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Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Vol. XX, No. 47

THE GEORGETOWN CURRENT Council ratifies municipal bond tax

CHILL OUT

■ Budget: Opponents argue

against ‘retroactive’ policy By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

The D.C. Council yesterday narrowly confirmed plans to tax interest on out-of-state municipal bonds, including bonds purchased in the past to make use of the District’s unusual tax exemption.

Council members, by a 7-6 vote, rejected a proposal by Ward 3 member Mary Cheh that would have placed $13.4 million on a “wish list” to maintain the tax exemption for bonds purchased before Oct. 1, 2011 — the start of the next fiscal year — if additional revenue allows. Cheh said what she called “a retroactive tax” is “clearly unfair.” Residents, including many seniors, “already purchased these bonds and relied on the income” for their

retirement, she said. Municipal bonds, issued by various government entities, are held by many pension funds and affluent individual investors. As at-large member Vincent Orange put it, of retirees who hold such bonds, 67 percent have incomes over $100,000. “People use the term ‘senior citizens’ when it’s convenient. These are wealthy people,” he said. See Budget/Page 18

Study touts local universities’ impacts By CAROL BUCKLEY Current Staff Writer

Bill Petros/The Current

Snow cones helped cool down the kids during Sunday afternoon's annual Volta Park Day in Georgetown.

As a handful of area universities ask the city to green-light their plans for growth in the coming decade, a group representing the schools has come out with a study touting the salutary effect the institutions have on the region’s economy. A George Mason University professor found that area schools, including American, Georgetown and George Washington universities, contributed $1.42 billion last year to the District’s economy in spending by the schools and their students, retirees and visitors. The regional impact of universities was significantly higher, according to the study published by the Consortium of Universities of the Washington Metropolitan Area. Though D.C. is still a government town, the study allows, area universities are the city’s top private employers, with schools and their hospitals taking eight See Study/Page 7

Bill Petros/Current File Photo

A new study reports that Georgetown University and its hospital are the first and fifth top private employers in the District, respectively.

City moves to save E6, cut N8 and K1

Destructive flooding persists long after Reno Road work

By KATIE PEARCE

■ Transportation: Agency

Current Staff Writer

The E6 bus route in Chevy Chase — one of three city lines proposed for elimination this year — now looks likely to be preserved. In advance of final budget decisions, both District and regional transportation authorities have recommended maintaining the E6, which runs between the Knollwood nursing home and Friendship Heights. But the N8 route in Glover Park and the K1 route in Takoma remain on the chopping block, with the District poised to save about $850,000 a year by cutting them, according to Steve Strauss of the D.C. Department of Transportation. “Clearly the E6 riders seem to be more passionate about their service,” Strauss said in a recent interview,

NEWS ■ AU case goes before Zoning Commission. Page 3. ■ Police district shift would split Dupont Circle. Page 3.

says fix will come in summer By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

Bill Petros/The Current

The Transporation Department had suggested the E6 and N8 bus routes for cuts due to low ridership. referring to comments at a public Metro meeting in May. “There was a very large number of people who spoke … on the E6,” he said. “They were universally opposed See Buses/Page 7

SPORTS ■ Coolidge, Sidwell hit court in summer league action. Page 11. ■ D.C. pools participate in attempt to set world record. Page 11.

When it rains really, really hard — perhaps two or three times a year — storm water races down Fessenden Street and Reno Road toward Chevy Chase Parkway, where Colleen Fogarty’s front yard and house lie directly in the path of the deluge. The upshot: soil eroded, plants drowned and water dripping down

PA S S A G E S ■ Local funeral director named ‘Father of Year.’ Page 13. ■ Critical Exposure gives kids cameras — to show decay. Page 13.

the basement wall of the white-brick house where Fogarty has lived for 25 years. “It’s washed out my front yard, and drains very slowly into my basement,” she said. According to Fogarty and neighbor Lenore Ostrowski, the problem started when Reno Road north of Nebraska Avenue was rebuilt and repaved in 2006 and 2007, leaving part of the road without the normal rise in the middle that’s supposed to direct runoff to both sides. And despite a hasty repaving this May to repair crumbling asphalt from the See Flooding/Page 30

INDEX Calendar/20 Classifieds/23 District Digest/4 Exhibits/23 In Your Neighborhood/10 Opinion/8 Passages/13

Police Report/6 Real Estate/17 School Dispatches/12 Service Directory/24 Sports/11 Theater/23 Week Ahead/3


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

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Police district shifts would divide Dupont Circle, Columbia Heights By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

A proposal designed to improve police response times would split both the Dupont Circle and Columbia Heights neighborhoods between police districts, part of an effort to balance police responsibilities across the city. Metropolitan Police Department officials said residents should not expect to see a significant impact from the realignment, because each shift is only a few blocks and because the same officers will typically continue to patrol their familiar territory. But at a meeting last week on the proposed changes to the 3rd District, some Dupont Circle residents wor-

ried about police collaboration across district lines and community groups’ ability to work with two districts’ leadership. A key aim of the proposed citywide realignment of police boundaries is to equalize each district’s crime at approximately oneseventh of the total, or 14.3 percent. Borders were last redrawn in 2004. The 3rd District, which now includes the neighborhoods of Shaw, Logan Circle, Columbia Heights, Adams Morgan, SheridanKalorama and Mount Pleasant, sees 16.7 percent of D.C. crime — the largest slice of any of the seven districts. Under the proposed changes, the 3rd District would account for 14.2 percent of the

Zoning Commission hears American University case By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

Neighbors of American University who have howled in protest over the school’s expansion plans may have caught the ear of Zoning Commission chair Anthony Hood. Last week, at the first zoning hearing on the university campus plan, Hood read from written testimony his commission had received from residents about a proposed increase in student housing and officials’ responsiveness to concerns during the planning process. “Why do we have so many people telling us that they’re not being listened to?” Hood asked university officials at the Thursday hearing. “I gotta tell you, this is very serious to me.” The Zoning Commission holds sole authority over university development plans. Neighbors have asked that the university locate its 1,300 beds of planned student housing on the central part of its campus rather than the outskirts. The highest-profile proposed development is on the “East Campus” — a parking lot on Nebraska Avenue that backs onto

the Westover Place town-house community — where officials propose housing 590 students and two academic/administration buildings. Other zoning commissioners questioned university officials about various details of the plan, but Hood was alone in offering pointed criticisms. Commissioner Peter May told officials after they described their plans, “I think overall the presentation was pretty effective. You hit all the high points pretty well.” Hood appeared less convinced. “‘We don’t want to be at war with students. They go out when we’re going to bed,’” he read from one neighbor’s letter. “These are real situations that the residents who live in that area have written to us about.” University officials replied that they’ve scaled back development plans to compromise with neighbors, but do need to address a lack of quantity and quality in the school’s housing. The residents who claimed they were being ignored were demanding that the university put only academic buildings on the East Campus site, school officials said, which would run counter to a longstanding practice of centralizSee Campus/Page 30

The week ahead Thursday, June 16 The D.C. Council Committee on the Whole will hold a public hearing on the mayoral appointment of Kaya Henderson as D.C. Public Schools chancellor. The hearing will begin at 2 p.m. in Room 500 of the John A. Wilson Building, 1350 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. ■ The Metropolitan Police Department will hold a community meeting for the 4th District on plans to realign police service area boundaries. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the 4th District Police Headquarters, 6001 Georgia Ave. NW.

Saturday, June 18 Ward 4 D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser will hold the 11th annual Ward 4 Family Fun Day, which will feature food, music and games. The event will be held from 2 to 5 p.m. at Lafayette Elementary School, 5701 Broad Branch Road NW. ■ The West End Citizens Association will hold its summer meeting, which will feature a presentation by D.C. Chief Financial Officer Natwar Gandhi. The meeting will begin at 2 p.m. at the Hotel Lombardy, 2019 Pennsylvania Ave. NW.

Wednesday, June 22 The Metropolitan Police Department will hold a community meeting for the 2nd District on plans to realign police service area boundaries. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. at the 2nd District Police Headquarters, 3320 Idaho Ave. NW.

city’s crime. The redrawn district would include the northwestern part of Dupont Circle, extending south to Q Street (instead of the current U Street) and west to 18th Street (instead of 15th Street). The rest of the Dupont Circle neighborhood would remain within the 2nd District. The 3rd District would also lose all of Mount Pleasant and a few blocks of Columbia Heights — north from Park Road — to the 4th District, which already contains the latter neighborhood’s northernmost streets. The changes will likely go into effect by the end of the year, Police Chief Cathy Lanier said at last week’s meeting, though they are subject to Council approval.

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“If you take my police force and divvy them up, everybody is getting the level of police service they should get,” she said of the realignment. Lanier said the changes “will actually bring your workload down and give your police officers more time to be more effective in their policing.” As is, she said, the volume of crime in the 3rd District means it is “getting crushed” with workload — officers are strained to respond to incidents and sometimes can’t communicate through an overburdened radio frequency. Dividing populous neighborhoods with relatively high crime — such as Dupont See Police/Page 15

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

THE CURRENT

District Digest mural was installed, after months of planning, on the station’s southern abutment wall along Cedar Street, according to a release from the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. “I wanted to make a work that is part of its environment, yet changes that environment,� Gilliam said in the release. “A work filled with color and light.� The D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities, along with

Artist unveils mural at Takoma Metro D.C. artist Sam Gilliam has debuted his new mural, “From a Model to a Rainbow,� in the oncedingy underpass of the Takoma Metro station. A dedication ceremony Saturday celebrated the new artwork, a 14foot-high, 39-foot-wide mosaic of multicolored ceramic and glass tiles mounted on aluminum panels. The

community members and the Metro Art in Transit Program, selected Gilliam to create the mural in December. The arts commission allotted $250,000 for the project. Gilliam, a Crestwood resident, became famous in the 1960s for his signature “draped� canvases. “From a Model to a Rainbow� is a mosaic translation of one of the artist’s earlier paintings, according to the release. The Metro Art in Transit pro-

gram, working with local government agencies, community groups and artists, aims to install art “that captures the spirit and vitality of the region,� the release says. Attendees at this weekend’s celebration included D.C. Mayor Vincent Gray, Ward 4 D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser, Metro general manager Richard Sarles and D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton. — Katie Pearce

District solicits bids on Zipcar spaces The D.C. Department of Transportation is soliciting bids from car-sharing companies for the 86 reserved curbside parking spaces that company Zipcar is currently using. “Our carsharing market has matured and we want to invite the carshare companies that have created the existing services, along with those that are newer to the industry, to operate here in the District,� Transportation Department acting director Terry Bellamy says in a news release. The city has reserved curbside spots for car-share vehicles since 2005, and car-sharing membership and ridership have seen “tremendous growth� since then, the release states. It says that the city’s bid solicitation “could potentially bring in more carsharing companies to compete for these spaces.�

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city and a series of street closures downtown this weekend, according to a news release. The event involves three waves on Sunday: at 6 a.m., the international distance race (a 1.5-kilometer swim in the Potomac River, followed by a 40-kilometer bike ride and a 10-kilometer run); at 7 a.m., the Sprint distance race (a 0.8-kilometer swim, 20-kilometer bike ride and 7.5-kilometer run); at 9 a.m., the professional men’s race; and then at 9:05 a.m., the professional women’s races. Weekend road closures will take place throughout the downtown area, particularly around Pennsylvania Avenue between 3rd and 6th streets NW, starting at 5 p.m. Saturday. On Sunday, Memorial Bridge, Rock Creek Parkway from Independence Avenue to P Street, and Whitehurst Freeway, among others, will be closed to traffic from 5 a.m. to 11 a.m., according to the D.C. Department of Transportation. Washington Sports and Event Management is presenting the event, which is a USA Triathlonsanctioned race and part of the World Triathlon Corp.’s 5150 series, with a total prize purse of $25,000 for the top professional athletes.

Correction A May 25 item in the School Dispatches section misstated the outcome of boys and girls lacrosse games between School Without Walls and Wilson High School the week before. Wilson prevailed in both. The Current regrets the error. As a matter of policy, The Current corrects all errors of substance. To report an error, please call the managing editor at 202244-7223.

THE CURRENT Delivered weekly to homes and businesses in Northwest Washington Publisher & Editor Davis Kennedy Managing Editor Chris Kain Assistant Managing Editor Beth Cope Associate Editor Koko Wittenburg Advertising Director Gary Socha Account Executive Shani Madden Account Executive Richa Marwah Account Executive George Steinbraker Account Executive Mary Kay Williams Advertising Standards Advertising published in The Current Newspapers is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services as offered are accurately described and are available to customers at the advertised price. Advertising that does not conform to these standards, or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any Current Newspapers reader encounters non-compliance with these standards, we ask that you inform us. All advertising and editorial matter is fully protected and may not be reproduced in any manner without permission from the publisher. Subscription by mail — $52 per year

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Stoddert, Wilson rebuild after book losses By CAROL BUCKLEY Current Staff Writer

Students at Stoddert Elementary School are finishing up their first year in a renovated and expanded building, but until last month one room of the spiffed-up campus stood forlorn and unfinished: the library. Boxes of books and other library materials went missing during the renovation, outgoing Stoddert PTA president Mary McLaughlin said at a recent advisory neighborhood commission meeting. But shortly after the meeting, McLaughlin reported that replacement materials were in place and the library is at full circulation strength. Contractor Whiting-Turner submitted an insurance claim when the school was ready to reopen, but delays meant that the books just

came in last month, she said. “It’s been a problematic year,� added McLaughlin, who said that the PTA and a $3,000 grant from the neighborhood commission will fund additions to the restored collection. Readers at Wilson High School are likely to share that sentiment; that school’s entire nonfiction collection, about 2,500 books, went missing during the switch from the school’s under-construction Tenleytown campus to its temporary site. Columnist Bill Turque of The Washington Post reported the loss and wrote that the school is getting help from a local nonprofit, the Wilson Parent Teacher Student Association and Politics and Prose bookstore. A spokesperson for D.C. Public Schools did not return calls for comment.

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Eaton students study schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 100-year history Current Staff Writer

When Eaton Elementary opened its doors for the first time 100 years ago, it served white students only, and boys and girls sat in separate classrooms. The building cost only $58,000 to construct and served a few dozen students. A lot has changed since then, as Eaton now boasts one of the most diverse student bodies in the District. Its operating budget for fiscal year 2011 was $3.4 million, and it serves more than 400 students. And yet, to some degree, the more things change, the more they stay the same. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What stayed the same is a sense of community amongst the parents and students, and a deep dedication to learning,â&#x20AC;? said principal Jacqueline Gartrell. And nowhere is that more evident, she said, than in the work that enrichment coordinators Eileen Langholtz and Michelle Koerner have been doing to study Eatonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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centennial with students. For several months, Langholtz and Koerner have been meeting with 17 fourth-graders during their lunch and recess periods to explore Eatonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s history. The participants learned about the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s architect, Appleton Clark, and its namesake â&#x20AC;&#x201D; John Eaton, a general, minister and assistant commissioner of the Freedmenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bureau. They met with scholars at the Library of Congress to learn about research techniques. And they talked to a folk-life specialist about how to conduct oral histories. Then students divided into smaller groups to research the school, its neighborhood and the District. Some, like Annalise Myre and Ella Cain, focused their energies inward, tallying the number of trophies the school has won, and chronicling the kinds of musicals it has produced. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I really liked learning that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re best at cheerleading,â&#x20AC;? Myre said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was kind of surprising.â&#x20AC;?

But the students said they were most excited to discover the drama surrounding a painting â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plowed Fieldsâ&#x20AC;? by Edgar Hewitt Nye â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that went missing from the library a few years ago. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was missing from 2000 to 2003,â&#x20AC;? Cain said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The FBI had to get involved.â&#x20AC;? Eventually the painting was found behind a set of bookshelves at the school. But, Cain said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interesting that a little neighborhood school had the FBI come.â&#x20AC;? Gartrell said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been impressed with the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; efforts. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done a lot of great research,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They learned about John Eaton the man, the building, segregation and integration.â&#x20AC;? But most of all, she said, the students have learned â&#x20AC;&#x153;that they can connect history to their real world,â&#x20AC;? she said. The student historians will present their findings to the public tomorrow from 9 to 10 a.m. in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s library. Eaton is located at 3301 Lowell St. NW.

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Police Report This is a listing of reports taken from June 5 through 12 in local police service areas.

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PSA 201 PSA 201 ■ CHEVY CHASE

Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 3900 block, Livingston St.; street; noon June 6. ■ 5800 block, Chevy Chase Parkway; street; 8:30 p.m. June 6. ■ 5400 block, 30th Place; street; 9:30 p.m. June 9. ■ 3200 block, Morrison St.; street; 9:30 p.m. June 9. ■ 3800 block, Jocelyn St.; street; 12:30 a.m. June 10. ■ Connecticut Avenue and Legation Street; street; 4 p.m. June 10. Theft from auto (attempt) ■ 2900 block, McKinley St.; street; 7:30 p.m. June 5.

PSA 202 ■ FRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS PSA 202

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Stolen auto ■ 4800 block, Davenport St.; street; 11 p.m. June 5. ■ 4300 block, Garrison St.; street; 7 p.m. June 9. ■ 4400 block, 47th St.; street; 6 p.m. June 10. ■ 4600 block, Albemarle St.; street; 7:30 p.m. June 10. ■ 4400 block, Albemarle St.; residence; 12:01 a.m. June 11. Theft (below $250) ■ 4400 block, Massachusetts Ave.; university; 5 a.m. June 7. ■ 3600 block, Upton St.; residence; 7 a.m. June 9. Theft (tags) ■ 4800 block, Davenport St.; street; 6 p.m. June 10. Theft from auto ($250 plus) ■ 3800 block, Van Ness St.; parking lot; 9 p.m. June 9. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 5200 block, Wisconsin Ave.; parking lot; 5:15 p.m. June 6. ■ 5300 block, Wisconsin Ave.; parking lot; 8 a.m. June 8. ■ 5100 block, 45th St.; street; 11 p.m. June 9. ■ 4400 block, 45th St.; street; 3 p.m. June 10. ■ 4400 block, 49th St.; street; 11 p.m. June 10.

PSA 203

PSA 203 ■ FOREST HILLS / VAN NESS

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Burglary ■ 4400 block, 36th St.; school; 2:36 a.m. June 11. Theft (below $250) ■ 4300 block, Connecticut Ave.; grocery store; 5:40 p.m. June 6. ■ Connecticut Avenue and Tilden Street; street; 9 a.m. June 7. ■ 4300 block, Connecticut Ave.; restaurant; 4:14 p.m. June 7. ■ 2900 block, Upton St.; school; 5 p.m. June 7. ■ 3500 block, International Place; sidewalk; 4:29 p.m. June 8. Theft from auto (below $250)

■ 3000 block, Davenport St.; street; 5 p.m. June 8.

PSA 204 ■ MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE HEIGHTS/ CLEVELAND PARK WOODLEY PARK / GLOVER PSA 204 PARK / CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS

Burglary ■ 2800 block, Quebec St.; residence; 3:30 p.m. June 10. ■ 2300 block, 40th Place; residence; 9 a.m. June 9.

PSA 205 ■ PALISADES / SPRING VALLEY PSA 205

WESLEY HEIGHTS/ FOXHALL

Stolen auto ■ 4900 block, Rockwood Parkway; residence; 2 a.m. June 10. ■ 4500 block, MacArthur Blvd.; residence; 5 p.m. June 11. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 5900 block, MacArthur Blvd.; residence; 3:50 p.m. June 5. ■ 1900 block, Foxview Circle; residence; 7 p.m. June 6. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ Lowell Street and Weaver Terrace; street; 7:15 p.m. June 8. ■ 4100 block, 52nd St.; street; midnight June 10.

PSA PSA 206 206

■ GEORGETOWN / BURLEITH

Robbery (pickpocket) ■ 3100 block, M St.; restaurant; 3:50 p.m. June 9. Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 2700 block, Pennsylvania Ave.; unspecified premises; 9:40 p.m. June 8. Burglary ■ 1000 block, 30th St.; residence; 12:01 a.m. June 9. ■ 1300 block, 27th St.; residence; 9:45 a.m. June 9. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 2500 block, Q St.; residence; 8 p.m. June 5. Theft (below $250) ■ 1300 block, Potomac St.; residence; 2 p.m. June 6. ■ 1200 block, Wisconsin Ave.; store; 4:10 p.m. June 8. ■ 3200 block, Grace St.; office building; 8 p.m. June 9. Theft (shoplifting) ■ 2800 block, M St.; drugstore; 8:10 p.m. June 11. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ N Street and Wisconsin Avenue; street; 9:30 p.m. June 8.

PSA PSA 207 207

■ FOGGY BOTTOM / WEST END

Robbery (pocketbook snatch) ■ 900 block, 24th St.; sidewalk; 4:30 p.m. June 9. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 2500 block, L St.; restaurant; 8:02 p.m. June 7. Theft (below $250) ■ 1800 block, H St.; office building; 2:30 p.m. June 7. ■ 1800 block, H St.; office building; 1 p.m. June 9. ■ 600 block, 23rd St.; universi-

ty; 3:15 p.m. June 9. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 900 block, 24th St.; parking lot; noon June 6. ■ 900 block, 26th St.; street; 6:30 p.m. June 7.

PSA 208 ■ SHERIDAN-KALORAMA

PSA 208 CIRCLE DUPONT

Robbery (pocketbook snatch) ■ 1700 block, 18th St.; sidewalk; 7 p.m. June 6. Robbery (pickpocket) ■ 1000 block, New Hampshire Ave.; restaurant; 12:30 p.m. June 8. Burglary ■ 1800 block, L St.; tavern; 12:05 a.m. June 7. ■ 1700 block, 21st St.; office building; 3 p.m. June 7. ■ 1700 block, M St.; store; 5 p.m. June 11. Stolen auto ■ 1600 block, 19th St.; alley; 11:38 a.m. June 6. Theft ($250 plus) ■ 2000 block, I St.; unspecified premises; noon June 9. ■ 1700 block, Massachusetts Ave.; unspecified premises; 1 p.m. June 9. ■ 1300 block, Connecticut Ave.; drugstore; 5:08 p.m. June 9. Theft (below $250) ■ 17th and K streets; street; 7:41 a.m. June 6. ■ 1300 block, Connecticut Ave.; drugstore; 6:27 p.m. June 6. ■ 2100 block, California St.; residence; 4:30 a.m. June 7. ■ 1100 block, 16th St.; office building; 4:25 p.m. June 7. ■ 1000 block, Connecticut Ave.; office building; 9 a.m. June 8. ■ 2000 block, Florida Ave.; sidewalk; 9 a.m. June 8. ■ 2000 block, L St.; office building; 4:10 p.m. June 8. ■ 2000 block, L St.; office building; 4:30 p.m. June 8. ■ 900 block, 17th St.; office building; 5 p.m. June 8. ■ 900 block, 17th St.; tavern; 6:35 p.m. June 8. ■ 2000 block, L St.; unspecified premises; 8 a.m. June 9. ■ 2100 block, N St.; residence; 4:57 pm. June 9. ■ 21st and L streets; sidewalk; 6:30 p.m. June 9. ■ 2100 block, Massachusetts Ave.; street; midnight June 11. ■ 1300 block, Connecticut Ave.; tavern; 2:20 a.m. June 11. ■ 1300 block, Connecticut Ave.; store; 11:20 a.m. June 11. ■ 2000 block, L St.; unspecified premises; 1 p.m. June 11. Theft (shoplifting) ■ 1500 block, K St.; store; 4 p.m. June 9. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1500 block, O St.; street; 5 p.m. June 5. ■ 2100 block, N St.; parking lot; 1 p.m. June 7. ■ 1700 block, P St.; street; 8 p.m. June 8. ■ 1500 block, 22nd St.; street; 10 p.m. June 9. ■ Unspecified location; street;

6:40 a.m. June 11. 1000 block, New Hampshire Ave.; street; 4 p.m. June 11. ■ 1500 block, P St.; street; 11:30 p.m. June 11. ■

PSA 303

PSA 303 ■ ADAMS MORGAN Robbery (carjacking) ■ 2200 block, 18th St.; alley; 2:20 a.m. June 11. Robbery (gun) ■ 1600 block, Fuller St.; street; 4:20 p.m. June 8. Robbery (force and violence) ■ 17th Street and Kalorama Road; sidewalk; 11 p.m. June 6. ■ 2400 block, 17th St.; sidewalk; 12:08 a.m. June 8. Assault with a dangerous weapon (knife) ■ 1600 block, Columbia Road; sidewalk; 3:20 p.m. June 6. Burglary ■ 1900 block, Calvert St.; residence; 10:30 p.m. June 6. Theft (tags) ■ 1800 block, Calvert St.; street; 11 a.m. June 7. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1700 block, Lanier Place; alley; 8 p.m. June 5. ■ 2300 block, Champlain St.; parking lot; 6 p.m. June 6.

PSA PSA 307 307

■ LOGAN CIRCLE

Robbery (fear and violence) ■ 13th and Q streets; sidewalk; 2:12 a.m. June 11. Robbery (pocketbook snatch) ■ 14th and Church streets; street; 8:10 p.m. June 9. ■ 900 block, M St.; street; 2:10 p.m. June 10. Assault with a dangerous weapon ■ 1400 block, N St.; sidewalk; 6:30 p.m. June 6. Burglary ■ 1400 block, N St.; public housing; 2:25 p.m. June 8. ■ 1300 block, 14th St.; store; 12:35 a.m. June 7. ■ 900 block, M St.; residence; 9 a.m. June 9. Stolen auto ■ 1400 block, R St.; street; 12:30 p.m. June 7. Breaking and entering (vending) ■ 1000 block, M St.; unspecified premises; 2 p.m. June 9. Theft from auto (below $250) ■ 1300 block, L St.; street; 8 p.m. June 5. ■ 12th and O streets; street; 5:10 p.m. June 6. ■ 13th and N streets; street; midnight June 7. ■ 900 block, L St.; street; 1:30 pm. June 7. ■ 1400 block, 11th St.; parking lot; 10:30 p.m. June 8. ■ 1500 block, Kingman Place; street; 4:25 p.m. June 9. ■ 13th and Riggs streets; street; noon June 10. ■ 1500 block, Kingman Place; street; 11:30 p.m. June 10. ■ 1300 block, Rhode Island Ave.; street; 12:01 a.m. June 11.


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THE CURRENT

BUSES From Page 1 to the route being eliminated.â&#x20AC;? Mayor Vincent Grayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s original budget proposed cutting all three bus routes to reduce the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s subsidy to the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority. The Transportation Department had suggested cutting the K1 route because it serves the soon-to-close Walter Reed Army Medical Center, and the E6 and N8 routes because they have low ridership numbers. The N8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which runs from Glover Park along New Mexico and Massachusetts

STUDY From Page 1 of the top 12 slots in that category. Consortium members employ about 16,000 D.C. residents directly, the study found, with school spending supporting another 5,000 positions. The lesson, said study author Stephen S. Fuller at a June 2 news conference feting the document, is clear: University growth can only help the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s economy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where does future growth come from?â&#x20AC;? he asked. The heyday of federal spending is past, he said; rather, higher-education institutes can be the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;engines of growthâ&#x20AC;? if â&#x20AC;&#x153;these universities are encouraged to enlarge their capacities to produce more workers.â&#x20AC;? But those are fighting words to some District residents who are now pushing back against school expansion plans around the city. Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s neighbors have thronged recent zoning hearings to tell the city that the school should grow no further unless it establishes a satellite campus. Residents near American University have opposed that schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans to build dormitories on a large parking lot on Nebraska Avenue and to relocate the law school to a spot off Tenley Circle. Nan Wells, an advisory neighborhood commissioner in Spring Valley and a founding member of the District-Wide Coalition of University Neighborhoods, said estimates of schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; positive impacts often miss the big picture. Neighbors of the proposed law school and Nebraska Avenue dormitories are concerned about a drop in property values, she said. Such a change would impact the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tax rolls, she noted, as could the growth of tax-exempt universities that buy up now-taxable property. And the cost to neighborhood character is hard to measure, Wells said. Chris Lane, an economist and neighbor of the proposed American University law school location, argued in a letter to the Zoning Commission that the snarled traffic many residents expect to result from the development could drive down area values by $5 to $10 million. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a close negative correlation between the volume of traffic and the value of housing,â&#x20AC;? he wrote. Georgetown University neighbors have raised similar alarms. They worry about property value

avenues and then on Yuma Street to the Tenleytown Metro station â&#x20AC;&#x201D; averages 150 round-trip riders per day, less han the other two, according to Strauss. But this spring residents thronged advisory neighborhood commission and Metro meetings to protest the cut of the E6. Gary Thompson, who chairs the Chevy Chase neighborhood commission, said in his five years in office he has â&#x20AC;&#x153;never seen an issue where the constituents â&#x20AC;Ś were so united.â&#x20AC;? He said the bus route is vital for students traveling to Deal Middle School and Wilson High School and elderly residents of the Knollwood home heading to doctors in Friendship Heights.

declines due to student group homes in the residential neighborhood. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People are moving out and they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to live on the west side [of Wisconsin Avenue] anymore,â&#x20AC;? testified one university neighbor at a recent zoning hearing for the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 campus plan. But homes in that area still command top dollar â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even if buyers are sometimes investors looking to rent to university students. One remedy to tax-exempt schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; problematic impacts, say Wells and others, including Ward 3 Council member Mary Cheh, is a payment in lieu of taxes. Other schools, including Harvard and Yale universities, use that mechanism to funnel money to municipalities for services such as fire protection and infrastructure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know why Washington has not done that yet,â&#x20AC;? said Wells, who formerly represented Princeton University. Area university officials have opposed the concept. Wells also pointed to a paper by economist Sol Shalit arguing against George Washington Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s divisive 2000 campus plan. An evaluation of university impacts should consider the costs any expansion would impose on a city, Shalit wrote in 2001, such as purchase of property to cater to short-term visitors and students â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who typically pay no income taxes. An analysis should examine the benefits of alternative development. The consortiumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s study sought to highlight equally hard-to-capture figures. About 90 percent of students at the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s universities moved to the city for school, the study reports. And many of them remain in town, earning incomes and paying taxes, after graduation. One of those transplants is Kris Hart, a 2005 George Washington University alumnus whose alma mater is now his landlord. Hart runs the Foggy Bottom Grocery on school property, as well as two other businesses. Together, his companies employ 70 people, he said. The balance likely lies somewhere between nurturing the universities and allowing unbridled growth, said Ed Lazere, executive director of the DC Fiscal Policy Institute. The city should clearly â&#x20AC;&#x153;listen to [the schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;] needs,â&#x20AC;? but â&#x20AC;&#x153;itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pretty obvious that D.C. will be a magnet for college-educated peopleâ&#x20AC;? whether or not the city â&#x20AC;&#x153;bends over backwardâ&#x20AC;? to accommodate the institutions, Lazere said.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

Many were unsatisfied with the Transportation Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suggestion to extend the M4 route to absorb a portion of the E6. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was half a solution and a bad one at that,â&#x20AC;? Thompson said, explaining that the new route would have been circuitous and would have removed the link to Friendship Heights. The response to the N8 cut was not as strong, but some said the route is essential for certain students and elderly riders. Glover Park advisory neighborhood commissioner Brian Cohen said transportation officials â&#x20AC;&#x153;received dozens of emails and letters in support of keeping the N8. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m mystified and angry that they did not pay heed.â&#x20AC;? The higher-performing K1 line, which

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averages 230 round-trip riders a day, is on the chopping block for a different reason: Its main source of riders, Walter Reed, is scheduled to close this fall. The K1 travels within the Walter Reed campus and along Georgia Avenue and Blair Road to the Takoma Metro station. Transportation officials said riders can use several other Georgia Avenue buses. The D.C. Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation committee and the transit authority recently agreed with the recommendation to discontinue the N8 and K1 but advised against cutting the E6. If the full Metro board adopts the proposals, Strauss said, the service changes would take effect on Sept. 25. The board is scheduled to vote on a final budget June 23.

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WomenÂ&#x2019;s Pelvic Health New Solutions for Bladder and Bowel Control When: Thursday, June 16, 2011 6:00 p.m.

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8

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

G

THE GEORGETOWN

CURRENT

Davis Kennedy/Publisher & Editor Chris Kain/Managing Editor

Sounding the alarm At one point in the 1990s, the District’s desperate financial woes sidelined half of the fire department’s fleet of truck-and-ladder units, with two of the three Ward 3 trucks out of commission for about two months. Meanwhile, the department’s three reserve units were prone to breaking down. The problem, according to the fire chief at the time, had been years in the making. Budget cuts had led the Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department to slow down replacement of vehicles — something that might have made sense on paper but had potentially deadly consequences. With such troubling history in mind, we are worried about reports of a maintenance backlog leaving many aging ambulances and fire trucks out of service. While union leaders warn of the potential for slower response times, Assistant Chief Kenneth Jackson sought to offer reassurance: The problem won’t delay response to the most critical emergencies, because it is mostly limited to ambulance transport units, he said. That’s heartening, but hardly satisfying. It’s obviously essential that firefighters and paramedics be able to respond immediately to emergencies. But even if they’re on the scene promptly, they can only do so much to save lives unless there’s a way to get the victim or victims to a hospital. While department officials say any delays are limited to noncritical patients, we worry of a greater impact if the maintenance backlog grows any more severe. And the union has raised another troubling aspect: Leaders say that many ambulances don’t have working air conditioning — an inconvenience to the medics, but a major risk for sick or injured patients. As of last Thursday, ambulances stationed at 4930 Connecticut Ave. NW and 2225 M St. NW were among nine without air conditioning. The D.C. Council Committee on Public Safety and the Judiciary needs to hold a public hearing soon to delineate the scope of problems associated with maintenance and repair of the department’s emergency vehicles — and to ensure that the situation is resolved. Budget shortfalls are not an excuse to put lives at risk.

A better way to pay Starting next month, D.C. drivers will be able to pay by cellphone at the 17,000-odd on-street parking meters in the city, putting a halt to the raiding of change jars and begging of shop clerks to acquire the pounds of quarters needed to park in the city. Thank goodness. While we’re thrilled to hear the new system will be up and running in less than a month, we’re still smarting from the 2009 decision to raise the fees from $1 to $2 while not providing alternative means for payment at all meters. Pilot programs to pay by credit card and phone were great — in the areas they covered. But at too many spots throughout the city, drivers had to have 16 quarters on hand just to park for the allotted two hours. We actually don’t have a problem with the higher fee in concept. Proponents say increasing the cost of driving promotes the use of alternative transportation options, and that’s a good thing for the local environment and traffic. And $2 per hour seems reasonable, compared with the $10 and more that some garages charge. But implementing the increase without expanding payment options discourages drivers from choosing metered spaces. That can only increase parking woes on residential roads, or lead shoppers and diners to bypass downtown. And despite our enthusiasm for the pay-by-phone program, we’re troubled to learn that the city will charge a fee for each transaction. That just seems greedy. We assume the fee is meant to cover the cost of operating the program, but we think the $2-an-hour meter payments should be sufficient. It’s this sort of nickel-and-diming that infuriates residents; wise leaders would avoid the unnecessary wrath.

THE CURRENT

Ethics for dummies …

O

n Kojo Nnamdi’s “The Politics Hour” Friday on WAMU, D.C. Attorney General Irvin Nathan was blunt. “When we talk about diverting over $300,000 of District grant funds for personal use of a public official,” he said of the scandal enveloping Ward 5 D.C. Council member Harry “Tommy” Thomas, “that implicates a host of criminal statutes both in the D.C. Code and the federal criminal code.” Nathan added, “We thought that the U.S. Attorney’s Office should examine this matter and determine whether there are criminal violations.” Nathan also made news by saying he wished he had the authority to bring criminal charges himself in such matters. He said he’s already seeking that authority from Congress. Nathan’s tough talk is just one shoe dropping in what could be a centipede’s worth regarding the city government’s ethics problems. On Monday, the council took its first public stab at rewriting ethics provisions. Again, at this hearing, Nathan was blunt. He said the council’s proposed bill should drop provisions creating a new agency and instead strengthen offices that already exist. Those agencies include Nathan’s office, the Office of Campaign Finance, the Office of the Inspector General and the Office of the D.C. Auditor. Ward 3 Council member Mary Cheh’s initial bill, Nathan said, “would create a redundant bureaucratic apparatus that would lead to expensive duplication of efforts, potential conflicts and unnecessary delays.” What’s needed is clarity in the law, tougher enforcement, quicker enforcement and real consequences. But it’s hard to legislate what should be common sense. If you use government funds — attention Council member Thomas — you ought to make certain they’re not used to your personal benefit. If someone offers you cash in an envelope — attention Council member Jim Graham — you might say you prefer a check so you can properly report it as a donation to your constituent service fund or campaign. And that goes for cash that’s not in an envelope, too. (You have to be pretty specific

in these instructions, sad to say.) If someone in your campaign offers cash or checks to another candidate — attention Mayor Vincent Gray — you should dismiss that campaign staffer no matter what the reason, and have authorities make sure no law was broken. If you want to do something on the edge, something that’s questionable or a mental tossup, you might consider how it would look in the blogosphere, on the front page of the newspapers or on a television broadcast. Ward 4 Council member Muriel Bowser added her own dose of common sense at Monday’s hearing. “I think it should be clear, though, and clearly stated, that a lot of the allegations that are swirling around our District building now are already against the law,” she said. “So while we are all eager to make sure the law is strong and loopholes are closed, we must all remind ourselves that we have already have sworn an oath to be highly ethical.” And finally, attention everyone! We’d like to add our observation that ethical behavior is the result of not just a set of laws but also a state of mind. ■ Ethics overtakes policing. The Notebook had said we would return this week to the subject of police power abuses in the region, but the ethics storm overtook that issue. We’re sadly certain that there will be additional opportunities to return to the subject of overly aggressive policing. ■ A photo finish. We couldn’t help noticing how the nation was captivated in recent days by two sets of photographs. There were (and still are) the grossly personal photos of Rep. Andrew Weiner, D-N.Y., tripping around Twitter for all to see. Weiner will come to wish that his computer had crashed before they got out. Now, it’s his career that’s crashed. The second set was heartwarming images of Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., recovering from the Arizona shootings. It’s a tough road back, and it’s clear she may not make it all the way to Congress. At this writing, both Weiner and Giffords have said they want to return to their congressional duties. We hope one of them succeeds. Tom Sherwood, a Southwest resident, is a political reporter for News 4.

TOM SHERWOOD’S

NOTEBOOK

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Letters misleading on D.C. tax impact It is difficult to feel sympathy for the letter writers who decry the proposed D.C. tax shift to eliminate the exemption for income from other jurisdictions’ bonds. These letters portray the sad situation of the retiree on a fixed income who presumably will be impoverished. Sorry, no sale. Any person sophisticated enough to own such bonds to get high tax-sheltered yields was presumably told by his or her broker that the federal and local tax exemptions in place at the time of purchase were subject to change. Now these people are trying to get us to eliminate a risk they willingly took. The letter asserting the relatively low level of D.C. taxes was even more unfortunate, at least based on my understanding of the situation. The writer cited Tax

Foundation’s calculation that D.C. taxes are now less in terms of per capita income than in the past, and indeed less than the national average. But this has little meaning, since the 50 states’ statistics include taxes paid by their business sectors, while in D.C.’s case, the primary employer (the federal government) pays no local taxes. Rather, its payments come in the form of grants and government services that it performs for D.C. A true comparison would add in these subsidies. Yes, D.C. property taxes historically have been low, given the extremely high income and sales taxes we pay. However, what the city calls an assessment adjustment — really an extended tax increase — is changing this situation. My own property taxes doubled between 2000 and 2010. They now are going up 10 percent per year and therefore will soon be triple. The letter asserts that D.C. property taxes as a percentage of median income also ranked low, but this is based on total property tax collections. The

extraordinary tax holidays given to the Marriott Corp. and others will continue to hold total receipts down even as the taxes paid by D.C. residents escalate. According to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, D.C. per capita income increased 75 percent from 2000 to 2010, while the country grew 34 percent. The resulting increase in income and tax yields, combined with the accelerating increases in property taxes paid by residents, should have provided more than enough ongoing revenue to fully fund all D.C. programs. This obviously has not happened, and the many charities to which I have donated over the years are sending out appeals for increased donations to replace lost city support. We residents deserve a better accounting of where these funds have gone, as well as why, despite an ongoing transfer of resources from residents’ pockets to the city treasury, the District cannot provide for those in need. Vic Miller Washington Heights


THE CURRENT

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

D.C. deserves wide search for chancellor VIEWPOINT TERRY LYNCH

I

have been a public school parent for 14 years. Like any parent, I expect the best for my children — nothing less than excellence will do. Given that, it’s clear to me as the school year comes to a close that Kaya Henderson, during her eight months as interim and acting D.C. Public Schools chancellor, has shown she is not the best person to lead our schools. Ms. Henderson has failed — in actions both big and small — to show that she should be entrusted with moving our schools forward on a permanent basis. In January it became known that D.C. high schools had not received their 2010-11 sports allocations. Teams and coaches had to labor with used equipment and uniforms, and they had no funds to start new sports. Despite being made aware of the situation, the interim chancellor failed to act until press reports on the equipment shortage and the city’s failure to pay coaches and athletic directors made the situation a public embarrassment. This year’s sports funds were released to the high schools some time in March — too late for schools to utilize them effectively for fall, winter and, to some extent, spring sports. Additionally, acting Chancellor Henderson has missed a number of important events sponsored by D.C. Public Schools. She did not attend the school system’s first-ever High School Open House Fair at the newly renovated Eastern High School last fall, an event that drew many prospective parents. On the same day and at the same location, two of our city’s great schools — Bell Multicultural and Wilson high schools — had teams competing for both the boys and girls soccer championships, after which trophies were awarded. Yet the chancellor was not present to congratulate our student athletes — both boys and girls — upon their stellar accomplishments. In January, D.C. Public Schools invited the leadership of the local school advisory teams to a meeting to explain the upcoming budget process, expected to be one of great difficulty given the city’s $400 million projected budget gap at the time. Parent leaders from

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Leaders should show strong code of ethics Vincent Gray, Kwame Brown, Michael Brown, Harry Thomas Jr., Marion Barry — what a collection of thieves, tax cheats and liars we have leading us. Is it any wonder people down in the ranks, like Harriette Walters, think they can steal millions and get away with it? We desperately need a strong code of ethics, one with some teeth, that applies to everyone and contains serious sanctions for bad behavior. William Herron Dupont Circle

Neighbors working to keep local character Mr. Neil Meyer’s letter to the editor [“Some Tenleytown residents back plan,” May 25] in

around the city showed up at the school system’s headquarters, but Henderson was again not present; instead, aides and assistants explained the expected budget process to the engaged parents assembled. D.C. Council Chairman Kwame Brown held a hearing in Ward 8 this spring on Henderson’s nomination to hear from the public about her appointment by the mayor for the permanent position — and, once again, the nominee could not make it to hear in person from the public she would be serving. The school system’s budget was released in early March, at least six weeks later than parents had been told it would be released. Despite promises that money had been found for schools, up to 40 percent of schools would suffer budget cutbacks under the chancellor’s and mayor’s proposal. School Without Walls, a magnet academic high school that prepares students from all eight wards to excel at the best of colleges, found its budget cut by $2,000 per pupil and was also faced with an enrollment increase of more than 10 percent! The school will have more students, larger class sizes, fewer teachers and staff, and yet still be expected to improve on prior-year test scores. It has long played an important role as a public alternative to the impressive array of educational programs offered by the city’s top private schools and the many magnet schools in surrounding counties. That role will become much harder under the proposed budget. The school system is at a critical juncture. After the tremendous, frenetic change both in terms of facilities and programs brought by former Chancellor Michelle Rhee and former Mayor Adrian Fenty, things could easily stall, or even fall back. We need a chancellor who is better than (and different from, in many respects) Michelle Rhee — someone who can engage both parents and teachers, understand and implement budgets, and adopt the best educational practices. Without any national search, Mayor Vincent Gray has nominated a person who was vetted almost solely by Ms. Henderson’s predecessor and mentor, Michelle Rhee. I maintain that is not enough. Our children deserve the best possible candidate to fulfill and complete school reform in Washington, D.C. Terry Lynch is a Mount Pleasant resident.

response to our earlier letter on American University’s plans for the Tenley Campus [“Neighbors oppose plan, not university,” May 11] is misleading on several points. If our neighborhood was against growth and change, the new library, the Cityline condominium addition to and commercial revitalization of the historic Sears building, and the impressive addition to Janney Elementary never would have been realized. We are part of a vocal majority who live within 200 feet of the Tenley Campus and will be most directly affected by the university’s proposed development of this site. Approximately 150 neighbors have signed the Tenley Campus Neighbors Association petition opposing the university’s plans. Mr. Meyer might want to consult the association’s website to see how the neighborhood really feels. We have owned our homes since before American University acquired the Tenley property. We were involved in the 1986 agree-

ment between Advisory Neighborhood Commission 3E and the university, which was negotiated to limit new construction on the site. We have been active on these issues for 25 years. The neighborhood and the Tenley Campus Neighbors Association have worked hard to enforce city zoning regulations, to encourage the neighborhood commission and the university to work in good faith with the neighborhood, and to recognize the intent of the 1986 agreement. Those efforts are hardly “knee-jerk reactions and legalistic arguments.” It is unfortunate that Mr. Meyer chose to express his views on what he considers the merits of the university’s plan for the Tenley Campus by criticizing the motivation of neighbors who have worked for so long to preserve the residential character of this neighborhood. Anthony Byrne Wesley Egan Tenleytown

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR The Current publishes letters and Viewpoint submissions representing various points of view. Because of space limitations, letters should be no more than 400 words and are subject to editing. Letters and Viewpoint submissions intended for publication should be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Current, Post Office Box 40400, Washington, D.C. 20016-0400. You may send e-mail to letters@currentnewspapers.com.

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10 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

THE CURRENT

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Portraits Conferences Events Publicity

CREATIVE IMAGES Y H P A R G O PHOT

In Your Neighborhood ANC 2E ANC 2E Georgetown â&#x2013;  GEORGETOWN / CLOISTERS Cloisters BURLEITH / HILLANDALE The commission will meet at 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, July 5, at Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School, 1524 35th St. NW. The commission adjusted its normal schedule because the meeting would otherwise occur on Independence Day. For details, call 202-724-7098 or visit anc2e.com. ANC 3B ANCPark 3B Glover â&#x2013;  GLOVER PARK/CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS The commission will meet at 7 p.m. July 14 at Stoddert Elementary School and Recreation Center, 4001 Calvert St. NW. For details, call 202-338-2969, contact info@anc3b.org or visit anc3b.org.

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ANC 3C ANC 3C Cleveland Park â&#x2013;  CLEVELAND PARK / WOODLEY PARK Woodley Park MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE HEIGHTS Massachusetts Avenue Heights CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. June 20 at the 2nd District Police Headquarters, 3320 Idaho Ave. NW. Agenda items include: â&#x2013;  consent-calendar approval of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application by National Cathedral School for permission to increase the number of faculty members. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Historic Preservation Review Board application for a landscape plan for the Beauvoir School. â&#x2013;  consideration of a Board of Zoning Adjustment application by Chipotle for a special exception to operate a restaurant at 3420 Connecticut Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public-space application by Medium Rare restaurant for a sidewalk cafe at 3500 Connecticut Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of an Alcoholic Beverage Control application by Lillies Cafe for a liquor license at 2915 Connecticut Ave. â&#x2013;  consideration of a public-space application by Cathedral Commons at 3336 Wisconsin Ave. For details, call 202-657-5725 or visit anc3c.org. ANC 3D ANCValley 3D Spring â&#x2013;  SPRING VALLEY/WESLEY HEIGHTS Wesley Heights PALISADES/KENT/FOXHALL At the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s June 1 meeting: â&#x2013;  commissioner Tom Smith asked neighbors to keep commissioner Lee Minichiello, who was recovering from a fall, in their thoughts and prayers. â&#x2013;  a Metropolitan Police Department lieutenant reported that area crime is down in every category but thefts. â&#x2013;  commissioner Tom Smith said an individual or group appears to be stealing stop signs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone seems to want them,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Four

Citizens Association of Georgetown Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t fret if you missed the May 22 installment of the Concerts in the Parks series, because youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got another chance this weekend. On Sunday, organizing committee members Dima Zalatimo, Dorothy Williams and Danielle Dooley will present the Mad Science Excavator Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Extravaganza, with Wes Tucker & the Skillets rocking Rose Park with their funk-inspired foot-stompers and soulful ballads. The fun will begin at 4:30 p.m., with the music kicking off around 5. Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day features will include â&#x20AC;&#x153;No. 1 Dadâ&#x20AC;? medals and craft tables to make Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day cards. We will have three-legged races, egg relays and a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dance with Dadâ&#x20AC;? competition. Fabulous prizes have been donated by Sherman Pickey, J. McLaughlin, Vineyard Vines and the Grooming Lounge. In addition, kids will get the chance to become mad scientists, with Rose Park transformed into a laboratory filled with crazy experiments, like slime making, insta-snow, and sun-sensitive paper. Then they can take off the lab coats, decorate their own construction hats and jump on the excavator stationed near the park. After the fun, kids can take a break for water, popcorn, hot dogs or pictures with dad courtesy of Nancy Taylor Bubes and Washington Fine Properties. Sothebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will provide snow cones and balloons. And Jetties, Häagen-Dazs and Sprinkles will provide their delicious sandwiches and treats. There will even be a grilled-cheese truck on hand for those who want to buy dinner. Something for everyone â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to say the least! Come celebrate Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day in Rose Park with neighbors, friends, activities and live music. And mark your calendars for our patriotic Fourth of July parade and the Image Band in Rose Park. See you Sunday! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jennifer Altemus have disappeared.â&#x20AC;? He said the signs have been stolen from 48th, Tilden and Rodman streets. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s particularly dangerous because itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a four-way stop at Tilden and 48th, and one of the signs was taken on 48th and one on Tilden.â&#x20AC;? Smith said the city had replaced them, but heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerned about safety if the vandalism continues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I could see a nice little accident happening,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x2013;  a representative from the Nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Triathlon gave a presentation about plans for the event on Sept. 11, which will benefit the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society and include swimming, biking and running components along the Potomac River and the National Mall. The commission had voted in November to support the triathlon. â&#x2013;  David Taylor, chief of staff to the president at American University, discussed recent amendments made to the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus plan. He said the university has reduced the square footage of the development plan by 18 percent and the number of beds by 24 percent. But commissioner Tom Smith expressed concern about the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s decision to increase surface parking, and he asked whether American anticipates adding more construction on those surfaces. University representative Jorge Abud said the school wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;precludingâ&#x20AC;? it. Commissioners also unanimously passed a motion objecting to a midblock traffic signal planned for Nebraska Avenue. â&#x2013;  Allison Prince, an attorney with Goulston & Storrs, gave a presentation about the Lab School of Washingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s application to make permanent a cap on students and staff at its Reservoir Road campus. In 2007, the Lab School received

permission from the Board of Zoning Adjustment to extend its cap from 310 to 330 for students, and from 95 to 182 for staff. The current cap is scheduled to expire on Feb. 12, 2012. As part of its approval, the zoning board required the Lab School to construct 43 angled parking spaces to be available to the public. It also required implementation of a traffic management plan. Prince said the school has complied with both requests and has spearheaded a series of strategies to reduce the number of trips to the school and parking spaces used. But commissioner Ann Heuer noted that since the cap was established, the Lab School has moved students to a new lower school campus at 1550 Foxhall Road. Making the cap at the upper school permanent, she said, could mean an increase in the total number of students and staff at the school. Heuer proposed approving the application to make the cap permanent on the condition that the Lab School continue its traffic management plan. She also asked that the new cap be identified explicitly as referring to the middle and high school on Reservoir Road. Commissioners passed the motion unanimously. â&#x2013;  commissioner Ann Haas provided an update on Georgetownâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10-year campus plan, which is now going through Zoning Commission hearings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The plans for this campus are enormous,â&#x20AC;? she said. The commission will meet at 7 p.m. July 6 in the new medical building at Sibley Memorial Hospital, 5215 Loughboro Road NW. For details, call 202-363-4130 or visit anc3d.org.


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June 15, 2011 ■ Page 11

ATHLETICS IN NORTHWEST WASHINGTON

Coolidge Colts strive for summer surge By BORIS TSALYUK Current Staff Writer

Matt Petros/The Current

Coolidge took the DCIAA West regular season title last year but couldn’t prevail in the league playoffs.

The Coolidge Colts haven’t won a D.C. Interscholastic Athletic Association title since 1998, and they watched rival Theodore Roosevelt take it on their own court last winter. But they’re hitting the ground running this summer with hopes of capturing the banner in 2012. Coolidge won the DCIAA West regular-season title last year but fell short in the semifinals of the league tournament, and coach Vaughn Jones knows there is plenty of room for improvement moving forward. So far this summer, he said, players are meeting his expectations. “They’re working hard, running, lifting weights in the gym,” said Jones, who was a standout player at DeMatha. “Probably 90 percent [also] play [Amateur Athletic Union], so they’re getting a lot of basketball games in this summer.” The Colts are again competing in the Nike Elite Youth Summer League, which is playing its games at DeMatha Catholic High School, Hyattsville, Md., for the first time this year. Jones said his guys can’t relax this summer — they have to take advantage of any chance they get to play. “If you have any aspiration of being a college player, basketball is pretty much all-yearround,” he said. After losing their first three contests in a league that kicked off on June 3, the Colts bounced back with a victory over Sidwell Friends on Sunday. In that contest, Khalen Cumberlander led

the way with 12 points, and the team played tenacious defense en route to a 59-47 win. “We’re a smaller team, so we want to use our aggressiveness with our defense to make it an up-tempo game,” Coolidge assistant coach Sammy Briggs said after the win. “The guys played good defense and shared the ball.” One of the improvements the team is looking for this summer, Jones said, is at “the most important position on the court” — point guard. The squad is hoping that rising sophomores Omar Roberts and Jaycee Wright will take their respective games to another level with more court time in the coming months. Coolidge will take on 2011 Prince George’s County champion Friendly in its next game, at DeMatha on Saturday. “Right now it’s just about us being consistent and improving each week during the summer league,” said assistant coach Briggs. Sidwell, meanwhile, is competing in two leagues this summer — the Nike Elite league and The Rock at High Point High School in Beltsville, Md. The defending Mid-Atlantic Athletic Conference champion has the potential to dominate the conference next year behind standout guards Jamal Lewis, a rising senior, and Matt Hillman, a rising junior. The Quakers beat Friendly in their first game at DeMatha on Friday before falling to Coolidge Sunday despite Alexander Gamble’s game-high 14 points. Nike Elite league games will be

played Friday through Sunday at DeMatha through July 17, with the championship and all-star game on July 18. The Rock hosts games Monday through Friday and will conclude its playoffs on July 21.

Schedule The Rock Summer League (High Point High School, Beltsville, Md.) • St. John’s vs. DuVal, Thursday, 6:40 p.m. • Gonzaga vs. Bishop McNamara, Thursday 9 p.m. • Sidwell vs. Riverdale Baptist, Friday, 9 p.m. • Gonzaga vs. Churchill, Monday, 9 p.m. • Sidwell vs. Long Reach (Columbia, Md.), Tuesday, 6:40 p.m.

Nike Elite Summer League (DeMatha High School, Hyattsville, Md.) • Sidwell vs. H.D. Woodson, Friday, 6 p.m. • Coolidge vs. Friendly, Saturday, 12:30 p.m. • Sidwell vs. McNamara, Saturday, 2 p.m. • Coolidge vs. Cesar Chavez, Sunday, 12:30 p.m.

Safety in numbers: Pools seek record By JULIA FISHER Current Correspondent

The D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation took part yesterday in an effort to set the Guinness World Record for the world’s largest swimming lesson. The previous record was set June 3, 2010, when almost 4,000 people in 34 states and five countries participated in the same lesson at the same time in a collaboration arranged by The World’s Largest Swimming Lesson, the same organization responsible for yesterday’s event. Three D.C. pools participated in the attempt: the Wilson Aquatic Center, the Upshur Outdoor Pool and the Deanwood Aquatic Center. No one arriving at Wilson for the 11 a.m. event yesterday would have suspected any record-breaking efforts. Although parks depart-

ment spokesperson John Stokes expected about 25 people at each location, only 10 attended at Wilson. The theory behind the collaboration is that hundreds of locations around the world hold lessons with the same curriculum at the same time; there is no actual connection between the events occurring in each place. Yesterday’s lesson, which lasted 45 minutes, aimed to teach general water safety. Each location provided its own instructors. Wilson’s lesson was held in the smaller of its two pools. Of the 10 people who participated, two were adults, one was an au pair with two small children, and the rest were school-age children. Ke’Shawna Howard, 12, said she went to the pool because she couldn’t go on Deal Middle School’s trip to King’s Dominion, and she learned about the lesson

only after she arrived. “At first I didn’t want to do it,” she said, “but then they told me I couldn’t come in here unless I did it. I just wanted to swim.” This is the first year D.C. participated in the event. “It’s really to bring a focus to the importance of learning how to swim,” said Stokes. He learned about the effort pretty late but was eager to join in. “We were looking to do anything and everything we could to bring safety to the DPR,” Stokes said. Stokes said he hoped students across the city would want to learn more after taking part. “It’s all about spreading the word,” he said. “The hook is that it’s a Guinness World Records event, but the underlying thing is that it’s a way to learn how to swim.” The three teachers at Wilson explained general pool safety rules before teaching participants how to

Matt Petros/The Current

Three D.C. pools took part yesterday in a worldwide attempt to set a Guinness World Record for the world’s largest swimming lesson. reel in a drowning swimmer with a floatation device, how to enter and exit the pool, and how to float. Vigdis Syderbow, an au pair from Denmark, arrived at the pool with two children in her care. “We just want [sic] to go to the pool,

and then they had this, so why not?” Syderbow said. “I rescued the lady!” said Genevieve, who is 3. She pulled another participant, who was playing the role of a drowning victim, to safety.


12 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

THE CURRENT

Spotlight on Schools Next were the farewell messages. The graduates talked about what it meant to them to spend years in the school. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as emotional as last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. Then we watched a slide show of the graduatesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lives. After they were awarded their diplomas, the ceremony was over, and there was a reception. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Ariel Garfield, fifth-grader, and Lukas Leijon, fourth-grader

Aidan Montessori School On June 8, Evan Manuel, Payton McCarty-Simas and Blaire Hardison graduated from Aidan Montessori School. First, the brass quintet played. Next the assistant head of school,

School DISPATCHES Mrs. Smith, greeted everyone. Then there was a greeting from the head of the board, Mr. Kay. At the graduation, alumni Sam Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien and Maggie Nixon spoke about two teachers who are changing the classes they teach. Mrs. Minardi, the head of school, spoke about what it means to be leaving elementary school and going to middle school. After that, it was Mrs. Mosherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn to speak. She spoke about what the graduates will be in the future. She predicted that Evan will become a third baseman with the Nationals and then retire to become head of the Nature Conservancy. Blaire will be a fashion designer and have a line of travel clothing, dancewear and sportswear. Payton will be a book reviewer and branch out to translate books into three modern languages and three ancient languages. After that, the Aidan elementary chorus sang multiple songs, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;White Choral Bellsâ&#x20AC;?; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visit Soon,â&#x20AC;? inspired by â&#x20AC;&#x153;Be Back Soonâ&#x20AC;? from â&#x20AC;&#x153;Oliverâ&#x20AC;?; a Spanish song; and a Chinese song.

British School of Washington Looking back on the school year, what we enjoyed most was participating in the secondaryschool production. We performed â&#x20AC;&#x153;Return to the Forbidden Planetâ&#x20AC;? on Feb. 16, 17 and 18 and was a great success. We got a standing ovation all three nights! The play is a sci-fi version of William Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Tempest.â&#x20AC;? It is about a ship that, while flying through a storm of asteroids, crashes into a planet called Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Illyria. Everyone on board is confused because the planet is not on the charts. After the crash, a face pops up on an onboard screen, and the captain of the ship, Captain Tempest, recognizes the person as Prospero. Prospero is a mad scientist who created a life-changing potion. As Prospero comes aboard the ship, he notices that the new science officer is a wife who betrayed him some 15 years ago. The pupils in the play made many of the props and scenery, like

SPORTSPHOTOS From Previous CURRENT NEWSPAPERS Photos are available from www.mattpetros.zenfolio.com

British School of Washington A World Class Learning School

Congratulations to the Class of 2011 Abdulaziz Alhusainan Jonathan Gass Matthew Hardy Copernicus Brown Hafiz Haris Olivia Cannon Blake Herendeen Lauren Chivers Matthew Kearns Andy Diaz James Lewin-Smith Dakota Freeman

Ben Pilbeam Bijan Razzaghi Samuel Reid Anna Saksa Otto Saksa Anya Warnke Gregory Williams

Acceptances at the following places (by country) Canada: Toronto University. McGill University United Kingdom: University of Durham, University of St Andrews, University of Reading, East Anglia University, Sussex University, University of Cumbria, Aston University, Bangor University, University of Wales Newport, University of Wales ,QVWLWXWH&DUGLII6KHIÂżHOG+DOODP8QLYHUVLW\ USA: Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), University of Maryland, St Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College, Maryland Goucher College 2001 Wisconsin Ave NW | Washington DC 20007 | (202) 829-3700 britishschoolofwashington.org

the ray guns used by Cookie the cook and Arial the robot. Many of you may know some of the songs we danced to, including numbers like â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wipeout,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Balls of Fireâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Monster Mash.â&#x20AC;? We all enjoyed the play very much and still remember performing. It was worth the hard work. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Phoebe Sullivan, Natasha Rawlings and Holly Callow, Year 8 Houston (seventh-graders)

Hyde-Addison Elementary In May, the third-graders went on a field trip. Since we had been studying Washington, D.C., in social studies and inventions in science, we went to visit the Washington Monument. The students went to the very top of the monument! We could see the whole city from the different windows. Some students thought the best part was when they were coming down in the elevator and got to see the rocks that each state had given. While some students were going to the top of the monument, a park ranger taught the other students about Benjamin Banneker. The ranger had us build walls like people did long ago. We learned how Banneker surveyed the land to know where to build the wall. We used a special compass to help us see the person who was holding the chain down the way. It was trickier than it seemed. When we returned to Hyde, we couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop talking about all we had seen! â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Alicia Colomer, third-grader

Jewish Primary Day School Field Day was at Meadowbrook Park on May 27. In the morning we made our class signs to hold. We made a class cheer. We got points for cooperation and sportsmanship. There were lots of games. In the morning we played mini-golf, cap-

ture the flag, big-ball soccer and many more games on the dry ground. We had different games for different ages. In the afternoon we had water play. We had water balloons, wet dodge balls, hoses and water guns. We had kids vs. teacher tug-of-war contests. Then we had to present our class cheers and signs. We all got personalized Field Day Frisbees. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Elianna Israel, fourth-grader On May 31, Jewish Primary Day School parent Shelly Kupfer talked to the fifth grade about how she helped a group of Ethiopian Jews go to Israel in 2007. First, she told us how she traveled to Ethiopia to help Ethiopian immigrants. She told us that the Ethiopians lived in their homeland. They did not have real buildings for school. They had four pillars and a hay roof, but no walls. Then she told us how people were picked to go to Israel. She helped teach the people who were chosen how to use household appliances like refrigerators and ovens that they had never seen before. She told us about getting on the plane from Ethiopia to Israel. After she and her group arrived, they went to a building where Ethiopians learn Hebrew and about Israeli life. The Ethiopians lived there for two years. After their education on life in Israel, they were free to live their new lives. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Daniel Ingber, fifth-grader

Parkmont School This year, chemistry began as it should, with the basics and fundamentals of the subject. We learned about matter, and how it makes up pretty much everything around us, then gradually moved toward studying measurements and how to accurately record data. During our second week of class we completed our first chemistry lab, one that focused on taking down different measurements. Things got a little complicated when we moved to the periodic table, but Sean was a great teacher and was always happy to answer our questions. Soon we learned about the composition of atoms and about all the different ways to identify and define elements. The first major test we took was pretty difficult, but we had a great review packet, which made it relatively easy to study. We then began learning about different types of chemical bonding, and we ended up drawing many different types of diagrams for each type of bond. Homework was never too stressful, bookwork was always pretty easy, and Seanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worksheets were always thorough and well-explained. It also helped that we went over the homework the next day in class to make sure we understood the material. For the end-of-the-year project, we were given the option of choosing any element in the periodic table and then completing a poster with all of its information. All in all, chemistry has been difficult, but

always fun. Sean has really focused on making sure we understood everything being taught. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Zoe Hoffman, 10th-grader

St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s College High School St. Johnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s has a variety of summer programs. One of the classes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the most unique â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is Introduction to Film. It is focused on the fact that movies are now a big part of our culture alongside books, music and other forms of art. Over the course of about two weeks, the students will watch some of the greatest movies of all time. After watching each film, the class will go on to discuss the symbols, story, characters and other parts of the movie. Then, at the end of the two weeks, the whole class will go down to the Uptown Theatre and watch a movie of its choice on the big screen. Also, the students will write a paper on movies and how they are a relevant art form today. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Emmett Cochetti, 10th-grader

School Without Walls On Wednesday, a band of School Without Walls students took Metrorail to Garrison Elementary School. A Ward 2 meeting about the school system was being held there, and acting Chancellor Kaya Henderson was scheduled to attend. The students went to protest the shrinking of the Walls budget. Among other things, seniors would get a new counselor for the second year in a row. At least three teachers would have to be cut. The sticking point is that the administrative budget (the budget for D.C. Public Schools employees who work at the central office and do not teach any students) was increased for next year. The Walls students carried signs, a written statement of objections and a petition with more than 300 signatures. Hopefully, all this will produce a positive change for Walls next year. Other than that, last week was mostly about finishing things up. For seniors, clearance sheets had to be signed. They were handed out on Tuesday, and by the end of the day on Thursday they were supposed to be finished. (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finishedâ&#x20AC;? means all the studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; teachers from this year had signed it, plus the heads of all the academic departments, and miscellaneous others like the nurse and each studentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s counselor.) For all the other grades, finishing up meant having one last test or presenting final projects. From personal experience, I can say that most of the projects were done last week. No one had time to do them before because students were busy studying for finals. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Lillian Audette, 12th-grader

Sheridan School Sheridan Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s kindergartners have been doing â&#x20AC;&#x153;trashwalksâ&#x20AC;? to keep the environment clean. A See Dispatches/Page 27


The People and Places of Northwest Washington

June 15, 2011 ■ Page 13

Students expose lost libraries, defunct doors By JESSICA GOULD Current Staff Writer

A

t Washington Metropolitan High School in LeDroit Park, the library’s shelves are empty and piles of books line the floors. There’s no librarian, and even the room’s doorknob is broken. “It’s a mess,” said junior Joshua Elliot. And it’s a metaphor. “It needs to be fixed just like the education system.” For months, Elliot and dozens of other D.C. Public Schools students have worked with the D.C.based nonprofit Critical Exposure to bring renewed focus to problems that plague public education. They took pictures of filthy lockers, broken clocks and empty bulletin boards. Now they’re using the photos to effect real change on their campuses. After all, Elliot said, “A picture is worth a thousand words.” And that, said Critical Exposure executive director Adam Levner, is what the organization’s mission is all about. Since 2004, Critical Exposure has been working with students to chronicle their lives through a series of snapshots. The organization equips students with cameras, teaches them photography techniques, and encourages them to document the issues that are important to them.

It has worked with approximately a thousand students across the country in an effort to bring arts and advocacy to low-income communities. “I really hope that students feel more comfortable as artists and using that as a form of expression, because many students don’t have access to the arts,” Levner said. He said the organization chose photography as a medium because it’s accessible. “We’ve all taken photographs, so it’s not very intimidating to students when you hand them a camera,” he said. Plus, he said, “It’s really powerful. People internalize what

Photos by students in Critical Exposure

Critical Exposure helps students document problems at their schools. Washington Metropolitan High School ninthgrader Diamond shot the school’s defunct library, top; Roosevelt High School 11th-grader Jacquan focused on students entering through the school’s rear, left; and Roosevelt 11th-grader Corey captured the unused front.

they’ve seen.” But Levner said the goal is as much about agency as it is about aesthetics. “They have a voice that they can use to change the world around them,” he said. “When they see injustice, they have the tools

they need to make that world better.” So the photographs of facilities quickly morphed into movements. At Roosevelt High School, students used photographs of classmates entering the school’s back door as part of a campaign to get officials to reopen the school’s grand entrance. “Because of the heritage of the

students — we have a highly diverse population of mainly minorities — we deserve the ability to use the front door,” said Roosevelt student and photographer Jacquan Clark. “It’s more dignified than using the back door.” The front of the school has been under construction, and the doors were open by graduation, as students had hoped. See Exposure/Page 14

In Friendship Heights, life in a real-world ‘Six Feet Under’ This is the ninth in a series of articles about locals and their occupations. By AMANDA ABRAMS Current Correspondent

I

Bill Petros/The Current

Terence Shotkoski is the American Diabetes Association’s Father of the Year. His parenting skills also come in handy at his job — as a funeral director.

t’s a tradition. For more than 20 years, the National Capital Area Father’s Day Council — yes, that really exists — picks a couple Fathers of the Year to fete, men who have distinguished themselves by their capacity to be strong yet sensitive, providing direction, affection and sometimes a little tough love to their offspring. One of this year’s winners was Terence Shotkoski, who says he tries to be a great father to his daughter, now 21, by giving her clear guidance and support. But what’s particularly interesting about Shotkoski is the way those characteristics have proved wholly applicable to his job as well, helping him thrive professionally. Shotkoski is a funeral director. Two years ago, he moved to D.C. from Southern California to take a position as president of

Joseph Gawler’s Sons Inc., a high-end funeral home in Friendship Heights. It’s no little accomplishment: Owned by Service Corporation International, Joseph Gawler’s Sons is a flagship branch of a national chain consisting of more than 1,500 institutions. Originally located at 1700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, the funeral home has been around for more than 150 years and has received seven presidents, plus senators and Supreme Court justices. Even before coming to D.C., Shotkoski was part of a prestigious team that assisted with high-profile funerals; he helped with services for presidents Reagan and Ford, Merv Griffin and Farrah Fawcett. From his composed and observant manner, it’s obvious he’s a very intelligent guy. But it may well be his warmth and efforts to comprehensively serve the grieving people who are his customers — that is, his support and guidance — that have led to his success. “We want to take as much burden as possible off the family,” said Shotkoski, explaining the goal of his job, which entails oversee-

ing operations before, during and after a funeral, taking charge so that bereaved family members don’t have to worry about all the details themselves. But that doesn’t mean simply acting as a dominant authority figure. “We have to be under control, but can’t come across as cold: They’ll connect better if they see you care.” And you have to be ready for anything. “I don’t think you’d survive in the business if you get uncomfortable in the face of extreme emotion.” It’s a mysterious profession, one that’s almost invisible until you suddenly need it. But anyone who watched the HBO series “Six Feet Under” knows that being an undertaker is about more than simply comforting despondent customers. Shotkoski, 49, readily admits that. He’s been in the business for 24 years, starting out with a degree in mortuary science from Cypress College in California and then two years as an apprentice under an experienced funeral director. That’s where he learned restorative art, getting practical training in reconstructing a See Father/Page 14


14 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

THE CURRENT

 

  



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EXPOSURE From Page 13 Meanwhile, at Washington Metropolitan, students secured $2,000 from the city to upgrade the library and hundreds of donated books from the Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Neighborhood Library. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think it was fair that most schools have a functioning library and we did not,â&#x20AC;? said principal Tanisha Williams Minor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just a matter of the adults doing the work and turning their wish list into a requisition.â&#x20AC;? For his part, Elliot said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s pleased with the out-

FATHER From Page 13 face following a traffic accident or gunshot, and embalming a body so that it can wait a few days before a funeral is held. Like in the TV show, the hands-on work takes place in the funeral homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basement, but these days, given his seniority, Shotkoski doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to do it. Still, he says itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good to remain familiar with whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s required to make a body presentable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can then explain it to the family, and build rapport and confidence. I believe more knowledge leads to more trust.â&#x20AC;? Other than dealing with the body, Shotkoski â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who, true to type, owns 10 black suits, part of the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dress code â&#x20AC;&#x201D; takes care of all the small details that need to be attended to when someone dies. That includes writing a death notice for the newspaper, helping the family pick out a casket or cremation urn, coordinating with whatever clergy might be involved, and even ensuring that flowers received by mourners are displayed prominently (but donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t block any-

come, and he hopes it will be a boost to the school, where only 26 percent of the students scored proficient in reading on last yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s D.C. Comprehensive Assessment System. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every school should have a library,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You need books to be literate.â&#x20AC;? And classmate Diamond Diggs said she has a new sense of her own power. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I found out that kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; voices really mean something,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now I know my voice means a lot.â&#x20AC;? Photos by students are on display thr ough the end of the month at the Pepco Edison Place Gallery at 702 8th St. NW. The gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m.

oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s view during the service). Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a job that will obviously never become obsolete, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics projected in 2008 that demand would increase by 12 percent over the next decade. Still, things do change with time. Cremation, for example, has grown in popularity over the past few years, and the tone of funerals has changed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s becoming a â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;celebration of life,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? said Shotkoski, â&#x20AC;&#x153;where you have eulogies and a receptionâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; not just an opportunity to grieve en masse. And in the past six months, heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worked on four or five home visitations, a very new (or, depending on how you look at it, very old) trend. The funeral home prepares the body, which then is taken to the family home to be viewed by visitors, and is eventually brought to a church for a service or simply to the cemetery. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The past is coming back,â&#x20AC;? he said of the trend. Still, some things never change. Taking good care of customers will never go out of style, said Shotkoski, explaining that he learned his business philosophy from his parents. They owned a grocery store in a small Nebraska

farming community and stressed customer service as the key to maintaining a successful enterprise. Last week, his parents flew into town to attend the Father of the Year ceremony, which the American Diabetes Association held on June 9 at the French Embassy. It was meant, in a way, to celebrate Shotkoskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s father as well, but the elder man got sick that night and couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t attend, and is still under observation at Georgetown University Hospital. You could almost call it Shotkoskiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s own worrying brush with mortality, but having seen so much death over several decades, he simply described it as an â&#x20AC;&#x153;interesting night.â&#x20AC;? Shotkoski later elaborated on his philosophy about dying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not afraid of death,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Death denial is really common in Western culture, which I think creates more stigma that death is bad. But if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve lived a good life and served well, when the time comes, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done everything you can do in that time.â&#x20AC;? Still, he admitted heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not quite ready to go. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a lot more to do,â&#x20AC;? he said.

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When to Intervene in Your Parents Care and Other Caregiving Dilemmas for Grown Children Sunrise on Connecticut Avenue has partnered with the experts to bring you a powerful two part series that will offer you groundbreaking caregiving advice, tools, and guidance to help you through your caregiver journey. Tuesday, June 21, 2011 6:30 - 7:30 To Intervene or Not to Intervene Do your parents insist that they can care for themselves even when you know they canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t? The dilemma for many is when and how to step in. Our Expert will share useful techniques to overcome this struggle. Guest Speaker: Linda Hill, MSW Tuesday, June 28, 2011 6:30 - 7:30 The Double-Whammy: Coping with Lifelong Personality Issues and Memory Impairment It is not obvious to many grown children that their parent has a personality problem or is exhibiting signs of dementia. Our expert will clarify and offer tips on dealing with the Double-Whammy. Guest Speaker: Barbara Kane, MSW, LCSW-C

Space is limited. RSVP today for you and a friend. Sunrise on Connecticut Avenue

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THE CURRENT

POLICE From Page 3 Circle and Columbia Heights — between districts means that radio traffic from officers responding to incidents is split between two frequencies, Lanier said. Another advantage, she added, is that one commander isn’t responsible for all the officers required to police an entire crime-dense neighborhood. Several Dupont Circle residents questioned whether their community needs to be split to accomplish those same ends, saying it’s confusing for neighbors to report to different police districts. “You’re going to disconnect us from the people we deal with on a daily basis: our community leaders, our [advisory neighborhood commissions],” one resident said at the meeting. Some of the residents asked that all of Dupont Circle stay in the 2nd District, which includes most upper Northwest neighborhoods and deals with less crime than the 3rd District, even under the proposed realignment. Others said they would prefer the entire neighborhood shift to the 3rd District, whose V Street headquarters is closer. In an interview, Ward 1 Council member Jim Graham objected to the 3rd District’s proposed northern boundary, which would shift part of his ward into the 4th District, saying

G

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

he needs more details on what it would accomplish and doesn’t want to lose the 3rd District substation on Park Road. “For the first five years I was in office, Ward 1 was divided between 3D and 4D. It was a major set of problems in terms of communications and chain of command” that he worked hard to address in 2004 under Lanier’s predecessor, Graham said. Lanier said collaboration among districts has improved in recent years, and she emphasized that she focused on crime, not on political boundaries, in developing the realignment. “It’s so easy if your district commander and your ward council members and your ANCs are all the same, right?” she said in an interview after last week’s meeting. “But that’s never going to happen; it’s impossible. I can’t police the city that way.” Police have also released proposed changes to police service areas, designed to fit with the new district boundaries and to match the latest crime and population trends. Lanier said the district boundaries are “pretty much set” but that officials are “still flexible” on the police service areas. Meetings will be held at the 4th and 2nd District headquarters on the proposals tomorrow and next Wednesday, respectively. Maps of the proposed changes are available at tinyurl.com/psamaps.

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15


16 Wednesday, June 15, 2011

BOYDS

The Current

$790,000

LIVE ON 7+ ACRES surrounded by agricultural reserve & nature! 4BR incl 2MBR, 1 w/balc. New KIT, huge 4-season sunroom, sep entry bsmt incl workshop, wine cellar & rock-climbing wall. Great space for office/studio. Insulated 2-car gar. Access to DC/Frederick & nr Barnesville School. Wendy Gowdey Foxhall Office 202-363-1800

DUPONT / U STREET

$1,275,000

EXQUISITE PROPERTY, not to be missed! Owners unit is 2BR + den/3rd BR, 3 European style BAs impeccably outfitted from Waterworks. Lux KIT w/Poggenpohl and imported Italian marble. Plus a legal, recently updated, high-end 2BR rental unit. Tour at www.scottpurcell.com. Scott Purcell 202-262-6968 Woodley Park Office 202-483-6300

OBSERVATORY

CHEVY CHASE

$1,199,000

UNIQUE 4BR, 4.5BA Contemporary nestled in a cul-de-sac on 1/3 acre lot, breathtaking view of mature trees. Brick home, impressive combination of interior hardwds, expanses of glass, beamed ceilings in Chef’s kit w/ FP & family area. 1st flr deck is width of house, overlooks pool and much more! Ramona Greene 202-494-2557 Friendship Heights 202-364-5200

FOXHALL VILLAGE

$1,095,000

RARELY available 6BR, 3.5BA Tudor TH. A special home, fully finished on 4 lvls. Foyer entry. Gracious LR. HWFs, Fpl. Spacious DR. New eatin KIT. MBR suite. All new baths. Fully finished bsmt. W/D on 2nd flr. 1604 44th St NW. Scott Polk 202-256-5460 Georgetown Office 202-944-8400

CHEVY CHASE MD

$1,269,000

PRIVACY & LUXURY to fulfill all your dreams. Resting on over ½ an acre, this 5BR, 3.5BA colonial offers privacy for family living. Tucked in a cul-de-sac with meticulously crafted details throughout including, gourmet KIT, formal DR, exquisite MBR suite w/Jacuzzi. Tricia Murphy 202-445-4664 Chevy Chase Office 301-986-1001

GEORGETOWN

$790,000

CHARMING Federal home on Thomas Jefferson Street. Zoned "W" - residential Or commercial. Just above the Canal. 3BR, 1BA classic home Waiting for your updates. In the heart of Georgetown. Deep garden. Nancy Itteilag Foxhall Office 202-363-1800

CRESTWOOD

$745,000

LOGAN CIRCLE

$535,000

AT THE EDGE OF ROCK CREEK PARK you’ll find this spacious 3BR, 3BA corner home offering easy one-lvl living + FR, attached garage & large lot. Helen Dodson 202-487-8070 Friendship Heights 301-652-2777

CHARMING 2BR Condo with parking and patio, Renovated kitchen and baths, wood burning fireplace, beautiful hardwoods, separate dining area and half bath on living area. Extra storage. Don Guthrie 202-486-7543 Woodley Park Office 202-483-6300

$1,995,000

CLASSIC 1920 7BR, 4.5BA on sunfilled corner lot. Enchanting garden w/azaleas, wisteria, roses & dogwood. Terrific KIT opens to FR, deck & yard. 2nd flr Mste w/deck & paneled lib w/fpl. Hi ceils, orig details, 3rd flr Cathedral view. Nr Gyu Mason Pk, Natl Cath, shops. 2700 36th St NW. Terri Robinson 202-607-7737 Georgetown Office 202-339-9209 CATHEDRAL HEIGHTS $375,000 THE WESTCHESTER – Rare 2BR, 1BA apt. 1,200 SF includes entr foyer, spacious LR, sep dining area & sunny solarium, expanded new KIT w/gran counters, new white tile BA, California closets, gracious Old World bldg. 4000 Cathedral Ave NW #206B. Roberta Theis 202-538-7429 Georgetown Office 202-944-8400

TAKOMA PARK

GEORGETOWN 1680 Wisconsin Ave. NW 202.944.8400

FRIENDSHIP HEIGHTS 5101 Wisconsin Ave. NW 202.364.5200

FOXHALL 3201 New Mexico Ave. NW 202.363.1800

CHEVY CHASE 20 Chevy Chase Circle NW 202.363.9700

CHEVY CHASE DC $825,000 SUPERB LOCATION! Inviting Dutch Colonial, 2 blocks to Friendship Hts METRO!!! 3BR, 1.5BA, hdwds, Updated KIT, fin LL. Big Front Porch, great yard! EXPLOSIVE Columbia Heights business Andra Gram 240-515-6059 district. Two former bldgs combined for a Chevy Chase Office 202-363-9700 great Newly Renov Space. New plumbing from fixtures to the street, New heat, AC CLEVELAND PARK $329,000 & electric. THINK FUTURE and BUY NEW PRICE – Fantastic opportunity to NOW! www.DCMDHomeFinder.com. 240-351-4663 buy in the historic Broadmoor. Sun filled Walt Johnson 202-363-9700 1BR, 1BA features hdwds, new SS appli- Chevy Chase Office ances/gas cooking, new windows, tons of $279,000 closet space, walk to Metro, shops. Secure DUPONT bldg w/24-hr desk attendant. Garage PKG RENOVATED 1BR w/new KIT & BA. Also avail, studio apt for $189,000. avail. 3601 Connecticut Ave NW #200. Alexandra Wilson 202-579-5313 Great location nr restaurants, shops, Georgetown Office 202-944-8400 Rock Crk, galleries, transportation. Kent Madsen CLEVELAND PARK $1,750,000 Foxhall Office 202-363-1800 SITUATED on charming cul-de-sac in Cleveland Pk, lovely 4BR, 3.5BA GEORGETOWN $2,350,000 home is nr Metro, shops, restaurants. NEW LISTING – Wonderful Victorian in This total renovation is a must see!! Gtown’s West Village. 4 finished levels, Kari Seppala 5BR, 4.5BA, landscaped garden. Grand Foxhall Office 202-363-1800 double LR, family/dining rm, high-end KIT, Master, in-law suite & more. 3407 COLUMBIA HEIGHTS $179,900 N St NW. 301-602-1596 SMART & STYLISH renovated Studio Jennifer Wellde Georgetown Office 202-944-8400 FHA Approved & pet friendly. Dina Paxenos 202-256-1624 $240,000 Friendship Heights 202-364-5200 GLOVER PARK FABULOUS newly renov 1BR featuring COLUMBIA HEIGHTS $699,000 brand new kit w/granite counters, SS OPPORTUNITY…right in the heart of the appl, renov BA, Jet tub, Brazilian cherry

WOODLEY PARK 2300 Calvert St. 202.483.6300

wd flrs, extra storage and much more! Sintia Petrosian 301-395-8817 Friendship Heights 202-364-5200 GLOVER PARK $255,000 ABSOLUTELY stunning 1BR unit w/Balcony. Bright, open floor plan, updated BA, good closet space and storage. Pets allowed! Close to park and transportation. Pat Gerachis Foxhall Office 202-363-1800 KALORAMA $299,500 BRIGHT AND LIGHT top floor unit in boutique Kalorama building. Beautifully renovated kitchen is open to large LR that boast large windows with Cathedral Views. Close to two Metros, a large park plus many shops and restaurants. This unit is ready to move into and you can start enjoying the city life. 1875 Mintwood Pl. NW #44. Christi Cline 202-997-2787 Georgetown Office 202-944-8400 LOGAN $539,000 LOGAN STATION! Don’t miss out on this great value in the heart of Logan. 1BR + den or 2BR, 2FBA, balcony, sep deeded garage pkg, gleaming HWFs. Nr metro,

$575,000

SO CONVENIENT and a great House too! 3 blks to Farmers’ market & ½ mile to METRO. Charming 3-4BR, 2.5BA w/Updtd KIT, LR w/FP, formal DR, terrific FR add’n w/PR on 1st flr. Fin LL w/Rec Rm, BR & BA. New CAC, pretty landscaping, inviting Front Porch, Rear Deck, & OSP! Julie Roberts 202-276-5854 Chevy Chase Office 202-363-9700 PETWORTH $585,000 BEAUTIFULLY RENOV, light filled extra wide 4BR row house + 2BR in-law suite. Close to metro. Renov BAs and KITs. Large double parlor and dining area opens to KIT. Refinished original HWFs. Huge yard with PKG easily added. New roof, porch deck, boiler, water heater, more. Home warranty included. www.DonGuthrie.net Don Guthrie 202-486-7543 Woodley Park Office 202-483-6300

POTOMAC $1,700,000 SPECTACULAR One-Of-A-Kind Home on 6 Wooded Acres. Unique 6BR, 5.5BA Shingle Craftsman-Style home, w/many hidden patios & private gardens, awaits your approval. Enter the long private drive & be amazed! Special features of MT PLEASANT $779,000 this private retreat incl a sep Guest SUNNY 3-story TH on quiet tree House, Greenhouse, Artist’s Studio, lined street near Rock Creek Park. Library and 4-car Garage. Margaret McLaughlin 202-297-3914 Generous LR, large DR, granite KIT Chevy Chase Office 202-363-9700 w/breakfast bar, Mste w/dressing rm & BA. 4BR, 2.5BA up + spacious LL TENLEYTOWN $479,900 in-law ste. CAC. Deep front garden GORGEOUS PENTHOUSE features a w/flagstone patio, 2nd flr porch. high-end KIT which opens with a brkfst Linda Low bar to the LR. HWFs, high ceilings, WD, Foxhall Office 202-363-1800 lrg MBR w/southern exposure & lrg closet. Den/2nd BR also has a closet. The PETWORTH $199,900 - $299,900 Cityline condo sits on top of the FHA APPROVED & One year Condo fees Tenleytown metro. Bldg has own gym, Paid! Light filled, fantastic condos avail- doorman, is pet friendly, and low fee. 202-441-2301 able in THE FLATS AT TAYLOR Jennifer Knoll 202-363-9700 STREET. Choose from 1BR, 1BR with Chevy Chase Office den, 2BR/2BA homes. Quality & afford$487,000 ability, finished with stylish and superior WESLEY HEIGHTS materials: granite, ss, hdwd & bamboo, DRAMATIC, sun-filled, 1,173sf apt with east CAC & W/D in each unit. Walk to & west exposure. LR w/12ft ceilings & wall Metro! www.804taylorstreet.com. 804 of glass leading to pvt balc w/majestic vw of The National Cathedral. FHA Approved! Taylor St, NW. 202-302-3900 Christy Zachary 202-494-2248 Connie Parker 202-364-5200 Woodley Park Office 202-483-6300 Friendship Heights shopping and all of the U St amenities. Low fees round out this very attractive deal. www.ScottPurcell.com. Scott Purcell 202-262-6968 Woodley Park Office 202-483-6300


A Look at the Market in Northwest Washington

June 15, 2011 â&#x2013;  Page 17

Contemporary home offers space, design accolades

V

isitors to this Spring Valley home may think they know exactly what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll find in the 1960 split-level: a traditional

ON THE MARKET CAROL BUCKLEY living room off the entry, with a renovated and possibly enlarged kitchen in the rear of the home. But architect Mark McInturff upended those expectations in his 1991 redesign of the home, a very thorough renovation that netted spreads in shelter publications and a handful of design awards. Now, the kitchen has a frontrow seat to this quiet neighborhood through the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s large bay window. Mahogany cabinetry, which echoes built-ins elsewhere on this level, warms up the space, as does the fireplace, a reminder that the spot was once a living room. European stainless-steel appliances and a custom island are the woodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cool counterparts. In the rear of this level, those cool tones dominate: Bleached-oak floors help create a sleek canvas, as do walls painted a uniform gallery white. Yet as in many successful contemporary designs, this home is no chilly blank slate, but a thoughtful

redeployment of classic architectural elements. A rigid symmetry, therefore, defines the living roomâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wall of windows at the rear of the home. Looking out over a swimming pool, the space incorporates an arch; this one, however, is made of aluminum rather than the stone or wood of its predecessors. Unfussy columns, too, punctuate the sunny gathering space, which can be shut off from the adjacent dining room for intimate dinner parties. Custom sconces â&#x20AC;&#x201D; designed, like many accessories here, by the architect â&#x20AC;&#x201D; strike a contemporary-industrial vibe. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a wood-burning fireplace, updated by its aluminum surround, to warm up the lofty living room, but on summer nights residents will likely focus on the property beyond the glassy rear wall. Past the swimming pool, a follylike structure offers cover for a small seating area. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a landscaped lawn here and a flagstone patio for grilling, perhaps in the built-in brick oven. That patio opens from the first of the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two lower levels, where a family room is also floored in flagstone. Whitewashed pecky cypress walls, a wood-burning fireplace and built-in bookcases offer a

Photos Courtesy of W.C. & A.N. Miller Realtors

This five-bedroom, 4.5-bath home in Spring Valley was extensively renovated in 1991. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s listed at $1,850,000. more traditional twist on the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clean-lined aesthetic. An office offers more built-in storage in the form of desks and bookcases on this level, which also connects to the two-car garage. Walk down the curving stair to the floor below this one, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s multipurpose space and storage galore. A bedroom suite includes a full bath and is suitable for a live-in nanny or long-term guest. A casual living space nearby is the perfect spot to hide an oversize television. The upper level holds four more bedrooms and two full baths. A

flat-weave gray carpet in these rooms is a mark of continuity with the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contemporary aesthetic. Up-to-date bathrooms include a pop of color in the form of reddish marble vanities. The master bath is particularly roomy, with one room holding a walk-in shower and a single vanity, and another space offering a tub and double sink. Storage was clearly a priority during this renovation, and mold-

ing-free closets sleekly conceal linens, clothing and more in this levelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hallway. This five-bedroom, 4.5-bath home at 5120 Van Ness St. is offered for $1,850,000. An open house will be held Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. For details, call James Sweeney or Penny McCormack of W.C. & A.N. Miller Realtors, a Long & Foster Co., at 202-3621300.

Another Jaquet New Listing!

  

 " #$  &$#$     !(#*  

TWO FABULOUS! 2 BRs, 2 Italian marble BAs, 2 balconies and 2 levels. Loft design w/13ft floor to ceiling windows in living room w/Cathedral view. Updated kitchen w/granite, separate dining room. Master suite and 2nd BR king sized. Lustrous parquet floors. Pets welcome, tennis courts w/pro, pool and 24 hr doorman. Gar pkg space and extra storage incl. Updated, recently painted, and available for immediate occupancy. Call Today!

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American University Park 4906 47th Street, NW

Graceful, sunfilled 4 BR, 3-1/4 B col, rare main lev BR, Ba & den! Sweet backyard, shady tree, garage! Ft. Bayard Pk at corner, quiet street, blocks to Friendship Hts shops, restaurants, Mtro!

Susan Jaquet

Overall Top Team - Long & Foster Washington Metro Region #1 Realtor Bethesda Allâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Points Office

202-365-8118 susanjaquet@aol.com

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$829,000

/HISHLZWH|VSÂ&#x2039;7HYSLMYHUsHPZ

301-229-4000

(DIRECT)


18 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

THE CURRENT

G

Northwest Real Estate BUDGET From Page 1 In a sometimes-raucous final debate on next yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s budget support act, Orange noted that a resident with $10,000 in now-tax-free interest income would pay only $850 a year on municipal bonds. Taxing the interest on nonDistrict bonds came up recently as officials struggled to close a $322 million budget gap, and as a partial

alternative to Mayor Vincent Grayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposal to raise the income tax rate on those earning more than $200,000 a year. Currently, all those earning more than $40,000 a year pay the same 8.5 percent rate. Gray had argued that raising income tax rates on higher earners is both more fair and more lucrative than retroactively taxing municipal bonds. But a bare majority of the council also rejected any income tax hike in its first vote two weeks ago. Since then, the controversy has

focused on whether to tax interest on municipal bonds previously purchased with the expectation of a continuing exemption. Under the current scenario for fiscal year 2012, such a tax will be levied on bond interest earned since last Jan. 1. The argument has two sides. Supporters of ending the exemption say the District is now the only U.S. jurisdiction that grants tax exemptions for bonds issued elsewhere, and that to continue doing so encourages investors to look out-

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PALISADES - 5837 SHERIER PLACE, NW

OPEN SUNDAY JUNE 19 TH 1-4PM 2006 top-to-bottom renovation & expansion of a classic 3 Bedroom, 3.5 Bath 1927 Sears Gladstone! 2-story addition encompasses gourmet Kitchen opening to Family Room & rear screened porch as well as 2nd floor Master Bedroom Suite with Master Bath. Exquisite finishes & details...no expense spared! Beautifully landscaped yard and garage parking. 

Offered at $1,050,000

side D.C. when buying bonds. Opponents say a â&#x20AC;&#x153;retroactive taxâ&#x20AC;? is unfair, especially for retirees who relied on the exception when they made investment choices. They say the District offers a more limited array of bonds than most states, and that abruptly adjusting investment portfolios in difficult economic times is both risky and expensive. The two positions were repeated yesterday. Ward 2 member Jack Evans said he wanted to protect â&#x20AC;&#x153;over 20,000 people who relied on District law at the time, and who rely on that income to live.â&#x20AC;? But Ward 1 member Jim Graham protested the idea of â&#x20AC;&#x153;making this tax relief a higher priority than restoring funds for child and family services, human services, libraries and the state office of education.â&#x20AC;? Orange said encouraging District residents to buy bonds issued in other states subsidizes investment there at the expense of

the District. Cheh coupled her amendment with a proposal to restore funding for â&#x20AC;&#x153;green teamâ&#x20AC;? employees, many of them ex-offenders, who keep some neighborhood streets clean. Her amendment picked up five other votes, from Evans, Muriel Bowser of Ward 4, Harry Thomas of Ward 5, at-large member David Catania and Chairman Kwame Brown â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one vote short of passage. In other budget action, the council largely shuffled items on its â&#x20AC;&#x153;wish listâ&#x20AC;? of priorities that would be funded if revenue projections rise for next year. For example, it accepted an amendment from Graham to make restoring the â&#x20AC;&#x153;green teamâ&#x20AC;? jobs a higher priority, and rejected one from at-large member Phil Mendelson to put funds for more police officers on top of the priority list. Only Evans and Mendelson voted against the final budget support act.

JAMIE COLEY & LEIGH REED www.coleyreed.com

7HO(PDLOFROH\UHHGKRPHV#DROFRP Long & Foster Real Estate, Inc. / O: 240-497-1700

                                                                                                                 

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7XQODZ5RDG1: :DVKLQJWRQ'& List Price $240,000

SINTIA PETROSIAN

RealtorÂ&#x160; (301) 395-8817 ² Mobile (202) 364-5200 ² Office

SintiaHomes@gmail.com www.SintiaHomes.com


Wednesday, June 15, 2011 19

The Current

F OR E S T H I L L S , D C

Sited just below Pierce-Klingle Mansion in Rock Creek Park, grand ornate colonial fully renovated 2001 with exquisite details, 6 fplcs, large LR, banquetsized DR, family rm w/vaulted ceiling, library, kitchen w/top-of-the-line appliances, 1,200+ sf MBR ste w/2 master baths & dressing areas. 6 BR, 4 full & 2 half baths total. 18,899 sf lot w/ large terrace & yard. $3,895,000.

Russell Firestone 202.271.1701 Jonathan Taylor 202.276.3344

F OR E S T H I L L S , D C

Sensational contemporary home with 7 BR, 5 full and 2 half baths on a spectacular 18,935 sf lot with 6,189 sf of living space close to the Metro. Large eat-in kitchen, 2 master baths w/dressing room, gorgeous entertaining spaces, cathedral ceilings, skylights, beautiful family room, paneled library, sun porch, expansive private lot with pool, parking for 8 cars. $2,195,000.

Barbara Zuckerman 202.997.5977

C H E V Y C HASE , D C

Magnificent unit with southern exposure in the acclimated Chase Point Condominium. Features incl 2 BR, 2 full baths, powder room, large den, gourmet kitchen with breakfast room and a spacious and unique living/ dining area with walls of glass. Perfect for entertaining and luxury city living. Walk to Whole Foods, shopping & restaurants. $1,780,000.

Marco Stilli 202.255.1552

C H E V Y C HASE , D C

C L E V E L A N D PA R K , D C

Classic home has 5 BR, 5.5 baths, front porch & 2 fplcs. Large great rm w/ renovated kit & brkfst area, exterior deck overlooks Rock Creek Park. Upstairs MBR ste w/ pvt outdoor terrace. The LL has 1 BR, 1 bath au pair suite w/ a 2nd kit. 2 car gar plus off street parking for 5 to 6 cars. walk to the Uptown Theater, National Zoo, Metro & restaurants. $2,495,000.

Theresa Burt 202.258.2600 Jonathan Taylor 202.276.3344

OB SE RVATORY C I RC L E , D C

Traditional, 5 BR, 5.5 bath Colonial, built in 1923 and thoughtfully updated and added to, provides a perfect equilibrium of charm and flow coupled with many amenities required for modern living. The balance between indoors and outdoors as well as the well-designed floor plan can easily accommodate all different kinds of lifestyles while providing a superb location and an important address. $2,475,000.

Marco Stilli 202.255.1552

C L E V E L A N D PA R K , D C

Classic Cleveland Park. Spacious & sun-filled floor plan includes a formal LR w/ fplc & classic chestnut detailing. Banquet sized DR, library, chef’s kit w/ island & dining space. 1st flr guest suite & den. 4 BR, 2 baths up. LL is lrg fam rm, BR/ bath & storage. Sensational studio w/ 1/2 bath & office/ living space. Lush lot w/ mature plantings. Driveway pkg. $1,995,000.

Michael Rankin 202.271.3344 Jean Hanan 202.494.8157

B E R K L E Y, D C

Foxhall Crescents. Architectural Design Chic with walls of windows, gourmet kit, 3 spacious BR, elegant baths on 3 levels, circular staircases, gleaming hardwoods, marble flooring, formal LR, DR & library, 3 marble fplcs. Elegant & gracious, entry-level 2-car gar, privately sited on a premium lot w/glorious terraced gardens! Minutes to the White House! $1,350,000.

Robin Waugh 703.819.8809 Maggie Shannon 202.486.4752

B E R K L E Y, D C

Special Foxhall Crescents Home designed by noted architect Arthur Cotton Moore. Elegant & perfect for entertaining w/ a new state of the art kit w/ center isle, custom cabinets, top applis & breakfast area w/gas fplc. Tremendous light & custom finishes throughout. Many terraces offer unlimited opportunities for outdoor relaxation & entertaining. $1,975,000.

Theresa Burt 202.258.2600 Michael Rankin 202.271.3344

G E ORG E TOW N , D C

Meticulously restored to preserve architectural details while adding state of the art upgrades. 3 BR, 2 bath plus office has a chef’s kitchen that opens to a private courtyard garden. Family room w/gas fireplace can double as a dining room. Elegant living room plus bonus upper level home office fitted with custom built-ins. Waterworks bathrooms and plantation shutters throughout. 2-car parking. $1,175,000.

Liz Dawson D’Angio 202.427.7890

W E SL E Y H E I G H T S , D C

A DA M S M ORG A N , D C

New Listing! Recently updated large side-hall tudor with 4 BR, 3 baths, beautiful inlaid floors and arches throughout. Front porch and stone patio in the rear enhanced by lovely landscaping and fenced yard. Garage parking. $939,000.

Two sensational opportunities at The Colonnade! * Stunning upper-floor corner 1 BR + den and separate DR. Gorgeous sun-filled views overlooking the park! $539,000 * Beautiful 2 BR + den end unit on high floor with south exposure and open views. $795,000. Luxury, service, convenience. Pool, fitness, gardens.

Bright and spacious 2 BR plus den / 2.5 bath condo with parking located on the quiet side of the building in the heart of Adams Morgan. Eat-in kitchen with maple, granite and stainless. Hardwood floors throughout, soaring ceilings, dramatic staircase, ample storage, gas fireplace and low fee. $589,000.

Sally McLuckie 202.297.0300

Diana Hart 202.271.2717

Bill Abbott 202.903.6533

www.ttrsir.com

Downtown, D.C. 202.234.3344

Georgetown, D.C. 202.333.1212

Chevy Chase, MD 301.967.3344

McLean, VA 703.319.3344

© MMXI Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. All Rights Reserved. Les Bords de l’Epte a Giverny, used with permission. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark licensed to Sotheby’s International Realty Affiliates LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity . Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


20 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

&

THE CURRENT

Events Entertainment Wednesday, June JUNE 15 Wednesday 15 Concerts â&#x2013;  The Golden Triangle Business Improvement District will present Monster Band performing funk, pop and dance music. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Farragut Square Park, Connecticut Avenue and K Street NW. goldentriangle.com. â&#x2013;  The Harbour Nights concert series will feature vocalist and guitarist Jason Masi. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Plaza, The Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202295-5007. â&#x2013;  Those Darlins will perform a blend of country punk and dirty South garage rock. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Band will perform works by DvorĂĄk, Rachmaninoff and Sousa. 8 p.m. Free. West Terrace, U.S. Capitol. 202-433-4011. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Erin McHugh and Nan Buzard will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The L Life: Extraordinary Lesbians Making a Difference.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. â&#x2013;  Juliet Eilperin will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Demon Fish: Travels Through the Hidden World of Sharks.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  Ari Redbord, an assistant U.S. attorney who specializes in cases involving human trafficking, and Kathleen Davis, national training coordinator for the Polaris Project, will discuss the extent of human trafficking and slavery in the Washington area. 7 p.m. Free. Adas Israel

Congregation, 2850 Quebec St. NW. 202362-6295. â&#x2013;  The D.C. Music Salon, a film and book series about music-related topics, will discuss 1950s entertainer Joyce Bryant and show excerpts from the documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joyce Bryant: The Lost Diva.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Neighborhood Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. Films â&#x2013;  The French CinĂŠmathèque series will feature Bertrand Tavernierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Princess of Montpensier.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $11; $9 for students; $8.25 for seniors; $8 for ages 12 and younger. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Britain With Loveâ&#x20AC;? will feature Debs GardnerPatersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Africa United.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $11; $9 for seniors and students; $8 for military personnel and ages 12 and younger. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202-419-3456. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Movie Nights in the Heights,â&#x20AC;? presented by the Columbia Heights Day Initiative, will feature Emile Adrolinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1987 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Dancing,â&#x20AC;? starring Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze and Jerry Orbach. 8:30 p.m. Free. Field, Tubman Elementary School, 11th and Kenyon streets NW. info@columbiaheightsday.org.

Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Nationals will play the St. Louis Cardinals. 7:05 p.m. $5 to $350. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Thursday at 7:05 p.m. Thursday, June 16 Thursday JUNE 16 Concerts â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature Con Candela performing Latin rhythms. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. â&#x2013;  The D.C.-based group Urban Funk will perform a blend of jazz, R&B and Latin sounds. 5 to 8 p.m. Free. Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  Members of the National Symphony

Orchestra Youth Fellowship Program will perform classical music for flute, trumpet, bass, viola and percussion. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Duke Ellington School of the Arts Show Choir will perform a concert to raise funds for its upcoming trip to France. 7 p.m. $25 to $100. La Maison Française, 4101 Reservoir Road NW. InstantSeats.com. The concert will repeat Friday at 7 p.m. â&#x2013;  The Embassy Series will present tenor Szabolcs Brickner (shown), mezzo-soprano Magdalena WĂłr and pianist George Peachey performing Hungarian folk songs, arias from operettas and operas, and works by Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin and FaurĂŠ. 7:30 p.m. $75. Embassy of Hungary, 2950 Spring of Freedom St. NW. 202-625-2361. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Band will perform works by DvorĂĄk, Rachmaninoff and Sousa. 8 p.m. Free. Sylvan Theater, Washington Monument grounds, 15th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-433-4011. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute will present a panel of Holocaust survivors discussing their experiences at the hands of the Nazi regime. 10 to 11:50 a.m. Free. Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-895-4860. â&#x2013;  Robert P.J. Cooney Jr., author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winning the Vote: The Triumph of the American Woman Suffrage Movement,â&#x20AC;? will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Becoming Invincible: Suffragistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Winning Strategies.â&#x20AC;? Noon. $10; reservations suggested. Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, 144 Constitution Ave. NE. sewallbelmont.org. â&#x2013;  Jack L. Robbins, project architect and senior urban designer at Perkins + Will, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Active Design Joins the Fight Against Obesity.â&#x20AC;? 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Free; registration required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. â&#x2013;  Susan Markham and Allida Black of the National Democratic Institute will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democracy and the

$9.99 ASIAN GOURMET SUSHI BAR

Ever experienced the true taste of healthy food?

Litestars Brunch Medley Enjoy our Weekend Special Medley of one savory tartlet of your choice including vegetarian and vegan selections and a glass of wine, sparkling wine, or beer and SAVE $3.00!

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202-293-0281 www.litestars.com

LUNCH SPECIAL

$10 Bento Boxes Happy Hour AT THE BAR

Mon-Fri 4 - 6pm Â&#x2021;%DPEX6LJQDWXUH&RFNWDLOV Â&#x2021;3UHPLXP5DLO&RFNWDLOV Â&#x2021;RIIZLQHE\WKHJODVV KRWVDNH VHOHFWEHHU HOURS: Sunâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thurs 11am-10pm Friâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11am-10:30pm

5101 MacArthur Blvd., NW

202.364.3088 Discount cannot be combined with other oďŹ&#x20AC;ers and is valid on Saturday and Sunday only. You must be 21 years of age to be served.

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Caroline Bottaroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2009 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Queen to Play,â&#x20AC;? starring Kevin Kline and Sandrine Bonnaire. $6.75 for ages 62 and older. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Camp: Sauceriferous!â&#x20AC;? will feature the 1951 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Day the Earth Stood Still.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 7th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-6331000.

Friday, JUNE 17 â&#x2013;  Concert: The 2011 June Chamber Festival will feature the American Chamber Players performing works by Mozart, DvorĂĄk, Liebermann and Bloch. 7:30 p.m. $35. Kreeger Museum, 2401 Foxhall Road NW. 202-337-3050.

Challenge of Change.â&#x20AC;? 5:30 p.m. $25; reservations required. Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Democratic Club, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-232-7363. â&#x2013;  A gallery talk will focus on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kandinsky, Abstraction, and the Mystic.â&#x20AC;? 6 and 7 p.m. $12; $10 for seniors; free for ages 18 and younger. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. 202-387-2151. â&#x2013;  Natalie Chanin, founder of the clothing line Alabama Chanin, will discuss the unique business model that makes her artisan enterprise possible. 6 p.m. $25; reservations required. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-667-0441, ext. 64. â&#x2013;  Trish Regan will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joint Ventures: Inside Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Almost Legal Marijuana Industry.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, 555 12th St. NW. 202-347-0176. â&#x2013;  Archaeologist Fabio Esteban Amador will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultural Identity in El Salvador: Olmec, Maya, Toltec, Pipil?â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Inter-American Development Bank Cultural Center, 1300 New York Ave. NW. 202-623-3558. â&#x2013;  Patricia A. Butenis, U.S. ambassador to Sri Lanka, and three of her predecessors will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whither Sri Lanka? PostConflict Peace and Reconciliation.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 to 8 p.m. $15; $5 for students. Reservations required. Cinnabar Room, Asia Society Washington, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-833-2742. â&#x2013;  Richard Guy Wilson, professor of architectural history at the University of Virginia, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edith Wharton and Her Visual World.â&#x20AC;? 6:45 to 9 p.m. $40. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Pete Hamill will discuss his novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tabloid City.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. â&#x2013;  The Georgetown Book Club will discuss Philip Rothâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nemesis.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. Free. Georgetown Neighborhood Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. â&#x2013;  Dr. Michael E. Kerr will reflect on his 20 years as director of the Bowen Center for the Study of the Family in Georgetown. 7:30 p.m. Free. Bowen Center for the Study of the Family, Suite 103, 4400 MacArthur Blvd. NW. 202-965-4400. Films â&#x2013; 

Senior Cinema Thursday will feature

Reading â&#x2013;  The Joaquin Miller Poetry Series will feature readings by Pia Taavila and Ian Williams. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202895-6070. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Mystics will play the Connecticut Sun. 7 p.m. $10 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-3977328. Friday, June JUNE 17 Friday 17 Book signing â&#x2013;  Paul Moylan will sign copies of his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camino de Santiago: Fingerprints of God.â&#x20AC;? 4 to 6 p.m. Free admission. Bourbon Coffee, 2101 L St. NW. 202-525-1886. Concerts â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature singer Marilyn AshfordBrown. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202312-1300. â&#x2013;  Simon Thomas Jacobs of Greenwich, Conn., will present an organ recital. 12:15 p.m. Free. National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW. 202-797-0103. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz in the Gardenâ&#x20AC;? series will feature guitarist John Lee performing fusion jazz/rock. 5 to 8:30 p.m. Free. Sculpture Garden, National Gallery of Art, 7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. â&#x2013;  Alliance Française de Washington will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;La FĂŞte de la Musique,â&#x20AC;? featuring local bands. 5:30 to 10 p.m. Free. 2142 Wyoming Ave. NW. 202-234-7911. â&#x2013;  Jazz vocalist Elissa Lala will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Embassy Series will present tenor Szabolcs Brickner, mezzo-soprano Magdalena WĂłr (shown) and pianist George Peachey performing Hungarian folk songs, arias from operettas and operas, and works by Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin and FaurĂŠ. 7:30 p.m. $75. Embassy of Poland, 2640 16th St. NW. 202-625-2361. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Army Concert Band will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunsets With a Soundtrack,â&#x20AC;? featuring â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comediansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gallop,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casey at the Batâ&#x20AC;? and familiar patriotic tunes. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Captiol. 703-696-3399. â&#x2013;  Nordic Jazz 2011 will feature Icelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AndrĂŠs Thor Trio. 9 and 11 p.m. $20. Twins Jazz, 1344 U St. NW. InstantSeats.com. â&#x2013;  Ruthie and the Wranglers will celebrate the release of the new live album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ruthie and the Wranglers, Live at Goose Creek.â&#x20AC;? 9:30 p.m. Free. Hill Country BBQ See Events/Page 21


20 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

&

THE CURRENT

Events Entertainment Wednesday, June JUNE 15 Wednesday 15 Concerts â&#x2013;  The Golden Triangle Business Improvement District will present Monster Band performing funk, pop and dance music. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Farragut Square Park, Connecticut Avenue and K Street NW. goldentriangle.com. â&#x2013;  The Harbour Nights concert series will feature vocalist and guitarist Jason Masi. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Plaza, The Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202295-5007. â&#x2013;  Those Darlins will perform a blend of country punk and dirty South garage rock. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Band will perform works by DvorĂĄk, Rachmaninoff and Sousa. 8 p.m. Free. West Terrace, U.S. Capitol. 202-433-4011. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Erin McHugh and Nan Buzard will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The L Life: Extraordinary Lesbians Making a Difference.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. â&#x2013;  Juliet Eilperin will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Demon Fish: Travels Through the Hidden World of Sharks.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  Ari Redbord, an assistant U.S. attorney who specializes in cases involving human trafficking, and Kathleen Davis, national training coordinator for the Polaris Project, will discuss the extent of human trafficking and slavery in the Washington area. 7 p.m. Free. Adas Israel

Congregation, 2850 Quebec St. NW. 202362-6295. â&#x2013;  The D.C. Music Salon, a film and book series about music-related topics, will discuss 1950s entertainer Joyce Bryant and show excerpts from the documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joyce Bryant: The Lost Diva.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Neighborhood Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. Films â&#x2013;  The French CinĂŠmathèque series will feature Bertrand Tavernierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Princess of Montpensier.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $11; $9 for students; $8.25 for seniors; $8 for ages 12 and younger. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Britain With Loveâ&#x20AC;? will feature Debs GardnerPatersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Africa United.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $11; $9 for seniors and students; $8 for military personnel and ages 12 and younger. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202-419-3456. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Movie Nights in the Heights,â&#x20AC;? presented by the Columbia Heights Day Initiative, will feature Emile Adrolinoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1987 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dirty Dancing,â&#x20AC;? starring Jennifer Grey, Patrick Swayze and Jerry Orbach. 8:30 p.m. Free. Field, Tubman Elementary School, 11th and Kenyon streets NW. info@columbiaheightsday.org.

Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Nationals will play the St. Louis Cardinals. 7:05 p.m. $5 to $350. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Thursday at 7:05 p.m. Thursday, June 16 Thursday JUNE 16 Concerts â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature Con Candela performing Latin rhythms. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. â&#x2013;  The D.C.-based group Urban Funk will perform a blend of jazz, R&B and Latin sounds. 5 to 8 p.m. Free. Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. â&#x2013;  Members of the National Symphony

Orchestra Youth Fellowship Program will perform classical music for flute, trumpet, bass, viola and percussion. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Duke Ellington School of the Arts Show Choir will perform a concert to raise funds for its upcoming trip to France. 7 p.m. $25 to $100. La Maison Française, 4101 Reservoir Road NW. InstantSeats.com. The concert will repeat Friday at 7 p.m. â&#x2013;  The Embassy Series will present tenor Szabolcs Brickner (shown), mezzo-soprano Magdalena WĂłr and pianist George Peachey performing Hungarian folk songs, arias from operettas and operas, and works by Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin and FaurĂŠ. 7:30 p.m. $75. Embassy of Hungary, 2950 Spring of Freedom St. NW. 202-625-2361. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Band will perform works by DvorĂĄk, Rachmaninoff and Sousa. 8 p.m. Free. Sylvan Theater, Washington Monument grounds, 15th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-433-4011. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute will present a panel of Holocaust survivors discussing their experiences at the hands of the Nazi regime. 10 to 11:50 a.m. Free. Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-895-4860. â&#x2013;  Robert P.J. Cooney Jr., author of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winning the Vote: The Triumph of the American Woman Suffrage Movement,â&#x20AC;? will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Becoming Invincible: Suffragistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Winning Strategies.â&#x20AC;? Noon. $10; reservations suggested. Sewall-Belmont House & Museum, 144 Constitution Ave. NE. sewallbelmont.org. â&#x2013;  Jack L. Robbins, project architect and senior urban designer at Perkins + Will, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Active Design Joins the Fight Against Obesity.â&#x20AC;? 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Free; registration required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. â&#x2013;  Susan Markham and Allida Black of the National Democratic Institute will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Democracy and the

$9.99 ASIAN GOURMET SUSHI BAR

Ever experienced the true taste of healthy food?

Litestars Brunch Medley Enjoy our Weekend Special Medley of one savory tartlet of your choice including vegetarian and vegan selections and a glass of wine, sparkling wine, or beer and SAVE $3.00!

Sat/Sun Brunch | 10:00 AM-3:00 PM 2101 L St. NW, Washington, DC

202-293-0281 www.litestars.com

LUNCH SPECIAL

$10 Bento Boxes Happy Hour AT THE BAR

Mon-Fri 4 - 6pm Â&#x2021;%DPEX6LJQDWXUH&RFNWDLOV Â&#x2021;3UHPLXP5DLO&RFNWDLOV Â&#x2021;RIIZLQHE\WKHJODVV KRWVDNH VHOHFWEHHU HOURS: Sunâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thurs 11am-10pm Friâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Sat 11am-10:30pm

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Caroline Bottaroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2009 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Queen to Play,â&#x20AC;? starring Kevin Kline and Sandrine Bonnaire. $6.75 for ages 62 and older. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Camp: Sauceriferous!â&#x20AC;? will feature the 1951 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Day the Earth Stood Still.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 7th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-6331000.

Friday, JUNE 17 â&#x2013;  Concert: The 2011 June Chamber Festival will feature the American Chamber Players performing works by Mozart, DvorĂĄk, Liebermann and Bloch. 7:30 p.m. $35. Kreeger Museum, 2401 Foxhall Road NW. 202-337-3050.

Challenge of Change.â&#x20AC;? 5:30 p.m. $25; reservations required. Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National Democratic Club, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-232-7363. â&#x2013;  A gallery talk will focus on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kandinsky, Abstraction, and the Mystic.â&#x20AC;? 6 and 7 p.m. $12; $10 for seniors; free for ages 18 and younger. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. 202-387-2151. â&#x2013;  Natalie Chanin, founder of the clothing line Alabama Chanin, will discuss the unique business model that makes her artisan enterprise possible. 6 p.m. $25; reservations required. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-667-0441, ext. 64. â&#x2013;  Trish Regan will discuss her book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Joint Ventures: Inside Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Almost Legal Marijuana Industry.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, 555 12th St. NW. 202-347-0176. â&#x2013;  Archaeologist Fabio Esteban Amador will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cultural Identity in El Salvador: Olmec, Maya, Toltec, Pipil?â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Inter-American Development Bank Cultural Center, 1300 New York Ave. NW. 202-623-3558. â&#x2013;  Patricia A. Butenis, U.S. ambassador to Sri Lanka, and three of her predecessors will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whither Sri Lanka? PostConflict Peace and Reconciliation.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 to 8 p.m. $15; $5 for students. Reservations required. Cinnabar Room, Asia Society Washington, 1526 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-833-2742. â&#x2013;  Richard Guy Wilson, professor of architectural history at the University of Virginia, will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Edith Wharton and Her Visual World.â&#x20AC;? 6:45 to 9 p.m. $40. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  Pete Hamill will discuss his novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tabloid City.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. â&#x2013;  The Georgetown Book Club will discuss Philip Rothâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nemesis.â&#x20AC;? 7:30 p.m. Free. Georgetown Neighborhood Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. â&#x2013;  Dr. Michael E. Kerr will reflect on his 20 years as director of the Bowen Center for the Study of the Family in Georgetown. 7:30 p.m. Free. Bowen Center for the Study of the Family, Suite 103, 4400 MacArthur Blvd. NW. 202-965-4400. Films â&#x2013; 

Senior Cinema Thursday will feature

Reading â&#x2013;  The Joaquin Miller Poetry Series will feature readings by Pia Taavila and Ian Williams. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202895-6070. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Mystics will play the Connecticut Sun. 7 p.m. $10 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-3977328. Friday, June JUNE 17 Friday 17 Book signing â&#x2013;  Paul Moylan will sign copies of his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Camino de Santiago: Fingerprints of God.â&#x20AC;? 4 to 6 p.m. Free admission. Bourbon Coffee, 2101 L St. NW. 202-525-1886. Concerts â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature singer Marilyn AshfordBrown. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202312-1300. â&#x2013;  Simon Thomas Jacobs of Greenwich, Conn., will present an organ recital. 12:15 p.m. Free. National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Circle NW. 202-797-0103. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz in the Gardenâ&#x20AC;? series will feature guitarist John Lee performing fusion jazz/rock. 5 to 8:30 p.m. Free. Sculpture Garden, National Gallery of Art, 7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. â&#x2013;  Alliance Française de Washington will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;La FĂŞte de la Musique,â&#x20AC;? featuring local bands. 5:30 to 10 p.m. Free. 2142 Wyoming Ave. NW. 202-234-7911. â&#x2013;  Jazz vocalist Elissa Lala will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Embassy Series will present tenor Szabolcs Brickner, mezzo-soprano Magdalena WĂłr (shown) and pianist George Peachey performing Hungarian folk songs, arias from operettas and operas, and works by Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin and FaurĂŠ. 7:30 p.m. $75. Embassy of Poland, 2640 16th St. NW. 202-625-2361. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Army Concert Band will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunsets With a Soundtrack,â&#x20AC;? featuring â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comediansâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Gallop,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Casey at the Batâ&#x20AC;? and familiar patriotic tunes. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Captiol. 703-696-3399. â&#x2013;  Nordic Jazz 2011 will feature Icelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s AndrĂŠs Thor Trio. 9 and 11 p.m. $20. Twins Jazz, 1344 U St. NW. InstantSeats.com. â&#x2013;  Ruthie and the Wranglers will celebrate the release of the new live album, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ruthie and the Wranglers, Live at Goose Creek.â&#x20AC;? 9:30 p.m. Free. Hill Country BBQ See Events/Page 21


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Events Entertainment Continued From Page 20 Market, 410 7th St. NW. 202-556-2050. Discussions and lectures ■ U.S. Botanic Garden botanist Kyle Wallick will discuss Liliaceae and explain how gene sequencing has changed the “old” lily family. Noon to 1 p.m. Free; reservations required. Conservatory Classroom and Terrace, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-1116. ■ Library assistant Valerie Sallis will discuss “Global War: The American Revolution in India,” referencing maps, manuscripts and books highlighting an often-overlooked theater of the conflict. 12:30 p.m. Free. Society of the Cincinnati, Anderson House, 2118 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-7852040. ■ Miroslav Barta, professor of Egyptology at Charles University in Prague, will discuss “Swimmers in the Sand: On the Origins of Ancient Egyptian Civilization.” 6 p.m. Free; reservations required. Rome Building Auditorium, Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies, 1619 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-663-5676. ■ Sam Kean will discuss his book “The Disappearing Spoon: And Other Tales of Madness, Love, and the History of the World From the Periodic Table of the Elements.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Festival ■ The 2011 World Children’s Festival will feature workshops, activities and performances intended to nurture and highlight children’s creativity. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Free. National Mall between 4th and 7th streets. worldchildrensfestival.org. The festival will continue Saturday and Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Performances ■ The Potter’s House will present a performance by jazz poet Golda Solomon. 7 to 10:30 p.m. $15 to $50 donation suggested. The Potter’s House, 1658 Columbia Road NW. pottershousedc.og. ■ The Bel Cantanti Opera Company will perform Rossini’s “La Cenerentola” as part of the Summer Opera Festival 2011. 7:30 p.m. $40; $15 for students. Ward Hall, Catholic University, 3801 Harewood Road NE. 301-266-7546. The performance will repeat Sunday at 7:30 p.m. Sporting event ■ The Washington Nationals will play the Baltimore Orioles. 7:05 p.m. $5 to $350. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Saturday at 1:05 p.m. and Sunday at 1:35 p.m. Saturday, June 18 Saturday JUNE 18 Children’s program ■ In honor of Caribbean Heritage Month, the Petworth Neighborhood Library will host a carnival mask-making activity for children and families. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free. 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. 202243-1188. Classes and workshops ■ Suzanne Bouchard, director of gardens and grounds, will lead a hands-on workshop on edible flowering plants. 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. $95; reservations

required. Tudor Place Historic House and Garden, 1644 31st St. NW. gardentotable.eventbrite.com. ■ Artist Jackie Abrams will lead a workshop on how to make a strong, colorful, multipurpose carrier using everyday plastic bags and crocheting. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $45. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202667-0441. ■ Physicist and astronomer Donald Olson will lead a seminar on “Tales of a Celestial Sleuth: From Van Gogh’s Starry Nights to Lincoln’s Moon.” 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $120. S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Drive SW. 202-633-3030. ■ S. Lynn Cooper will lead a “Twitter Bootcamp for Beginners” workshop. 1 to 3 p.m. $45. First Class Inc., 1726 20th St. NW. 202-797-5102. ■ Citronelle master sommelier Kathy Morgan will lead a class on “Big Reds.” 1 to 3 p.m. $100. Michel Richard Citronelle, 3000 M St. NW. 202-625-2150. Concerts ■ The Adams Morgan Partnership Business Improvement District’s summer concert series will feature the D.C.-based band Aubriot performing original rock songs and pop covers. 5 to 7 p.m. Free. Public plaza in front of BB&T Bank at Columbia Road, Adams Mills Road and 16th Street NW. 202-997-0783. ■ Members of the National Symphony Orchestra will perform classical works. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Discussions and lectures ■ John Ochsendorf, engineering professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will discuss “Guastavino Vaulting: The Art of Structural Tile.” 11 a.m. to noon. Free. Baird Auditorium, National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-2722448. ■ The “I Love a Mystery Book Club” will discuss Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None.” 3 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. ■ Snigdha Prakash will discuss her book “All the Justice Money Can Buy: Corporate Greed on Trial.” 6 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Festivals ■ The U.S. Botanic Garden’s “Green Genes Festival” will feature a chance to delve into the plant family tree with handson activities, a cooking demonstration and a tour focusing on palms and arums. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free. U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. 202-225-1116. ■ The French American Cultural Foundation will present “Fête de la Musique,” featuring more than 50 bands and street performers. 4 p.m. to midnight. $8; free for ages 10 and younger. La Maison Française, 4101 Reservoir Road NW. InstantSeats.com. Films ■ “Opera in Cinema” will feature “The Barber of Seville,” recorded live at Teatro Regio di Parma. 11 a.m. $20. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202-419-3456. ■ A Reel Portraits Double Feature will present George Lucas’ 1973 film “American Graffiti” at 1 p.m. and Ron Howard’s 1984 film “Splash��� at 3 p.m. Free. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. ■ “Color, ’Scope: Recent Restorations From the 1950s” will feature Samuel

Capitol St. SE. 202-544-7077. ■ A park ranger will lead ages 7 and older on a two-hour hike to Rolling Meadows Bridge. 2 p.m. Free. Rock Creek Nature Center, 5200 Glover Road NW. 202895-6070. Sunday, JuneJUNE 19 Sunday 19

Sunday, JUNE 19 ■ Film: “A Classic Father’s Day” will feature Vincente Minnelli’s 1950 film “Father of the Bride,” starring Elizabeth Taylor and Spencer Tracy. 2:30 to 4 p.m. $20; $12 for college student; $8 for ages 6 through 18. Reservations suggested. Hillwood Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202-686-5807.

Fuller’s 1955 film “House of Bamboo.” 2:30 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. ■ Erika Brooks Adickman, founder of Troop Beverly Hills: The Experience, will host a screening of the 1980s cult classic “Troop Beverly Hills,” starring Shelley Long. 7:30 p.m. $12. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. sixthandi.org. ■ “Divas Outdoors: Classic Films Under the Stars” will present Blake Edwards’ 1959 film “Operation Petticoat,” starring Cary Grant and Tony Curtis. 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. $15; $10 for students and ages 6 through 18. Reservations suggested. Hillwood Museum and Gardens, 4155 Linnean Ave. NW. 202-686-5807. Performances ■ The DC Black Theatre Festival will feature “Black Girl Lost” by Mary McCallum. 1:30 p.m. $15. August Wilson Stage, Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. eventbrite.com/event/1499235253. The performance will repeat Sunday at 5:30 p.m. ■ The Bel Cantanti Opera Company will perform Mozart’s “Der Schauspieldirektor” as part of the Summer Opera Festival 2011. 7:30 p.m. $40; $15 for students. Ward Hall, Catholic University, 3801 Harewood Road NE. 301-266-7546. The performance will repeat Sunday at 3 p.m. ■ “Capital City Showcase” will feature local comedians, musicians and performing artists. 10 p.m. $12. District of Columbia Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. capitalcityshowcase.com.

Children’s program ■ Muralist Byron Peck will present “Mosaic Mania,” a hands-on chance for families to work with tiles and make their own small mosaic murals to take home. 1 to 3 p.m. $17 per child; reservations required. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. Concerts ■ The 12th annual Washington Jewish Music Festival will feature the Mama Doni Band in a highenergy, interactive family rock concert. 11 a.m. $25 per family. Goldman Theater, Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-777-3251. The festival will continue through June 26. ■ The weekly Steel Drummer Sundays concert series will feature Roger Greenidge. Noon to 3 p.m. Free. Plaza, The Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202295-5007. ■ The Citizens Association of Georgetown’s Concerts in the Park series

will present Wes Tucker & the Skillets performing roots rock. 5 to 6:30 p.m. Free. Rose Park, 26th and P streets NW. 202337-7313. ■ The Funk Ark will perform a mix of Afrobeat and big-band funk. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. ■ Nordic Jazz 2011 will feature the Andrés Thor Trio from Iceland, In the Country from Norway and Dan Burglund’s Tonbruket (shown) from Sweden. 6 to 10 p.m. $25. Rooftop Terrace, House of Sweden, 2900 K St. NW. ticketweb.com. ■ Dahlak Restaurant will host its weekly “DC Jazz Jam” session. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Free. 1771 U St. NW. 202-527-9522. Discussions and lectures ■ The Middle East Dialogue will feature a talk on the “Shared Communities” project by the mayors of the Jewish town of Pardes Hanna and the Arab village of Kfar Kara. 9 to 11 a.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. ■ Local artist Matthew Mann will discuss “Acupuncture Pitchfork Style” by the artist “Uncle Jack” Dey. 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Free. Smithsonian American Art Museum, 8th and F streets NW. 202-633-1000. ■ Ceramacist Cliff Lee and jeweler Holly See Events/Page 22

Budding Yogis Mindful Yoga Camps Sign-up week to week, June 13-Aug 22 Check out our NEW afternoon Teen Camp July 18-22, 1-3pm

Special event ■ Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage and the Washington Humane Society will hold a Pet Adoption Day. Noon to 4 p.m. Free admission. Suite 101, The Washington Harbour, 3000 K St. NW. Walks and tours ■ Docents will lead tours of the Folger Shakespeare Library’s Elizabethan Garden, which is filled with a mix of plants mentioned in Shakespeare’s works and herbs popular in his day. 10 and 11 a.m. Free. Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East

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22 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

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Events Entertainment Continued From Page 21 Lee will discuss their work and their lives as artists. 2 p.m. Free. Grand Salon, Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. 202-633-1000. ■ Meryle Secrest, author of “Modigliani: A Life,” will discuss “The Unknown Modigliani.” A book signing will follow. 2 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. ■ International concert organist Neva Krysteva will discuss “The Contrapuntal

Films

about the veteran performer. 7 p.m. $10; $9 for seniors and ages 24 and younger. Goldman Theater, Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-777-3251.

■ “Color, ’Scope: Recent Restorations From the 1950s” will feature Delmer Daves’ 1956 film “Jubal,” starring Glenn Ford. 4:30 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202737-4215. ■ The Washington Jewish Music Festival will feature episodes from the Israeli television series “Culture Heroes” — “Zubin Mehta and I,” about the man whose name is synonymous with classical music in Israel, and “Chava Alberstein, Singer,”

Reading ■ “Sunday Kind of Love” will present a reading from the anthology “Persistent Voices: Poems by Writers Lost to AIDS,” featuring editor Philip Clark and guest poets Jericho Brown, H.G. Carillo, Richard McCann (shown) and Joseph Ross. 5 to 7 p.m. $5 donation sug-

Temple of Mozart’s Last Symphony.” 5 p.m. Free. Church of the Holy City, 1611 16th St. NW. 202-462-6734.

gested. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. Monday, June JUNE 20 Monday 20 Classes ■ Jeanne Fogle will lead a class on “D.C. Tour Guides: Studying for the Licensing Exam.” 6 to 8 p.m. $45. First Class Inc., 1726 20th St. NW. 202-7975102. ■ Step Africa! will offer a master class on performance techniques and stylistic expression of rhythmic footwork, body percussion, spirited vocalizing and African polyrhythms. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 7th St. SE. 202-547-6839. Concerts ■ The “Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plaza” series will feature Transformation performing classical melodies. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. ■ The eclectic R&B duo Sweet Rush will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. ■ The Washington Jewish Music Festival will feature The Klezmatics and gospel singer Joshua Nelson. 7:30 p.m. $30; $25 for seniors and ages 24 and younger. Goldman Theater, Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-777-3251. ■ The U.S. Navy Band Concert Band will perform. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. 202-433-2525. Discussions and lectures ■ The National Archives, the Ronald Reagan Presidential Foundation and the Close-Up Foundation will present a youth conference on the role of civil discourse throughout U.S. history. 2 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. ■ A monthly lecture series on “Body, Spirit and Mind” will feature librarian Paul Sweeney discussing “The Path of Eckhart Tolle.” 6:30 p.m. Free. Watha T. DanielShaw Neighborhood Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. ■ Louisa Thomas will discuss her book

“Conscience: Two Soldiers, Two Pacifists, One Family — a Test of Will and Faith in World War I.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. Films ■ “Opera in Cinema” will feature “Mahon,” recorded in December 2009 at Gran Teatre del Liceu in Bercelona. 7 p.m. $20. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202-419-3456. The film will be shown again Saturday at 11 a.m. ■ “Marvelous Movie Mondays” will feature Adam Shankman’s 2007 film “Hairspray,” starring John Travolta, Queen Latifah, Nikki Blonsky and Zac Efron. 2 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. ■ Asia Society Washington and the Embassy of India will present Kavery Kaul’s film “Back Walking Forward: In the Aftermath of Brain Injury.” A question-andanswer session with Kaul will follow the screening. 6:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Embassy of India, 2017 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-833-2742.

Performances ■ Zeitgeist DC will present a staged reading of “Oil,” written by Lukas Bärfuss and translated by Neil Blackadder. A discussion will follow. 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Goethe-Institut, 812 7th St. NW. 202-289-1200, ext. 167. ■ “Nine Lives — Live,” a musical compilation that ran for two sold-out performances at the New Orleans Jazz Fest, will feature singer/songwriter Paul Sanchez, actor Michael Cerveris, author Dan Baum and musician Arsene Delay. 8 p.m. $20 in advance; $23 on the day of the show. Sixth & I Historic Synagogue, 600 I St. NW. 800745-3000. ■ Blacktop Theatre Company and the Keegan Theatre will present “The 1st Annual Blacktop Theatre Company Spelling Bee,” an adult twist on the grade-school standby. 8 p.m. Pay-what-you-can. Church Street Theatre, 1742 Church St. NW. 703217-0912. Tuesday, June JUNE 21 Tuesday 21 Concerts ■ The Harbour Kids concert series will feature Mr. Knick Knack. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Free. Plaza, The Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202-295-5007. ■ The “Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plaza” See Events/Page 28


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Events Entertainment

Exhibition highlights focus on shapes, colors

â&#x20AC;&#x153;P

attern: Three Generations of Shape and Color,â&#x20AC;? featauring three painters who work with recurring shapes and colors, will open Friday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at Carroll Square Gallery and continue through Aug. 26. Located at 975 F St. NW, the gallery is open

SAVE THE DATE!

On EXHIBIT Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. 202234-5601. â&#x2013;  Parish Gallery will celebrate its 20th anniversary by opening a group show Friday with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. attended by many of the represented artists, including Sam Gilliam. The show will continue through July 12. Located at 1054 31st St. NW, the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202944-2310. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Something Other Than the Present,â&#x20AC;? a group show about the desire for nonexistent places, unreachable times and unattainable states of being, will open Friday at the District of Columbia Arts Center and continue through July 17. An opening reception will take place Friday from 7 to 9 p.m., and the artists will give a talk July 16 at 5 p.m.

Mark your calendars for the weekend of

October 14-15, 2011

when Woodrow Wilson High School celebrates its 75th birthday with a gala celebration in the atrium Friday night and a FREE music and arts festival and open house all day Saturday.

Tom Greenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;In Green,â&#x20AC;? a 2004 acrylic on canvas, is part of an exhibit at Carroll Square Gallery. Located at 2438 18th St. NW, the center is open Wednesday through Sunday from 2 to 7 p.m. 202-4627833. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Walk on the Wild Side: The Animal Art of Walter Addison (1914-1982),â&#x20AC;? featuring works by an artist who painted many of the animal-house murals at the Bronx Zoo, will open Friday at Susan Calloway Fine See Exhibits/Page 28

We are looking for LOCAL ARTISTS, CRAFTSPEOPLE, MUSICIANS, AND PERFORMING ARTISTS to participate in the music and arts festival. If you are or know of local musicians and artists who would like to participate, please visit our website at www.75wilsonhighdc.org to sign up to perform, display your art, or sell your crafts! Or contact us at 75wilsonhighdc@gmail.com.

Kennedy Center hosts â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Wickedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; for summer run

T

he Kennedy Center will host the hit Broadway musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wickedâ&#x20AC;? June 15 through Aug. 21. Featuring music and lyrics by Stephen Schwartz, the play takes place long before Dorothy visits

On STAGE the land of Oz. Two girls meet â&#x20AC;&#x201D; one, born with emerald green skin, is smart, fiery and misunderstood; the other is beautiful, ambitious and very popular. How do they grow to become the Wicked Witch of the West and Glinda the Good? Performance times generally are 7:30 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and 1:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets cost $37 to $250. 202-467-4600; kennedy-center.org. â&#x2013;  Arena Stage will close John Grishamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Time to Killâ&#x20AC;? June 19 in the Kreeger Theater. Performance times are 7:30 p.m.

The Broadway musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wickedâ&#x20AC;? will play at the Kennedy Center June 15 through Aug. 21. Wednesday; 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; 2 p.m. Saturday; and 1 and 6 p.m. Sunday. Ticket prices start at $55. Arena Stage is located at 1101 6th St. SW. 202488-3300; arenastage.org. â&#x2013;  The Kennedy Center will close a new production of Stephen Sondheimâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tony Award-winning musical â&#x20AC;&#x153;Folliesâ&#x20AC;? June 19. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and

1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday. Tickets cost $45 to $150. 202-467-4600; kennedy-center.org. â&#x2013;  Penumbra Theatre Company will close Dominic Taylorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;I Wish You Love,â&#x20AC;? featuring the words and music of Nat â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kingâ&#x20AC;? Cole, June 19 at the Kennedy Center. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. Wednesday through Sunday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets cost $34 to $40. 202-467-4600; kennedy-center.org. â&#x2013;  The Washington Savoyards will close the Tony Award-winning musical revue â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Misbehavinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? June 19 at the Atlas Performing Arts Center. Performance times generally are 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; 2:30 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; and 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $15 to $40. The Atlas Performing Arts Center is located at 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993; savoyards.org.

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24 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

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Service Directory Department 5185 MacArthur Blvd. N.W., Suite 102, Washington, D.C. 20016 The Current Service Directory is a unique way for local businesses to reach Northwest Washington customers effectively. No matter how small or large your business, if you are in business to provide service, The Current Service Directory will work for you.

HANDYMAN Categories listed in this issue Air Conditioning Cabinet Work Carpet Cleaning Chimney Services Cleaning Services Electrical Services Floor Services Handyman Hauling

Home Improvement Home Services Iron Work Kitchens & Baths Landscaping Lawn Care Locksmith

Painting

Masonry

Windows & Doors

Pest Control Plumbing Roofing

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Tree Services Windows

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Service Directory

HOME IMPROVEMENT

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26 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

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Service Directory

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

☎ 202/244-7223 (FAX) 202/363-9850 ROOFING

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HOOVER ROOFING, LLC. Licensed/Bonded/Insured Member of the BBB Leak Detection Specialist All Types of Roof /Repairs & Replacement Masonary Restoration Historical Exterior Restoration Speak Directly with the Owner - Don Office #- 301-441-2712 • Cell #- 301-440-4850 FIND US ON THE WEB @ HOOVERROOFINGVA.COM

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27

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trashwalk is where you walk around the neighborhood and pick up trash. There are three or four kids in each group and you go with a parent or a teacher. You don’t go in a car. You put on a glove, and only the hand with the glove can pick the garbage up. You don’t pick up trash in people’s yards — you get it from the sidewalk or the grass between the sidewalk and the road. You can’t go in the street, but if there is trash in the street, the grown-up can get it. When we get back to school, we weigh the trash to see how much we found. Sheridan School has been doing trashwalks for a very long time. Once we got 54 pounds of trash on one walk. Martha Adler started the trashwalks 18 years ago when her son Will was in kindergarten. Sam Berman and Ruby Luzzatto interviewed Mrs. Adler to find out how the trashwalks started. Mrs. Adler said she wanted the kids to do something for the environment. There was a lot of trash in the neighborhood, and she thought a trashwalk would be fun. Sheridan has had a lot of fun doing these trashwalks for all of these years, and we’ve been helping to clean the environment. So far this year we have gotten 30 pounds of trash. — Kindergartners

Stoddert Elementary Hi, my name is Givonne, and I’m in the fourth grade at Stoddert. We had a lot of interesting projects to look at during our Science Fair in our gym. We had several weeks to prepare our science experiments. I chose to find out if electricity lights a bulb brighter with thick wire or thin wire. I discovered that my hypothesis was correct because the thick wire makes a light bulb brighter than thin wire. I saw Victor’s experiment in the other fourth-grade class, and it was brilliant. He created Pharaoh’s Snakes by using calcium gluconate and dry spirit. You have to use fire, too, to light it up. As the fire reached these chemicals, a black snake formed, and it kept forming as long as the fire was on. I also liked Jared’s experiment. He’s in the fifth grade. Jared made a tornado in a large bottle. It was fascinating. Hi, my name is Alonzo, and I also visited the Science Fair. I really enjoyed making my science experiment. I did a boiled egg in a bottle. I lit a piece of paper and dropped it in a bottle. The fire separates the molecules and the egg seals off all of the air, and that creates a vacuum effect and the egg is sucked into the bottle. Students got to watch my experiment, but only part of the egg went in. I really liked the “Sticky Road to Success” experiment by Danielle. It was about how gum improves your memory. Eclipse gum was used in the experiment. — Givonne Talley, fourth-grader, and Alonzo Beverly, fifth-grader


28 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

Service Directory WINDOWS

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EXHIBITS From Page 23 Arts and continue through July 23. An opening reception will take place Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. Located at 1643 Wisconsin Ave. NW, the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202-965-4601. ■ “Historic Washington, DC: New Works by the Washington Society of Landscape Painters,” highlighting the historic nature of the nation’s capital with works in diverse media, will open Saturday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. at American Painting Fine Art and continue through Sept. 10. Located at 5118 MacArthur Blvd. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. 202-244-3244. ■ “Workingman Collective: Prospects and Provisions,” featuring diverse works by a collective that fosters artistic collaboration and viewer participation, will open Saturday with a reception from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at Hemphill Fine Arts and continue through Aug. 20. Located at 1515 14th St. NW, the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202-234-5601. ■ “American Temple,” presenting an interactive sculpture and a series of drawings by Jenny Sidhu Mullins inspired by spiritual tourism in India, will open Saturday with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. at Flashpoint Gallery and continue through July 23. Located at 916 G St. NW, the

gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202315-1305. ■ “Views in Colors,” a two-day exhibit and sale for mixed-media artist and sculptor Evangeline J. Montgomery, will take place Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. at Chevy Chase House, 5420 Connecticut Ave. NW, where Montgomery is artist-in-residence. 202-686-5504. ■ “Both Sides of the Lens: The Faces and Stories of D.C. Youth,” Critical Exposure’s sixth annual exhibit of D.C. student photos and writing, opened recently at Edison Place Gallery and will continue will continue through July 1. Located at 702 9th St. NW, the gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from noon to 4 p.m. 202872-3396. ■ “Wavelengths,” a site-specific installation curated by microWave project and inspired by the concept of wavelengths, opened last week at Honfleur Gallery and will continue through July 22. Located at 1241 Good Hope Road SE, the gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202-580-5972. ■ “Documents: alternative guide to dc underground,” investigating subjects of identity through photographic and physically interactive portraits, opened last week at the Gallery at Vivid Solutions and will continue through July 22. Located at 2208 Martin Luther King Jr. Ave. SE, the gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from noon to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202-365-8392.

THE CURRENT

&

Events Entertainment Continued From Page 22 series will feature singer Annie Sidley. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. ■ Ron Reid and Sunsteel, a Bostonbased pan-jazz ensemble, will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. ■ The New Dominion Chorale will host a singalong of choral excerpts from Verdi’s “Requiem,” conducted by Thomas Colohan, artistic director of the National Master Chorale. 7:30 p.m. $10. Western Presbyterian Church, 2401 Virginia Ave. NW. 703-442-9404. ■ Presented in conjunction with the Washington Jewish Music Festival, “Songs of Life Festival: A Melancholy Beauty” will feature the premiere of an oratorio highlighting the rescue of Bulgaria’s 49,000 Jews during the Holocaust. 8 p.m. $50 to $150. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. ■ The U.S. Navy Concert Band will perform. 8 p.m. Free. U.S. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-737-2300. ■ The U.S. Air Force Band’s Singing Sergeants will perform. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. 202-767-5658. Discussions and lectures ■ The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute will present George Washington University history professor Adele Alexander discussing her book “Parallel Worlds: The Remarkable GibbsHunts and the Enduring (In)significance of Melanin.” 10 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Free. Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-895-4860. ■ Carol Joynt will discuss her memoir “Innocent Spouse” as part of a “Meet the Author” luncheon series. Noon to 1:15 p.m. $25; reservations required. Rivers at the Watergate, 600 New Hampshire Ave. NW. 202-333-1600. ■ Kurt E. Johnson, professor of anatomy and regenerative biology at George Washington University, will discuss his book “In My Back Yard: Natural History in the Suburbs.” 6:30 p.m. Free. Reiter’s Books, 1900 G St. NW. 202-223-3327. ■ Eddie Brown will discuss his book “Beating the Odds: Eddie Brown’s Investing and Life Strategies.” 6:30 to 8 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-387-7638. ■ Howard University law professor W. Sherman Rogers will discuss his book “The African American Entrepreneur: Then and Now.” 6:30 p.m. Free. Room 310, Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. 202-727-0321. ■ Ellis Cose will discuss his book “The End of Anger: A New Generation’s Take on Race and Rage.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. ■ Thomas Chorlton will discuss his book “The First American Republic, 1774-1789: The First Fourteen American Presidents Before Washington.” 7 p.m. Free. Arts Club of Washington, 2017 I St. NW. 202-3317282. ■ “Deception and Spycraft: Military Intelligence in the Civil War” will feature

Tuesday, JUNE 21 ■ Film: The second in a series of screenings based on “AFI’s 100 Years … 100 Movies” list will feature No. 90 — George Stevens’ 1936 film “Swing Time,” starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers. 6 p.m. Free. Georgetown Neighborhood Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-7270232.

International Spy Museum historian Mark Stout, Buena Vista University professor William B. Feis and State University of New York at Fredonia professor James A. Davis. 7 to 9 p.m. $25. International Spy Museum, 800 F St. NW. 202-393-7798. ■ “National Geographic Weekend” host Boyd Matson will hold a conversation with explorers Sylvia Earle, Mattias Klum, Paula Kahumbu (shown) and Kevin Hand. 7:30 p.m. $25. National Geographic, 1600 M St. NW. 202857-7700. Film ■ The Washington Psychotronic Film Society will screen Larry Cohen’s 1985 film “The Stuff.” 8 p.m. Free; donations suggested. The Passenger, 1021 7th St. NW. 202-462-3356.

Sporting events ■ The Washington Mystics will play the Indiana Fever. 7 p.m. $10 to $300. Verizon Center, 601 F St. NW. 202-397-7328. ■ The Washington Nationals will play the Seattle Mariners. 7:05 p.m. $5 to $350. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Wednesday at 7:05 p.m. and Thursday at 1:05 p.m. Wednesday, June 22 Wednesday JUNE 22 Class ■ Deena Hadar will lead a “Preparing for Childbirth” class as part of a parenting series. 7 p.m. $40; registration required. Lil Omm, 4830 V St. NW. 202-248-6304.

Concerts ■ The “Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plaza” series will feature the Kamel Zennia Band performing world music. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-312-1300. ■ The Harbour Nights concert series will feature Josh Burgess performing grassroots rock. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Plaza, The Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202-295-5007. ■ The Golden Triangle Business Improvement District will present the band

Cazhmiere performing top 40 and dance tunes. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Free. Farragut Square Park, Connecticut Avenue and K Street NW. goldentriangle.com. ■ Tony Ellis and his band will perform banjo and string-band music. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. ■ Singer/songwriter Noah Gittell will present an acoustic concert. 7:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. District of Columbia Arts Center, 2438 18th St. NW. 202-462-7833. ■ The U.S. Marine Band will perform works by Paul Creston, Kenneth J. Alford, Amilcare Ponchielli, Arturo Márquez, Eric Osterling and Frank Ticheli. 8 p.m. Free. West Terrace, U.S. Capitol. 202-433-4011. Discussions and lectures ■ National Gallery of Art lecturer Sally Shelburne will discuss “Abstract Painting and Sculpture in Europe: Dada and Surrealism.” Noon. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202737-4215. ■ Howard Means will discuss his book “Johnny Appleseed: The Man, the Myth, and the American Story.” 2 p.m. Free. McGowan Theater, National Archives Building, Pennsylvania Avenue between 7th and 9th streets NW. 202-357-5000. ■ NPR host Diane Rehm will talk to Eva Gabrielsson about her memoir “‘There Are Things I Want You to Know’ About Stieg Larsson and Me.” 6 to 9 p.m. $10. House of Sweden, 2900 K St. NW. 866-4687619. ■ Barbara Babcock, law professor emerita at Stanford University, will discuss her book “Woman Lawyer: The Trials of Clara Foltz.” 6:30 p.m. Free. Reiter’s Books, 1900 G St. NW. 202-223-3327. ■ Panelists will discuss the Vienna Summit of 1961 between U.S. President John F. Kennedy and Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev. 7 p.m. Free; reservations required. Embassy of Austria, 3524 International Court NW. 202-895-6776. ■ Mary Doria Russell will discuss her novel “Doc.” 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. Film ■ The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute will present Susan Froemke’s 2009 film “The Audition,” about a competition to pick 11 finalists to sing on the Metropolitan Opera stage. 10 a.m. to 11:50 a.m. Free. Abramson Family Recital Hall, Katzen Arts Center, American University, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. 202-895-4860.

Performance ■ The 12th annual Washington Jewish Music Festival will feature performance artist and indiefolk musician Dan Fishback presenting “On a Queer Day, You Can See Forever.” 7:30 p.m. $15; $12 for seniors and ages 24 and younger. Goldman Theater, Washington DC Jewish Community Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 202-777-3251. Reading ■ Radio and television host Robert Aubry Davis will read his favorite love poems. A wine and hors d’oeuvres reception will follow. 5:30 p.m. $20; reservations required. Arts Club of Washington, 2017 I St. NW. 202-331-7282, ext. 16.


WWW.CURRENTNEWSPAPERS.COM

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Computers

CHAIR CANING Seat Weaving – All types

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☎ 202/244-7223 (FAX) 202/363-9850 E-mail: Classified@Currentnewspapers.com

Estate Sales

Help Wanted

Housing for Rent(hs/th)

SEEKING SECURE space for estate sale. Contemp furn, misc household items. Willing to share space. 202-244-0305.

Gardening Project Manager Specialty Gardening Service seeks horticulturally educated individual to help maintain and sometimes oversee small crew for residential gardens in Georgetown and surrounding areas. Applicant must have previous experience/education in horticulture, demonstrated skills in maintaining high caliper gardens; including but not limited to corrective pruning, seasonal design & installation, general maintenance, and managing small crews on site. Acting as a representative of our company, person must be proficient in discussing gardening issues with clients and fluent in English. Only exper. applicants need apply. We offer a great working environment, flexible hours, and competitive pay. If you are passionate about gardening and would like to be considered, please email Gardens_Remembered@comcast.net Will not accept any phone calls.

TOWNHOUSE WITH off-street parking to share with Episcopal/Anglican Nun: Available immediately in Foggy Bottom near GWU & Metro. Contact Sister Lydia: jastelzig@yahoo.com or 202-642-7985.

Furniture

References

email: chairsandseats@aol.com

LIKE NEW: two beautiful (Georgetown Restoration) Wallis Chairs, upholstered in silver sage, 26" W x 35" D x 34” H, castered legs, hardwood frame, set $1,100. 202-342-9406

STEVE YOUNG • 202-966-8810

Autos for Sale 2000 BMW 323 cic convertible, $9,500. Very good condition, 90k miles, premium package, automatic, Navig., 6CD, Titanium Silver. Michelin tires. Call 5:00 pm-8:00 pm (202) 342-9406.

Handyman

Handy Hank Services SERVICES:

Child Care Available

• Carpentry • Painting Int/Ext • Gutters/Downspouts • Drywall/Plaster Repairs • Light Rehab – Tile Installation • Flooring – Wood/Tile

EXPER. NANNY, lives in CC/DC, avail for even. wknd/ childrare pos. good w/ infants, exc. ref’s. 202-362-3841 (

FT/PT NANNY available. Caring, legal, drives, 10 years exp. Good References, flexible. Call (240)645-2528.

Established 1990 Excellent Local References

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LIVE-IN NANNY/HOUSE-MGR to join Dad +2 (11 & 9) in Chevy Chase, MD. You are legal, experienced, flexible, a good minivan driver, meal preparer, homework helper, self-starter, work evenings and some overnight. References req'd. We offer top pay, warmth, blocks of daytime & wkds off, private bed/bath/entrance, vacation. Call 240-479-9713 (corrected number).

Cleaning Services

HOUSE CLEANING service, weekly, bi-weekly, monthly. Customer satisfaction 100%. Excel. Ref’s. Call Solange 240-855-1099. HOUSE/CONDO CLEANING Mondays & Saturdays. DC & Maryland. Free Estimates. 240-351-3548. Great references.

Painting Drywall Tile Work Carpentry Computer problems solved, control pop-ups & spam, upgrades, tune-up, DSL / Cable modem, network, wireless, virus recovery etc. Friendly service, home or business. Best rates.

Call Michael for estimate: 202-486-3145 www.computeroo.net New Computer? iPod? Digital Camera? NW DC resident with adult training background will teach you to use the Internet, e-mail, Windows, Microsoft Word, numerous other programs, or other electronic devices. Help with purchase and setup available. Mac experience. Call Brett Geranen at (202) 486-6189. ComputerTutorDC@gmail.com

Domestic Available HOUSECLEANINGIRONING and laundry. Low prices, all materials, own transportation, excel. references. 202-702-8594

I CLEAN houses in NW DC. Honest, reliable, hardworking. Please call 202-689-4429 & leave a message.

I’M LOOKING for a domestic job. I have 20yrs experience. Call me at 202-726-3326

MGL CLEANING SERVICE

MY EXCELLENT housekeeper is seeking housekeeping job 1 or 2 days a week. Please call Jasmina at 202-203-9510. I am happy to provide reference.

Good References, Free Estimates Our customers recommend us Mario & Estella: 703-798-4143

Computers Nationally Certified Expert Can make your Windows PC run noticeably faster and more reliably. Additionally, hardware and software upgrades available at no markup. Fixed $125 fee. Your satisfaction guaranteed. Scott at 202-296-0405.

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301-412-0331

Hauling/Trash Removal

Bulk Trash Low VPery ric Pick Up es • Sofas as low as $15.00 • Appliances as low as $25.00 • Yards, basement & attic clean-up • Monthly contracts available

Mike’s Hauling Service

Junk Removal Commercial and Residential Serving NW DC Since 1987

240-876-8763

Sunny Offices for Rent Small office suite overlooking Connecticut Avenue, near Dupont Circle. Two rooms, approximately 500 square feet, with lots of windows. Perfect for small organization or non-profit. Available immed. $1500 per month includes utilities. Parking available for $200 addl. Call: Anne-Marie (202)232-2995.

Housing for Rent (Apts) FOGGY BOTTOM condo: 1BR, , 3 large closets, modern kit., gran/ stain appliances, balcony/courtyard view, W/D. Incl all utils. Metro/ G’town- 6 min. $2,500/ mo. Call 240-780-1490.

AU / Cathedral Area Idaho Terrace Apts – 3040 Idaho Ave, NW

Manager Special *** • 1BR. $1250 All utilities included. Sec. Dep. $250 Controlled entry system. Metro bus at front door. Reserved parking. Office Hours: M-F, 9-5

202-363-6600

Domestic Wanted LOOKING FOR Housecleaner/Gourment Chef who is legal, paid on the books (no cash, yes W-2). Gourmet Chef is needed to entertain a busy social family. Drives, cleans, cooks well for family and for dinner parties; grocery shopping and other errands. Our 3 kids are in school full time. Job is mostly housekeeping not childcare. Car is available for work. Good salary, health insurance and generous vacation. email laurablu01@aol.com or call cell 917-439-2499.

Help Wanted CARRIERS WANTED For Northwest Current in Palisades neighborhood. Ideal for 10-11 yr old with committed family. Contact: 202-244-1062

TEACHER N.A.E.Y.C. Accredited, Partnership for Jewish Life and Learning commended, progressive play-based nursery school in Upper NW seeks teacher 5 mornings/wk for Fall. Degree in ECE or related field required. Competitive salary & benefits. Supportive & professional work environment. Fax resume to: 202-363-6396. Attn: Nursery School.

Cooking Classes Glover Park/ Burleith Simple, delicious, everyday vegetarian cooking. Eat dinner first, then learn how to make it! Contact Juliette @ healthylivinginc@earthlink.net www.healthylivinginc.org LEARN PIANO

Vista Management Co.

HOUSECLEANING, QUALITY service at fair prices with great reference and excellent work. Satisfaction guaranteed. Free Estimate. Call Kathy at 703-998-5338.

Experienced Husband & Wife Team Licensed Bonded, Insured

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Benny’s Cleaning Co., Inc. Residential & Commercial Weekly/Bi-Weekly - One Time Experienced cleaners, Own trans. Excellent work, Reasonable Prices Good References • Lic. & Insured 703-585-2632 • 703-237-2779

Tom Wass Handyman Services

Instruction

Housing for Rent(hs/th) OPEN - SAT & SUN 6/18-6/19 1-4 p.m. NORTH CLEVELAND PK $3100/mo. 3721 Windom Place, NW, WDC 20016. Classic Norman-style Duplex: 3 Fin Lvls + Walk-up Attic; 2BR+Den; 2Bath; High Ceilings; Vintage Fpl. Walk to Metro or Bike Ride to Downtown. Sec Dep $3100. Avail 8/1.

In the convenience of your home. Patient, experiened teacher. Beginners welcome.

202-342-5487

Max Murphey ~ Math Tutor Grades 4-12 In your home or via webcam 14 years tutoring experience ‘01 St. Albans; ’05 Columbia Univ. Math teacher at St. Albans for 4 yrs Currently in Ph.D. program References available 301-996-1715 mfm2002@gmail.com

Middle School Liberal Arts Tutoring (MSLAT) Current middle school teacher offers instruction in: •History •Latin •English grammar •Writing: Composition, Research •Keyboarding; Mac and PC skills •Planning, Organization, Study Skills • Free Pre-assessment Andy Pitzer:202-262-5676; pitzerac@verizon.net Qualifications avail. upon request SPANISH INSTRUCTION All ages and levels: Students, business and travel. Professor, native of Spain, 20 + years teaching in DC: St. Alban’s, GW, GU Belen Fernandez 202-316-0202 belen.fp@verizon.net

Say You Saw it in

THE CURRENT THE CURRENT Help Wanted Newspaper Carrier Needed (car required) Earnings on most routes $50-$70

PT Dog Walker needed 11 a.m.-3 p.m., M-F. Must have experience working with animals and love dogs, have own vehicle and pass background check. apply online at www.zoolatry.com

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The Current has openings for Home Delivered newspaper delivery routes to serve on Wednesday (daylight hours), rain or shine. Dependability is essential. Call Distributor Jim Saunders 301-564-9313


30 WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15, 2011

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Misc. For Sale TOTAL GYM as seen on the Info commercial with Chuck Norris, almost new for $250. Email: Debbie@DCLiving.com.

WHIRLPOOL WASHER Dryer, Super Capacity, Units are like new. $295 for both. 202.686.1035

Pets Cat Care Services Providing loving, attentive care for your cat(s) while you are away by doing more than just cleaning the box & filling the bowl. â&#x20AC;˘ Over 15 years experience. â&#x20AC;˘ Am/pm & weekend visits â&#x20AC;˘ Short term & long term. Will also take care of other small indoor pets, water plants & bring in mail. References available upon request. Great rates! Located in The Palisades. catcaresvcs@yahoo.com call 703-868-3038

Moving/Hauling CONTINENTAL MOVERS Free 10 boxes Local-Long Distance â&#x20AC;˘ Great Refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

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Dogsitter/ Dog Daycare Personalized daycare and overnight petsitting in my home. Lots of care, walks and park time. Good references.

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Professional Services General office/clerical assistance After hours (5:30-8:30). Ideally suited for the busy executive working from home. Able to assist with filing, organizing documents, Accounts Payable, organization. etc. Reasonable Rates â&#x20AC;˘ Palisades Area Please call Ann at 202.352.1235.

Professional Assistant Can help w/ business, financial, legal paperwork, medical insur. form reimbursement, Quicken, QB, organizing. Catholic U Grad. Native of Chevy Chase. Reliable & Confidential. Julie Furth, J.D. 202-557-0529 www.jfurth.com julie@jfurth.com

Senior Care CERTIFIED GERIATRIC nursing assistant, over 12 years exp. 10 yrs. exp. childcare. Good refâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, honest, reliable, hardworking. Seeking L/O pos for childcare/ caregiver. Reliable, loving and Caring. Call 240-645-2528.

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Ace Window Cleaning Window Cleaning, Lic., Bonded, Ins. 25 years exp., working owners assure quality. many local references.

301-300-0196 Yard/Moving/Bazaar MOVING SALE: Sat. June 18th, 8-5. Sun. June 19, 9-5. Furniture, art work, electronics. 3226 Military Road, NW.

Pets ADOPT â&#x20AC;&#x153;FRITZIâ&#x20AC;? 10 mo Gr/Wh polydactyl, cutie WITH big bro â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snookie.â&#x20AC;? that play, groom and snuggle with each other. Others. 202-244-0556

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Say You Saw it in

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NW BARGAINS! Sat June 18 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 Women's Summer Clothing! Drastically Reduced Art! The Shops at Ingleside 3050 Military Road, N.W. Washington DC 202-363-8310 Ext 2017

CAMPUS From Page 3 ing academic functions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For a long time in the process, [neighbors] have said no beds. We started off at 1,000, then we went to 770, now weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re at 590,â&#x20AC;? said Paul Tummonds, an attorney for the university. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we have shown that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to work with them.â&#x20AC;? In addition to four sites for new or expanded dormitories â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including the East Campus â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 10-year plan envisions expanding several nonresidential buildings on its main campus, adding 17,000 square feet of retail space to the East Campus, significantly increasing graduate school enrollment, and relocating its Washington College of Law from 4801 Massachusetts Ave. to its Tenley Campus at Wisconsin and Nebraska avenues. To the disappointment of many

FLOODING From Page 1 original botched job, nothing has been done about the drainage. A number of Chevy Chase residents have complained about quickly deteriorating pavement from the 2006-2007 work on Reno Road north of Nebraska Avenue. But for Fogarty, the aftermath has been worse than potholes and bumpy car rides. Despite intervention by Ward 3 D.C. Council member Mary Cheh, who asked D.C. Department of Transportation directors to do something about the drainage problem, Fogarty still worries when a hard rain is forecast. The Transportation Department sent engineers to look at the problem in February 2008, Ostrowski said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A supervisor took one look at the road and said, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no crown.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; But nothing happened.â&#x20AC;? Last year, the agency did install a new drain right in front of Fogartyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s property, but it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help. Transportation Department spokesperson John Lisle partially agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The drain we put in works in low flow, but is not sufficient for high flow,â&#x20AC;? he said. Now the agency is hoping to correct the flooding problem by installing two new catch basins on the curb near Fogartyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re still working on it,â&#x20AC;? Lisle said recently, adding the agency plans to get the fix completed â&#x20AC;&#x153;by mid-summer.â&#x20AC;? A curb cut put in as part of the 2006-2007 reconstruction, and required by federal law, added to Fogartyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s problem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The curb cut is like a ramp. It directs the water, mostly into Colleenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s yard,â&#x20AC;? said neighbor Ostrowski. So when Reno was resurfaced this spring, Fogarty and Ostrowski were astonished that nothing was done about the drainage. A supervisor on site said the resurfacing couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t wait, according to Fogarty. Lisle confirmed that the

neighbors, the university has not yet put forward detailed plans for the Tenley Campus, which is covered under the campus plan, or for the existing law school building, which â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as a commercially zoned site â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is out of the Zoning Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus plan jurisdiction. At the hearing, Hood said university officials should work to ease neighborsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; concerns about the Massachusetts Avenue facility. The officials said they would likely retain the building for academic functions, but noted they have few legal restrictions on its use. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to hear, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any regulatory responsibility, so weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to do whatever we do whenever we do it.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the wrong answer,â&#x20AC;? Hood replied. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People want predictability. â&#x20AC;Ś It might not be a regulatory issue, but at the end of the day, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s about being a good neighbor.â&#x20AC;? The commission will continue to hear the case June 23. Transportation Department had planned to address Fogartyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drainage problem when Reno Road was resurfaced, but went ahead without that portion when the city and the contractor finally reached an agreement over the cost of the repaving work. Lisle could not comment on whether the original reconstruction job left Reno with an improper slope. A chain of emails from Fogarty, Ostrowski and Cheh to and from various Transportation Department staffers tells a frustrating tale. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The problem originally was an incompetently executed Reno Road resurfacing, which banks the runoff steeply to one side, pouring into Chevy Chase Parkway,â&#x20AC;? Ostrowski wrote to various officials in 2008. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have rivers of water cascading down the sidewalk, street and over the front strip of lawn. I have attached photos,â&#x20AC;? she wrote last summer after a downpour. At that time, Cheh tried to get then-Transportation Department director Gabe Klein involved. In April this year, Cheh forwarded the emails to new agency director Terry Bellamy, asking him to â&#x20AC;&#x153;please make this part of the repairs the contractor has agreed to do on Reno. The problem is interconnected.â&#x20AC;? Bellamy responded that he would have agency workers â&#x20AC;&#x153;assess the situation with the contractor.â&#x20AC;? On May 16, Fogarty wrote to Ostrowski: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heads up. The repaving on Reno commenced this morning. No, our flooding is not being corrected.â&#x20AC;? Fogarty said she had considered filing a claim with the city for the damages to her property, but was advised by a Transportation Department staffer to wait until the drainage problem was â&#x20AC;&#x153;straightened out.â&#x20AC;? She finally filed a claim, but then learned such claims must be filed within six months of the damage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They denied it,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She can always put in a claim,â&#x20AC;? Lisle said, adding, â&#x20AC;&#x153;What weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing is trying to correct the problem,â&#x20AC;? he said.


Wednesday, June 15, 2011 31

The Current WASHINGTON, DC GEORGETOWN BETHESDA/CHEVY CHASE MARYLAND VIRGINIA

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Extensive renovations in 2009 make this classic 1921 colonial like a new home! Fabulous kitchen, spectacular great room & MBR suite with his/her baths, on nearly .5 acre level lot with terrace, gardens & pool! Near Connecticut Ave, Rock Creek park, mins to downtown! $2,895,000

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Charming 7BR, 4.5BA bungalow including formal LR & DR, kitchen overlooking FR w/FP, large terrace & garden w/ deck & koi pond, MBR, 4 add’l BR on 2nd & 3rd floors, LL w/2 add’l BR, FBA & second kitchen. $1,195,000

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Beautifully renovated 5BR/4.5BA Tudor with great entertaining spaces including a spacious LR, sunroom, chef’s kit opening to FR, MBR ste w/en-suite renov bath & wall of closets, LL bedroom & rec room, a great rear deck & a 2 level flagstone patio. $1,795,000

202-256-2164

GeorGetown, washinGton, DC

wesley heiGhts, washinGton, DC

Terrell McDermid

Ellen Morrell Matthew B. McCormick Saundra Giannini

NEW LISTING! Spacious, fully renovated townhouse steps to Volta Park. Beautiful living spaces, fabulous kitchen, professionally designed garden, three bedrooms, two baths. $1,200,000

202-256-5871

Charming 4BR, 3.5BA with open family room with cathedral ceilings, sun room, 2FP, Palladian windows and skylights throughout,plus large yard and gardens. $1,195,000

202-728-9500 703-307-6096

Penn Quarter, washinGton, DC

FoGGy Bottom, washinGton, DC

GeorGetown, washinGton, DC

Matthew B. McCormick Ben Roth

William F. X. Moody Robert Hryniewicki

Nancy Taylor Bubes

Spectacular two-level Penthouse unit with two bedrooms, two full & one half bath, custom marble floors on main level, eat-in kitchen, finishes throughout. Private rooftop terrace with incredible city views. $845,000

202-728-9500 202-243-1619

Townhouse-style, duplex 2,150 SF floor plan with 1,350 SF terrace in the Watergate West. Walls of glass, gracious rooms. Two bedrooms, two full & one half baths. Parking space. Storage space. $799,000

202-243-1620

INTERNATIONAL NETWORKS • LOCAL AFFILIATE

UNDER CONTRACT! Beautiful 2BR, 1BA home in the heart of Georgetown boasts exquisite details throughout including custom cabinetry, high ceilings and recessed lighting. Renovated kitchen, updated bath, separate dining room & rear patio.

202-256-2164


32 Wednesday, June 15, 2011

The Current

stately eleGance

luxury at its Best

Eric Murtagh 301-652-8971

Dupont. Four level renovated townhouse w/ open floor plan. 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs, gourmet kitchen, 3rd fl. MBR suite w/stairs to fabulous roof dec, LL in-law suite. Patio + pkg for 2 cars. $1,549,000

Green Vista

chic renoVations

Town of Chevy Chase. Beautifully sited on the “street of streets”, extensively renovated & expanded. Panoramic views. 6 BRs, 4.5 BAs. Deep & expansive grounds. $2,195,000

Ellen Abrams 202-255-8219 Anne-Marie Finnell 202-329-7117

Martins addition. Sun filled Colonial with expansive back yard. 4 bedrooms, 2.5 baths, family room, kitchen w/island. Open floor plan. Spacious deck. Short walk to shops & playground $1,229,000

Erin Deric 240-599-6029 Jenny Chung 301-651-8536

Bethesda. Westgate. Charming & spacious 4 BR, 2.5 BA recently expanded. Chef’s kitchen, Great rm w/cathedral ceiling. Updated owner’s suite w/stunning bath. Patio & landscaped garden. $1,095,000

Eric Murtagh 301-652-8971

Gracious liVinG

Chevy Chase, Md. The Somerset House. Elegant & stunning 2 BR + den, 2.5 BA apt. w/over 2400 sf of space. Oversize balcony w/spectacular views. 2 pkg spaces. Prestigious bldg offers multitude of amenities & services. $1,549,000

Susan Berger 202-255-5006 Ellen Sandler 202-255-5007

Picturesque & charminG

Westmoreland Hills. Sunny Colonial w/beautiful patio & courtyard. Newly renovated kitchen, 4 BRs, 3 FBs, 2 HBs includes 1st floor BR & BA. Den. $1,180,000

Bonnie Lewin 301-332-0171

CHEVY CHASE 4400 Jenifer Street, NW Washington, DC 20015 202-364-1700

contemPorary style

Chevy Chase, MD. Town of Somerset. Renovated 5 level 4000 sf w/5 BRs, 3 BAs, cathedral ceilinged LR & DR opening to deck. Community pool & tennis courts. $1,325,000

Bonnie Lewin 301-332-0171

stylish sPaces

Kenwood Park, MD. Split Colonial w/4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. Spacious open floor plan includes sun rm and family rm both off kitchen. LL rec rm + bonus rm. Walk to Whitman/Pyle. $972,000

Linda Chaletzky 301-938-2630

DUPONT 1509 22nd Street, NW Washington, DC 20037 202-464-8400

www.EversCo.com

VintaGe BunGalow

contemPorary mode

Pat Lore 301-908-1242 Ted Beverly 301-728-4338

Pat Kennedy 202-549-5167 Ed Schneider 202-277-9499

Crestwood. Exciting 4 BR, 2.5 BA Observatory Circle. Amazing period in sylvan setting. Cutting edge chef’s details in this cute 4 bedroom, 2 bath. Wonderful condition. Welcoming kitchen opens to Great Room. Vaulted ceilings, window walls, balcony & 2 front porch, private rear garden, screened porch and garage. $939,000 decks. Fabulous renovation. $915,000

rooms with a View

The Garfield. Crisp and sunny apt with open liv rm, din rm, kitchen, updated baths, hdwd flrs and treetop views. $439,000

Nancy Wilson- 202-966-5286

old hamlet charm

all For you

Laura McCaffrey 301-641-4456

Rachel Widder 703-216-4446

Foggy Bottom. Tastefully updated 2 Chevy Chase. Captivating brick bedroom, 1.5 bath row house in the colonial in the Old Hamlet: 3 Brs, center of it all. Kitchen w/granite, SS. 3 Bas, liv rm, din rm w/ frpls, Built-ins & fireplace Lovely fenced completely charming decks and patio/garden. Steps to Metro, porches, sunny kitchen + family room; Kennedy Center. $679,000 finished lower lvl; att. garage. $875,000

historic statement

Dupont. Desirable 2 bedroom one bath on the 12th floor at the Cairo. Exposed brick walls. W/D, city views. Roof deck, pets welcome. $439,000

Lynn Bulmer 202-257-2410

SELLING THE AREA’S FINEST PROPERTIES

sleek & sPecial

Dupont Circle. Perfect pied-aterre in the heart of Dupont. One bedroom, two baths, renovated chef’s kitchen, glitzy baths. Low condo fees. $349,000

Eric Murtagh 301-652-8971

eVerythinG you want

Chevy Chase, DC. Duplex one bedroom condo at Christopher Mews. Open stairwell w/exposed brick, 3 skylights, sep. DR opens to deck, wood burning fireplace. Flooded with light. $329,000

charm & character

American University Park. Semidetached Tudor w/ 3 bedrooms, 2 baths, sun room/sleeping porch. Deck & beautifully landscaped garden. $699,000.

Susan Berger 202-255-5006 Ellen Sandler 202-255-5007

Best address

Mt. Pleasant. Historic Wardman building. Renovated one bedroom (755 sf) with updated bath & table space kitchen with SS appliances & granite counter tops. 10’ceilings. Awesome roof deck. 4 blocks to Metro $329,000

Ellen Abrams 202-255-8219 Anne-Marie Finnell 202-329-7117 Delia McCormick 301-977-7273

LICENSED IN DC, MD, VA


GTC -- 06/15/2011