancy on Tenleytown ANC heritage at Walter Reed site

of single-family homes on either side. (It does not include American University’s Tenley Campus.) The seat became open when commissioner Eliza Most college students living in D.C. are tempo- beth Haile moved out of D.C. Like her four former rary residents, part of a transient population that often colleagues on the commission, Haile is a parent who doesn’t have the same connection to the community lived in a single-family home. In contrast, Tinker said she can offer the views of as do longer-term neighbors. someone living in the sort of transit But Kathryn Tinker, a 21-year-old oriented development the commission rising senior at American University, has already been urging for the Wisdid most of her moving around before consin Avenue corridor, while also starting college. The D.C. native grew sharing the perspective of a student. up mostly in Hong Kong and SingaFor instance, in a debate about parkpore, never living in the same neighing needs for a business, Tinker said borhood for more than three years — she would be able to share how her until she rented a condo unit in Cityline car-free friends would walk or bicycle at Tenley, 4101 Albemarle St., while there, “whereas the other commissionattending school. ers can come at it with the angle of, “I’ve never really had the chance to ‘This is how I would travel there with get to know a community intimately my family.’� — get to know the history of a build- Kathryn Tinker lives in Fellow commissioner Matt Fruing, a tree or a street,� Tinker said in an Cityline at Tenley. min praised Tinker as “a very quick interview. “This is the first time I’ve said, ‘This is going to be my home and I’m going to study� on local issues and said he will appreciate her contributions. learn about it.’� Tinker was sworn in over the summer as the first “I think there are lots of different kinds of people undergraduate student in recent years to serve on the who live in our community and having people who Tenleytown/Friendship Heights advisory neighbor- come from different backgrounds is a very important hood commission, representing single-member dis- part of being a representative body,� Frumin said. trict 3E01. The district is bordered very roughly by “Though I think it’s safe to say we will share many of 38th Street to the east, Yuma Street to the south, 47th the same values.� Street to the west and Brandywine Street to the north Tinker also emphasized that she does not identify — comprising not only a stretch of dense develop- herself as a “student commissioner� — “I’m someSee Commissioner/Page 14 ment on Wisconsin Avenue but also neighborhoods By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

By KATIE PEARCE Current Staff Writer

As redevelopment of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center churns forward, one local group is trying to make sure the site’s Civil War history doesn’t get buried. That group, the Alliance to Preserve the Civil War Defenses of Washington, has taken on a sort of watchdog role for historic preservation as both the U.S. State Department and D.C. government reimagine the sprawling campus. That role is particularly relevant as the site is poised for designation as a historic district. The alliance — a coalition of history-focused groups, community activists and Civil War buffs — has been highlighting the property’s significance to the pivotal Battle of Fort Stevens in 1864. “It’s almost a constant need to call the attention of the project team and the developers that this is also a vital dimension to this project they’re doing at Walter Reed,â€? said Benjamin Frank Cooling, a local Civil War historian and board member of the alliance. Cooling said his group is focused on “smart growth of ‌ historic tourismâ€? features at Walter Reed. “It’s vital that the preservation of open spaces, combined with interpretative markers and possibly a visitors center, be incorporated, to carry on historic preservation ‌ as this new neighborhood is developed.â€? Today’s 113 acres of the Walter Reed site hosted combat and staging

areas during the Battle of Fort Stevens, “ground on which Union and Confederate troops fought bitterly to capture the city of Washington and throw the Lincoln administration out of office,� Cooling said. Fought on July 11 and 12, 1864, it was the sole Civil War battle that occurred within the boundaries of the District of Columbia, as Union troops stopped an attack by Confederate Gen. Jubal Early. Famously, it was also the only time a sitting U.S. president came under fire. Sharpshooters who aimed at Lincoln took position on parts of the present-day Walter Reed site. Cooling — who has written extensively about the Battle of Fort Stevens and recently published a book titled “The Day Lincoln Was Almost Shot� — summed up the broader historical significance in a 2010 position paper. “Events at Fort Stevens (and the grounds of Walter Reed) prevented the wounding, killing or capture of the American president, sacking of the national capital and major political re-direction of the nation,� he wrote. Once the war ended, much of the area remained farmland until the Army medical center was established in the early 1900s; later the surrounding community grew more suburban. Now, after years of planning and the official shutdown of the medical center in 2011, both the federal and D.C. governments are moving forward with redevelopment schemes for Walter Reed. While the State Department plans an enclave of See Walter Reed/Page 13

The week ahead Saturday, Aug. 17

At-large D.C. Council member David Catania, chair of the committee tasked with oversight of the D.C. Public Library system, will discuss issues affecting the city’s public libraries, to be followed by the annual business meeting of the Friends of the Cleveland Park Library group. The event will begin at 10 a.m. at the Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. For details, call 202-6696235.

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Thursday, Aug. 22

The D.C. Department of Transportation will host a meeting of the moveDC Transportation Plan Advisory Committee from 6 to 8 p.m. in the second-floor public meeting room at the Reeves Center, 2000 14th St. NW.

Saturday, Aug. 24

Mayor Vincent Gray will lead a D.C. statehood march and rally in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington. The event will begin at 9 a.m. at the D.C. War Memorial, located on the north side of Independence Avenue SW between the World War II Memorial and the Lincoln Memorial. At 9:30 a.m., attendees will march to the Lincoln Memorial to join the main rally. â–  D.C. Public Schools will hold its annual Beautification Day from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Volunteers are needed at more than 100 sites to help ensure that schools are ready and welcoming for the first day of school; activities will include landscaping, trash pickup, light painting and planting flowers. Registration is requested by Aug. 16. For details, visit dcps.dc.gov, email dcps.beautificationday@dc.gov or call 202719-6601.

Wednesday, Sept. 4

The D.C. Board of Elections will hold a public hearing on whether a proposed measure on decriminalizing the possession of small amounts of marijuana for personal use is a proper subject matter for a ballot initiative. The hearing will be held at 10:30 a.m. in Suite 280, One Judiciary Square, 441 4th St. NW.

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Wednesday, August 14, 2013

The Current

District Digest District joins lawsuit over airline merger

The District is joining a lawsuit that seeks to block the proposed merger of US Airways and American Airlines, according to a news release from the Office of the Attorney General. D.C. joins the U.S. Justice Department and six states in the suit, which claims that the merger would decrease competition and

violate federal antitrust law. D.C. officials fear that the move — which would leave the United States with just four major airlines — would discourage companies from expanding or adding service at Reagan Washington National Airport. “Reagan National Airport provides a unique and important service for D.C. consumers and should not be dominated by any one airline,� Attorney General Irv Nathan

said in the release, which notes that the merger would leave US Airways with 69 percent of the slots at the airport, rather than the 55 percent it has now.

Agency to stagger fall pool closings

The D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation will close its outdoor pools for the season on a staggered schedule, according to a news

release. In Northwest, the Jelleff and Volta Park pools will close at 6 p.m. Aug. 25; Banneker, Francis and Upshur pools will close at 6 p.m. Sept. 2. Two Ward 1 children’s pools — Parkview and Happy Hollow — will close Aug. 18.

Cheh calls for action on school crowding

Ward 3 D.C. Council member Mary Cheh is calling on D.C. Public Schools to address crowding in her ward’s schools, asking for a written plan within two months. In an Aug. 9 letter to D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson, Cheh writes to “reiterate� her concerns about the issue, noting that every school in Ward 3 was overenrolled beyond capacity last school year — the worst, Hearst Elementary, by as much as 152 percent. Cheh points out that she has offered suggestions in the past, including analyzing and possibly altering school boundaries, and constructing new facilities. Since those efforts have been rebuffed, Cheh writes, she is seeking a written plan to address the problem, including a timeline, within 60 days.

New taproom set to open in Glover Park

Come Join Us...

The owners of the Mad Fox Brewing Co. in Falls Church will open a Glover Park taproom next year, taking over the former Town Hall space at 2218 Wisconsin Ave. Owner Bill Madden, who spent 10 years as executive brewer at Capitol City Brewing Co., opened Mad Fox three years ago in Virginia. The bar offers award-winning handcrafted beers with draught and English-style cask service, as well as a full menu. “Building upon the success of our Falls Church location, we fully

The Current

Delivered weekly to homes and businesses in Northwest Washington Publisher & Editor Davis Kennedy Managing Editor Chris Kain Assistant Managing Editor Beth Cope Advertising Director Gary Socha Account Executive Shani Madden Account Executive Richa Marwah Account Executive George Steinbraker Advertising Standards

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DC-CAS results use new index

The D.C. Office of the State Superintendent of Education has released the standardized test performance of each D.C. public and public charter school, as well as their rankings in a new “accountability� system. Citywide, public school students’ scores jumped 4 percentage points from the spring 2012 D.C. Comprehensive Assessment System tests to the 2013 tests. The data were released July 29. The new accountability system uses a formula to rate schools based on “student proficiency, growth, graduation rates, attendance and participation rates,� according to a news release from the superintendent’s office. Schools are judged to be Reward, Rising, Developing, Focus or Priority (in declining order). See full school-by-school results for wards 1, 2, 3 and 4 on page 16. expect the Mad Fox Taproom to become a Glover Park destination, with craft beer lovers from all over DC coming to taste our beers,� Madden says in a news release. The new bar, which will have 127 seats, is expected to open in the first quarter of 2014 depending on renovations and permitting.

Ted’s Bulletin adding 14th Street location

Capitol Hill hotspot Ted’s Bulletin will open a second location on Monday, adding another new dining option to busy 14th Street. Located at the corner of 14th and Swann streets, the new Ted’s will serve breakfast (all day), lunch and dinner in a 1930s-style dining room with 160 seats. The diner is known for comfort foods including grilled cheese sandwiches made with Wonder Bread and served with tomato soup; meatloaf with a ketchup glaze; and homemade pop-tarts. The latter will be part of a bakery operation also featuring gourmet doughnuts, pastries and cookies. “Since opening up the first Ted’s in 2010, we have had our eye on this neighborhood,� said Drew Kim, one of the partners in matchboxfoodgroup, which also owns all of the area’s Matchbox restaurants. Located at 1818 14th St., Ted’s Bulletin will be open 7 a.m. to 10:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday and 7 a.m. to 11:30 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Corrections

As a matter of policy, The Current corrects all errors of substance. To report an error, call the managing editor at 202-567-2011.


The Current Wednesday, August 14, 2013

Logan Circle ANC issues parking proposal By KAT LUCERO Current Staff Writer

The Logan Circle advisory neighborhood commission is pushing a series of parking recommendations aimed at solving one of the area’s most daunting problems. The commission unanimously passed four parking proposals last week, including one that addresses the long-running parking tensions between Sunday churchgoers and residents. That recommendation proposes a formal process for making normally off-limits parking spots available not only to the crowds that flock to Logan Circle’s multiple churches each Sunday, but also to other types of community groups. Commissioner Walt Cain noted that the city has already made significant progress in working to open up a number of spots, some owned by private entities, for churchgoers. He said the D.C. Department of Transportation has also shown “an extraordinary willingness to work with community groups� in developing plans for their own parking needs. The commission’s community development committee, which Cain chairs, helped develop the parking recommendations over the past few months. Another proposal suggests centralizing the city’s parking enforcement under one office — the Department of Public Works — so there will be a uniform set of rules. Currently, the Public Works Department enforces parking Monday through Saturday, while the Metropolitan Police Department takes over on Sundays. According to Cain, the police department doesn’t enforce the rules

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the way the other agency does. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In conversations with MPD, they essentially said, unless you call and report these incidents, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to enforce parking,â&#x20AC;? said Cain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That leads to kind of a real lack of enforcement on Sundays in comparison to other days of the week.â&#x20AC;? The third suggestion encourages the city to continue its Enhanced

â??In conversations with MPD, they essentially said, unless you call and report these incidents, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to enforce parking.â?&#x17E; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Commissioner Walt Cain Residential Parking Pilot Program, which restricts one side of a block to residents, leaving the other available to other cars. The community development committee noted that residents should be made aware that if a sufficient number on their block object, they can opt out of the program. The last recommendation is for the commission to consider a visitor parking program prior to implementation of the D.C. governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planned citywide version. But just last week, the Transportation Department announced that it was launching that citywide program, a development Cain described yesterday as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;interesting wrinkle.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in the process of evaluating and determining if the plan is something weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re amenable to,â&#x20AC;? he said. A series of community forums,

hosted by the eight-member community development committee, led to these four recommendations. With the help of committee members, Cain endeavored to take a systematic look at the root of Logan Circleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s parking problems. The commission tabled the parking ideas in June to allow the public enough time to go over the issues. At last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting, attendees focused most on Sunday parking, with some objecting to the set-aside of spaces for churchgoers and others backing the arrangement. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The membership is profoundly affected by the parking challenges,â&#x20AC;? said a member of John Wesley African Methodist Episcopal Zion Church on 14th Street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunday is a day of family reunification. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a day of rest â&#x20AC;Ś Metro is no longer the reliable option for Sunday travel,â&#x20AC;? said one member of the community development committee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Policy is good policy, but it has to soften on Sundays to allow families to visit their friends.â&#x20AC;? Commission vice chair Mike Connolly noted that he has sought out other organizations in the neighborhood that would provide parking space on Sundays. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We went to Horizon House, which has a bunch of space. They graciously agreed to give parking to ... the church. I think there are other opportunities like that going forward,â&#x20AC;? he said. Cain said this type of solution is effective as a compromise between congregation members and Logan Circle residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our suggestion to the congregations is to work with these businessesâ&#x20AC;? such as the upcoming CityCenterDC in downtown and City Market at O in Shaw to offer up their ample parking spaces, he said.

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n g Wednesday, August 14, 2013 T he Current

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This is a listing of reports taken from Aug. 5 through 11 by the Metropolitan Police Department in local police service areas.

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Robbery ■ 800-819 block, 13th St.; 4 a.m. Aug. 6. Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 12th Street and Madison Drive; 12:15 p.m. Aug. 10. Theft from auto ■ 700-999 block, Independence Ave. SW; 10:24 a.m. Aug. 9.

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Theft ■ 900-999 block, G St.; 2:30 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 1000-1099 block, 14th St.; 9:36 p.m. Aug. 9. ■ 900-999 block, F St.; 6 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 1000-1099 block, F St.; 9:25 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 1000-1099 block, F St.; 11:57 p.m. Aug. 10.

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Robbery ■ 400-499 block, L St.; 5:15 a.m. Aug. 6 (with gun). Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 9th and F streets; 12:26 a.m. Aug. 8 (with knife). Theft from auto ■ 401-698 block, New York Ave.; 11:40 a.m. Aug. 5. ■ 4th and G streets; 9 a.m. Aug. 7. ■ 600-699 block, K St.; 5 a.m. Aug. 11.

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Theft ■ 400-499 block, L St.; 9:43 a.m. Aug. 5. ■ 800-899 block, E St.; 11 a.m.. Aug. 8. ■ 600-699 block, F St.; 5:10 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 600-699 block, H St.; 10:44 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 400-499 block, K St.; 9:10 a.m. Aug. 10. ■ 800-899 block, F St.; 7:30 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 600-699 block, K St.; 4:50 a.m. Aug. 11.

psa 201

PSA 201 ■ chevy chase Theft from auto ■ 5300-5399 block, 29th St.; 5 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 5300-5399 block, 28th St.; 10:29 p.m. Aug. 8. Theft ■ 5523-5599 block, Connecticut Ave.; 1:44 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 2800-2899 block, Rittenhouse St.; 5:53 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 5210-5228 block, Connecti-

cut Ave.; 8:42 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 5420-5499 block, Connecticut Ave.; 9:27 a.m. Aug. 11.

psa 202

■ Friendship Heights PSA 202

Tenleytown / AU Park

Motor vehicle theft ■ 4700-4799 block, Brandywine St.; 2:45 p.m. Aug. 5. Theft from auto ■ Unspecified block, 42nd Street; 5 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 4300-4399 block, Harrison St.; 8:45 p.m. Aug. 8. Theft ■ 4500-4599 block, Fort Drive; 8:06 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 4612-4699 block, 42nd St.; 10:30 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 4500-4599 block, Nebraska Ave.; 11:41 p.m. Aug. 9. ■ 4500-4599 block, Fort Drive; 12:50 p.m. Aug. 11. ■ 4500-4599 block, Fort Drive; 8:06 p.m. Aug. 5.

psa 203

■ forest PSA 203 hills / van ness

cleveland park

Robbery ■ 3000-3099 block, Veazey Terrace; 5 p.m. Aug. 11. Burglary ■ 4530-4599 block, Connecticut Ave.; 12:30 a.m. Aug. 8. Theft from auto ■ 3300-3399 block, Highland Place; 9 a.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3400-3499 block, Yuma St.; 8:50 a.m. Aug. 10.

Ave.; 12:31 p.m. Aug. 7. Theft ■ 3120-3199 block, New Mexico Ave.; 5 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 4800-4813 block, MacArthur Blvd.; 9:07 a.m. Aug. 7. ■ 4400-4499 block, Macomb St.; 6:18 p.m. Aug. 11.

psa PSA 206 206

■ georgetown / burleith

Robbery ■ N and 30th streets; 1:02 a.m. Aug. 11. Burglary ■ 3000-3099 block, N St.; 2:24 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 3400-3499 block, Prospect St.; 2:45 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 3600-3699 block, O St.; 4:35 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 3300-3399 block, Dent Place; 9:01 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 3300-3399 block, Dent Place; 9:28 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 2250-2599 block, P St.; 10:26 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 3000-3099 block, Canal St.; 4:58 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3100-3199 block, Dumbarton St.; 1:17 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 3300-3399 block, Prospect St.; 10:49 a.m. Aug. 11. Theft from auto ■ 3400-3499 block, N St.; 12:02 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 1200-1299 block, 27th St.; 4:09 p.m. Aug. 11.

Theft ■ 2400-2798 block, Calvert St.; 10:37 a.m. Aug. 5. ■ 4000-4299 block, Cathedral Ave.; 5:14 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 3000-3199 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 1 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3800-3899 block, Benton St.; 8:01 p.m. Aug. 9.

Theft ■ 3036-3099 block, M St.; 3:02 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 3100-3199 block, M St.; 12:46 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 3300-3347 block, M St.; 1 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 3200-3277 block, M St.; 1:35 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 3200-3277 block, M St.; 6:58 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 1000-1003 block, Thomas Jefferson St.; 7:22 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 1000-1003 block, Thomas Jefferson St.; 1:25 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3200-3277 block, M St.; 2:35 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3000-3049 block, M St.; 3:08 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3200-3277 block, M St.; 8:45 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 3300-3347 block, M St.; 9:43 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 3200-3277 block, M St.; 3:17 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 3808-3899 block, Reservoir Road; 8:17 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 3200-3277 block, M St.; 8:44 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 3100-3199 block, M St.; 6:11 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ Whitehurst Freeway over 31st Street; 7:34 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 3000-3091 block, K St.; 12:40 p.m. Aug. 11. ■ 3100-3199 block, K St.; 1:45 p.m. Aug. 11.

psa 205

psa PSA 207 207

Wesley Heights / Foxhall

Robbery ■ 2100-2199 block, L St.; 3:50 a.m. Aug. 8.

Theft ■ 5000-5099 block, Connecticut Ave.; 12:44 a.m. Aug. 11. ■ 4707-4799 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:29 p.m. Aug. 11.

psa 204

■ Massachusetts avenue

heights / cleveland park woodley PSA 204 park / Glover park / cathedral heights

Motor vehicle theft ■ 2111-2199 block, Wisconsin Ave.; 7:56 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 3300-3399 block, Idaho Ave.; 9:52 a.m. Aug. 8. Theft from auto ■ Connecticut Avenue and Devonshire Place; 1:43 p.m. Aug. 9.

■ palisades / spring valley PSA 205

Theft from auto ■ 4000-4299 block, Cathedral

■ foggy bottom / west end

Motor vehicle theft ■ 1800-1899 block, M St.; 12:11 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 18th and L streets; 1:47 p.m. Aug. 8. Theft from auto ■ 1130-1199 block, 17th St.; 1:50 a.m. Aug. 10. Theft ■ 1200-1299 block, 24th St.; 11:25 a.m. Aug. 5. ■ 2400-2499 block, N St.; 2:38 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 2200-2299 block, I St.; 4:59 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 1800-1899 block, F St.; 6:44 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 2400-2499 block, M St.; 9:33 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 2200-2299 block, G St.; 9:37 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1900-1999 block, K St.; 3:11 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1900-1949 block, Pennsylvania Ave.; 5:19 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1100-1199 block, Vermont Ave.; 9:31 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 600-699 block, 14th St.; 1:16 a.m. Aug. 9. ■ 800-899 block, New Hampshire Ave.; 11:57 a.m. Aug. 9. ■ 2000-2099 block, M St.; 7:18 p.m. Aug. 9. ■ 23rd and I streets; 10:55 p.m. Aug. 9. ■ 23rd and I streets; 11:53 p.m. Aug. 9. ■ 23rd and I streets; 12:19 a.m. Aug. 10. ■ 1800-1899 block, M St.; 3:11 a.m. Aug. 10. ■ 2400-2499 block, L St.; 12:08 a.m. Aug. 11.

psa 208

■ sheridan-kalorama PSA 208

dupont circle

Theft from auto ■ 1700-1799 block, Church St.; 1:01 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 1400-1499 block, Church St.; 6:34 a.m. Aug. 7. ■ 2100-2199 block, O St.; 9:49 p.m. Aug. 9. ■ 1500-1531 block, Church St.; 5:40 p.m. Aug. 10. Theft ■ 1400-1499 block, P St.; 1:59 p.m. Aug. 5. ■ 1200-1219 block, 19th St.; 11 p.m. Aug. 6. ■ 1300-1699 block, Connecticut Ave.; 2 p.m. Aug. 7. ■ 1400-1499 block, P St.; 6 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1301-1319 block, 21st St.; 8:10 a.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1728-1799 bock, 18th St.; 3:09 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1700-1799 block, Connecticut Ave.; 3:39 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1200-1215 block, Connecticut Ave.; 9:09 p.m. Aug. 8. ■ 1300-1699 block, Connecticut Ave.; 4:28 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 1200-1249 block, 22nd St.; 9:06 p.m. Aug. 10. ■ 1521-1599 block, 16th St.; 4:55 a.m. Aug. 11. ■ 1300-1699 block, Connecticut Ave.; 11:30 a.m. Aug. 11. ■ 2100-2115 block, M St.; 5:32 p.m. Aug. 11.


The Current Wednesday, August 14, 2013

7

PARKING: Agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s citywide visitor pass plan sparks debate for some neighborhoods

From Page 1

the program would change little as it grew citywide has attracted some criticism. Opponents argued that making it easier for visitors to park for free will only make it harder for everyone else to find a spot in crowded blocks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re disappointed to see DDOT take a step in the wrong direction after it seemed to signal it was going to be looking at comprehensively re-evaluating the [Residential Parking Permit] program,â&#x20AC;? said Cheryl Cort, policy director for the Coalition for Smarter Growth. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just mailing out a lot of free parking passes to most households in the city is not a good approach.â&#x20AC;? Ward 3 Council member Mary Cheh, who chairs the committee overseeing the Transportation Department, said requiring residents to explicitly request a visitor pass is an improvement. But she agreed that further reform of D.C. parking programs would be valuable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love the visitor parking program,â&#x20AC;? Cheh said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important and well-used by people who need it for regular visitors. ... I just want to see a more comprehensive, thoughtful approach.â&#x20AC;? A common fear has been abuse of the passes, particularly in parts of Ward 2, where several advisory neighborhood commissions

voted against receiving visitor parking passes, in part due to concerns that they would be sold to commuters. The Georgetown commission had been working with the Transportation Department on a customized solution. â&#x20AC;&#x153;DDOTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s announcement was a surprise to everyone,â&#x20AC;? said Ron Lewis, chair of the Georgetown commission. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been working with DDOT all along on parking issues, including sponsoring two well-attended public meetings. We learned that there are a lot of possibilities for improving visitor parking. Some of these are more flexible than the proposal of one placard per household.â&#x20AC;? Ward 2 Council member Jack Evans echoed that surprise, noting the opposition from his constituents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been made clear to DDOT that the leadership in Ward 2 doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want these,â&#x20AC;? Evans said of the passes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I thought this was a settled issue.â&#x20AC;? Transportation Department spokesperson Reggie Sanders said the latest reforms will help prevent misuse of the passes, such as sale or duplication, while retaining the convenience and simplicity of the earlier system. For instance, requiring residents to request a pass will reduce the number of passes in circulation and link each one to a particular person rather than an address. Furthermore, the new passes will have a scannable code associ-

ated with an individual and address, easing enforcement efforts, according to Sanders. The scan will also show whether the pass is being used in the wrong neighborhood â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a common issue, he said. Requested replacements of a lost or stolen pass will also be tracked more easily, Sanders said, and duplications or other misuses could mean a $300 fine. Owners of cars regularly spotted overnight, even with a visitor pass, will also be asked to register locally or demonstrate that they live elsewhere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once the enforcement piece of it is established, they will see that people will be very careful about how they use these passes,â&#x20AC;? he said. He also urged residents to file a 311 report of a car they suspect of improper use of a pass. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We hope that the residents will be our eyes and ears; we hope that the residents who apply for these visitor passes will use the honor code to do the right thing,â&#x20AC;? said Sanders. Dupont Circle neighborhood commissioner Noah Smith said that although his commission had opposed the visitor passes previously, the new changes to the system are significant. In requiring orders, â&#x20AC;&#x153;theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re adding in a barrier to entry â&#x20AC;Ś and hopefully that will reduce the amount of visitor parking permits that are actually out there,â&#x20AC;? he said. Sanders of the Transportation Department

APPEAL: West End redevelopment to move forward From Page 1

of the EastBanc plans for two new mixed-use high-rises. But last week the Appeals Court deferred to the Zoning Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s judgment on various aspects of the development. EastBancâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan includes replacing the library in the 2300 block of L Street and the firehouse at 23rd and M streets, as part of an intricate deal that lets the developer build on cityowned property. For both sites, EastBanc will add housing above the rebuilt public facilities. The library activist groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s primary argument was that the Zoning Commission should have evaluated the projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finances, at which point the commission would have found that EastBanc was underpaying the city and would not have granted a waiver of affordable-housing requirements. It further argued that the project violates the D.C. Comprehensive Plan. Under the deal, EastBanc is essentially using the construction of the library and firehouse to pay the District for the land for its housing projects. The library group argued that the Zoning Commission should therefore not have counted the new public facilities as amenities associated with the project. But the courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ruling states that it will â&#x20AC;&#x153;defer to an agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interpretation of its own regulations unless that interpretation is plainly wrong or inconsistent with the regulations or with the statute under which the [agency] acts.â&#x20AC;? The ruling states that while the Zoning Commission could have elected to consider the financial issues, it was reasonable to defer to the D.C. Council on a subject outside â&#x20AC;&#x153;the core of the Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s expertise in land-use matters.â&#x20AC;?

Oliver Hall, the attorney representing the library group, said that this ruling isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t entirely surprising. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anytime youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re appealing an agency decision, you have to prepare for the fact that the court is going to defer to what the agency decided.â&#x20AC;? But Hall said the appeal nevertheless â&#x20AC;&#x153;raised issues that are worth raisingâ&#x20AC;? about the way the city handles public-private partnerships. Deals like the EastBanc project, he said, are â&#x20AC;&#x153;giveawaysâ&#x20AC;? of city land. Hall added that the group was â&#x20AC;&#x153;gratified that the court recognized that we had the right to bring this appeal,â&#x20AC;? with nearly half of the court decision justifying those rights. Asher Corson, a Foggy Bottom/ West End advisory neighborhood commissioner, said most community members seem relieved at last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sign of progress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m hearing that neighbors are happy to see this long-stalled project finally moving forward,â&#x20AC;? he said, noting that the development plans won support from all of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s citizens groups after months of community meetings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve always felt like the appeal was highly inappropriate,â&#x20AC;? Corson added, suggesting that the library group would have been better off voicing its concerns before the project secured various city approvals â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;as opposed to trying to hijack the process after the fact.â&#x20AC;? One angle the Library Renaissance Project highlighted was the Zoning Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to waive â&#x20AC;&#x153;inclusionary zoningâ&#x20AC;? requirements for EastBanc. The commission agreed not to require the developer to provide affordable housing because it was spending so much on public benefits. The city later provided EastBanc with a $7 million subsidy to cover the cost of offering

some units below market rate. Attorney Hall, in an interview, said â&#x20AC;&#x153;the loss of $7 million in cash that taxpayers are paying for these units, which the private developer is going to own, is an important issue that needs review.â&#x20AC;? He further questioned the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s appraisal of the land value at $30 million, noting that various other real estate experts have estimated it at closer to $65 million. The library group argued further that the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Comprehensive Plan calls for retaining public facilities under government ownership unless theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re no longer needed. The Appeals Court ruled that it is not unreasonable for the Zoning Commission to waive various rules, including affordable housing. The decision states further that the commission has the authority to weigh competing goals of the Comprehensive Plan. The lawsuit prompted fears that the projects would be delayed. But Mottershead of EastBanc said â&#x20AC;&#x153;at the end of the day, [the appeal] didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really end up costing us a lot of extra timeâ&#x20AC;? due to the simultaneous delays to securing interim sites for the city facilities. She said the â&#x20AC;&#x153;extra legal feesâ&#x20AC;? posed more of a burden. The library has signed a lease for temporary quarters in the Watergate, and should launch its move in November, she said. Both the library and the former home of the Metropolitan Police Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s special operations division â&#x20AC;&#x201D; also a part of the land swap â&#x20AC;&#x201D; should be torn down in January, she said. She said relocating the fire station to its interim site at the Stevens School on 21st Street is a little more complicated, but should happen a couple months later. Staff writer Brady Holt contributed to this report.

said that simply expanding the existing visitor parking program could have increased parking pressures. But he said the revisions have addressed the issue, and he doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe that making passes more available will increase parking demand from legitimate guests. Responding to the coupon-book proposal, he said such a system would be more expensive to manage, for little gain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our feeling is and our feedback has been that paying for the pass is not necessarily a deterrent,â&#x20AC;? Sanders said. Cort disagreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pricing is a very efficient tool for allocating something that is in demand,â&#x20AC;? she said. Cheh predicted that the city will move in that direction eventually. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think even though [the visitor passes are] going to be free this coming year, [the Transportation Department] ought to signal somehow that itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not always going to be free.â&#x20AC;? Sanders said the agency will continue to modify its programs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is not an end point,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We will continue to hear feedback from residents ... and we will continue to design this to help get us to a system where there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t any abuses.â&#x20AC;? The Transportation Department is accepting comments on the visitor parking pass modifications at publicspace.policy@dc.gov.

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8

g Wednesday, August 14, 2013 T he Current

The Georgetown

Current

Davis Kennedy/Publisher & Editor Chris Kain/Managing Editor

Don’t defer maintenance

It feels almost futile to even weigh in on this issue, as we’ve done it so many times before. But we can’t ignore the recent maintenance issues at the Wilson Aquatic Center and Tenley-Friendship Library — which are particularly troubling given the long, dispiriting history of lacking upkeep at city facilities. We’ll say it again: Pouring millions into new schools, libraries, pools and parks only to leave them to fall apart is foolish. Ward 3 D.C. Council member Mary Cheh has been calling for action at the two Tenleytown spots — both of which were totally renovated within the past four years — to address chronic problems, the most recent involving failing heating and cooling units. In July 29 queries to council members who lead the committees with relevant oversight, Ms. Cheh urges attention to the library and a hearing on the Wilson pool. We hope members Marion Barry (Ward 8) and Kenyan McDuffie (Ward 5) will schedule a hearing immediately upon their return from summer recess. Then, during the session, they should pin down the parks department and general services agency on how they are managing maintenance at the pool. Is there inadequate funding? Are there unfilled positions? Is nobody in charge? Because given the history, we can’t help but think there are some major systemic problems affecting the entire city. At-large Council member David Catania would do well to take a similar approach for the library. But the pool situation is particularly galling, because poor maintenance was the reason the 1970s facility had to be rebuilt in the first place. After a catastrophic failure in 1998, the new maintenance supervisor in charge of the city’s pools cited “a lot of neglect over time” and a history of “Robinson Crusoe fixes just to keep the pool operating.” Then, in 2003, an unrepaired leak caused a wall in the facility to partially collapse, requiring the pool’s prolonged closure. It took six years — and $34.7 million — for the city to rebuild it. And despite that investment, the list of troubles at the facility since 2009 includes a broken hot tub, insufficient water pressure (including at nearby homes) and a chlorine smell spreading into the neighborhood. High incidences of thefts at the facility are unrelated to maintenance, but they serve as another example of poor follow-up. Appropriate staffing at the site — where lifeguard shortages have caused closures — would surely help deter thieves. We understand that flashy new facilities draw lots of attention for the politicians who can claim credit. But we’d like to see some local leaders touting their success in proper long-term maintenance, too.

Decision time

More than a month after the D.C. Council passed the Large Retailer Accountability Act, we’re still waiting to see whether this ill-advised bill will become law. Mayor Vincent Gray has expressed concerns but not indicated whether he will veto the measure, which would increase the minimum wage by more than $4 per hour for large retailers including Walmart. Meanwhile, Council Chairman Phil Mendelson has been waiting to send the measure on to the mayor until he has enough supportive colleagues in town to override a veto. The result is a limbo that has major retailers questioning whether to open shops in the District, harming efforts to recruit national companies to the city. D.C. may traditionally slow down over the summer, but business and development nationwide doesn’t grind to a halt. Walmart, the target of the bill, has three stores under construction in Washington and three more planned. But officials from the megachain have said they would likely drop the planned stores should the bill become law. We’re troubled by this situation. D.C. loses about a billion dollars a year in sales to the suburbs, because they offer better shopping options for many of our residents. That’s $57.5 million in lost sales taxes. New Walmart stores — and other big retailers that would be similarly dissuaded by this measure — would help stem the tax tide, as well as a boost in property taxes. Plus, two of Walmart’s planned stores would open in areas across the Anacostia River, where residents desperately need more shopping options. Except for a scattering of liquor stores, there are relatively few local businesses to be threatened by the big-box retailers. By and large, the shops that will be hurt when Walmart opens here are in the suburbs. The delay over the bill — and Mr. Gray’s delay in announcing if a veto is forthcoming — is harming efforts to recruit businesses to the city. Resolving this issue is extremely important. There’s no reason for D.C. to spend money luring retailers if this bill goes into effect and makes those efforts futile.

Coming into focus …

S

ummer is winding down and city scandal is heating up. Longtime political operative Vernon Hawkins was the latest to do the U.S. District Court dance Tuesday. Hawkins, 74, is usually mild-mannered and mostly easygoing. But he was awkward in the courtroom Tuesday morning, pleading guilty to a felony charge of lying to the FBI. Hawkins had to lean over to speak into the courtroom microphone. “You’re quite tall,” remarked Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly. “You need to speak up in a loud, clear voice.” Over the next hour and 40 minutes, the judge laid out the plea deal — how Hawkins admitted to being part of the shadow campaign that spent $653,000 off the books to help elect Vincent Gray mayor in 2010. Hawkins will be sentenced later, but only after he continues to cooperate with federal prosecutors. And given Hawkins’ closeness to Gray — who declines to comment on what he knew and what he did in his own campaign — it was an important step. “Vernon Hawkins was at ground zero of a scheme to design, staff, and execute an off-the-books shadow campaign,” U.S. Attorney Ronald Machen said in a statement to the media. Machen noted that Hawkins and others broke the law and then tried to cover it up. “This guilty plea takes us one step closer to understanding the extent of the deception that tainted the 2010 campaign.” At this point we have four close associates of the mayor who have pleaded guilty and are cooperating fully with Machen’s probe into Gray’s campaign. Last summer Jeanne Clarke Harris pleaded guilty. She was a principal in the scheme. Campaign associates — and Gray friends — Howard Brooks and Thomas Gore previously pleaded guilty to charges involving improper payments to minor mayoral candidate Sulaimon Brown for his frequent criticisms of Adrian Fenty during the campaign. All are cooperating with authorities. Mayor Gray this week was maintaining his “no comment” silence as his longtime associates went down one by one. Many in the public find it hard to believe that Gray — himself a stickler for details — did not at least know of the illegal campaigning or, worse, approve of it. ■ Election approaching. As the prosecutor sorts out wrongdoing in the last election, the next one quickly is approaching. The primary for mayor is now scheduled for April 1, 2014. That seems a long way away, but it isn’t really. Good-government watchdog Dorothy Brizill noted online this week that candidates can start picking up petitions to get on the April ballot this Nov. 8. Completed petitions must be filed with the Board of Elections by Jan. 2.

That’s a fast timetable. And it requires campaigning right through the holidays. It’s possible that the D.C. Council, when it returns from recess in September, may move the primary from April 1 (April Fool’s Day) to as late as June. If it does, there will be a little more breathing room on those petitions. And Mayor Gray, who has yet to declare for a second term, will get a little longer to see what damage the U.S. Attorney’s Office will do to his political future. Some folks are suggesting that Gray has already decided he’s not running. But we need to more clearly see some of the pending legal developments before that can be said. ■ Watch Walmart. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson said this week that he’s about ready to send to the mayor the bill that would force big-box stores to pay at least $12.50 an hour (including benefits). The chairman has been sitting on the bill since it passed 8-5 in July, just before the council went on its summer recess. Though Gray hasn’t announced his intentions formally, NBC4 has reported that Gray will veto the bill, declaring it anti-business and a threat to the city’s growing retail corridors. (Walmart has threatened to pull the plug on all six of city stores it has planned.) Mendelson is hoping to line up nine votes to override any veto, but he’s not there yet. Last week, former Mayor Tony Williams and other business leaders weighed in. Williams, who also heads a task force on the city’s revenue sources, is chief executive officer of the influential Federal City Council. Former Rep. Tom Davis, D-Va., is serving as president of the council. In a sternly worded letter sent last Friday, they and other business leaders called the Walmart bill “arbitrary and discriminatory legislation.” More importantly, they said the bill threatens economic development in key areas of the city. “In the city’s most under-resourced wards,” the leaders wrote, “jobs are scarce and access to affordable retail and fresh groceries is nearly nonexistent.” They warned that “retailers will continue to build their new stores just over the city lines in Maryland and Virginia.” Davis, in an interview with NBC4, noted that dollars from District citizens “will follow them to the suburbs.” Labor unions and community activists who support the higher wage bill for big-box stores aren’t impressed with the business leaders’ lament. “Surprise, surprise,” said the Rev. Graylan Hagler, a leader of a group urging the mayor to sign the bill when he gets it. “Typical of the Federal City Council,” Hagler told NBC4. “They are overseers of the plantation.”
 Tom Sherwood, a Southwest resident, is a political reporter for News 4.

TOM SHERWOOD’s

Notebook

Letters to the Editor Zoning issues need further clarification

It is important that Current readers hear about the significant changes being proposed as part of the zoning code revision. The Aug. 7 article “Planners issue revised rewrite of zoning code” helps to isolate some of the issues. But I want to clarify two of the Committee of 100’s positions. The Committee of 100 has a separate view on accessory apartments established in the home than for apartments established in

the rear yard in garages or accessory structures. Homeowners deserve the opportunity to create an apartment in a home as long as it is safe and doesn’t unreasonably affect neighbors and neighborhoods. It’s time that we learn how many units we have, who lives in them, how affordable and safe they are, and whether they help our seniors stay in their homes. Apartments created in garages or rear-yard accessory structures raise more issues than do apartments located within a home. We may find from our experience with accessory dwelling units in the home that it is unnecessary to have apartments in garages or other structures in the rear yard, or

that we should allow a neighborhood to decide whether it wants garage apartments. The Committee of 100 has offered the Office of Planning many comments about the formatting of the proposed new code to make it more user-friendly. Charts and illustrations are new positive features, but at almost 900 pages the text is very cumbersome with many new terms, new zones and new concepts. There is change in the draft that does not improve over the current code, and those organizational alterations should be reconsidered. Nancy MacWood Chair, Committee of 100 on the Federal City


The Current

Letters to the Editor Spring Valley editorial on health unfounded

The Current has for many years questioned and criticized the conclusions of Johns Hopkins University studies about the health of Spring Valley residents. The Current previously questioned and criticized the 2007 study. The actual conclusions of the 2007 study by researchers of Johns Hopkins (as recorded in the minutes of a May 8, 2007, meeting of the Spring Valley Restoration Advisory Board) were: “The community health is good compared to the nation: The mortality rates are low. The cancer rates are low. No association was found between the D.C. cancer registry cases and the [boundaries of interest].” The researchers also found: “The overall community health status of Spring Valley is very good. For 11 of the top 15 causes of death, the mortality rates in Spring Valley are 20% to 70% lower than U.S. rates.” The follow-up Johns Hopkins study in 2013 agreed with these overall findings by concluding: “[C] ommunity health in the Spring Valley and Chevy Chase areas continues to be very good. … Incidence … and mortality rates for all of the selected cancers in the Spring Valley area are lower than US rates. … Residents can be assured that community health is very good and most environmental indicators are in compliance with established standards or are similar to conditions in other urban areas.” Despite these conclusions by researchers from one of the premier universities in the country and with absolutely no proof, The Current continues to criticize and question the conclusions. To support its position The Current in its Aug. 7 editorial outrageously and wildly speculates that members of the Bush family “might” have contracted diseases by once living in Spring Valley. A famous lawyer once said in a televised congressional hearing: “Have you no shame?” My dictionary defines fact as “a thing known to be true ... truth, reality.” Your repeated articles and editorials about the health of the residents of Spring Valley continue to be based on speculation, not facts. Malcolm Pritzker Spring Valley

Bikes don’t belong on city sidewalks

Please get bicycles off of the sidewalks of the District of Columbia! Sidewalks are for pedestrians, including the elderly and baby carriages. Sidewalks are not for trans-

portation vehicles! Bicycles endanger the safety and security of pedestrians. I have been riding a bicycle in D.C. for 20 years and I can honestly say I never ride on sidewalks. If required to be on a sidewalk with my bicycle for a short period of time, I walk it. Additionally, I frequently walk from Van Ness to the West End and see bicyclists zooming down the sidewalks of Connecticut Avenue, heedlessly intimidating the elderly. I also regularly see people flagrantly breaking the law by riding their bicycles on sidewalks south of Massachusetts Avenue NW. Why is this situation allowed to persist? Kenneth Borden West End

Pumping stations are worse than tree loss

I’m responding to Rock Creek Park superintendent Tara Morrison’s July 31 Viewpoint about sewer work proposed in Glover Archbold Park. I think everyone can agree that doing nothing and letting the sewer lines degrade and leak sewage into our parks is the worst possible option. And since diverting the flow to other existing city lines has been ruled out, we must choose the lesser of two evils — the temporary removal of trees, or the building of 20 sewage pumping stations that will become permanent noisy, smelly fixtures in our area. The pumping stations are undesirable for many reasons. Foremost, one would potentially occupy part of a historic victory garden that has been in Glover Archbold for nearly as long as the park’s existence. However, I find the arguments against tree removals to be specious. I understand the National Park Service’s commitment to preserving parkland and public access, but this finger of a park is less about natural habitat than it is about improved urban living. In the spirit of scrutiny, let’s take a view of the forest from the trees. Void now of most of its native residents such as elk, black bears, cougars and coyotes, this park is a shell of its origins. So now it lends itself to joggers, hikers, dog walkers, children, community gardens — and let’s not forget the birds, foxes, turtles, deer, et al. But remember that these trees Ms. Morrison defends were planted less than 40 years ago, when the current sewer line was installed in the 1970s. The idea that 50 years will be needed to restore the loss is exaggerated. And to say that such removal will only fuel invasive plants seems to overlook the near decimation of native species in all our parks, not from sewer construction but an uncontrolled deer population. It would seem that either

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

replacement or removal of the sewer line is going to limit public access and remove trees — temporarily. So let’s all take a deep breath and recognize the facts: We could spend Herculean efforts defying gravity with some 20 sewage pumps, abandoning the concrete line to become a crumbling liability that would eventually need to be removed (with the same dear trees getting hacked). We ought to take this opportunity to manage our discordant park as it is. As ugly and invasive as surgery can be, this could be a healing chance for the park to get a properly sized trail to accommodate joggers, walkers and their four-legged friends — perhaps even a dog run. And at the same time look at inventive ways to reduce invasives and revive the native flora and fauna (well, perhaps not the cougars). Matthew Carucci Glover Park

Walter Reed site has supermarkets nearby

There are many reasons to desire adding a Wegmans supermarket to the D.C. retail mix, as The Current advocates in its July 31 editorial “A Walter Reed milestone.” Wegmans is a market leader in the industry in terms of merchandising, the breadth of products offered, the wide range of gourmet and prepared foods, and a great number of in-store eating options — some stores even offer Italian restaurants or pubs. But counter to the statement in the editorial that “Wegmans would suit the site well because the Walter Reed campus doesn’t have any other supermarkets nearby,” lack of supermarket options for Upper Northwest residents is not one of those reasons. The reality is that what Upper Northwest lacks most is a variety of nonfood retail options (Friendship Heights excepted). There is a Safeway 0.4 miles south from the Walter Reed site. As The Current has reported, Harris Teeter will be including a store in a residential development at Georgia and Eastern avenues, 0.4 miles north of Walter Reed. Of course, one mile south there will be a Walmart in the 5900 block of Georgia Avenue, and 55 percent of Walmart’s revenues are from the sales of groceries. Safeway is also upgrading its Petworth store as an element of a residential development there, although that location is two miles south of Walter Reed. It would be a lot more helpful to residents if reporting on proposed developments considered the broader land-use context outside of the confines of the particular lot of the project being covered. Richard Layman Ward 4

Letters to the editor The Current publishes letters and Viewpoint submissions representing various points of view. Because of space limitations, letters should be no more than 400 words and are subject to editing. Letters and Viewpoint submissions intended for publication should be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Current, Post Office Box 40400, Washington, D.C. 20016-0400. You may send email to letters@currentnewspapers.com.

9


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In Your Neighborhood ANC 1C ANCMorgan 1c Adams

â&#x2013;  adams morgan

At the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Aug. 7 meeting: â&#x2013;  commissioners agreed to consider a grant request at their September meeting from the Adams Morgan Basketball Association, which is seeking up to $1,000 for a tournament in Kalorama Park. Group president Michael Taylor said the money would be used for T-shirts and medals for the winners; for a $450 Department of Parks and Recreation fee to use the court; and to pay two referees $150 each. He said the association is also raising money from local businesses. Commissioner Wilson Reynolds said the last time this group received a grant it failed to provide adequate documentation, and that it is not registered with the District as a nonprofit organization. Denis James of the Kalorama Citizens Association said he would look into the possibility of his organization working with the basketball association as a nonprofit fiscal agent. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted unanimously to support the closure of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;paper alleyâ&#x20AC;? that runs through the 122-year-old house at 1753 Seaton St. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously agreed to conditionally support a curb cut for the renovated Dorchester apartment building in the 2400 block of 17th Street next door to the Harris Teeter store. The commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support is contingent upon certain conditions for trucks and loading. The resolution suggests requiring that visiting trucks not be longer than 32 feet, not idle more than 10 minutes, and be monitored by building staff. The loading dock should be used only between 8 a.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday, and monitored by closedcircuit TV. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 5-1, with Wilson Reynolds opposed, to request that the D.C. Department of Transportation study the idea of allowing limited commercial loading and unloading in the medians of the 2300 and 2400 blocks of 18th Street and the 1700 and 1800 blocks of Columbia Road. The Adams Morgan Partnership Business Improvement District is requesting a 120-day pilot to evaluate the concept, but the commission stopped short of calling for the pilot to be implemented. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted unanimously to protest an entertainment endorsement for Doener Bistro, at 1654 Columbia Road, to preserve the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s procedural rights while negotiating a settlement agreement. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously agreed to co-sponsor the VIDA Senior Center outdoor health fair from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 26 at 1842 Calvert St. The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 4, at Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center, 2355 Ontario Road NW.

Citizens Association of Georgetown

Not a day goes by that we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t read or hear something about the real estate market in Georgetown. It appears that homes are selling and new individuals and families are moving in. The Citizens Association of Georgetown extends a warm welcome to all of you calling Georgetown home for the first time. Moving is a big undertaking and the lists are long as you work to make Georgetown comfortable for you and your family. After the furniture is in place and the refrigerator is full, one of the best ways to begin to learn what your new community has to offer is to go onto our organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cagtown.org. What does it offer you? Some very basic information about living in Georgetown is available, as well as more detailed accounts of the issues affecting every resident. For example, if you are considering renovations or an addition to your home, a check of our website will give you good advice about what is involved in moving your project forward to a successful conclusion in our historic district. One of our most popular initiatives is our Public Safety Program. In a few weeks, this column will give you more details about how you can stay informed about safety issues on a regular basis. When you become a member of Citizens Association of Georgetown and are on our mailing list, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll receive a monthly newsletter that highlights â&#x20AC;&#x153;what you need to know.â&#x20AC;? For now you should plan to join us for the Citizens Association of Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s September community meeting at 7 p.m. Sept. 26. We are very pleased to have the Washington Boat Club, located on K Street near Key Bridge, as our hosts. The panelists will offer varying insights into how the Georgetown waterfront might well develop in the years ahead. The boat club is one of the true treasures in Georgetown. We hope youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll join your neighbors and invite new neighbors to enjoy a glass of wine and good conversation. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Pamla Moore For details, call 202-332-2630 or visit anc1c.org.

For details, visit dupontcircleanc. net.

ANC 2B ANCCircle 2B Dupont

ANC 2E ANC 2E Georgetown â&#x2013;  Georgetown / cloisters Cloisters burleith / hillandale

â&#x2013;  dupont circle

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 14, at the Brookings Institution, 1775 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013;  announcements. â&#x2013;  consideration of a resolution thanking the Urban Forestry Administration for tree removal. â&#x2013;  consideration of a resolution about joining the Ward 2 education coalition. â&#x2013;  consideration of a resolution marking the passing of Annie Kaylor of Annieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Paramount Steak House. â&#x2013;  consideration of a request by ChiCha Lounge, 1624 U St., to amend its settlement agreement to allow for a holiday hours extension. â&#x2013;  consideration of an Alcoholic Beverage Control application by Shoreditch Cooperative LLC for a new restaurant-class license at 1513 17th St. â&#x2013;  consideration of a proposed resolution on the 17th Street moratorium. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for a sidewalk cafe at 1333 New Hampshire Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for a sidewalk cafe at 1717 Pennsylvania Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public space application for the installation of bollards at 1050 Connecticut Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Historic Preservation Review Board application for proposed signage at 1737 Connecticut Ave. â&#x2013;  committee reports.

The commission will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 3, at Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School, 1524 35th St. NW. For details, call 202-724-7098 or visit anc2e.com. AANC 3B ANCPark 3B Glover

â&#x2013;  Glover Park / Cathedral heights

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 12, at Stoddert Elementary School and Glover Park Community Center, 4001 Calvert St. NW. For details, call 202-338-2969, email info@anc3b.org or visit anc3b. org. ANC 3C ANC 3C Cleveland Park â&#x2013;  cleveland park / woodley Park Woodley Park massachusetts avenue heights Massachusetts Avenue Heights Cathedral Heights The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 16, at the 2nd District Police Headquarters, 3320 Idaho Ave. NW. For details, visit anc3c.org. ANC 3D ANCValley 3D Spring â&#x2013;  spring valley / wesley heights Wesley Heights palisades / kent / foxhall The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 11, at the Lab School of Washington, 4759 Reservoir Road NW. For details, call 202-363-4130 or visit anc3d.org.


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August 14, 2013 ■ Page 11

Eagles ready to fly high on the gridiron By BRIAN KAPUR Current Staff Writer

After DeMatha knocked Gonzaga out of the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference playoffs last November, Nick Johns, who knew he would become the Eagles’ starting quarterback this fall, headed for the weight room. The rising junior’s work ethic and mentality following that defeat was infectious in the locker room. And now Gonzaga’s football team enters the new season hungry for a shot at the WCAC crown. “The day after our last game I started lifting,” said Johns. “I started getting stronger. I gained about 20 pounds. I was ready then.” The Eagles took the field for the first time against an opposing squad this season when they hosted Baltimore’s Gilman for a scrimmage Saturday. The results were a mixed bag, which is to be expected this early in the preseason; Gonzaga only had eight days of camp before Saturday. “I was really proud of a lot of our guys that stepped up,” said Eagles coach Aaron Brady. “Being in the middle of camp, we have a lot of guys banged up. Some people were out today, and some young guys stepped up and did some really good things, which is exciting.” Gonzaga showed glimpses of a strong offense, with Reggie Corbin ripping off a 43-yard touchdown run and fellow runner Robbie Walker stringing together some solid yards on the ground. That tandem is poised for a big season after combining for more than 1,500 rushing yards last year. “They both work really hard in the offseason,” said Brady. “They’re two guys that really put the time in. They’re both stronger and faster than they were last year. I’m glad that they’re on our team.” Although they share carries, Walker, who is committed to Ohio University, and Corbin, who has drawn Division I interest, are close friends, and they push each other to improve. “We watch film together and tell each other what we see when we’re

on the sidelines,” said Corbin. “It’s a brotherhood.” The team will even get creative with play design in order to get them both on the field at the same time, creating mismatches for defenses. “Having another back like Reggie is great because we can do a whole lot of things,” said Walker, who will play receiver at the college level. “We can both be on the field. There’s a lot that we can do. I can even line up in the slot.” The team’s rushing attack will provide a solid foundation for Johns, who enters the season as a first-year starter. Although it will be his first time as the team’s signalcaller, he has already gained the respect of his teammates because of his offseason regimen. “Nick’s crazy,” Corbin said with a laugh. “He lives in the weight room. Every time I go to the film room, he’s in there. He knows all the plays. He knows them better than the coaches sometimes. It’s just his way of life right now.” Johns made a point of creating a strong rapport with top receiver Jabari Greenwood, who holds a slew of Division I offers. The two spent time in the offseason working on their chemistry. “We just got after it,” said Greenwood. “I went to a couple of camps with him. We went to Tennessee together and worked out.” The extra work showed on Saturday, with Johns looking sharp

Sports Desk School Without Walls brings in new girls soccer coach

Jason Gross will take over School Without Walls girls soccer program this coming school year, according to an email Kip Smith, the school’s athletic director, sent out July 31. Gross replaces Bob O’Sullivan, who

Brian Kapur/The Current

Rising junior Nick Johns, above and bottom left, takes over as Gonzaga’s starting quarterback this season. He showed poise and a strong arm during Saturday’s scrimmage. Johns will have a talented stable of running backs to lean on, including Robbie Walker and Reggie Corbin, who combined for more than 1,500 yards last season. while leading the offense. “Nick has done a great job of becoming a leader for these guys,” said Brady. “He didn’t get flustered. He handled it well. As he goes, we’re going to go.” Johns showed poise despite a banged-up offensive line, which gave him limited time to get rid of the ball and allowed a few sacks. “That’s where we have a lot of injuries — on the line,” said Brady. “We’re working to get those young guys going.” Although the patchwork line had some breakdowns, Brady said the squad did a good job of creating running room for Corbin and Walker. With the team’s talent at the prime positions on offense, the Eagles could fly high this season. “We have good skill players and will get them the ball and let them

resigned after spending 12 seasons at the helm, according to the email. Walls’ new coach, an alumnus of the school himself, brings both coaching and playing experience to the squad. Gross played soccer during his high school years at Walls, and went on to play at the Division I level for Howard University and professionally in the Major Indoor Soccer League. The team will have an interest meeting Friday and tryouts begin Aug 19.

make plays,” said Brady. “I think we’ll be hard to stop offensively.” While the offense appears loaded, the defense appears to need some more time to sort out responsibilities. Gilman ripped off two long touchdown runs during Saturday’s scrimmage. But Brady viewed the mistakes as correctable ones and good lessons the team could build on as it heads into the season. “We have to close down those holes,” said Brady. “And everybody has to do their job. In our league, if you mess up like that, it’s going to the house. We just have to get those things fixed up.” The team still has several weeks to work out the kinks, with the season opening in North Carolina on Aug. 24 at Charlotte Catholic. Gonzaga will play its first local game on Sept. 1 against Florida’s Cocoa at

Capitol City all-star team falls in Little League regional semifinals

The Capitol City Little League all-stars fell to Delaware’s Newark National Little League team 15-4 in the Mid-Atlantic regional semifinals in Bristol, Conn., Saturday. Newark was able to use the win as a springboard to the Little League World Series, which begins tomorrow. Capitol City’s 11- and 12-year-old team

the University of Maryland at College Park. Both games — along with a week-three matchup against St. Peter’s Prep — could help the Eagles garner national recognition. “With the national schedule I would like to be top-ranked,” said Corbin. “We’ve been putting in work. I have no idea what would happen.” The early games will also prepare them for dates with WCAC heavyweights Good Counsel and DeMatha. The Eagles believe they have what it takes to make a serious run in the league this season. “We have got to go to the championship,” said Walker. “This year is definitely our year. We have good senior leadership, we have the young guys, we have a good combination. I honestly don’t think we should lose a game in the WCAC.”

made it all the way to the semifinals after knocking off Northwest’s Little League 7-1 last month. That win and the city crown gave them a ticket to regionals in Bristol. Pool play began Aug. 2 and wrapped up last Wednesday. Capitol City went 2-2 in those games before falling to Newark in playoff competition. Saturday’s game is still available via watchespn.com.


12 Wednesday, August 14, 2013

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The Current

SHERMAN: Historic landmark undergoes two-year reconstruction after earthquake

From Page 1

Two years and at least $13 million later, the renovation of the Sherman Building is nearly complete. Compared to the attention some popular tourist spots received after the earthquake, reconstruction efforts at this castle-like structure haven’t received much publicity. Housed in the 272-acre government retirement facility at 3700 North Capitol St., the Sherman Building is not open to the public. But last Saturday, several members of the D.C. Preservation League toured the newly refurbished space in Petworth. This included climbing the two-story winding staircases that lead up to the clock tower, which commands striking views of the city. “Everyone is aware of the damage and recovery that’s ongoing at the Washington

Monument and National Cathedral and so we’re excited to show the off-beaten path,” said Burton during the presentation that took place before the tour. At 10 a.m. Aug. 29, the retirement community will also open its doors to the public to showcase both the reconstruction efforts at the Sherman Building and the grand opening of the newly built Scott Building. The Sherman Building, built in 1852 by Barton S. Alexander and Gilbert Cameron, first served as a dormitory for soldiers coming home from the Mexican-American War. In 1952, the building began to house administrative offices. Today, the Sherman Building — named after Union Army Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman — still hosts administrative functions for the armed forces facility, which houses around 500 retired military members.

After the 2011 earthquake, crew members working on the new Scott Building shifted their focus to fixing the older structure. They worked all night to remove 180 unstable stones. Before Hurricane Irene passed through a few days later, they also wrapped straps around the clock tower. “Most concerning was the clock tower. We had no idea the extent of structural damage at that time. It was too dangerous to go up there. Structural engineers came up with the system using custom-made nylon straps to wrap around and hold it together to withstand the wind,” said Burton. The retirement home, also known as the “Old Soldiers’ Home,” enlisted The Christman Co. and a multidisciplinary team that included Preserve Scapes and Quinn Evans Architects to take on the repairs. The most significant feat was deconstruct-

ing the 120-foot clock tower, which was added to the original structure in 1868. A construction crane removed each stone and laid it down on the ground, with Burton and her business partner Molly McDonald cataloguing each masonry. The heaviest stone taken out weighed 4,000 pounds. A structural steel frame was then raised to strengthen the tower. Using a puzzle map, the crew put the historic stones back together around the frame. League members were impressed by what was accomplished. “So much attention was given to the Washington Monument and National Cathedral,” said John DeFerrari, a blogger for Streets of Washington and a board member of the preservation league who attended the tour. “It’s great that the Armed Forces Retirement Home was in a position to restore this. This is a real triumph.”

TENANTS: Off-campus GU students organize to improve living conditions in rental units

From Page 1

ourselves,” said Peterson. Working with the neighborhood

life department, Georgetown University Student Association, the D.C. Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs, and the D.C. Office of the Tenant Advocate, she created the Georgetown Student Tenant Association. Launched in late July, the new group will aim to protect the rights of students living off campus, as an independent nonprofit entirely operated by students. In doing so, student volunteers trained by the city’s Tenant Advocate Office will help their peers understand the basics of a standard lease; serve as university liaisons to the city government on problems such as illegal rent increases, infestations, broken facilities and landlord harassment; and educate students on their rights as tenants in the District. The group may go on to serve as a model for other D.C. universities,

but for now, Peterson is busy implementing programs at Georgetown for the upcoming school year. Her new group is also already assisting five students who are experiencing landlord problems. College students, especially those new to the city and first-time renters, are often intimidated dealing with government or clueless about the legalities of renting an apartment, said Johanna Shreve, the city’s chief tenant advocate, whose office worked closely with Peterson in developing the association’s incorporation documents and bylaws. “People lose control of their environment,” Shreve said of students leaving their comfort zone to attend college in another city. “Until they become comfortable ... they’re absolutely vulnerable. … Students will have a place to find out about other

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services in the city.” She said her agency has always worked with colleges and universities in the city to improve off-campus student life. With stronger ties to Georgetown, her office will be able to directly address student grievances about off-campus problems. “We envision having a legal clinic on campus at least once or twice a month so that as Alyssa and members of her association take complaints, we will have attorneys to meet and address those complaints,” she said. In the past, Georgetown off-campus students have normally gone to the Office of Neighborhood Life to voice their discontent about uncooperative property managers. Since February, interim director Cory Peterson said he has received a dozen complaints. All his office could do was direct his constituents to city services, such as the Office of the Tenant Advocate. The director said the new nonprofit will make this communication process “more efficient and more well-rounded.” The Georgetown advisory neighborhood commission also supports the new student tenant organization. In the past year, the commission — which includes two students at the university — has been actively discussing tenant issues. “This will address these studenttenant issues in a very positive step,” said commission chair Ron Lewis. Commissioner Jeffrey Jones, who co-chairs environmental and landlord initiatives for the Georgetown Community Partnership, also supported the new effort.

“We are working on a winning situation for the students, the community and the university. [The Department of Consumer and Regulatory Affairs] has informed us their intent is not to remove the studenttenants from their rental properties, but their primary focus is to ensure rental properties are safe,” Jones wrote in an email. “Now is an ideal time for landlords to reach out to DCRA to ensure their property is up to code. The Student Tenant Advocacy Association is an excellent resource for every student-tenant to reach out to whether they have a safety concern or not.” A D.C.-based landlord who has been leasing his rental properties to Georgetown students for 25 years praised the university for keeping good relations with long-term residents and landlords in recent years. “Georgetown has done a phenomenal job at keeping stude nts accountable” with their living situation off campus, said the property owner, who asked not to be identified. “If [the tenant organization] gets a strong operation, then it’ll be worth their time.” According to Shreve, Georgetown’s tenant advocate group is the first of its kind since the launch of her office in 2006. She said she hopes it becomes a template for other schools. “We hope to use this one as a demonstration project this year as a program designed together so that we can introduce this to university campuses all over the city,” said Shreve. “I envision student-tenant associations all over the city hopefully in the next 24 to 36 months.”

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The Current

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

13

WALTER REED: Group seeks protection of Civil War history during siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s redevelopment

From Page 3

embassies for part of the site, the District is currently reviewing proposals from three competing development teams â&#x20AC;&#x201D; all of which envision a mix of residential, retail and institutional uses on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 62.5 acres of the campus, fronting Georgia Avenue. One part of the process the Civil War alliance has been watching closely is a requirement â&#x20AC;&#x201C; as part of the complex transfer of the Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s land â&#x20AC;&#x201C; to designate the Walter Reed campus as both a national and local historic district. That status would â&#x20AC;&#x153;control the demolition, major alterations and new constructionâ&#x20AC;? on Walter Reed, said Loretta Neumann, the allianceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president.

The Army is now developing the historic district nomination and plans to submit it this October, according to an Army staffer who spoke to The Current. At the same time, the Army is assessing the siteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s archaeological resources to see if further research is warranted. Down the line, the Army is developing a plan for interpretive historical markers for the site, due by 2017. The Army staffer said the propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Civil War history â&#x20AC;&#x153;wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a driving force of the programmatic agreementâ&#x20AC;? for preservation â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the focus has always been the Armyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hospital buildings â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but he said Civil War activists have been in touch and plans do incorporate that element.

Neumann said that in recent public meetings about Walter Reed, development teams seem â&#x20AC;&#x153;clearly aware there would be [preservation] restraints on themâ&#x20AC;? going forward. But she also said that when the specific topic of Civil War history comes up, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s usually coming directly from a member of her alliance. The activist group started out as a scattered effort, organizing into a formal nonprofit a few years ago. Its primary cause, as the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Fort Stevens approaches, is to increase protection and unification of the immediate areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection of 19 Civil War forts. To that end, the group is now advocating for D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton to put forth legislation establishing a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Civil War Defenses of Washington National

Park.â&#x20AC;? Cooling said the Walter Reed land â&#x20AC;&#x153;fits into the overall story of the Fort Stevens event,â&#x20AC;? and its Civil War history has benefited from de facto protections â&#x20AC;&#x153;for years, preserved under the guise of the Walter Reed [Army Medical Center].â&#x20AC;? As development looms, Cooling said the process to establish a historic district offers â&#x20AC;&#x153;some encouraging signs.â&#x20AC;? Beyond that, â&#x20AC;&#x153;all we can do is continue to press for recognition and work with developers and the city and the State Department.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many of the plans theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing are fabulous,â&#x20AC;? he said, but â&#x20AC;&#x153;the more they rip it up, the more [the history] is lost to posterity â&#x20AC;Ś and the communityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s knowledge base.â&#x20AC;?

CONSTRUCTION: Concerns over traffic, pedestrian impacts prompt adjustments

From Page 2

the â&#x20AC;&#x153;superdormâ&#x20AC;? project, and 21st and G streets for a new museum. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We now have construction virtually nonstop from 24th Street all the way down on H Street,â&#x20AC;? one resident said at Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s meeting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somebody had to have staggered those projects. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t question the needs you put forth; we question the timing that we all have to have everything at the same time.â&#x20AC;? At the public health school, twoway traffic â&#x20AC;&#x201D; albeit with narrowed lanes and no parking â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is set to be restored on 24th Street at the end of this month. Knight said the university will make each lane of 24th about 18 inches wider than originally planned â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 11.5 feet instead of 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and will use chain-link fencing instead of Jersey barriers to further increase the perceived width of the lanes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That is the most that, because of site logistics, that we can continue to bring it back,â&#x20AC;? she said. That layout will remain through December. Outside Ross Hall, Knight said, the university has shifted its H Street fencing farther from the 24th Street corner to increase visibility for motorists. The school will remove the fencing as soon as possible, but parking there will remain prohibited to leave room for temporary uses, she said. The closures there will wrap up by the end of December. Closures will last through November 2014 at the Science and Engineering Hall, a project that has all of Square 55 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; bordered by 22nd, 23rd, I and H streets â&#x20AC;&#x201D; under construction. Knight said the logistics are actually easier there, though, because work doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to accommodate other buildings. One travel lane, two parking lanes and two sidewalks on that square are closed, with the least impact on 23rd Street. At the site of the planned new museum building, which will house the Textile Museum and university exhibits, Knight said closures are â&#x20AC;&#x153;imminently comingâ&#x20AC;? of the sidewalks and parking lanes at the northeast corner of 21st and G streets. A parking and travel lane will soon be lost on a stretch of the 2100 block of H Street for the dorm project.

Visit tinyurl.com/gwmap2013, tinyurl.com/gwmap2014 and tinyurl. com/gwmap2015 to see maps showing year-to-year closure plans. At the same time, the IMF is shutting the 1900 block of H Street through 2016 except for one sidewalk â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on the north side of the street. University projects nearby make the sidewalks on the south side of H Street the only ones open for several blocks. Some residents at the meeting noted that so many northbound streets are affected by lane closures or other construction-related congestion that thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no easy way out of the neighborhood. Barbara Kahlow of the West End Citizens Association requested that the university provide a flagman to allow two-way traffic on 24th Street. Knight said at the meeting that the university had not thought of that idea but would consider it. University spokesperson Michelle Sherrard said yesterday that the university had originally proposed a flagman but the Transportation Department instead requested one-way traffic southbound at all times. In response to a neighborâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s complaint, Knight also promised to step up enforcement against contractors

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parking their personal vehicles in closed-off lanes. The university is also expected to build a new office building at 2100 Pennsylvania Ave. and gut and rebuild a dorm, the former Howard Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hotel, at 2601 Virginia

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14 Wednesday, August 14, 2013

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The Current

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COMMISSIONER: AU student to represent Tenley From Page 3

one who represents the 2,000 residents of my single-member district,â&#x20AC;? she said. She plans to go door-todoor throughout her area to get residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; opinions on key issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to ask around, look around, generally be proactive and find things to do to help this place,â&#x20AC;? she said. Tinker mentioned a few issues sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d already like to pay attention to, such as exploring new community uses for Fort Reno Park and spurring further redevelopment along Wisconsin. But overall, she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to go about learning what [residents] think needs fixing before setting about trying to fix it.â&#x20AC;? Tinker had her first meeting on a commission issue Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a private discussion between several commissioners and the new owners

of the Dancing Crab Restaurant, located at 4615 Wisconsin Ave. within her single-member district. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll attend her first full commission meeting Aug. 29. It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be her first foray into politics, though. Tinker is a former president of the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College Democrats, and she canvassed Ward 3 for Mayor Adrian Fentyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s re-election campaign. She also has volunteered as a tutor with Kid Power, which she said gives her insights into D.C. public schools. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I see something that, with a lot of work on my end, is going to benefit the community, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going to do it,â&#x20AC;? she said. Tinker predicts sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll remain at Cityline through at least December 2014 and says sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll likely stay in D.C. afterward, though perhaps not in Tenleytown. She laughed at a question about political ambitions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People have said to me that

being an ANC commissioner makes you an elected official on your way to being president of the United States â&#x20AC;&#x201D; no, no, no,â&#x20AC;? said Tinker. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is something Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m really doing because I want to learn more and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m interested in being more integrated into the Washington community.â&#x20AC;? Tinker is one of three American University students presently on advisory neighborhood commissions; the other two, Rory Slatko and Joe Wisniewski, serve in the Spring Valley/Wesley Heights commission around the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main campus. Wisniewski, a friend of Tinkerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, encouraged her to run after learning about the vacant 3E01 seat, she said. Tinker was unopposed in her bid but needed to collect 25 signatures of registered voters within that singlemember district. Her term will expire at the end of 2014.

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LICENSES: ABC cap considered From Page 2

nitely lacking a factual base, a documentation of public opinion,â&#x20AC;? she said, suggesting the community needs time to put together â&#x20AC;&#x153;a complete report.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a great chance to look at the 17th Street business area,â&#x20AC;? Nichols said, noting that the timing is ripe with the recent revival of the Historic Dupont Circle Main Streets organization. A few members of the Dupont Circle Citizens Association also supported that logic, urging collaboration between the various neighborhood organizations. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Between DCCA, the ANC and Main Streets, we may be able to do some stuff to liven up the place,â&#x20AC;? said citizen association member Susan Volman. There was disagreement over whether the moratorium has encouraged or hampered retail since it took effect in 1990. Resident Judith Neibrief praised the retail options, noting she can walk to â&#x20AC;&#x153;a supermarket, dry cleaner, drugstore, hardware store, kitchen supply store, yoga studio [and] coffee shop.â&#x20AC;? Others pointed to some dead spaces. Commissioner Kishan Putta read aloud a letter from a longtime resident who asked: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are empty storefronts better for the neighborhood than additional restaurants?â&#x20AC;? But Robin Diener of the citizens association questioned whether the commissionersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; proposal to get rid of the cap on restaurant-class licenses â&#x20AC;&#x201D; published in a draft resolution last week â&#x20AC;&#x201D; would be effective. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want good restaurants, oneof-a-kind, new ideas,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think by lifting the cap weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get that. We might, but we might get a chain.â&#x20AC;?

She also worried about the threat to retail diversity if landlords can obtain more rent from alcohol-selling businesses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What will be the pressures on lower-grossing, lowerprofit-margin, neighborhood-serving retail businesses?â&#x20AC;? she asked, noting that â&#x20AC;&#x153;one of the main goalsâ&#x20AC;? of the moratorium was to protect them. But several community members agreed that another of the moratoriumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original intents â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to control the club scene on 17th Street â&#x20AC;&#x201D; has lost some relevance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;17th Street was once the place to come to â&#x20AC;&#x201C; not anymore,â&#x20AC;? commissioner Leo Dwyer said of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nightlife. He also spoke of the neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s spike in affluence, which has changed its needs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fifteen years ago, I could rent a one-bedroom apartment for $500 and buy one for $50,000. â&#x20AC;Ś Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s half a million.â&#x20AC;? To commissioner Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; suggestion to ask for an emergency extension, the three other commissioners present Wednesday night expressed reluctance if not opposition. Even with 120 more days, as Nichols proposed, â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to have anything groundbreaking or anything thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to change the results of this,â&#x20AC;? said commissioner Stephanie Maltz. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve had three years!â&#x20AC;? said Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor, doubting the city alcohol board would respond sympathetically to a request for more time. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor also said he gets the sense the board is moving away from the rigidity of moratoriums, after watching its recent decisions. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dupont East Moratoriumâ&#x20AC;? is set to expire Sept. 23. The neighborhood commission will consider the issue at its monthly meeting at 7 tonight at the Brookings Institution.

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A Look at the Market in Northwest Washington

August 14, 2013 â&#x2013;  Page 15

Colonial offers luscious landscaping, sunny disposition

T

ucked behind lush foliage in Wesley Heights sits an impressive brick Colonial, on a corner lot atop a grassy knoll

ON THE MARKET kat LucERo

in one of the most desirable neighborhoods in D.C. The street view is especially striking, as you encounter this 16,000-square-foot property down the bend of a winding road. The six-bedroom, five-and-half bath and four-fireplace house at 4773 Dexter St. is on the market for $2,250,000. Surrounding the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exterior is a wide array of mature greenery, including azaleas and crepe myrtle, holly, dogwood, maple and pine trees. The front yard boasts an expansive lawn, a driveway and a winding flagstone path leading to a cozy portico. Wrapping the rest of the house, the backyard also showcases a lush lawn, as well as a small pond and a flagstone-patterned patio excellent for outdoor entertaining. Built in 1940, this charming abode presents an interior brimming with natural light from abundant windows.

The homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s radiance can be seen from the foyer. To the left, the allwhite living room with randomwidth wood floors creates a welcoming atmosphere. Natural light splashes from four oversized windows lined with ledges and crown moldings. The space also features a wood-burning fireplace with a mantel and a set of four generously sized built-in bookcases with bottom cabinets. The living room flows north through a set of French doors into an oak-paneled den. The dark hues contrast with the illuminated neighboring room, but plenty of sunlight floods into this space from more large windows and another set of French doors leading to the backyard. A fireplace and three built-in bookcases adorn the walls, creating a reposing ambiance perfect for a music room â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is its current use â&#x20AC;&#x201D; or a library. At the center of this level sits a separate dining room that can seat up to 12 guests. Two built-in bookshelves bookend an oversized window overlooking the backyard. Embellishing the ceiling is a French chandelier. Some buyers may elect to update the walls, which are currently splashed with sea-foam blue paint and feature an off-white chair

railing. A door from the dining room leads to a tablespace kitchen. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s outfitted with the latest stainless steel appliances, including a SubZero refrigerator, but future owners may also want to modernize this area. To the rear is a mudroom, another port of entry to the backyard. The most airy feature of the house is a garden room, located on the other side of the first floor. It can be accessed by descending a few short wooden steps from the hallway. The lowered space, which is currently used as a family room, shows off cathedral ceilings, slate floors, glass doors crowned with arched windows, and walls of glass, all displaying views of the luscious backyard. Four of the six bedrooms rest on the second floor, with the master suite dominating the west end. The suite features a spacious sleeping

SELLING THE AREAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FINEST PROPERTIES Dazzling Design

Keepsake Quality

Kent. Gracious home renovated & updated to the highest level. 4 fin. levels w/7 BRs, 5 BAs, 2 HBAs. Gourmet eat in kit., 2 fam rms w/firpls. art/loft studio, amazing MBR suite, home theater. LL au pair suite. Pool! $3,200,000 Beverly Nadel   202-236-7313 Melissa Brown  202-469-2662

Sitting Pretty

Chevy Chase, MD. Fabulous updated Colonial w/lge family addition. near Rock Creek Pk.Sun filled 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs. Updated kit,  MBR w/sitting rm. Finished LL. Lovely landscaped yard. $799,000 Delia McCormick  301-977-7273 Laura McCaffrey 301-641-4456

CHEVY CHASE 4400 JENIFER STREET NW 202-364-1700

Georgetown. Transformed 3 BR, 3.5 BA home w/elevator. Gourmet eatin kitchen, LR w/granite frpl, family rm. Master BR w/adj office & dressing rm. Stone terraced patio. Gated community w/pool, tennis & 24 hour security. $1,650,000 Lynn Bulmer  202-257-2410

A Sense of Style

Photos courtesy of Long & Foster Real Estate

This six-bedroom Wesley Heights house is priced at $2,250,000. area with coved ceilings, a sun-lit dressing room with three closets, and a full bath with skylights. It also connects to a private woodpanel study complete with built-in bookcases and a handsome brick wood-burning fireplace. The two smaller bedrooms in the middle of this floor are connected by a full bath, while a larger one, with its own private bath, is currently furnished as a second family room on the east side. The hallway is lined with ample closet space and has another set of stairs leading to the third floor. This story features a generous wooden

landing, an insulated attic space and a large sleeping area connected to a full bath. In the bottom level, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find a spacious area that includes a ceramic-tiled recreation room with pinepaneled walls and a fireplace. The sixth bedroom and a utility room storing the washer and dryer are also housed on this floor. This six-bedroom, five-and-halfbath property at 4773 Dexter St. is offered for $2,250,000. For more information contact Terri Robinson of Long & Foster Real Estate at trrestate@aol.com or 202-6077731.

Jaquet Listings are Staged to Sell

Restored Classic

Palisades. Sears Catalog Home beautifully restored. 3 BR sun drenched Colonial. Kitchen w/brkfst room, spacious MBR suite. Charming front porch. Great location. $875,000 Delia McCormick  301-977-7273 James Gregory  240-447-7701

Chevy Chase, MD  The Hamlet. Lovely coop townhouse in great location. 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs. Spacious rooms, kit w/granite counters. Walk-out Best Kept Secret LL w/flexible suite. Michigan Park. Fantastic 4 level Colonial Flagstone patio w/ on lge corner lot. 3 BRs, 2 BAs & 2 HBAs. park view. $599,000  Upgraded kit & brkfst rm. Sun rm. LL fam rm Delia McCormick  301-977-7273 w/built-in bar. $569,000  Leyla Phelan  202-415-3845 Denny Horner 703-629-8455

DUPONT 1509 22ND STREET NW 202-464-8400

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16 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 The Current

Spring DC-CAS Results

For details about D.C.’s scores, see page 4

Bancroft Elementary

Ward 2

DCPS

Charter

Ward 1

DCPS

Benjamin Banneker Academic High

Charter DCPS

Ward 3

DCPS

Math Scores

Reading Scores

CLASSIFICATION

2013

2013

2012

CHANGE

2013

2012

Change

2013

2012

RISING

52.3

47.4%

42.2%

5.2%

52.0%

49.4%

2.6%

42.9%

35.1%

Change

7.8%

REWARD

103.0

98.1%

91.7%

6.4%

100.0%

96.8%

3.2%

96.1%

86.6%

9.5%

REWARD

53.5

48.5%

34.2%

14.2%

56.5%

40.6%

15.9%

40.5%

27.9%

12.6%

Cardozo High at Meyer

PRIORITY

30.6

26.1%

28.6%

– 2.4%

32.6%

31.6%

1.0%

19.7%

25.5%

– 5.8%

Cleveland Elementary

RISING

73.6

69.7%

70.9%

– 1.2%

68.1%

74.5%

– 6.4%

71.3%

67.3%

3.9%

Columbia Heights Education Campus

RISING

55.4

49.3%

44.0%

5.4%

51.9%

47.6%

4.3%

46.8%

40.3%

6.5%

H.D. Cooke Elementary

FOCUS

40.1

37.1%

29.9%

7.2%

33.3%

29.1%

4.2%

40.8%

30.7%

10.1%

Marie Reed Elementary

RISING

60.1

58.4%

53.8%

4.6%

63.6%

58.0%

5.6%

53.3%

49.6%

3.7%

Shaw Middle at Garnet-Patterson

FOCUS

32.3

28.6%

32.3%

– 3.7%

26.5%

32.6%

– 6.2%

30.7%

31.9%

– 1.2%

Tubman Elementary

RISING

74.6

71.0%

58.4%

12.6%

79.3%

65.0%

14.3%

62.7%

51.9%

10.8% – 14.1%

Booker T. Washington

PRIORITY

23.8

17.5%

26.3%

– 8.8%

17.5%

21.1%

-3.6%

17.5%

31.6%

Capital City — Lower

FOCUS

48.9

45.8%

N/A

N/A

44.0%

N/A

N/A

47.5%

N/A

N/A

Cesar Chavez — Chavez Prep

RISING

71.2

65.6%

60.2%

5.4%

78.0%

72.9%

5.2%

53.1%

47.4%

5.6%

D.C. Bilingual

RISING

64.6

60.2%

50.2%

10.0%

57.6%

45.5%

12.0%

62.9%

55.0%

7.9%

E.L. Haynes — Georgia Avenue Campus

RISING

68.1

62.6%

62.3%

0.2%

64.5%

65.8%

– 1.3%

60.5%

58.9%

1.7%

Howard University Middle School of Math and Science

RISING

78.8

75.7%

76.0%

– 0.3%

78.5%

78.9%

– 0.4%

73.0%

73.0%

– 0.1%

Inspired Teaching Demonstration

RISING

61.4

60.8%

34.6%

26.2%

64.9%

23.1%

41.8%

56.8%

46.2%

10.6%

Meridian

FOCUS

62.1

56.8%

50.0%

6.8%

56.6%

53.7%

3.0%

56.9%

46.3%

10.5%

Duke Ellington School of the Arts

REWARD

84.3

77.8%

66.1%

11.8%

75.4%

58.3%

17.1%

80.3%

73.9%

6.4%

Francis-Stevens Education Campus

RISING

58.7

51.6%

50.7%

0.9%

46.7%

49.6%

– 2.9%

56.6%

51.8%

4.8%

Garrison Elementary

FOCUS

36.0

31.9%

47.8%

– 15.9%

32.8%

50.7%

– 18.0%

31.0%

44.8%

– 13.7%

Hardy Middle

RISING

71.7

64.6%

65.6%

-1.0%

66.8%

68.4%

– 1.6%

62.5%

62.8%

– 0.3%

Hyde-Addison Elementary

REWARD

81.1

78.7%

82.2%

– 3.5%

80.0%

81.2%

– 1.2%

77.4%

83.2%

– 5.8%

Ross Elementary

REWARD

84.6

80.9%

68.8%

12.1%

78.7%

72.9%

5.8%

83.0%

64.6%

18.4%

School Without Walls

REWARD

104

98.3%

98.2%

0.1%

97.3%

98.2%

– 0.9%

99.3%

98.2%

1.1%

Seaton Elementary

FOCUS

56.6

50.5%

43.0%

7.5%

67.0%

45.2%

21.9%

34.1%

40.9%

– 6.8%

Thompson Elementary

RISING

63.3

62.2%

51.9%

10.3%

68.1%

54.5%

13.6%

56.3%

49.3%

7.0%

REWARD

84.2

79.2%

N/A

N/A

77.0%

N/A

N/A

81.3%

N/A

N/A

RISING

54.0

42.9%

38.8%

4.0%

45.2%

41.3%

4.0%

40.5%

36.4%

4.1%

Community Academy Butler Bilingual

RISING

76.2

73.7%

61.0%

12.7%

77.2%

63.2%

14.0%

70.2%

58.8%

11.4%

KIPP DC — WILL Academy

RISING

74.5

70.2%

60.9%

9.4%

78.5%

66.8%

11.7%

62.0%

55.0%

7.0%

Deal Middle

REWARD

92.2

85.6%

83.4%

2.2%

88.4%

84.7%

3.6%

82.8%

82.1%

0.7%

Eaton Elementary

REWARD

85.3

84.5%

84.6%

– 0.1%

84.8%

83.8%

1.0%

84.2%

85.5%

– 1.2%

Hearst Elementary

RISING

72.1

68.9%

61.7%

7.2%

67.0%

60.2%

6.8%

70.9%

63.3%

7.6%

Janney Elementary

REWARD

97.4

93.4%

91.2%

2.2%

92.5%

89.1%

3.4%

94.2%

93.2%

1.0% 0.4%

Center City — Shaw Campus

Key Elementary

REWARD

95.9

90.6%

91.6%

– 1.0%

89.9%

92.3%

– 2.5%

91.3%

90.9%

Mann Elementary

REWARD

94.7

90.5%

85.1%

5.4%

89.5%

83.1%

6.4%

91.6%

87.1%

4.5%

Murch Elementary

REWARD

86.0

80.8%

83.4%

– 2.6%

79.7%

81.3%

– 1.5%

81.9%

85.5%

– 3.6%

Oyster-Adams Bilingual (Oyster Campus)

REWARD

87.0

82.9%

82.8%

0.1%

84.0%

82.2%

1.8%

81.8%

83.4%

– 1.7%

Stoddert Elementary

REWARD

91.0

87.4%

81.2%

6.2%

89.7%

84.8%

4.9%

85.0%

77.6%

7.4%

Wilson High

FOCUS

67.1

60.6%

59.9%

0.7%

60.0%

59.5%

0.4%

61.3%

60.3%

1.0%

Barnard Elementary

RISING

56.5

50.9%

57.1%

-6.2%

48.5%

58.3%

– 9.8%

53.3%

55.8%

– 2.6%

Brightwood Education Campus

FOCUS

50.4

45.1%

34.1%

11.0%

47.7%

34.8%

13.0%

42.4%

33.3%

9.0%

DEVELOPING

38.6

31.3%

33.1%

– 1.8%

27.3%

31.6%

– 4.3%

35.2%

34.6%

0.7%

Lafayette Elementary

REWARD

92.7

91.1%

90.5%

0.7%

92.2%

90.8%

1.3%

90.1%

90.1%

0.0%

Coolidge High

Lasalle-Backus Education Campus

PRIORITY

38.3

32.7%

18.8%

14.0%

30.9%

17.6%

13.2%

34.6%

19.9%

14.7%

Macfarland Middle

REWARD

60.9

50.8%

30.9%

19.9%

54.6%

34.5%

20.2%

46.9%

27.3%

19.7%

Powell Elementary

RISING

56.6

54.0%

43.8%

10.2%

63.0%

50.8%

12.2%

45.0%

36.9%

8.1%

Raymond Education Campus

RISING

51.1

43.9%

41.2%

2.7%

41.5%

42.0%

– 0.5%

46.3%

40.3%

6.0%

PRIORITY

29.0

20.4%

16.7%

3.7%

19.7%

17.9%

1.7%

21.1%

15.4%

5.7%

Roosevelt High

N/A

N/A

92.5%

90.5%

2.0%

95.0%

85.7%

9.3%

90.0%

95.2%

– 5.2%

Shepherd Elementary

RISING

78.7

73.6%

72.7%

0.9%

71.0%

69.1%

1.9%

76.1%

76.3%

– 0.2%

Takoma Education Campus

FOCUS

50.0

43.4%

37.2%

6.2%

40.2%

37.2%

3.1%

46.5%

37.2%

9.3%

Truesdell Education Campus

RISING

52.7

50.0%

42.8%

7.2%

52.8%

47.2%

5.6%

47.2%

38.4%

8.8%

West Education Campus

RISING

62.5

57.5%

49.1%

8.4%

60.2%

50.4%

9.7%

54.9%

47.9%

7.0%

Whittier Education Campus

FOCUS

44.5

37.7%

41.2%

– 3.4%

40.6%

42.9%

– 2.4%

34.9%

39.4%

– 4.5%

Capital City High

RISING

74.9

67.1%

N/A

N/A

62.0%

N/A

N/A

72.2%

N/A

N/A

Capital City Middle

RISING

60.7

56.5%

N/A

N/A

50.7%

N/A

N/A

62.3%

N/A

N/A

Center City — Brightwood Campus

RISING

66.8

62.8%

48.7%

14.0%

68.6%

51.8%

16.8%

56.9%

45.7%

11.3%

Center City — Petworth Campus

FOCUS

61.6

60.9%

53.6%

7.3%

63.8%

57.5%

6.4%

57.9%

49.6%

8.2%

Community Academy — Amos I

RISING

54.1

47.3%

44.0%

3.3%

47.3%

44.8%

2.5%

47.3%

43.3%

4.0%

Community Academy — Online

RISING

69.8

65.0%

63.7%

1.3%

60.9%

61.3%

– 0.4%

69.1%

66.1%

3.0%

E.L. Haynes — Kansas Avenue Campus

RISING

60.8

54.5%

N/A

N/A

50.6%

N/A

N/A

58.3%

N/A

N/A

DEVELOPING

41.5

38.6%

49.0%

– 10.5%

37.1%

46.2%

– 9.0%

40.0%

51.9%

– 11.9%

Sharpe Health

Charter

Composite Scores

Bruce Monroe Elementary at Park View

Basis DC

Ward 4

Accountability index

Hope Community — Lamond Campus Hospitality

FOCUS

44.4

32.7%

27.0%

5.7%

34.6%

26.7%

7.9%

30.8%

27.3%

3.5%

Ideal Academy — North Capitol Street Campus

RISING

55.4

50.0%

40.6%

9.4%

50.0%

37.6%

12.4%

50.0%

43.6%

6.4%

Latin American Montessori Bilingual

RISING

77.3

73.8%

66.3%

7.6%

71.4%

62.5%

8.9%

76.2%

70.0%

6.2%

Mary McLeod Bethune Day Academy — Slowe Campus

RISING

53.3

46.0%

38.4%

7.6%

49.0%

36.6%

12.4%

42.9%

40.1%

2.7%

Paul Junior High

RISING

75.7

71.1%

64.0%

7.2%

81.2%

68.1%

13.1%

61.1%

59.9%

1.2%

Roots

RISING

60.4

59.7%

59.1%

0.6%

54.8%

47.7%

7.1%

64.5%

70.5%

– 5.9%

Washington Latin High

REWARD

80.4

73.0%

61.3%

11.6%

68.9%

62.7%

6.1%

77.0%

60.0%

17.0%

Washington Latin Middle

REWARD

83.9

79.0%

78.8%

0.2%

78.1%

77.1%

1.0%

79.9%

80.6%

– 0.7%


&

The Current

Events Entertainment

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

17

This summer, Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Much Ado About Nothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is available for free

T

he Shakespeare Theatre Company will present its 23rd annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free for Allâ&#x20AC;? production â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much Ado About Nothingâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aug. 20 through Sept. 1 at Sidney Harman Hall. This production, initially presented during 2011-2012 season, is inspired by 1930s Cuba â&#x20AC;&#x201D; with the original playâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s island milieu,

On STAGE

Catholic background and frothy mix of military and social conflict updated for a new era and continent. The most playful of Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s romantic comedies comes to life through the sounds and rhythms of AfroCuban music and dance. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Tuesday and Wednesday; 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are free and can be obtained by online lottery or in person. Sidney Harman Hall is located at 610 F St. NW. Visit shakespearetheatre.org or call 202-547-1122 for details.

â&#x2013;  Rorschach Theatre will present Robert Kauzlaricâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s adaptation of Neil Gaimanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Neverwhereâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 16 through Sept. 15 at the Atlas Performing Arts Center. In this urban fantasy, a wounded girl appears on the London sidewalk in front of Richard Mayhew. Quickly, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plunged into an underworld where heroes and monsters are real and where death waits in the dark of Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bridge. Performance times are generally 8 p.m. Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $15 to $30. The theater is located at 1333 H St. NE. 202-3997993; rorschachtheatre.com. â&#x2013;  The National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts will present a staged reading of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Menâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 19. Written by local playwrights Mario Baldessari and Chris Stezin, the play tells the story of two estranged best friends from college â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one straight, one gay â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who are unexpectedly reunited by their spouses. Their rocky reunion takes them from a hospital waiting room back to the riverbank where their friendship ended 20 years ago.

The reading will begin at 7:30 p.m., with doors opening at 7. Admission is free. The National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts is located at 1556 Wisconsin Ave. NW. theconservatory.org/now-playing.html. â&#x2013;  The newly formed Fat and Greasy Citizens Brigade will stage an outdoor production of Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pastoral comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;As You Like Itâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 14 through 18 at Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grace Episcopal Church. The groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s founders, Heather Cipu and Alexis Truitt, plan to offer D.C. free outdoor productions of the Bardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s works each summer. Their first selection follows the heroine Rosalind as she finds safety and, eventually, love after fleeing to the Forest of Arden. Performance times are 8 p.m., with the grounds open for pre-performance picnicking at 7 p.m. Admission is free. Grace Episcopal Church is located at 1041 Wisconsin Ave. NW. For details visit fgcitizens.org. â&#x2013;  Theater Alliance will kick off its 11th season with Nathan Louis Jacksonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s family drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;Broke-ologyâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 14 through Sept. 8 at the Anacostia Playhouse. See Theater/Page 26

Corcoran exhibit features â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;augmented realityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

Photo by Scott Suchman

Floyd King and Ted van Griethuysen appear in the Shakespeare Theatre Companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much Ado About Nothing.â&#x20AC;?

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anifest: AR,â&#x20AC;? highlighting the Manifest. AR collective of artists who work with the burgeoning technology of augmented reality to

On EXHIBIT

place their works in site-specific virtual spaces accessible by smart mobile devices, will open today at the Corcoran Gallery of Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free Gallery 31 space. Continuing through Sept 1, the exhibit is the second in the galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Manifest: AR,â&#x20AC;? a new exhibit at the Corcoran Gallery of Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s free â&#x20AC;&#x153;Manifestâ&#x20AC;? series, which focuses on Gallery 31 space highlighting augmented reality, includes â&#x20AC;&#x153;creatAR,â&#x20AC;? the relationship between art, techby Mark Skwarek, Animesh Anand and Jeremy Hight. nology and exhibition spaces. On view are works by six artists ion and poetry. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;all-white Madison Building. that allow visitors to look through Commemorating the bicentenni- attireâ&#x20AC;? affair will be held from 7 to iPads, or similar devices, and see 10 p.m.; the event is free, but reserals of iconic opera composers images from objective reality that Giuseppe Verdi and Richard Wagvations are required at gogoswing. have been ner, the exhibit eventbrite.com. altered electroniwill continue An â&#x20AC;&#x153;instrument petting zooâ&#x20AC;? will cally. Cards will through Jan. 25. be held Sept. 14 from 3 to 4 p.m., also be given out and a gallery talk will take place Located at 101 directing visitors later the same day from 4:30 to Independence to view virtual Ave. SE, the 5:30. monuments on library is open Located at 200 I St. SE, the galthe Mall through Monday through lery is open daily from 9 a.m. to 8 their iPhones. Saturday from p.m. 202-724-5613. Located at 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lions & Tigers & Bears: Š Paul Nicklen/National Geographic p.m. 202-707500 17th St. Through the Lens With National Paul Nicklenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photograph of a NW, the gallery 8000. Geographic,â&#x20AC;? presenting 50 photois open Wednes- protective mother with her cub is â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Go-Go graphs of these iconic animals by part of the National Geographic day through Swing: Washing- three of National Geographicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top Sunday from 10 Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lions & ton, DCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wildlife photojournalists, opened a.m. to 5 p.m., Unstoppable recently at the National GeographTigers & Bears.â&#x20AC;? Wednesday Beat,â&#x20AC;? a multiic Museum, where it will continue until 9 p.m. 202-639-1700. media celebration of the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s through Feb. 2. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Night at the Opera,â&#x20AC;? featuring signature sound, will open Friday Michael â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nickâ&#x20AC;? Nichols took manuscript and printed scores, with a gala opening reception at the more than a million photographs of librettos, photographs, corresponlions hunting, mating, fighting and 200 I Street Gallery. The D.C. dence and set designs from the late socializing, the best of which have Commission on the Arts and 18th through the early 20th centubeen selected for this exhibit. Steve Humanities exhibit will continue ries, will open tomorrow in the Per- through Oct. 18. Winter has traveled to India, Sumaforming Arts Reading Room at Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opening gala will featra and Thailand to document the See Exhibits/Page 26 the Library of Congressâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; James ture art, music, photography, fash-

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&

18 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 The Current

Events Entertainment

Wednesday, Aug. 14

Wednesday august 14 Classes and workshops ■ The Downtown Business Improvement District’s “Workout Wednesdays in Franklin Park” will feature a weekly fitness class. 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Franklin Park, 13th and I streets NW. downtowndc.org. The classes will continue through Sept. 25. ■ The Vajrayogini Buddhist Center will host a class on “Who Am I? Who Are You? A Buddhist Perspective.” 7 to 8:30 p.m. $12. Vajrayogini Buddhist Center, 1787 Columbia Road NW. 202-986-2257. Concert ■ The Marine Band will perform works by Sousa, Wagner and Copland. 8 p.m. Free. West Terrace, U.S. Capitol. 202-4334011. Discussions and lectures ■ Olumbumi Bakare will discuss her recent visit to Egypt. 5 p.m. Free. Juanita E. Thornton/Shepherd Park Library, 7420 Georgia Ave. NW. 202-541-6100. ■ In celebration of the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, filmmaker Brian Bullock will discuss his forthcoming documentary “The Richmond 34,”

about students at Virginia Union University in Richmond and their February 1960 effort to desegregate a department store’s lunch counter. 6:30 p.m. Free. Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1488. ■ The Historical Society of Washington, D.C., will present a book talk by Howard University professor Ida E. Jones, author of “Mary McLeod Bethune in Washington, D.C.: Activism and Education in Logan Circle.” 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. ■ Amanda Ripley will discuss her book “The Smartest Kids in the World: And How They Got That Way.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Films ■ The Global Lens Film Series will feature Mohamed Diab’s 2010 film “Cairo 678,” about three women from different backgrounds who join together in uneasy solidarity to combat the sexual harassment that has

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■ The Friends of Mitchell Park’s “Films in the Field” series will feature Ang Lee’s 2012 film “Life of Pi,” about the journey of a young man who survives a disaster at sea. 8:30 p.m. Free. Mitchell Park, 23rd Street and Bancroft Place NW. mitchellparkdc. org.

affected their lives. 6 p.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. ■ The NoMa Summer Screen outdoor film series will feature John Hughes’ 1986 film “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” starring Matthew Broderick. 7 p.m. Free. Loree Grand Field, 2nd and L streets NE. nomabid.org/noma-summer-screen. ■ The Lions of Czech Film series will feature Milan Cieslar’s 2012 film “Love Is Love,” about the many faces of love. 8 p.m. $8.50 to $11.50. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-9666000. Performances ■ The Kalanidhi Dance Company will perform traditional Kuchipudi dance. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. ■ The collective LYGO DC will host a stand-up comedy show featuring Max Rosenblum, Adam Friedland and Sara Armour. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $10. The Codmother, 1334 U St. NW. lygodc.com. ■ An open mic event hosted by artist, activist and performer Jonathan B. Tucker will feature poet Kyla Lacey. 9 to 11 p.m. $5. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-789-2227. Special event ■ As part of D.C. Beer Week, New Belgium Brewing Co. will present a tasting of a blended sour ale combined with Counter Culture cold brew coffee. 7 to 11 p.m. $35 to $40. Tryst, 2459 18th St. NW. tinyurl.com/l2eeemp. Sporting event ■ The Washington Nationals will play the San Francisco Giants. 7:05 p.m. $5 to $65. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Thursday at 4:05 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 15

Thursday august 15 Children’s programs ■ Slim Harrison and the Sunnyland Band will perform America folk music (for ages 5 through 12). 10:30 a.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202724-8707. The performance will repeat at 1:30 p.m. at the Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW; 202-2820021. ■ Kids will learn about Rock Creek Park’s birds of prey as part of the junior scientist series. 4 to 4:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6070. Class ■ The Tenleytown yoga studio lil omm will host a complimentary vinyasa flow class. 11 a.m. Free; reservations required. 4708 Wisconsin Ave. NW. lilomm.com. Concerts ■ Vocalist Andréa Wood will pay tribute to D.C. jazz legend Shirley Horn. 5 to 8 p.m. Free. Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F streets NW. 202-6331000. ■ The Freddie Dunn Quartet will perform jazz selections. 6:30 p.m. Free. Monroe Street Market Arts Plaza, 8th Street and Monroe Street NE. 202-269-1600. ■ The D.C.-based band Caz and the Day Laborers will perform reggae music. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600.

Thursday, august 15 ■ Discussion: Vanessa M. Gezari will discuss her book “The Tender Soldier: A True Story of War and Sacrifice.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. ■ The Marine Band will perform works by Sousa, Wagner and Copland. 7:30 p.m. Free. Yards Park, 355 Water St. SE. 202433-4011. ■ The U.S. Army Band Downrange and Rock Orchestra will perform 1970s classics as part of the “Sunsets With a Soundtrack” concert series. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. usarmyband.com. The concert will repeat Friday at 8 p.m. ■ Singer/songwriter Nila Kay will perform pop and rock songs. 8:30 p.m. $5. Bossa Bistro & Lounge, 2463 18th St. NW. bossaproject.com. Demonstration ■ Gardening specialist Adrienne Cook and nutritionist Danielle Cook Navidi will present a “Late Summer Bounty Cooking Demonstration.” Noon and 12:45 p.m. Free. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. Discussions and lectures ■ Mark Holt, a nuclear energy policy analyst at the Congressional Research Service, will discuss “Challenges for Congressional Action on Extending the U.S.Republic of Korea Nuclear Cooperation Agreement.” 2 p.m. Free; reservations required. Rome Building Auditorium, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW. alanahn@thegabi.com. ■ A gallery talk will focus on “A Fusion of Styles: Renoir’s ‘Luncheon of the Boating Party.’” 6 and 7 p.m. Free. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. 202-3872151. ■ Curator Renée Maurer will discuss “Georges Braque and the Cubist Still Life, 1928-1945.” 6:30 p.m. $10 to $12; free for members. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. 202-387-2151. Films ■ The Sixth & I Historic Synagogue will sponsor a “Dive-in Movie” screening of the classic 1980 comedy “Airplane!” starring Robert Hays, Julie Hagerty and Leslie Nielsen. 7:30 p.m. $10. Pool, Capitol Skyline Hotel, 10 I St. SW. 877-987-6487.

Meetings ■ The Classics Book Group will discuss “The Mayor of Casterbridge” by Thomas Hardy. 6:30 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, 555 12th St. NW. 202-347-0176. ■ The Georgetown Book Club will meet to discuss “Snow-Storm in August: Washington City, Francis Scott Key, and the Forgotten Race Riot of 1835” by Jefferson Morley. 7:30 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-7270232. Performances ■ Washington Improv Theater will present performances by its five ensembles as well as special guests. 8 p.m. $12 to $30. Source, 1835 14th St. NW. washingtonimprovtheater.com. Performances will continue Friday and Saturday at 8 and 10 p.m. ■ The Topaz Hotel Bar’s weekly standup show will feature local comics. 8 to 10 p.m. Free. 1733 N St. NW. 202-3933000. Sale ■ The National Building Museum Design Show will feature custom decorative and functional objects, including home furnishings, fine art and photography, flooring, fabric, lighting and outdoor fixtures. 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. $8 to $10; free for ages 12 and younger. Great Hall, National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. go.nbm.org/design-show. The event will continue Friday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Special events ■ The Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library will provide chess sets for players of all ages and abilities. 9:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. The event will continue daily during the library’s operating hours. ■ The “Growing Local” series will feature a screening of the 2009 movie “Julie & Julia” in honor of the 101st birthday of American culinary icon Julia Child. The event will feature drinks and locally produced food, as well as tours led by Smithsonian gardens staff members. 6 to 8 p.m. $20. Victory Garden, National Museum of American History, 12th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. americanhistory. si.edu/events/food-garden. ■ As part of D.C. Beer Week, New Belgium Brewing Co. will present a workshop on sour beer blending, led by sensory specialist Lauren Salazar. 6 to 8 p.m. and 9 to 11 p.m. $55. The Black Squirrel’s Tap Room, 2427 18th St. NW. newbelgiumsession1.eventbrite.com. Friday, Aug. 16 Friday august 16 Children’s program ■ Park ranger Tony Linforth will lead a Children’s Moonlight Night Hike (for ages 6 through 12 and their families). 8:30 to See Events/Page 19


Continued From Page 18 9:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. anthony_linforth@nps. gov. Concerts â&#x2013;  The U.S. Air Force Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Air Force Strings ensemble will perform. 12:30 p.m. Free. National Air and Space Museum, 600 Independence Ave. SW. 202767-5658. â&#x2013;  Doc Scantlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palmettos will perform 1920s and 1930s big band sounds. 5 to 8:30 p.m. Free. Sculpture Garden, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-289-3360. â&#x2013;  The Hill and Wood, an indie rock group from Charlottesville, Va., will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Discussion â&#x2013;  Peter Ross Range will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Murder in the Yoga Store: The True Story of the Lululemon Killing.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Films â&#x2013;  The seventh annual African Diaspora International Film Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washington DC will open with a screening of Tukufu Zuberiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2013 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;African Independence,â&#x20AC;? followed by a question-and-answer session with the director. Reception at 6 p.m.; film at 7 p.m. $20. Goethe-Institut, 812 7th St. NW. nyadiff.org. The festival will continue through Sunday. â&#x2013;  American Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Neighborhood Family Movie Night will feature an outdoor screening of the 1979 classic â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Muppet Movie.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. Free. Woods-Brown Amphitheatre, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-885-2167. Meeting â&#x2013;  A weekly bridge group will meet to play duplicate bridge. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $6. Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. 301-6541865. Performances â&#x2013;  The Sackler Gallery will host a performance of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Imperial Garden Banquetâ&#x20AC;? scene from the 17th-century play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Palace of Everlasting Youth.â&#x20AC;? 1 p.m. Free. Sackler Gallery, 1050 Independence Ave. SW. 202-633-1000. The performance will repeat Saturday at 1 and 2 p.m. â&#x2013;  Freddie Dunn and Carlo Perlo will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live Jazz and Hoop Jam.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Monroe Street Market Arts Plaza, 8th Street and Monroe Street NE. 202-269-1600. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Corps will host a weekly Friday Evening Parade with music and precision marching. 8:45 to 10 p.m. Free; reservations required. Marine Barracks, 8th and I streets SE. 202-4336060. Special events â&#x2013;  Maryann Priddy of Taylor Marie Fashions will present a runway show featuring fashions designed for seniors, with the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s line of womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing and accessories available at discounted prices. 11 a.m. Free. Seabury at Friendship Terrace, 4201 Butterworth Place NW.

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The Current

Events Entertainment 202-244-7400. â&#x2013;  The Fairmont Washington, D.C., Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth annual Sustainability Fair will feature information about the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s green program and displays by local firms, government agencies and environmental groups â&#x20AC;&#x201D; along with treats from the hotelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s garden and its rooftop hives. 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Free. 2401 M St. NW. 202-429-2400. â&#x2013;  The International Club of DC will host a Dumbarton House Jazz Soiree. 7 to 10 p.m. $20. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW. dumbartonhouse.org/events. â&#x2013;  The Women of Faith 2013 Conference will feature musical artists Third Day and CeCe Winans, comedian Mark Lowry, and authors and Bible teachers Sheila Walsh, Liz Curtis Higgs, Judah Smith, Angie Smith and Priscilla Shirer. 7 to 10 p.m. $49 to $109. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. womenoffaith.com. The conference will continue Saturday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tour â&#x2013;  U.S. Botanic Garden public programs manager Ari Novy will lead a tour on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fascinating Foods From Around the Globe.â&#x20AC;? 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Free; reservations required. Meet on the terrace by the conservatory entrance, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-2258333. Saturday, Aug. 17 Saturday august 17 Auditions â&#x2013;  The Washington School of Ballet will hold auditions for the upcoming school year. Registration from 9:30 a.m. to noon with specific times depending on age. $30. Washington Ballet, 3515 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-362-3606. Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs â&#x2013;  A park ranger will explain Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seafaring history and how to tie knots like a sailor. 10 to 11 a.m. Free. Meet at the splash fountain in Georgetown Waterfront Park, Wisconsin Avenue and K Street NW. 202-895-6070. â&#x2013;  A park ranger will lead a night sky tour in the Rock Creek Park planetarium. 1 to 1:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6224. The program will repeat Sunday at 1 p.m. â&#x2013;  Slim Harrison and the Sunnyland Band will perform American folk music (for ages 5 through 12). 3 p.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  Park ranger Tony Linforth will lead a planetarium program about the weather in the solar system. 4 to 4:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-895-6070. Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  Lay Buddhist teachers Chris Jamison and Judith Stroman will lead a meditation workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Level Headed: Wisdom During Stress.â&#x20AC;? 10 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. $30. Vajrayogini Buddhist Center, 1787 Columbia Road NW. 202-986-2257. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Introduction to 3-D Printingâ&#x20AC;? will offer an overview of the technology, web resources and the printing capability available to the public in the Digital Commons. 11 a.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202727-0321. The class will repeat Monday at 7 p.m. Concert â&#x2013;  Listen Local First D.C. will present

Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. Performances â&#x2013;  Rich Bennett and Matty Litwack will star in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wake & Bacon,â&#x20AC;? a weekly brunch and comedy show presented by the collective LYGO DC. 3 to 5 p.m. $10. Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tavern, 520 Florida Ave. NW. lygodc.com. â&#x2013;  The Capital City Showcase will feature rock band The Grey Area, musician Matt Tarka and comedians Katherine Jessup, Matty Litwack, Ol Mike B and Gabe Zucker. 10 p.m. $10 to $15. District of Columbia Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. capitalcityshowcase.com.

Friday, august 16 â&#x2013;  Concert: The S&R Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Overtures Summer Concert Series will feature flutist Shawn Wyckoff. 6:30 p.m. $65. Evermay, 1623 28th St. NW. overtureseries.org.

Special event â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Asia After Darkâ&#x20AC;? will feature martial arts performances and visuals, art activities, themed cocktails, food trucks and more. 7 to 11 p.m. $15 to $30. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. 202-6331000.

the Afro-pop band Elikeh performing Togolese rhythms with Americaninfluenced styles. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600.

Walks and tours â&#x2013;  Geologist Chelsea Lewis will lead â&#x20AC;&#x153;Secrets in the Soil,â&#x20AC;? an archaeologicaland geological-oriented walking tour about the Rock Creek Valley (as seen from 300 feet above during a broad loop around the National Zoo). 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free; reservations required. Meet outside the Woodley Park Metro station. chelsea_b_lewis@nps.gov. â&#x2013;  A docent-led walk through the Folger Shakespeare Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Elizabethan Garden will focus on the plants, design and Shakespeare-inspired statues by Gregg Wyatt. 10 and 11 a.m. Free. Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077. â&#x2013;  Washington Walks will present a walking tour of the Mount Pleasant neighborhood, featuring highlights from the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Village in a Cityâ&#x20AC;? heritage trail. 11 a.m. $15. Meet in front of the Capital City Public Charter School, 3047 15th St. NW. washingtonwalks.com.

Discussion â&#x2013;  U.S. Botanic Garden volunteer Todd Brethauer will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Right Soil and Fertilizers: Nitrogen, Phosphorous and Potah, Oh My!â&#x20AC;? 10:30 a.m. to noon. Free; reservations required. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-2258333. Festivals â&#x2013;  The Arts & Humanities Festival at St. Elizabeths East will feature a summer celebration with appearances by Faycez U Know, Rashida â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tulaniâ&#x20AC;? Jolley, Aisha Striggles and Liberated Muse. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Free. 1100 Alabama Ave. SE. ahfest.com. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Elements of Hip Hop: A Cultural Summitâ&#x20AC;? will feature an artist market featuring prints, toys, canvasses, T-shirts and more. 1 to 6 p.m. Free admission. The Fridge DC, 516 ½ 8th St. SE. thefridgedc.com. â&#x2013;  NoMa Beer Fest will feature live music, games and entertainment, as well as special summer ales by local breweries. 2 to 8 p.m. Free admission; beer tickets available for advance purchase online. Parking lot, 1st and N streets NE. nomabeerfest.org. Films â&#x2013;  West End Cinema will screen â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Pharaohâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Daughter.â&#x20AC;? 11 a.m. $18.80. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202419-3456. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Classic Hollywood Saturdaysâ&#x20AC;? will feature Orson Wellesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1941 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizen Kane.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202-671-3121. â&#x2013;  Pianist Robert Israel will provide accompaniment at â&#x20AC;&#x153;CinĂŠ-Concertâ&#x20AC;? screenings of Alexandre Volkoff and Ivan Mosjoukineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1923 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Le Brasier ardent,â&#x20AC;? at 2 p.m.; and Volkoffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1924 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Les Ombres qui passent,â&#x20AC;? at 4 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of

Sunday, Aug. 18 Sunday august 18 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x2013;  National Park Service volunteer Libby Moulton will introduce games and toys that children played with during the 1770s (for ages 6 through 12 and their families). 3 p.m. Free. Old Stone House, 3051 M St. NW. 202-895-6070. Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Elements of Hip Hop: A Cultural Summitâ&#x20AC;? will feature a workshop led by Peerless Creatives artist Shaymar Higgs on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Screen Printing 101.â&#x20AC;? 1 to 3 p.m.          

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

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$15. The Fridge DC, 516 ½ 8th St. SE. thefridgedc.com. â&#x2013;  A weekly Ukulele Circle led by Liz Ennis will offer beginners a chance to learn a few easy chords and more advanced players an opportunity to improvise and jam. 4 to 4:30 p.m. Free. Middle C Music, 4530 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202244-7326. â&#x2013;  Pam Ginsberg, a butcher at Wagshalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Market, will lead a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Man Meats Grill 2.0â&#x20AC;? workshop, featuring tips on different cuts of meat, preparation and how to cook lamb and chicken to perfection. 5 p.m. $18 to $20. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 877-987-6487. Concert â&#x2013;  Dahlak Restaurant will present its weekly â&#x20AC;&#x153;DC Jazz Jamâ&#x20AC;? session. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free. 1771 U St. NW. 202-5279522. Discussion â&#x2013;  Lecturer David Gariff will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Art of Edvard Munch: Early Work.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. Films â&#x2013;  As part of the Global Lens 2013 film series, the Freer Gallery of Art will present Suman Ghoshâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shyamal Uncle Turns off the Lights.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  Pianist Robert Israel will provide accompaniment at a â&#x20AC;&#x153;CinĂŠ-Concertâ&#x20AC;? screening of Alexandre Volkoffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1926 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casanova.â&#x20AC;? 4 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. â&#x2013;  The seventh annual African Diaspora International Film Festival â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Washington DC will close with a screening of Nadine M. Pattersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2012 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tango MacBeth,â&#x20AC;? followed by a question-andanswer session with the director. Reception at 4:30 p.m.; film at 5 p.m. $15. Goethe-Institut, 812 7th St. NW. nyadiff.org. â&#x2013;  Trent Heminger and Kevin Gray of Beasley Real Estate will present an outdoor screening of John Hughesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 1984 film See Events/Page 20

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20 Wednesday, August 14, 2013 The Current

Events Entertainment

Continued From Page 19 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sixteen Candles,â&#x20AC;? starring Molly Ringwald. 8 p.m. Free. St. Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church, 15th and P streets NW. dlanning@beasleyre.com. â&#x2013;  The Friends of Rose Parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Movie Night will feature Chris Noonanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1995 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Babe,â&#x20AC;? at 8:15 p.m.; and Phil Alden Robinsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1989 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Field of Dreams,â&#x20AC;? at 9:30 p.m. Free. Rose Park, 26th and O streets NW. roseparkdc.org. Performances â&#x2013;  The Sackler Gallery and the Wintergreen Kunqu Society will present a performance of Du Yun and Quian Yiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new music-theater work â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dreaming of the Phoenix.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. Sackler Gallery, 1050 Independence Ave. SW. 202-6331000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunday Kind of Loveâ&#x20AC;? will include readings by emerging and established poets, followed by an open mic segment. 5 to 7 p.m. $5. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-3877638. â&#x2013;  The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority will present some of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top street performers. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. â&#x2013;  The collective LYGO DC will present a stand-up comedy show. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $10. Desperados, 1342 U St. NW. lygodc.com. Special events â&#x2013;  Dumbarton Houseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s End-of-Summer Ice Cream Sunday event will feature opportunities to make ice cream and to sample a flavor popular during the Federal period, as well as a tour of the historic mansion. 1 p.m. $8. Dumbarton House, 2715 Q St. NW. augusticecreamsunday.

eventbrite.com. â&#x2013;  A classic American car display will feature vehicles from the 1950s, â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s and â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s provided by the Straight Eights Car Club, a chapter of Lambda Car Club International. 1 to 5 p.m. $5 to $15; free for ages 5 and younger. Hillwood Estate, Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202-686-5807.

â&#x2013;  The National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts will present a staged reading of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best Men,â&#x20AC;? written by Mario Baldessari and Chris Stezin and directed by Tom Prewitt. 7:30 p.m. Free. National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts, 1556 Wisconsin Ave. NW. theconservatory.org/now-playing.html.

Walks and tours â&#x2013;  Rock Creek Park will host a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fun Run,â&#x20AC;? featuring a three- to four-mile loop and a five- to seven-mile option. 10 to 11 a.m. Free. Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-8956227. â&#x2013;  A behind-the-scenes tour will focus on the Washington National Cathedralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gargoyles and grotesques. 2 p.m. $5 to $10. Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW. nationalcathedral.org. The tour will repeat Thursday at 6:30 p.m.

Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  Teacher and therapist Heather Ferris will lead a weekly yoga class. Noon. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. â&#x2013;  The group Yoga Activist will present a weekly yoga class geared toward beginners. 7 p.m. Free. Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-2823080.

Monday,august Aug. 19 Monday 19 Class â&#x2013;  The Digital Commons will offer a class on Adobe Photoshop CS6. 6 p.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. Concerts â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature The JT Project performing jazz selections. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. Performances will

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Portraits Conferences Events Publicity

Tuesday, Aug. 20 Tuesday august 20

Tuesday, august 20 â&#x2013;  Concert: The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature vocalist Julie Mack performing Brazilian music. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-3121300. continue through Aug. 27 each Monday and Tuesday at noon. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Navy Concert Band will perform. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. navyband.navy.mil. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The group 40Plus of Greater Washington will present a talk by Devora Zack on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Interview Skills.â&#x20AC;? 9:45 to 11:30 a.m. Free. Suite T-2, 1718 P St. NW. 40plusdc.org. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;At the Crossroads of Freedom and Equality: The Emancipation Proclamation and the March on Washingtonâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; about the role of activists from the end of the Civil War to the historic 1963 march â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will feature panelists Sandra Jowers-Barber, assistant professor of history at the University of the District of Columbia; Hari Jones, assistant director and curator of the African American Civil War Memorial and Museum; and Roger Davidson Jr., assistant professor of history at Coppin State University. 6 p.m. Free. Black Studies Center, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  Robert Wilson will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mathew Brady: Portraits of a Nation.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Film â&#x2013;  The Goethe-Institut will present Rainer Werner Fassbinderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1969 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love Is Colder Than Death,â&#x20AC;? about a small-time pimp and the friendship he forms with his tail from a large gangster syndicate. 6:30 p.m. $4 to $7. GoetheInstitut, 812 7th St. NW. 202-289-1200.

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Meetings â&#x2013;  The Fiction Loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Book Club will meet to discuss Sally Bedell Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Elizabeth the Queen: Life of a Modern Monarch.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Room 221, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  The Film Discussion Group will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spoiler Alert: Can We Be Surprised Anymore?â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, 555 12th St. NW. 202-347-0176. Performances â&#x2013;  The contemporary dance ensemble NY2Dance will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Family Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-4674600.

Concerts â&#x2013;  The Tuesday Concert Series will feature pianist Agnes Wan performing works by Bach, Schumann and Beethoven. 12:10 p.m. Free. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. 202-347-2635. â&#x2013;  Pianist Terry Eder will perform Hungarian music by BartĂłk, DohnĂĄnyi and KodĂĄly. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Navy Band will perform. 7:30 p.m. Free. U.S. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. navyband.navy.mil. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Air Force Concert Band and Singing Sergeants will perform. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. 202-7675658. â&#x2013;  The band Parachute will perform, with singer/ songwriter Andrew Ripp as the opener. 8 p.m. $16 to $18. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 800-745-3000. â&#x2013;  Singer/songwriter Jason Blum will perform. 8:30 p.m. Free. Hill Country BBQ, 410 7th St. NW. 202-556-2050. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Laura Gottesdiener will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Dream Foreclosed: Black America and the Fight for a Place to Call Home.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202789-2227. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Was There: Oral Histories of the March of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;? will feature reflections from retired Howard University administrator and academic Ella Kelly, social activists Chris Hager and Paul Kuntzler and journalist A. Peter Bailey. 6:30 p.m. Free. Black Studies Center, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  Jesse Walker will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The United States of Paranoia: A Conspiracy Theory.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. Films â&#x2013;  A childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s movie matinee will feature Andrew Stantonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2008 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wall-E.â&#x20AC;? 3 p.m. Free. Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. â&#x2013;  The Georgetown Library will present Terry Georgeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2004 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hotel Rwanda,â&#x20AC;? starring Don Cheadle and Xolani Mali. 6 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW.

202-727-0232. â&#x2013;  A Czech film series will feature JirĂ­ Menzelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1974 drama â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who Looks for Gold?â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Bistro Bohem, 600 Florida Ave. NW. bistrobohem.com. â&#x2013;  The Washington DC Jewish Community Center will screen the first episode of the Israeli television show â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hatufim,â&#x20AC;? which inspired the American hit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Homeland.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. $9. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org. Meeting â&#x2013;  Recovery International will host a group discussion for people suffering from stress, anxiety, panic, depression, sleep problems, anger, fear and other mental, nervous or emotional problems. 7 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-3642680. The group meets every Tuesday. Performance â&#x2013;  Busboys and Poets will present an open mic poetry night hosted by Droopy the Broke Baller. 9 to 11 p.m. $5. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Mystics will play the Chicago Sky. 7 p.m. $12 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 800-7453000. Wednesday, Aug. 21 Wednesday august 21 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x2013;  Children will learn how to make a cornhusk doll during a hands-on program. 11 a.m. to noon. Free. Peirce Mill, Tilden Street and Beach Drive NW. 202-8956070. Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  The National Archives will host a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beyond the Basicsâ&#x20AC;? genealogy workshop on the Freedmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bank. 11 a.m. Free. Room G-25, Research Center, National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202357-5000. â&#x2013;  The Downtown Business Improvement Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Workout Wednesdays in Franklin Parkâ&#x20AC;? will feature a weekly fitness class. 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Free; reservations requested. Franklin Park, 13th and I streets NW. downtowndc.org. The classes will continue through Sept. 25. Concerts â&#x2013;  The U.S. Air Force Strings will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Marine Jazz Combo will perform works by Charlie Parker, Peter Erskine and Pat Metheny. 8 p.m. Free. West Terrace, U.S. Capitol. 202-433-4011. Demonstration â&#x2013;  U.S. Botanic Garden staff members will show off carnivorous plants such as flytraps and sundews. 1 to 1:30 p.m. Free. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  National Museum of Women in the Arts associate curator Virginia Treanor will discuss the exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Awake in the Dream World: The Art of Audrey Niffenegger.â&#x20AC;? Noon to 12:30 p.m. Free. National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. 202-783-7370. See Events/Page 21


Continued From Page 20 ■ Stephanie Chong of Seabury Care Management will lead a seminar on “The Challenges and Rewards of Aging.” 1 p.m. Free. Seabury at Friendship Terrace, 4201 Butterworth Place NW. 202-244-7400. ■ Ruth Trocolli, city archaeologist for the District, will discuss “Archaeology in the District,” including recent finds at a burial site in Georgetown. 6:45 p.m. Free. Mount Pleasant Library, 3160 16th St. NW. 202671-3121. ■ Blogger Mark Rosenberg will discuss his book “Eating My Feelings: Tales of Overeating, Underperforming, and Coping With My Crazy Family.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. Films ■ The Textile Museum will present the 2012 documentary “Weavers’ Stories From Island Southeast Asia.” Noon. Free. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-6670441. ■ The Global Lens film series will feature Nahid Ghobadi and Bijan Zamanpira’s 2012 film “111 Girls,” about a government official who travels across Iranian Kurdistan with his driver and a young guide on a mission to stop 111 young Kurdish women from committing suicide in protest against conditions that have left them spinsters. 6:30 p.m. Free. West End Library, 1101 24th St. NW. 202-724-8707. ■ The NoMa Summer Screen outdoor film series will feature Paul Feig’s 2011 comedy “Bridesmaids,” starring Kristen Wiig and Maya Rudolph. 7 p.m. Free. Loree Grand Field, 2nd and L streets NE. nomabid.org/noma-summer-screen. ■ The French Cinémathèque series will feature Alan Resnais’ 2012 film “You Ain’t Seen Nothin’ Yet,” based on two works by the playwright Jean Anouilh. 8 p.m. $8.50 to $11.50. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. ■ The U Street Movie Series will feature an outdoor screening of Mamoru Hosoda’s 2009 anime feature “Summer Wars.” Sundown. Free. Harrison Recreation Center, V Street between 13th and 14th streets NW. movies.ustreet-dc.org. Performances ■ The collective LYGO DC will host a stand-up comedy show featuring Matty Litwack and Bengt Washburn. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $10. The Codmother, 1334 U St. NW. lygodc.com. ■ SpeakeasyDC and the Washington DC Jewish Community Center will present “Atonement: Stories About Confession, Redemption and Making Amends.” 8 to 9:30 p.m. $15 to $20. Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. washingtondcjcc.org/authorsoutloud. ■ Story League will hold a storytelling contest about villains, with a $100 grand prize. 9 to 11 p.m. $10. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. storyleague.org.

&

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Events Entertainment perform. 8 p.m. $22.50 to $36.50. Warner Theatre, 513 13th St. NW. 800-745-3000.

■ Busboys and Poets will host an open mic poetry night hosted by Jonathan Tucker. 9 to 11 p.m. $5. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-7892227.

Discussion ■ Washington Post writer David Sheinin will discuss his book “RG3: The Promise.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919.

Teen program ■ “Crafts for Teens” will feature a class on making colorful knotted bracelets. 1 to 2:30 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. Tour ■ National Zoo keepers at the Reptile Discovery Center will lead a behind-thescenes look at some of the most critically endangered species on the planet, including an Aldabra tortoise feeding and an animal encounter. 9 to 11 a.m. $95. National Zoo, 3001 Connecticut Ave. NW. nationalzoo.si.edu. The tour will repeat Aug. 24 at 9 a.m. Thursday, Aug. 22 Thursday august 22 Children’s program ■ As part of the junior scientist series, kids will learn about the life of trees during a ranger book reading and short hike. 4 to 4:45 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Park Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202-8956070. Classes and workshops ■ Artists Ken Kewley and Jill Phillips will lead a short discussion about the current Georges Braque exhibition that focuses on the artist’s use of spatial arrangement and surface texture, and then participants will respond to Braque’s work by creating collages. 6 p.m. $25 to $35; reservations required. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org/events. ■ The monthly Fiber Arts Workshop will explore cross stitch. 7 p.m. Free. Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-3080. Concerts ■ “Happy Birthday, Chuck!” — a tribute to the godfather of go-go, Chuck Brown — will feature the band Vybe. 5 to 8 p.m. Free. Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. ■ The Duende Quartet will perform smooth Latin jazz. 6:30 p.m. Free. Monroe Street Market Arts Plaza, 8th Street and Monroe Street NE. 202-269-1600. ■ The Marine Jazz Combo will perform works by Charlie Parker, Peter Erskine and Pat Metheny. 7:30 p.m. Free. Yards Park, 355 Water St. SE. 202-433-4011. ■ The U.S. Army Concert Band will perform as part of the “Sunsets With a Soundtrack” concert series. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. usarmyband.com. The concert will repeat Friday at 8 p.m. Discussions and lectures ■ William P. Jones will discuss his book “The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights.” 3:30 p.m. Free. Room 307, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. ■ A gallery talk will focus on the Phillips Collection’s focus on artists with powerful, independent objectives that may or may not fit within specific categories or schools of art. 6 and 7 p.m. Free. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. 202-387-2151. ■ Stan Long will discuss his book “Black Bird Medley: The Transformation of a Gangster.” 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. ■ William P. Jones will discuss his book

Film ■ The Comcast Outdoor Film Festival will feature Joss Whedon’s 2012 film “The Avengers,” starring Robert Downey Jr. and Scarlett Johansson. 8:15 p.m. Free. Carter Barron Amphitheatre, 16th Street and Colorado Avenue NW. 202-426-0486.

Thursday, August 22 ■ Concert: Pianist Nicholas McCarthy, who was born without his right hand, will perform as part of the 2013 Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability Conference. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. “The March on Washington: Jobs, Freedom, and the Forgotten History of Civil Rights.” 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202789-2227. ■ Historian Jonathan Nashel will discuss “James Bond, All-American Hero.” 6:30 p.m. $8 to $10. International Spy Museum, 800 F St. NW. 202-397-7798. ■ Thurston Clarke will discuss his book “JFK’s Last Hundred Days: The Transformation of a Man and the Emergence of a Great President.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. Performance ■ The Topaz Hotel Bar’s weekly standup show will feature local comics. 8 to 10 p.m. Free. 1733 N St. NW. 202-393-3000. Walks and tours ■ U.S. Botanic Garden education technician Alex Torres will lead a tour of the National Garden. 10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m. Free. National Garden Lawn Terrace, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-8333. ■ A behind-the-scenes tour will focus on the Washington National Cathedral’s gargoyles and grotesques. 6:30 p.m. $5 to $10. Washington National Cathedral, 3101 Wisconsin Ave. NW. nationalcathedral.org. Friday, Aug. 23

Friday august 23 Class ■ An AARP driver safety course will offer instruction in proven safety strategies. 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. $12 to $14; reservations required. Seabury at Friendship Terrace, 4201 Butterworth Place NW. 202362-0704. Concerts ■ The U.S. Air Force Band’s Air Force Strings ensemble will perform. 12:30 p.m. Free. National Air and Space Museum, 600 Independence Ave. SW. 202-7675658. ■ The Dixie Power Trio will perform zydeco, Cajun and Louisiana funk. 5 to 8:30 p.m. Free. Sculpture Garden, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-289-3360. ■ The DC Casineros will perform Cuban salsa. 6:30 p.m. Free. Monroe Street Market Arts Plaza, 8th Street and Monroe Street NE. 202-269-1600. ■ Recording artist Bridgit Mendler will

Meeting ■ A weekly bridge group will meet to play duplicate bridge. 11 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $6. Chevy Chase Community Center, 5601 Connecticut Ave. NW. 301-654-1865. Performances ■ The Kenendy Center and VSA will present “Jazz Hand” as part of the 2013 Leadership Exchange in Arts and Disability Conference. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. ■ The U.S. Marine Corps will host a weekly Friday Evening Parade with music

Wednesday, August 14, 2013

21

and precision marching. 8:45 to 10 p.m. Free; reservations required. Marine Barracks, 8th and I streets SE. 202-4336060. ■ The last-ever Charlie Visconage Show will feature artists Matt Sesow and Dana Ellyn, rapper Born I Music, and Post Secret founder Frank Warren. 9 p.m. $15. District of Columbia Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. cvshow.brownpapertickets.com. Sporting event ■ The Washington Mystics will play the Atlanta Dream. 7 p.m. $12 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 800-745-3000. The Current welcomes submissions for the Events & Entertainment calendar, although space constraints limit the number of items we can include. Items must be submitted at least two weeks prior to the event and include a summary of the event and its date, time, location with complete address, and cost to attend (indicate “free” if there is no charge). Also, please list a phone number for publication and a phone number for an editor to reach a contact person. Entries may be sent to calendar@currentnewspapers.com or The Current, P.O. Box 40400, Washington, D.C. 20016-0400.


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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 14, 2013 25

â&#x2DC;&#x17D; 202/244-7223 (FAX) 202/363-9850 Handyman

WINDOWS & DOORS

Your Neighborhood

HANDYMAN

THE BEST VALUE FOR NEW ROOFS AND ROOF REPAIR IN DC â&#x20AC;˘ Flat â&#x20AC;˘ Rubber â&#x20AC;˘ Slate â&#x20AC;˘ Metal â&#x20AC;˘ Tiles & Shingles â&#x20AC;˘ Vinyl and Aluminum Siding â&#x20AC;˘ Skylights â&#x20AC;˘ Gutters & Downspouts â&#x20AC;˘ Chimneys â&#x20AC;˘ Waterproofing

HALLIDAY

Donald Davidson 202-744-3647

ROOFING

â&#x20AC;˘ Sash Cords, Glass, Wood Rot, Blinds â&#x20AC;˘ Doors, Locks, Mail-Slots, Shelves â&#x20AC;˘ Decks, Steps, Banisters & Moulding â&#x20AC;˘ Carpentry, Tub Caulking & Safety Bars â&#x20AC;˘ Furniture Assembly & Art Hanging 25 Years Experience

Stopping Leaks is our Specialty!

202.637.8808

Seamless Gutters Experts

New Roofs, Maintenance & Repairs

We Do it All!! Our Guarantees â&#x20AC;˘ Our work comes with warranties covering workmanship and material. â&#x20AC;˘ Straight Forward pricing - No surprises. â&#x20AC;˘ 24-hour emergency response. â&#x20AC;˘ 100% satisfaction - We do not stop until you are happy!

Recommended in May â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;03,â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;04 â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;05

Licensed, bonded & Insured, D.C.

ANY NEW ROOF

ANY NEW SKYLIGHT

500 off

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$

$

exp. 11/30/10

exp. 11/30/10

HALLIDAY

HALLIDAY

ROOFING

ROOFING

2 202.637.8808

2 202.637.8808

ANY ROOF REPAIR

FULL GUTTER INSTALLATION

250 off

$

100 off

$

exp. 11/30/10

exp. 11/30/10

HALLIDAY

HALLIDAY

ROOFING

ROOFING

2 202.637.8808

2 202.637.8808

Classified Ads Antiq. & Collectibles

Furniture Restoration

â&#x20AC;˘ Refinishing â&#x20AC;˘ Repairs â&#x20AC;˘ Painting â&#x20AC;˘ Chair Caning & Any Woven Seating â&#x20AC;˘ Picture Hanging & Frame Restoration â&#x20AC;˘ Experienced with Reasonable Rates Raymond 301-589-2658

rayburkettcraftsman@gmail.com

CHAIR CANING Seat Weaving â&#x20AC;&#x201C; All types

Cane * Rush * Danish Repairs * Reglue

TREE SERVICES

References

email: chairsandseats@aol.com

STEVE YOUNG â&#x20AC;˘ 202-966-8810

1920â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S WICKER ROCKER Elegant design, perfect condition $200 OBO 202-966-6375

Child Care Available FANTASTIC NANNY available 9-3 starting end of August to work in upper NW or Bethesda. 3-4 days per week but flexible. Drives own car. Contact lfitzrandolph@gmail.com.

Cleaning Services Bennyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cleaning Co., Inc. Residential & Commercial Weekly/Bi-Weekly - One Time Experienced cleaners, Own trans. Excellent work, Reasonable Prices Good References â&#x20AC;˘ Lic. & Insured 703-585-2632 â&#x20AC;˘ 703-237-2779

WATERPROOFING

HOUSECLEANING AND ironing: Own cleaning supplies. Excellent references. Call 202-534-7827. I CLEAN houses. Mon-Sat. Weekly, bi-weekly. Affordable Prices. Please call Mercedes 202-237-2674.

MGL CLEANING SERVICE

WINDOWS & DOORS

Experienced â&#x20AC;˘ Same Team Everytime Lic. Bonded, Ins.

WINDOW WASHERS, ETC... Celebrating 15 years

RESIDENTIAL SPECIALISTS

SERVING UPPER N.W. Residential Specialists Windows â&#x20AC;˘ Gutters â&#x20AC;˘ Power Washing DC â&#x20AC;˘ MD â&#x20AC;˘ VA

F REE ES TIMATES

Fully Bonded & Insured

Computer problems solved, control pop-ups & spam, upgrades, tune-up, DSL / Cable modem, network, wireless, virus recovery etc. Friendly service, home or business. Best rates.

Call Michael for estimate: 202-486-3145 www.computeroo.net New Computer? iPod? Digital Camera? NW DC resident with adult training background will teach you to use the Internet, e-mail, Windows, Microsoft Word, numerous other programs, or other electronic devices. Help with purchase and setup available. Mac experience. Call Brett Geranen at (202) 486-6189. ComputerTutorDC@gmail.com

Domestic Available HOUSEKEEPER available, FT M-F. References and experience. Call 202-422-5644, leave message.

Estate Sales ESTATE SALE 8/16, 8/17. 9:00a.m.-2:00p.m. Sleeper sofa, housewares, china, vintage linens. Art pieces. 3342 Dent Place NW.between.33rd and 34th.

Floors Chevy Chase Floor Waxing Service

Polishing, buffing, waxing, cleaning, all types of floors, paste wax service for wood floors. Wall-to-wall carpet removal. Careful workmanship. Licensed Bonded Insured 301-656-9274, Chevy Chase, MD

Furniture

Our customers recommend us

25% off your first clean! Mario & Estella: 202-491-6767-703-798-4143

Computers

 

202-337-0351 In the heart of the Palisades since 1993

Good References, Free Estimates

Computers

IWCA

Member, International Window Cleaning Association â&#x20AC;˘ In the heart of the Palisades since 1993

   

               

     

(301) 642-4526

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Washingtonian Magazineâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Small custom carpentry projects â&#x20AC;˘ Furniture repair & Refinishing â&#x20AC;˘Trimwork, painting â&#x20AC;˘ Miscellaneous household repairs Experienced woodworker Good references, reasonable rates Philippe Mougne: 202-686-6196 phmougne@yahoo.com

Health

â&#x20AC;˘ Weight Loss â&#x20AC;˘ Health Coaching â&#x20AC;˘ Cooking Classes Call for free consultation 202-330-3047 www.NutritionMattersNow.com

Help Wanted CARRIER NEEDED Palisades area, every Wednesday. (Dana, Eskridge, Garfield, University) 119 newspapers. Contact Jack@koczela.net.

MIDDLE C Music is looking for a full time employee with a background in print music. General instrument & music knowledge important. Flexible hours including weekends. Competitive Salary. Tenleytown location, Metro accessible. Send cover letter & resume to: myrna@middlecmusic.com

Housing for Rent (Apts) ADORABLE SUN-FILLED studio, McLean Gardens. Hardwoods, W/D, built-ins, granite, pool, California closets, extra storage. $1,350/ mo. Avail August. Call Sarah: (202)337-0398. BEAUTIFUL 1 bedroom basement apartment 1200 Sq Ft available Aug 1 separate alley entrance hardwood floors working stone fireplace plentiful natural light new full kitchen with gas range microwave garbage disposal refrigerator w/water & ice maker all utilities included (Internet cable gas heat central A/C) stacked w/d 1/2 block from Military Rd metro stop 1/4 mile from Rock Creek Park walking distance to Chevy Chase DC plentiful off-street parking Call 301-841-7813 JohnSwartz01@Verizon.Net

AU / Cathedral Area Idaho Terrace Apts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3040 Idaho Ave, NW

Studio: $1250-$1380 All utilities included. Sec. Dep. $300 Controlled entry system. Metro bus at front door. Reserved parking. Office Hours: M-F, 9-5

THE CURRENT

888-705-1347

Bernstein Management Corp.


26 Wednesday, August 14, 2013

THE CURRENT

The Current

Classified Ads Pets

Pets

[202] 277-2566 PO Box 25058 Washington, DC 20027 jule@julespetsitting.com www.julespetsitting.com

J ULE’S Petsitting Services, Inc.

• Mid Day Dog Walks • Kitty Visits • In-Home Overnight Pet Sitting and other Pet Care Services • Insured and Bonded

Setting the Standard for Excellence in Pet Sitting and Dog Walking Since 1991

Housing for Rent (Apts)

Personal Services

FOGGY BOTTOM condo: 1BR, modern kit., gran/stain appl, lrg closets, W/D, balcony/courtyard, incl. utils and pk, Metro/ G’town, avail 9-1, $2,500/ mo. Call 240-780-1490.

Pressure Washing Chesapeake Power Washing, Co.

Housing Wanted

LEARN PIANO

In the convenience of your home. Patient, experiened teacher. Beginners welcome.

202-342-5487

res1685@gmail.com

VIOLIN LESSONS

with experienced teacher Masters of Music from Yale U. All ages All levels Located near A.U.

Pets CAT CARE Services Providing loving, attentive care for your cat(s) while you are away by doing more than just cleaning the box & filling the bowl. • Over 15 years experience. • Am/pm & weekend visits • Short term & long term. Will also take care of other small indoor pets, water plants & bring in mail. References available upon request. Great rates! Located in The Palisades. catcaresvcs@yahoo.com call 703-868-3038

Dog Boarding

Misc. For Sale

Susan Mcconnell’s Loving Pet Care. • Mid-day Walks • Home visits • Personal Attention

Moving/Hauling CONTINENTAL MOVERS

Free 10 boxes Local-Long Distance • Great Ref’s

202-966-3061

GREAT SCOTT MOVING INCORPORATED

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Dogsitter/ Dog Daycare

EXPERIENCED PETSITTER/ Housesitter available. Responsible 32/F, seeking long or short-term opportunities. Employed non-smoker with car, can provide multiple references. Call 703-772-8848 or email kp105dc@gmail.com for more details.

ADVERTISE IN

202-328-8244

Get Organized Today!

Call today for a free consultation! Around Tuit, LLC Professional Organizing

202-489-3660

www.getaroundtuitnow.com info@getaroundtuitnow.com

THE CURRENT

THE CURRENT NEWSPAPERS 202-244-7223

‡ZZZJUHDWVFRWWPRYLQJFRP

Get "Around Tuit" now and organize your closets, basement, home office, kids' rooms, kitchens, garages and more!

Ace Window Cleaning, Co. Family owned and operated for over 20 years using careful workmanship 301-656-9274 Chevy Chase, MD Licensed • Bonded • Insured • We also offer glass, screen, and sash cord repair service

If you believe in your business, and want to build it. . .

Highly rated in Better Business Bureau, Consumer Check Book, Yelp and Angie’s List so call us for a Great Move at a Great Price.

Personal Services

Upholstery

Personalized daycare and overnight petsitting in my home. Lots of care, walks and park time. Good references.

301-984-5908 • 202 438-1489 www.continentalmovers.net

washing wand ensures no damage to clean brick, stone, slate, wood, and siding. Careful workmanship with 20 years exper. Lic. Bond Ins. 301-656-9274 Chevy Chase, MD

Windows

Call Rach el @ 202-342-5487

KING MATTRESS & box springSealy Med. Firm. New in packaging $200 - 202-629-3588

lives of tigers and, in the process, has documented the endangered cats as they stalk, eat, wade, rest and groom. Paul Nicklen, best known for his pictures of polar bears and other denizens of the Arctic, has recently turned his lens on other bears, including black, grizzly and the rare spirit bear. Located at 1145 17th St. NW, the museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission costs $11 for adults; $9 for seniors, students

From Page 17

Gentle, low-pressure, thorough turbo-

Instruction

From Page 17

THEATER

LARGE RENOVATED (2011) 1BR Granite kit, tile bath, rooftop pool. Close to Dupont Cir. $2300 incl util. Call Tom @Long & Foster 301-758-6036

ROOM NEAR Sangamore Safeway job needed. $400-500/ mo. Max 202-421-6185.

EXHIBITS

CALL TODAY

CALL TODAY TO PLACE YOUR AD IN THE NEXT ISSUE! 202.244.7223

William King, a single father, has successfully raised two children despite challenging circumstances. Overcoming the death of his wife, King has instilled responsibility, loyalty, love and obligation in his sons. As his illness slowly takes over, the King sons are charged with decisions about his care. Performance times are 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 2 p.m. Saturday and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $15 to $25. The Anacostia Playhouse is located at 2020 Shannon Place SE. 202-241-2539; theateralliance.com. ■ The Studio 2ndStage will celebrate its 25th anniversary with the horror comedy musical “Richard O’Brien’s The Rocky Horror Show” through Aug. 17 in the Metheny Theatre. Two lovers, Brad and Janet, seek shelter from a thunderstorm in an old castle — and find themselves thrust into the laboratory of pansexual, cross-dressing mad scientist Dr. Frank ‘N’ Furter and his cadre of madcap minions. Performance times are 8 p.m. Thursday and Friday and 7 and 10 p.m. Saturday. Tickets start at $40, with some discounts available. The Studio Theatre is located at 1501 14th St. NW. 202-332-3300; studiotheatre.org. ■ The Kennedy Center will host the hit Broadway musical “The Book of Mormon” through Aug. 18 in the Opera House. The irreverent show by “South Park” creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone received nine Tony Awards in 2011, including Best Musical. It is the story of two young, naive missionaries sent to a remote village in Uganda overseen by a brutal warlord. Performance times are generally 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets cost $43 to $250. Limited tickets are available on the Kennedy Center website; there are also some obstructed-view seats available at the box office or by phone. 202467-4600; kennedy-center.org. ■ Scena Theatre will stage Oscar Wilde’s controversial one-act tragedy “Salomé” at the Atlas Performing Arts Center through Aug. 18. Victorian-era censors banned the

and military personnel; and $7 for ages 5 through 12. 202-857-7588. ■ “Body of Work,” highlighting local artists Alan Callander, Evan Hume and Jenny Walton with abstract works that attempt to make sense of the unknown, opened last week at Studio 1469, where it will continue through Aug. 25. Featured are photographs, monotypes and a video installation. A closing party is slated for Aug. 25 from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. Located at 1469 Harvard St. NW, rear, the gallery is open Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 202-518-0804. play from the London stage on the grounds that it was illegal to portray biblical characters on stage. The dark tale of revenge, lechery and deception tells the story of the beautiful stepdaughter of King Herod Antipas. Performance times are Wednesday through Sunday at 8 p.m. and Sunday at 3 p.m. Tickets cost $20 to $40. The Atlas Performing Arts Center is located at 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993; scenatheater.org. ■ The Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company and Chicago’s The Second City have extended “America All Better!!” through Aug. 18. Targeting everything from politics and high school to the economy and online dating, the new production will feature Woolly Mammoth company members and other local performers as well as actors from The Second City. Performance times are 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, 3 p.m. Saturday, and 2 and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $35 to $67.50. Woolly Mammoth is located at 641 D St. NW. 202-393-3939; woollymammoth.net. ■ The Keegan Theatre will present Aaron Sorkin’s drama “A Few Good Men” through Sept. 7. First produced on Broadway in 1989 and inspiring an Academy Award-nominated film of the same name, the play tells the story of military lawyers who uncover a highlevel conspiracy in the course of defending their clients, two U.S. Marines accused of murder. “A Few Good Men” is based on events that took place at Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in July 1986. Performance times are generally 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $30 to $35. The Andrew Keegan Theatre (formerly known as the Church Street Theater) is located at 1742 Church St. NW. 703-892-0202; keegantheatre.com. ■ The long-running whodunit “Shear Madness” at the Kennedy Center draws input from the audience and provides up-to-the-minute improvisational humor. The setting for the comic play is the Shear Madness Hair Styling Salon in Georgetown. The schedule is generally 8 p.m. Tuesday through Friday; 6 and 9 p.m. Saturday; and 3 and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $38 to $50. 202-467-4600; kennedy-center.org.


The CurrenT

Wednesday, augusT 14, 2013 27

SOLD

GEORGETOWN

This stately completely detached 1916 mansion draws on the best building practices of the day and boasts striking entertaining spaces. $5,990,000 MICHAEL RANKIN +1 202 271 3344

KALORAMA

This renovated home is restored with modern conveniences while reflecting the style of the early 1900s. Grounds feature a pool and detached 2-car garage. $4,500,000 | ttrsir.com/id/DC8097997 MICHAEL RANKIN +1 202 271 3344

GEORGETOWN

Newly Priced Victorian semi-detached home on coveted block features expansive living and entertaining spaces and offers 5 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. $2,595,000 JULIA DIAZ-ASPER +1 202 256 1887

GIVING BACK:

TTR Sotheby’s International Realty is proud to sponsor the 2013 Joan Hisaoka Gala.

SPRING VALLEY

OBSERVATORY CIRCLE

This fully detached 5 BR, 4.5 BA Colonial has been renovated and expanded, offering spacious flexible floor plan and stunning kitchen with stainless steel appliances incl. Viking oven and range. $1,795,000 | ttrsir.com/id/DC8143175 JONATHAN TAYLOR +1 202 276 3344

This extraordinary 2 BR, 2 BA condo at Sheridan Garage offers soaring ceilings, large casement windows, open floor plan, 1 garage space and storage. $1,295,000 | ttrsir.com/id/dc8105303 MICHAEL BRENNAN +1 202 330 7808

WESLEY HEIGHTS

DUPONT CIRCLE

ADAMS MORGAN

This 6 BR, 4 full BA brick Center-Hall Colonial is located on a sought-after street sited adjacent to Spring Valley Park and offers an attached garage, flagstone terraces and multiple gardens. $1,799,000 | ttrsir.com/id/DC8019198 MICHAEL RANKIN +1 202 271 3344

This updated 2000 sf 3 BR, 3 BA upper floor unit in the Colonnade offers stunning views, balcony, storage & garage parking. The Colonnade features a pool, fitness, doorman, front desk & more. $1,100,000 DIANA HART +1 202 271 2717

This 2 BR, 2 BA flat in a historic brownstone features high ceilings, fully-renovated kitchen, wood-burning fireplace, built-ins, large closets, washer/dryer, and common rooftop deck with city views. $719,000 | ttrsir.com/id/DC8156714 GARY WICKS +1 202 486 8393

GEORGETOWN

This 2 BR, 2 BA third floor unit offers floor-to-ceiling windows, loftstyle design, wood floors, high ceilings, exposed ductwork, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, private balcony, and garage parking. $559,000 | ttrsir.com/id/DC8148906 MAXWELL RABIN +1 202 669 7406

GEORGETOWN, DC BROKERAGE | +1 202 333 1212 VIRGINIA BROKERAGE | +1 703 319 3344 MARYLAND BROKERAGE | +1 301 967 3344 DOWNTOWN, DC BROKERAGE | +1 202 234 3344

ttrsir.com

©MMXIII TTR Sotheby’s International Realty, licensed real estate broker. Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered service marks used with permission. Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Equal housing opportunity. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. Price and availability subject to change.


28 Wednesday, augusT 14, 2013

The CurrenT

MCENEARNEY

mcenearney.com 17 SU O 26 N PE 17 DA N H th Y O St 8/1 US N 8, E W 1#3 3 04

ASSOCIATES, INC. REALTORS®

Palisades, DC $2,095,000 Beautiful Potomac river views abound from this elegant, updated & impeccably maintained 4 BR, 3.5 BA home.

Dupont, DC $350,000 Stylish one-bedroom condo just steps to Metro! Spacious kitchen, large closets, dark hardwoods, & built-in cabinets, desk & shelves. Rooftop deck with great views of the city.

Glover Park, DC $800,000

Dupont Circle, DC $874,900

Chevy Chase Village, MD $1,195,000

Beautifully renovated Victorian building with low condo fee. 12-ft ceilings, fabulous kitchen. Parking included.

Beautiful & spacious home featuring 4 bedrooms, family room, den, and huge yard. Just blocks from Metro.

Dolly Tucker & Frank Snodgrass 202.744.2755

Anslie Stokes Milligan 202.270.1081 www.StokesRealtor.com

Santiago Testa 202.905.8002 www.testarealestate.net

Catherine Czuba 202.549.6819 www.CzubaGroup.com

Bethesda, MD $1,379,000

Silver Spring, MD $749,900

Palisades, DC $1,495,000

Saint Michaels, MD $510,000

Wonderful new Parkwood farmhouse. Quality craftsmanship. Open floor plan ideal for today’s lifestyle.

Incredible home with 5 bedrooms and 3.5 baths. Updates galore, tons of space and large rooms.

Gorgeously renovated and updated 4-bedroom, 3.5-bath colonial on a charming, private street.

Wonderful Eastern Shore home feels like new. Relax and enjoy historic Saint Michaels. Owner/Agent.

Kathy Byars 240.372.9708 www.KathyByars.com

Mark Hudson 301.641.6266 www.MarkHudsonGroup.com

Dolly Tucker & Frank Snodgrass 202.744.2755

Lisa LaCourse 301.792.9313 www.LaCoursePortfolio.com

Washington, DC VOLUME 7 • AUGUST 2013

MORTGAGE RATES UP A FULL POINT IN 60 DAYS. AND THE SKY ISN’T FALLING. Well, we knew rates would bottom out – and they did. From a low of 3.35% for 30-year fixed mortgages at the end of April, rates jumped to 4.46% by the end of June. And that translates to a 12.6% loss of buying power. On the short-term, that has brought more buyers into the market to take advantage of still very low rates before they climb higher. However, this will undoubtedly put a damper on demand in the months ahead, and that will ease some of the upward pressure on home prices. So why are we so confident the sky isn’t falling? In July 1980 when McEnearney Associates opened for business, mortgage interest rates averaged 12.71%. By September 1981, rates had climbed to 18.45%, representing a 30% loss of buying power in just over a year. (Already feel a little better about today’s rates?) But people still bought homes, and believe it or not, home prices actually rose slightly during that period of time. Today’s rising rates will moderate the market, not kill it. Copyright 2013 - McEnearney Associates, Inc. REALTORS® ®

Preferred Lender ®

BUYING POWER

With a $1,000 Mortgage Payment $250,000

April 2013 to June 2013 12.6% Loss of Buying Power

$200,000 $150,000

June 1980 to September 1981 30% Loss of Buying Power

$100,000 $50,000 0

April 2013

June 2013

June 1980

Sept. 1981

For a more detailed discussion about this report, visit McEnearney.com and click on the Market Trends tab or scan this QR code.

202.552.5600

4315 50th Street NW • Washington, DC 20016


Gt 08 14 2013