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Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Serving Chevy Chase, Colonial Village, Shepherd Park, Brightwood, Crestwood, Petworth & 16th Street Heights

Vol. XLV, No. 31

The NorThwesT CurreNT

Pepco wire-burying plans on hold

CHEF CHALLENGE

■ Utilities: Firm proposed

undergrounding on Oregon

By BRADY HOLT Current Staff Writer

Pepco has developed plans to bury a trouble-prone feeder along Oregon Avenue in Chevy Chase, but the work remains indefinitely on hold while the utility clarifies with the D.C. Public Service Commission

the process for selecting lines for undergrounding. Pepco secured permits for the work, which would run from Nebraska Avenue to Beech Street, and told the commission this spring it would be ready to move forward within about eight weeks of receiving the panel’s blessing. That would mean the project could likely have been well into the anticipated fourmonth construction process today, Pepco officials confirmed.

But the Public Service Commission said it wasn’t satisfied with Pepco’s criteria for choosing a “selective undergrounding” site. Although it raised no specific objection to Oregon Avenue — or to a second proposed undergrounding site along Michigan Avenue NE — the commission wrote in an April 27 order that the methodology used to select them might allow for costly projects that aren’t fully necessary. See Power/Page 14

D.C. CAS test scores increase modestly By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

Bill Petros/The Current

Celebrity chefs Bryan Voltaggio, above, and Victor Albisu competed in the 2012 Chef Challenge on Monday at the Citi Open tennis tournament at the William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center.

While top city education officials touted signs of growth in the latest standardized test scores last Thursday, the D.C. Comprehensive Assessment System results present a complex mixed picture. Public schools made modest prog- ■ SCHOOL BY ress, and charter schools less so, but SCHOOL: A the charters continue to top tradi- detailed look at tional public schools in overall read- the numbers. Page 7. ing and math achievement. The scores, released annually with great fanfare since school reform efforts began in 2007, do show one clear and predictable constant: Schools in Ward 3 and other affluent areas outperform schools in poorer neighborhoods, where fewer than half of students typically score “proficient” for their grade levels in reading and math. See Scores/Page 27

Bill Petros/The Current

Key Elementary, designated a 2012 “reward school,” had a 91.6 percent proficient rate on the D.C. Comprehensive Assessment System.

Zoning panel to weigh car-free Tenley project

Federal policy change may impact D.C. sewer efforts

By KATIE PEARCE

■ Facilities: City delaying

Current Staff Writer

Can a parking-free residential building work in Tenleytown? D.C. zoning commissioners were skeptical about the concept this week as they agreed to hold public hearings on a proposed development in the area. “All of this stuff sounds good; it sounds great,” commissioner Anthony Hood said Monday of the plan from Douglas Development. “But the decisions we’re making, the impacts are going to be felt for 10 years.” Douglas plans to redevelop the old Babe’s Billiards site at Wisconsin Avenue and Brandywine Street as a six-story building. Five floors of about 60 residential units will top ground-floor and below-grade retail. One form of zoning flexibility the developer is seeking is relief from the city’s requirements for parking,

NEWS City looks for new operator for historic Lincoln Theatre

— Page 3

construction of two tunnels

By BRADY HOLT Bill Petros/The Current

Douglas Development has proposed a six-story residential and retail project, with no parking, for the corner of Wisconsin Avenue and Brandywine Street. which call for one space per 300 square feet of retail, and one space per two residential units. The project application says the site’s proximity to the Tenleytown Metro station and several bus routes makes the parking spots unnecessary in this case. See Babe’s/Page 12

SPOR TS New coach begins to revamp St. John’s hoops

— Page 11

Current Staff Writer

An Environmental Protection Agency policy shift is making it increasingly unlikely that the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority will need to spend more than $1 billion to construct two giant sewage-storing tunnels in addition to one that is already being built. Local officials warn, however, that there is no inexpensive way to prevent wastewater

PASSAGES Weekend event digs into Civil War history in Logan Circle

— Page 13

from polluting local waterways. The water authority is under a federal mandate to drastically reduce pollution flowing into the Anacostia and Potomac rivers and Rock Creek. It agreed in 2005 that it would comply by building three tunnels, each more than a mile long, that would store millions of gallons of untreated wastewater that would otherwise be discharged when the system is overloaded, such as after a heavy rainfall. The stored sewage is treated later as capacity permits. One of the three — a seven-mile, $1.8 billion tunnel targeting the See Tunnels/Page 5

INDEX Calendar/18 Classifieds/26 District Digest/4 Exhibits/21 In Your Neighborhood/16 Opinion/8

Police Report/6 Real Estate/15 Service Directory/22 Sports/11 Theater/21 Week Ahead/3

Tips? Contact us at newsdesk@currentnewspapers.com


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The CurreNT

District’s fledgling ethics board works to prepare for Oct. 1 launch date By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

The city’s new Board of Ethics and Government Accountability is scrambling to organize itself, even as allegations of campaign misconduct and other ethical violations mount against the mayor and other top D.C. government officials.

As of last week, the new board had no staff, no office or meeting space, scanty phone service and only a skeletal website at bega.dc.gov. But chair Robert Spagnoletti said the panel will be ready to accept and investigate complaints once it officially opens for business Oct. 1. The three members were sworn in July 12. “We’re only a whopping 13 days old,�

Spagnoletti said last week, “so there’s a large amount of work ahead.� Spagnoletti is a former D.C. attorney general and president of the D.C. Bar; the two other board members are Laura Richards and Deborah Lathen, both attorneys and civic activists. At the board’s first meeting on July 25, Spagnoletti outlined the challenges for the new

office: eight full-time employees to be hired, rules to be written, office space to be located at One Judiciary Square, and coordination to be worked out with the many other agencies that now handle ethics investigations and complaints. The board has a huge mandate. It must oversee financial disclosure and lobbyist regisSee Ethics/Page 10

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City seeks new manager for Lincoln Theatre

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After managing the troubled Lincoln Theatre for seven months, the city is looking for a new operator to restore the historic U Street venue to health. The city intends to release a solicitation this month for a â&#x20AC;&#x153;fulltime theater operator â&#x20AC;Ś with a proven track record of creative, high-quality programming and financial management experience,â&#x20AC;? said Marquis Perkins of the D.C Commission on the Arts and Humanities, the agency that has managed the theater since Jan. 1. Perkins said the new operator would be in charge of creating â&#x20AC;&#x153;a sustainable business model for the theater.â&#x20AC;? That goal has proved elusive in recent years, as the city has struggled to bail out the underused institution at 12th and U streets. The arts commission took over management after the city dropped its previous contract with the struggling U Street Theater Foundation, a nonprofit. Ward 1 D.C. Council member Jim Graham said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for some fresh thinking about the city-owned theater, so the same problems donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keep cropping up. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We certainly need another approach to this,â&#x20AC;? he said. Bonnie Nelson Schwartz, a former board member of the U Street Theater Foundation, said one idea thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s come up before is a private/ public partnership involving a professional promoter. Another strategy that worked in the past was joining a commercial operator with a nonprofit foundation. Schwartz said both possibilities were discussed again at a roundtable meeting last month exploring a sustainable solution for the theater, held by at-large D.C. Council member Vincent Orange. The Lincoln Theatre first opened in 1922 and became the heart of the area known as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Broadway.â&#x20AC;? It shut down after the 1968 riots, but it was restored and reopened in partnership with the city in 1994. Perkins said the city hopes to select a new operator by the end of this year.


The CurreNT

wedNesday, augusT 1, 2012

3

Group hires light designer to illuminate Connecticut Avenue median By ELIZABETH WIENER Current Staff Writer

Subtle shifting lights will soon grace a lushly planted median on Connecticut Avenue between Farragut Square and Dupont Circle, courtesy of the Golden Triangle Business Improvement District and the D.C. Commission on the Arts and Humanities. The two groups in late July chose lighting designer Alexander Cooper, who also does projects for the National Portrait Gallery, to

create the latest enhancement to the important commercial strip. Work on the median, including installation of new plantings and Cooper’s programmable, low-energy LED lights, will begin late this summer. Cooper’s unusual lighting scheme, said Golden Triangle director Leona Agouridis, will sweep bands of color up the median and across the new landscaping. Colors, and some of the plants, will change with the seasons. “It will be hard to walk on Connecticut Avenue and not say wow,” Agouridis said.

“People will want to come and see it.” As part of a major streetscape enhancement, the first section of the median — from K to L streets — was converted from asphalt to green space a year ago. Work on the three northern blocks will extend the raised, landscaped median strip up to Jefferson Place, just south of Dupont Circle. The D.C. Department of Transportation is handling the street work and sidewalk improvements, while the Golden Triangle group is paying for the plantings. The $200,000 cost of

MPD partners with community for Night Out By ELI OKUN

Current Correspondent

The Metropolitan Police Department will combine forces with various community partners next Tuesday to host National Night Out, celebrating the work such groups have done in the past and offering opportunities to continue public-safety efforts. The District will join 9,000 cities and jurisdictions around the country, as well as U.S. military bases around the world, in marking the 29th year of National Night Out, which is sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch, a nonprofit community safety organization. The evening’s lynchpin in D.C. will be a main kickoff event at the Anacostia Library in Southeast; at the same time, each police district will host at least one event of its own. All the events are funded by the Washington DC Police Foundation and Target. Yvonne Smith, director of the police department’s Office of Community Outreach and coordinator of National Night Out events, said the evening is an impor-

tant chance to honor the various community groups that help preserve neighborhood safety in the city. “It’s just almost like a neighborhood reunion where we come out and celebrate our partnerships,” she said. The central kickoff event will play host to city dignitaries including Mayor Vincent Gray, Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton, U.S. Attorney Ronald Machen and representatives from other government agencies. That event “will be set up kind of like a street festival,” Smith said, with tables with food, games and other activities. Unique this year will be a celebration of the late go-go icon Chuck Brown, who worked a few years ago with the police department on a campaign encouraging youth to tell authorities if they see or hear about crimes. Posters with Brown’s image that were created for that campaign will be available free, Smith said. The evening will also include awards for community groups that have stepped up to assist the police department, Smith said, like a “court watch” program through which residents gather community impact statements about repeat violent offenders in their neighborhoods to See Police/Page 27

the “light art” will be shared equally by the group and the city arts commission, Agouridis said. Sponsors say the various improvements will not only create a sense of place and enliven the streetscape, but also enhance pedestrian safety on the busy corridor. “Mr. Cooper’s light display is an excellent example of how public art and urban planning can come together,” said Lionell Thomas, director of the Arts and Humanities Commission.

The week ahead Thursday, Aug. 2

The Corcoran Gallery of Art will hold a community meeting to discuss upcoming decisions about the institution’s future, including the search for a new director. The event will begin with a brief presentation on “What Should the Corcoran Be?” by chief curator and head of research Philip Brookman. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. Reservations are suggested; visit getinvolved.corcoran.org/museum_community.

Saturday, Aug. 18

The Office of the Deputy Mayor for Education will hold a “Community Conversation” for Ward 4 residents as part of its Quality Schools Community Engagement Initiative. The meeting is intended to identify and discuss strategies to improve access and quality of education for D.C. students, particularly in areas identified as having a high need for additional seats at quality educational programs. The meeting will be held from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Emery Recreation Center, 5701 Georgia Ave. NW. To RSVP, visit dcward4.eventbrite.com.

Saturday, Aug. 25

D.C. Public Schools will hold its annual Beautification Day from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Volunteers are needed to help ensure that schools are ready and welcoming for the first day of school. For details, call 202-724-4881, visit dcps.dc.gov or email dcps.beautificationday@dc.gov.


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The CurreNT

District Digest Task force to review lower camera fines

Ward 6 D.C. Council member Tommy Wells has convened a task force to study the possibility of reducing the cost of traffic offenses caught by cameras while increasing the number of cameras in the city for more consistent enforcement. Task force members include AAA Mid-Atlantic, the DC Pedestrian Advisory Council, the DC Bicycle Advisory Council and the Council for Court Excellence â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

groups that have offered different stances on the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s automated enforcement program, according to a news release from Wellsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; office. In the release, Wells says he convened the task force to ensure that the camera program focuses on safety rather than revenue, and that he will introduce legislation based on the task forceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s recommendations this fall. Ward 3 D.C. Council member Mary Cheh has agreed to co-chair the panel. Cheh, who chairs the councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s transportation committee,

hopes to make sure that the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fines are based on policy considerations, according to Cheh spokesperson Kiara Pesante.

Feds to close local Social Security office

Due to budget cuts, the U.S. Social Security Administration is closing its Shepherd Park office this month and merging its activities with those of locations in the West End and Brentwood, according to a news release. The 7820 Eastern Ave. NW office will cease operations at the close of business on Friday, Aug. 24. Residents and organizations in Zip codes 20012, 20039, 20040, 20303 and 20307 will be able to get assistance at 2100 M St. NW, while those in Zip codes 20010, 20011, 20317 and 20422 should go to an office at 1905-B 9th St. NE. Both offices are open 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, except federal holidays. The Social Security Administrationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s news release notes that most of the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s services do not require an in-person visit. Residents may apply for benefits, sign up for direct deposit, replace a

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Medicare card, obtain a proof-ofincome letter or submit a change of address or phone number at socialsecurity.gov or by calling 800772-1213. A newsletter from Ward 4 D.C. Council member Muriel Bowser says anyone with questions about the closure can contact the district manager of the M Street office, Robin Wells, at 866-752-0972. Bowserâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office did not respond to requests for further comment.

Jogger assaulted on Georgetown trail

U.S. Park Police are investigating the July 26 sexual assault of a jogger on the Capital Crescent Trail in Georgetown, according to a news release from the department. The jogger was grabbed from behind, placed in a chokehold and briefly left unconscious at 9:16 p.m. in an area near Water Street and north of the Three Sisters Islands, the release states. She awoke to find that the assailant had pulled down her pants, and he fled toward Fletcherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Boathouse when she screamed. No weapon was used. Police describe the suspect as muscular black man with 3- to 4-inch-long dreadlocks and a scruffy beard, standing between 5 feet 8 inches and 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighing between 180 and 200 pounds. At the time of the assault the suspect was wearing a white shirt or tank top and long, black jersey-type shorts.

Local man charged in 2003 sexual assault A Northwest man was arrested Thursday morning and charged with armed first-degree sexual assault in connection with an incident that occurred in the Petworth area in 2003, according to a Metropolitan Police Department

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news release. In February 2012, the FBI linked DNA from the incident to Anthony Lamont Burns, who is now 38, the release states. Burns is accused of approaching a minor and sexually assaulting her at knifepoint on Jan. 26, 2003, near Iowa Avenue and Allison Street NW.

Drunk drivers to face stiffer penalties

Effective today, motorists charged with driving under the influence of alcohol in the District can face higher fines and more jail time, and those convicted of driving drunk with a minor in the car will automatically spend at least five days in jail. Under a new law, the maximum penalties for driving under the influence will increase from a $300 fine and 90 days in jail to $1,000 and 180 days. The mandatory minimum sentence for drunk drivers transporting minors is a new measure. The D.C. Council approved the Comprehensive Impaired Driving Act on July 10.

New health study will survey D.C. residents

The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey will get under way in D.C. this week, as part of an effort to survey 5,000 people across the country for a comprehensive report on U.S. health. Conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics â&#x20AC;&#x201D; which is part of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the study â&#x20AC;&#x153;serves as the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;health check-up,â&#x20AC;&#x2122; going into communities to get health information throughout the country,â&#x20AC;? said Centers for Disease Control director Thomas Frieden. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The survey is a unique resource for health information, and without it we would lack important knowledge about major health conditions.â&#x20AC;? Selected residents will receive an invitation to participate. Those who agree to do so will receive compensation for their time and expenses. Further information is available at cdc.gov/nchs/nhanes.htm.

Corrections

In the July 25 issue, an article on possible fees at the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation misidentified Dr. Ranit Mishori, who attends a morning boot camp. In the same issue, an item on a new book by Maz Rauber and Amy Reingold gave the wrong title: The first book in the series is called â&#x20AC;&#x153;Capital Girls,â&#x20AC;? while the second is â&#x20AC;&#x153;Secrets and Lies.â&#x20AC;? Both books appear under the author pseudonym Ella Monroe. The Current regrets the errors. As a matter of policy, The Current corrects all errors of substance. To report an error, please call the managing editor at 202-2447223.


The CurreNT

wedNesday, augusT 1, 2012

5

TUNNELS: EPA likely to back low-impact efforts to reduce storm sewer overflows

From Page 1

Anacostia â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is already under way and is ultimately projected to prevent 98 percent of todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2.5 billion gallons of annual wastewater discharges into the river. One of the two tunnels that the water authority hopes to avoid would run from Georgetown to the Potomac Pumping Station near the Kennedy Center, likely causing construction impacts along the way; the other would be located in Northeast. But since 2005, a new best practice has emerged that tries to reduce overload in the first place, authority general manager George Hawkins testified last Wednesday at a hearing of the U.S. House Subcommittee on Water Resources and Environment. And it appears likely that the federal environmental agency will allow the District to seek compliance with Clean Water Act provisions by reducing stormwater runoff rather than building the other tunnels. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is no question ... that we have seen a sea change in the negotiations we are undertaking with the agen-

cy,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins said. The environmental agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cynthia Giles testified at the hearing that a revised policy introduced in June increases municipalitiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; flexibility while achieving the same goals of improving water quality. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have made tremendous progress towards cleaner water over the last four decades,â&#x20AC;? Giles said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to continue to make progress ... by working together to make smart choices about priorities, take advantage of innovations and address the most important problems first.â&#x20AC;? Stormwater reduction techniques like encouraging developers to install green roofs and reduce impervious surfaces also have side benefits like reduced flooding, Hawkins said. But he emphasized that the evidence doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t suggest they will cost the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ratepayers any less than the tunnels would. They could even cost more, he said, which is why the authority has so far asked only to delay the second and third tunnels while it develops, implements and evaluates pilot pro-

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grams. Hawkins didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go into details about the specific projects he is working with the environmental agency to use as runoff-reduction pilots. He noted, though, that the authority has already spent $2 million simply to research the ideas it has been privately floating with the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s water regulators. At the hearing, Hawkins also noted that the need to comply with federal mandates has been forcing the authority to spend billions of dollars â&#x20AC;&#x201D; driving up water bills â&#x20AC;&#x201D; on

issues that for the most part donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t address the Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aging water and sewer network. Some pipes are too small and many others are too old, but thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only so much money to go around. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our funding first goes to mandates and second to the operational needs,â&#x20AC;? Hawkins said. Speaking at the hearing, D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton echoed the concerns about funding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with competing priorities here,â&#x20AC;? she said, â&#x20AC;&#x153;and the public wants both. And the public never wants the kinds of costs youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re

getting now.â&#x20AC;? Unlike several representatives of other municipalities from across the country who spoke at the hearing, neither Hawkins nor Norton asked either to be relieved of the mandate to improve water quality in local rivers or for the federal government to fund the work. Hawkins testified, however, that the environmental agency or Congress ought to ease provisions demanding continuous improvement in treating wastewater, which he said yield diminishing returns.

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6

ch Wednesday, August 1, 2012 T he Current

Police Report Nancy Feldman, a long time DC resident and community leader, formed her law firm 15 years ago for the benefit of people facing important life issues. Planning ahead for family, friends and bequests to non-profits; forming new households or parting ways; business and personal transitions - - these matters deserve an attentive, knowledgeable legal advisor to assist you through clearly explained processes.

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alancing lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s priorities is not >Â?Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;i>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x17E;°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;">Â&#x17D;Ă&#x192;]Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;,iĂ&#x192;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;-Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x160; ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;viVĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤĂ&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;v>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2DC;ii`Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Ă&#x152;iÂ&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2DC;ViĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;V>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;iÂ&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;i`Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i°Ă&#x160;

This is a listing of reports taken from July 22 through 29 in local police service areas.

psa PSA 101 101 â&#x2013;  downtown

Robbery (pickpocket) â&#x2013;  900 block, F St.; restaurant; 7:43 p.m. July 29. Robbery (snatch) â&#x2013;  1200 block, New York Ave.; restaurant; 2:04 a.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  900 block, 10th St.; sidewalk; 10:15 a.m. July 27. Stolen auto â&#x2013;  1000 block, H St.; street; 7:30 p.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  14th Street and Constitution Avenue; street; 11:30 a.m. July 26. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  700 block, 14th St.; restaurant; 6:30 p.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  10th Street and New York Avenue; unspecified premises; 2:40 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  1200 block, L St.; street; 2 a.m. July 27. â&#x2013;  1000 block, F St.; store; 3:20 p.m. July 27. â&#x2013;  900 block, F St.; store; 4:26 p.m. July 28. â&#x2013;  1200 block, G St.; store; 6 p.m. July 28. â&#x2013;  1300 block, Pennsylvania Ave.; unspecified premises; 10:30 a.m. July 29.

psa 102

â&#x2013;  Gallery place PSA 102

PENN QUARTER

Whether your senior is visiting vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2DC;]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iVĂ&#x2022;ÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;>vĂ&#x152;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ?Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;iÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;>vi]Ă&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;>LÂ?iĂ&#x160;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x201C;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â?iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x203A;iÂ?]Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x153;vviĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;{Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x160; Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;`Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;`Ă&#x2022;>Â?Â&#x2C6;âi`Ă&#x160;V>Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x160;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;iĂ&#x160;VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; of luxurious surroundings on the V>Â&#x201C;ÂŤĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160;-Â&#x2C6;LÂ?iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;Ă&#x192;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;>Â?]Ă&#x160;ÂŤ>Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;i`Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x160;

iÂ?Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;VĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;i]Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Ă&#x203A;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;vĂ&#x160; cultural and social activities and a dedicated staff all VÂ&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â&#x201C;>Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x203A;iĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;`>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;`Ă&#x160;">Â&#x17D;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x192;ÂŤiVÂ&#x2C6;>Â?°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;>Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160; >Ă&#x153;>Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;vĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2026;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â?Â?Ă&#x160;iĂ?Vii`Ă&#x160; your expectations!

Scheduling a stay is easy!

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Robbery (snatch) â&#x2013;  900 block, 9th St.; sidewalk; 10:16 p.m. July 23. Assault with a dangerous weapon (knife) â&#x2013;  3rd and K streets; sidewalk; 5:15 a.m. July 27. Stolen auto â&#x2013;  900 block, 7th St.; parking lot; 7:02 p.m. July 24. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  400 block, K St.; parking lot; 12:50 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  500 block, Indiana Ave.; sidewalk; 11:55 a.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  400 block, K St.; parking lot; 3:15 p.m. July 27. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  700 block, 7th St.; parking lot; 7 p.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  400 block, 8th St.; street; 7:09 a.m. July 28.

psa PSA 201 201

â&#x2013;  chevy chase

Theft ($250 plus) â&#x2013;  5400 block, Connecticut Ave.; residence; 2 p.m. July 23. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  3700 block, Kanawha St.; unspecified premises; 4:10 p.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  3700 block, Morrison St.; unspecified premises; 4 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  3900 block, McKinley St.; unspecified premises; 8 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  3900 block, Morrison St.; street; 9:30 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  3900 block, Livingston St.; street; 10:30 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  6100 block, 30th St.;

unspecified premises; 6:30 p.m. July 28.

psa 202

â&#x2013;  Friendship Heights PSA 202

Tenleytown / AU Park

Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  5200 block, 42nd St.; residence; 3 p.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  5300 block, Wisconsin Ave.; medical facility; 1:55 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  4400 block, Warren St.; residence; 4:15 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  4400 block, Warren St.; residence; 4:33 p.m. July 26. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  4600 block, Verplanck Place; street; 10 p.m. July 22. â&#x2013;  4300 block, Nebraska Ave.; unspecified premises; 5:420 a.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  4500 block, Harrison St.; unspecified premises; 7:48 p.m. July 26.

psa 203

â&#x2013;  forest hills / van ness PSA 203

cleveland park

Robbery (snatch) â&#x2013;  3900 block, Wisconsin Ave.; sidewalk; 2:01 a.m. July 29. Theft ($250 plus) â&#x2013;  3200 block, Davenport St.; residence; 10:27 a.m. July 26. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  3300 block, Connecticut Ave.; medical facility; 10:49 a.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  4200 block, Connecticut Ave.; restaurant; 10:16 p.m. July 26. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  3500 block, Davenport St.; street; 6 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  4500 block, 36th St.; unspecified premises; 10 a.m. July 27. â&#x2013;  2900 block, Ordway St.; street; 11:24 a.m. July 28.

psa 204

â&#x2013;  Massachusetts avenue

heights / cleveland park woodley park / Glover PSA 204 park / cathedral heights

Robbery (snatch) â&#x2013;  3100 block, Cathedral Ave.; sidewalk; 2:30 a.m. July 28. Assault with a dangerous weapon (miscellaneous) â&#x2013;  2400 block, Wisconsin Ave.; tavern/nightclub; 12:08 a.m. July 28. Burglary â&#x2013;  4200 block, Massachusetts Ave.; unspecified premises; 3 a.m. July 28. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  4000 block, Wisconsin Ave.; unspecified premises; 5:45 p.m. July 27. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  2500 block, 41st St.; street; 8:34 a.m. July 23.

psa 401

â&#x2013;  colonial village PSA 401

shepherd park / takoma

Robbery (snatch) â&#x2013;  7400 block, Georgia Ave.; store; 9:20 a.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  100 block, Carroll St.; park-

ing lot; 11:55 a.m. July 24. Stolen auto â&#x2013;  7100 block, Piney Branch Road; street; 3 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  2000 block, Plymouth St.; unspecified premises; 6:15 a.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  6900 block, 5th St.; street; 7 p.m. July 27. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  7400 block, Georgia Ave.; store; 2:25 a.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  7400 block, Georgia Ave.; store; 10:39 p.m. July 29. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  1500 block, Van Buren St.; street; 10:55 a.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  2100 block, Sudbury Place; alley; 7 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  2100 block, Yorktown Road; residence; 7:11 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  2100 block, Sudbury Place; street; 12:01 a.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  1200 block, Hemlock St.; street; 11:23 p.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  7000 block, Blair Road; gas station; 11 a.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  400 block, Cedar St.; street; 11 p.m. July 27.

psa PSA 402 402

â&#x2013;  Brightwood / manor park

Robbery (force and violence) â&#x2013;  Colorado and Missouri avenues; alley; 9:30 p.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  1000 block, Rittenhouse St.; sidewalk; 2:04 a.m. July 27. Robbery (gun) â&#x2013;  1300 block, Fort Stevens Drive; parking lot; 10:23 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  6500 block, Georgia Ave.; unspecified premises; 2:53 a.m. July 28. Assault with a dangerous weapon (knife) â&#x2013;  6500 block, Piney Branch Road; grocery store; 10:25 p.m. July 26. Stolen auto â&#x2013;  1600 block, Tuckerman St.; street; 5 p.m. July 22. â&#x2013;  6300 block, 9th St.; gas station; 12:16 a.m. July 27. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  6200 block, Georgia Ave.; store; 2 p.m. July 24. Theft (shoplifting) â&#x2013;  6200 block, Georgia Ave.; unspecified premises; 3:29 p.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  6200 block, Georgia Ave.; unspecified premises; 5:27 p.m. July 26. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  1300 block, Van Buren St.; alley; 7:35 a.m. July 26.

psa 403

â&#x2013;  Brightwood / petworth

Brightwood park PSA 403

16th Street heights

Robbery (gun) â&#x2013;  5700 block, Georgia Ave.; sidewalk; 1:14 a.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  5800 block, 14th St.; sidewalk; 10:25 p.m. July 24. Robbery (force and violence) â&#x2013;  900 block, Longfellow St.; bus stop; 12:08 p.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  900 block, Longfellow St.; street; 10:05 a.m. July 27. â&#x2013;  900 block, Kennedy St.; alley; 12:21 a.m. July 28. â&#x2013;  5500 block, Georgia Ave.;

bus stop; 6:13 p.m. July 28. Robbery (snatch) â&#x2013;  Georgia Avenue and Kennedy Street; street; 1 p.m. July 28. Burglary â&#x2013;  5200 block, Georgia Ave.; restaurant; midnight July 23. Theft ($250 plus) â&#x2013;  1200 block, Hamilton St.; street; 11 p.m. July 25. â&#x2013;  1300 block, Jefferson St.; residence; 4 p.m. July 26. Theft from auto ($250 plus) â&#x2013;  800 block, Marietta Place; unspecified premises; 9:15 a.m. July 23.

psa 404

â&#x2013;  16th Street HEIGHTS

PSA 404 crestwood

Robbery (gun) â&#x2013;  1200 block, Randolph St.; residence; 9 p.m. July 25. Assault with a dangerous weapon (gun) â&#x2013;  4100 block, Kansas Ave.; unspecified premises; 10:29 a.m. July 24. Burglary â&#x2013;  1300 block, Quincy St.; unspecified premises; 2 p.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  900 block, Randolph St.; residence; 12:10 p.m. July 26. Stolen auto â&#x2013;  1200 block, Decatur St.; street; 6:30 p.m. July 22. â&#x2013;  14th and Shepherd streets; street; 8 p.m. July 27. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  4300 block, Arkansas Ave.; unspecified premises; 8 a.m. July 24. â&#x2013;  3700 block, Georgia Ave.; sidewalk; 9 p.m. July 29. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  3800 block 13th St.; unspecified premises; 8 p.m. July 22. â&#x2013;  1800 block, Randolph St.; unspecified premises; 11:30 p.m. July 23. â&#x2013;  1900 block, Upshur St.; unspecified premises; 7:34 a.m. July 25.

psa PSA 407 407 â&#x2013;  petworth

Assault with a dangerous weapon (miscellaneous) â&#x2013;  900 block, Gallatin St.; residence; 8:09 p.m. July 28. â&#x2013;  400 block, Buchanan St.; unspecified premises; 4:30 p.m. July 29. Burglary â&#x2013;  3900 block, 7th St.; residence; 5:32 p.m. July 25. Stolen auto â&#x2013;  4700 block, 9th St.; unspecified premises; 11:39 p.m. July 24. Theft ($250 plus) â&#x2013;  700 block, Farragut St.; unspecified premises; 9 p.m. July 29. Theft (below $250) â&#x2013;  200 block, Farragut St.; unspecified premises; 6 p.m. July 29. Theft from auto (below $250) â&#x2013;  900 block, Emerson St.; parking lot; 11:05 a.m. July 26. â&#x2013;  500 block, Webster St.; parking lot; 11:08 a.m. July 27.


The Current

DCPS DCPS CHARTER

WARD 4

DCPS

WARD 3

CHARTER

WARD 2

CHARTER

WARD 1

DCPS

Spring 2012 DC-CAS Results

OVERALL PROFICIENCY

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

READING SCORES GROWTH 2011-12

2008

2009

2010

2011

MATH SCORES 2012

GROWTH 2011-12

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

GROWTH 2011-12

Bancroft Elementary

42.2%

– 2.4%

53.0%

38.1%

40.1%

37.6%

35.1%

– 2.5%

58.6%

45.9%

45.1%

51.6%

49.4%

– 2.2%

Banneker Academic High (2012 Reward School)

91.7%

– 4.3%

97.1%

97.0%

96.3%

94.3%

86.6%

– 7.6%

98.1%

98.0%

100.0%

97.7%

96.8%

– 0.9%

Bruce-Monroe Elementary School at Park View

34.2%

– 0.6%

43.1%

37.1%

22.9%

29.1%

27.9%

– 1.2%

48.3%

46.8%

21.5%

40.2%

40.6%

0.4%

Cardozo High

28.6%

2.2%

23.0%

25.2%

20.6%

27.5%

25.5%

– 2.0%

26.6%

27.5%

22.7%

25.4%

31.6%

6.3%

Cleveland Elementary

70.9%

6.4%

73.0%

78.7%

64.2%

58.9%

67.3%

8.5%

63.5%

75.8%

82.3%

70.1%

74.5%

4.4%

38.0%

30.6%

41.7%

45.5%

33.3%

46.4%

Columbia Heights Educational Campus

44.0%

– 0.2%

40.3%

– 1.3%

47.6%

1.2%

H.D. Cooke Elementary

29.9%

2.1%

36.1%

32.2%

34.7%

31.7%

30.7%

– 1.0%

42.6%

37.8%

37.0%

24.2%

29.1%

4.9%

Marie Reed Learning Center (2012 Reward School)

53.8%

11.5%

60.9%

67.7%

49.1%

41.0%

49.6%

8.5%

58.4%

71.8%

51.7%

43.5%

58.0%

14.5%

Shaw Middle School at Garnet-Patterson

32.5%

1.4%

38.7%

30.5%

25.0%

27.1%

32.1%

5.0%

32.7%

29.2%

31.6%

35.1%

32.9%

– 2.2%

Tubman Elementary

58.4%

7.9%

29.3%

42.1%

45.1%

42.5%

51.9%

9.4%

35.9%

60.6%

62.4%

58.6%

65.0%

6.4%

25.0%

18.0%

12.8%

7.3%

8.3%

1.1%

Washington Metropolitan High

9.4%

– 3.6%

10.4%

– 7.6%

Booker T. Washington

26.3%

– 7.3%

17.8%

38.9%

26.5%

48.1%

31.6%

– 16.5%

11.4%

22.2%

30.6%

19.2%

21.1%

1.8%

Capital City – Lower

65.1%

– 4.7%

77.6%

71.5%

66.0%

69.8%

67.8%

– 2.0%

73.0%

62.5%

65.3%

69.8%

62.3%

– 7.5%

Capital City – Upper

48.7%

– 8.2%

55.3%

54.0%

56.9%

48.7%

– 8.2%

42.1%

50.8%

56.9%

48.7%

– 8.2%

Cesar Chavez – Bruce Prep Campus

60.0%

– 4.0%

55.0%

51.0%

50.7%

47.0%

– 3.7%

57.4%

67.5%

77.1%

72.9%

– 4.2%

28.6%

43.6%

67.9%

50.0%

51.3%

71.7%

63.2%

– 8.5%

30.6%

30.6%

Community Academy – Butler Bilingual

61.0%

– 8.8%

58.8%

– 9.1%

D.C. Bilingual

50.0%

8.1%

31.0%

43.9%

33.0%

38.3%

54.5%

16.1%

3.4%

33.3%

31.1%

45.5%

45.5%

0.1%

E.L. Haynes – Georgia Avenue Campus

62.3%

– 2.6%

60.0%

66.1%

67.2%

53.0%

58.9%

5.8%

67.1%

79.6%

69.3%

76.8%

65.8%

– 11.0%

Howard University Middle School of Math and Science

76.0%

– 2.5%

60.4%

73.0%

70.2%

77.6%

73.0%

– 4.6%

63.9%

70.1%

66.3%

79.4%

78.9%

– 0.4%

Meridian

59.5%

8.2%

40.3%

66.4%

64.0%

52.5%

57.3%

4.8%

48.1%

72.0%

65.2%

50.2%

61.8%

11.6%

Duke Ellington School of the Arts

65.8%

– 14.7%

76.5%

77.8%

72.1%

85.1%

73.4%

– 11.7%

52.3%

61.9%

59.8%

76.0%

58.3%

– 17.7%

Francis-Stevens Education Campus

50.7%

– 2.0%

48.2%

45.5%

43.9%

55.2%

51.8%

– 3.3%

43.3%

42.1%

38.9%

50.3%

49.6%

– 0.7%

38.4%

51.6%

42.2%

38.2%

45.2%

23.5%

Garrison Elementary

47.8%

15.0%

57.3%

44.8%

2.6%

55.6%

50.7%

27.2%

Hardy Middle

65.6%

– 1.3%

71.3%

72.8%

74.8%

65.9%

62.8%

– 3.1%

63.1%

68.4%

66.3%

67.8%

68.4%

0.6%

Hyde-Addison Elementary (2012 Reward School)

82.2%

3.6%

82.1%

82.5%

79.2%

82.4%

83.2%

0.8%

79.5%

84.0%

85.3%

74.7%

81.2%

6.5%

Ross Elementary

68.8%

– 2.8%

62.7%

76.6%

76.8%

72.4%

64.6%

– 7.8%

46.3%

68.2%

58.9%

70.7%

72.9%

2.2%

School Without Walls (2012 Reward School)

98.2%

– 0.5%

93.0%

97.1%

96.2%

99.2%

98.2%

– 1.0%

93.0%

94.2%

95.3%

98.4%

98.2%

– 0.1%

Seaton Elementary

43.0%

4.5%

39.7%

29.0%

47.9%

41.9%

40.9%

– 1.0%

44.4%

47.2%

40.2%

35.0%

45.2%

10.1%

Thomson Elementary

51.9%

12.6%

44.9%

45.4%

46.4%

39.2%

49.3%

10.0%

31.7%

44.0%

51.7%

39.2%

54.5%

15.3%

Center City – Shaw Campus

38.8%

7.2%

37.5%

34.3%

34.4%

36.4%

2.0%

21.5%

24.2%

28.8%

41.3%

12.5%

KIPP DC – WILL Academy

60.9%

– 6.3%

60.3%

64.9%

62.7%

55.0%

– 7.7%

73.6%

76.7%

71.7%

66.8%

– 4.9%

Deal Middle (2012 Reward School)

83.4%

– 1.8%

78.6%

77.5%

82.4%

82.7%

82.1%

– 0.6%

76.9%

76.3%

82.9%

87.6%

84.7%

– 2.9%

Eaton Elementary (2012 Reward School)

84.6%

8.5%

73.9%

85.4%

78.8%

79.1%

85.5%

6.3%

63.8%

79.8%

74.9%

73.2%

83.8%

10.6%

56.2%

65.4%

Hearst Elementary

61.7%

– 3.8%

87.0%

81.5%

75.6%

64.9%

63.3%

– 1.6%

87.0%

88.9%

66.7%

66.2%

60.2%

– 6.0%

Janney Elementary (2012 Reward School)

91.2%

0.3%

87.8%

90.8%

88.3%

92.0%

93.2%

1.2%

89.0%

85.5%

88.4%

89.7%

89.1%

– 0.5%

Key Elementary (2012 Reward School)

91.6%

2.3%

84.6%

85.1%

90.0%

87.8%

90.9%

3.1%

91.5%

85.5%

90.0%

90.8%

92.3%

1.5%

Mann Elementary (2012 Reward School)

85.1%

– 6.0%

91.4%

91.9%

90.3%

91.2%

87.1%

– 4.1%

84.9%

88.1%

89.7%

90.9%

83.1%

– 7.8%

Murch Elementary (2012 Reward School)

83.2%

– 2.7%

79.4%

83.1%

85.6%

86.1%

85.1%

– 1.0%

73.1%

81.0%

79.8%

85.7%

81.3%

– 4.4%

Oyster-Adams Bilingual (2012 Reward School)

82.8%

1.0%

73.8%

77.6%

75.5%

81.5%

83.4%

1.9%

69.0%

72.3%

72.2%

82.0%

82.2%

0.2%

Stoddert Elementary (2012 Reward School)

81.2%

0.2%

73.3%

74.5%

87.0%

78.1%

77.6%

– 0.5%

61.6%

79.5%

89.3%

83.7%

84.8%

1.1%

Wilson High

59.9%

1.2%

62.5%

72.2%

63.5%

65.2%

60.3%

– 4.9%

59.9%

67.3%

66.4%

52.2%

59.5%

7.3%

Barnard Elementary (Lincoln Hill Cluster)

57.1%

– 1.4%

65.3%

84.9%

67.6%

56.7%

55.8%

– 0.8%

55.1%

80.8%

64.0%

60.3%

58.3%

– 2.0%

Brightwood Education Campus

36.7%

4.5%

46.4%

48.5%

36.7%

34.9%

34.1%

– 0.8%

27.8%

47.5%

36.1%

29.7%

39.4%

9.8%

Coolidge High

33.1%

– 2.7%

27.0%

38.0%

53.6%

41.3%

34.6%

– 6.7%

47.6%

43.0%

48.2%

30.2%

31.6%

1.4%

Lafayette Elementary (2012 Reward School)

90.5%

3.1%

89.0%

90.3%

87.4%

87.8%

90.1%

2.3%

88.6%

89.0%

84.4%

86.9%

90.8%

3.9%

LaSalle-Backus Education Campus

18.8%

– 11.4%

38.9%

41.1%

43.4%

30.2%

19.9%

– 10.4%

31.3%

26.7%

38.3%

30.1%

17.6%

– 12.4%

MacFarland Middle (Lincoln Hill Cluster)

30.8%

– 1.3%

33.8%

25.2%

27.0%

26.6%

27.1%

0.5%

35.6%

32.7%

33.5%

37.2%

34.5%

– 2.7%

Powell Elementary (Lincoln Hill Cluster)

43.8%

– 0.6%

32.2%

27.4%

41.0%

38.1%

36.9%

– 1.2%

46.3%

41.3%

32.3%

50.8%

50.8%

0.0%

Raymond Elementary

41.2%

– 2.9%

70.0%

58.9%

35.3%

42.4%

40.3%

– 2.1%

68.0%

48.2%

33.5%

45.7%

42.0%

– 3.7%

Roosevelt High

16.7%

– 7.6%

21.2%

29.2%

32.0%

23.5%

15.4%

– 8.1%

27.0%

24.4%

40.0%

25.0%

17.9%

– 7.1%

Sharpe Health School

90.5%

3.0%

90.2%

66.7%

100.0%

95.8%

95.2%

– 0.6%

92.7%

66.7%

93.1%

79.2%

85.7%

6.5%

Shepherd Elementary

72.7%

5.5%

72.6%

77.4%

62.6%

67.8%

76.3%

8.4%

63.0%

75.6%

61.9%

66.4%

69.1%

2.6%

Takoma Education Campus

37.2%

– 10.6%

70.8%

65.8%

47.7%

50.0%

37.2%

– 12.8%

66.3%

50.3%

46.7%

45.7%

37.2%

– 8.5%

Truesdell Education Campus

42.8%

5.2%

47.8%

49.3%

39.6%

32.9%

38.4%

5.5%

49.3%

53.7%

35.5%

42.3%

47.2%

5.0%

West Elementary

49.1%

5.2%

55.3%

59.1%

49.3%

48.7%

47.9%

– 0.9%

38.3%

51.3%

41.8%

39.2%

50.4%

11.3%

Whittier Education Campus

41.2%

2.4%

50.0%

45.9%

49.5%

37.7%

39.4%

1.7%

44.3%

51.1%

53.4%

39.7%

42.9%

3.2%

Center City – Brightwood Campus

48.6%

10.8%

43.1%

42.3%

43.9%

45.3%

1.4%

26.7%

21.4%

31.8%

51.8%

20.0%

Center City – Petworth Campus

53.4%

6.3%

39.1%

39.5%

52.6%

49.3%

– 3.3%

34.6%

39.2%

41.5%

57.5%

16.0%

Community Academy – Amos I

50.2%

– 4.0%

52.0%

47.8%

51.8%

50.8%

48.8%

– 1.9%

58.9%

57.2%

47.5%

57.6%

51.6%

– 6.0%

Community Academy – Online

63.7%

0.9%

70.6%

74.6%

61.9%

66.7%

66.1%

– 0.5%

43.1%

60.3%

51.6%

59.0%

61.3%

2.3%

Hope Community – Lamond Campus

51.5%

11.8%

48.1%

45.5%

51.5%

50.0%

– 1.5%

22.2%

15.9%

27.9%

52.9%

25.0%

Hospitality

26.7%

– 25.2%

41.2%

29.4%

52.5%

26.7%

– 25.8%

14.7%

24.2%

51.2%

26.7%

– 24.6%

Ideal Academy – North Capitol Street Campus

40.6%

0.8%

43.6%

46.5%

35.9%

43.6%

7.7%

43.6%

46.5%

43.7%

37.6%

– 6.1%

50.0%

69.0%

76.1%

33.3%

63.3%

57.4%

33.3%

28.1%

Latin America Montessori Bilingual

66.3%

– 0.4%

70.0%

– 6.1%

62.5%

5.1%

Paul Junior High

63.8%

– 4.4%

61.5%

62.4%

66.0%

63.9%

59.5%

– 4.4%

67.6%

66.3%

68.0%

72.4%

68.1%

– 4.4%

Roots – Kennedy Street Campus

58.4%

9.8%

53.7%

58.3%

56.1%

58.3%

68.9%

10.6%

34.1%

22.2%

65.9%

38.9%

47.7%

8.8%

Washington Latin High

61.3%

Washington Latin Middle (2012 Reward School)

78.8%

– 1.6%

75.4%

82.1%

82.9%

84.0%

80.6%

– 3.4%

72.5%

81.4%

81.3%

76.9%

77.1%

71.4%

59.2%

60.0%

62.7% 0.1%

7


8

ch n Wednesday, August 1, 2012 T he Current

The Northwest

Current

Davis Kennedy/Publisher & Editor Chris Kain/Managing Editor

ABC tweaks needed

Ward 1 D.C. Council member Jim Graham’s approach to updating the city’s alcohol laws has been laudable: He convened a 26-member task force, including representatives of residential communities and businesses, and the group met a dozen or so times to draft legislation. But a careful approach is not the same thing as a perfect bill, and we hope the council will not simply adopt the group’s proposal without scrutiny. The measure includes some solid ideas — like instituting new requirements for soundproofing and establishing a hotline where noise complaints about bars and restaurants could trigger investigation — but other aspects would benefit from tweaking. We find flaw, in particular, with the controversial proposal to limit the pool of residents who may protest an establishment’s liquor license to those living within 400 feet. Current law allows any group of five D.C. residents, regardless of address, to challenge a license application or renewal before the city’s alcohol board, and admittedly this approach is far too broad. We understand that responding to protests is an onerous task for businesses. But the new 400-foot restriction could well exclude many who are affected by alcohol-serving businesses. Surely this limit is too strict; perhaps 600 or 800 feet would be more reasonable. We also think there should be some consideration given to those who reside outside the selected radius. One option would be to allow others to make their voices heard without requiring a full-scale hearing. Finally, we have major concerns about a provision stipulating that if the city alcohol board approves a voluntary agreement between a liquor license applicant and his or her advisory neighborhood commission, protests from all other groups would be dismissed. Council member Graham has promised that established citizens associations will not be excluded from the process, but he has not clarified how such groups would be involved. Either way, we don’t believe neighborhood commissions should be the only actors in community-business relations.

Mixed grades for D.C.

The latest D.C. Comprehensive Assessment System scores are out and, as usual, the results paint a complex portrait of student achievement in the city’s traditional public and charter schools. The improved state of our test scores at the five-year anniversary of the mayoral takeover of schools is an undeniable achievement, and city and school officials should be proud of the progress. But at the same time, a citywide average is almost useless here. Dig a little deeper, and particularly troubling data emerges: Nearly all of the city’s high-performing schools are in wards 1, 2, 3 or 4. We know that school officials are focused on improving elementary education across the city, and rising test scores show that the effort is bearing some fruit. But the fact remains that the city’s elementary schools still seem to be sharply divided by geographic fault lines. With D.C. high schools, the scene is gloomier. Falling scores at the secondary level concern us greatly. Strong citywide public high schools like School Without Walls and Benjamin Banneker now exist, but both already face more demand than they can meet. School officials should act now to reverse area high schools’ falling fortunes and expand the options for all District students. A large-scale effort is needed to attract high-achieving students and to bring more D.C. youth into their ranks. Be it a highly competitive International Baccalaureate program, a math- and science-focused school aiming to rival Virginia’s Thomas Jefferson High School, a New York Regents-style exam to signal to colleges that a student has excelled, or another approach, the city needs bold solutions. D.C. Public Schools Chancellor Kaya Henderson is touting a new framework that will intensely target the city’s lowest-performing 40 schools. That’s appropriate and necessary work. We don’t suggest eliminating that goal in favor of addressing the needs of already successful students. But we must do both.

Mayor Gray’s ballet …

I

n the Broadway musical “A Chorus Line,” one of the performers sings a plaintive song about escaping harsh reality by performing ballet: Everything was beautiful at the ballet, Raise your arms and someone’s always there. Yes, everything was beautiful at the ballet, At the ballet, At the ballet!!! Well, not to be too dramatic, but Mayor Vincent Gray is dancing as fast as he can in his own sort of ballet as a federal investigation inches forward. Last week, The City Paper’s Loose Lips columnist Alan Suderman wrote a cover story on the mayor’s almost-frantic adherence to a routine mayoral schedule to prove he’s not distracted by scandal. The Washington Post’s Mike DeBonis wrote, “Mayor Vincent C. Gray is doing his darndest to make it clear he’s not been distracted by those campaign corruption revelations.” And on Wednesday every city hall reporter suffered through more than an hour of the mayor’s latest rollout, a glossy, 60-page handbook on all the dramatic — there’s that word again — things he is doing and will do as mayor. The booklet includes eight pictures of the mayor hard at work. Looking closely, the booklet is filled with goals that you might think any mayor would have. “Recruit, hire and train police” is one example. “Modernize all public school buildings” is another. (We wonder what Adrian Fenty thinks of that one.) “Decrease theft of smartphones and other devices.” We’re looking forward to learning how much the government can accomplish on that one. More than a half-dozen senior administration officials were standing behind the mayor, listening intently. Three of them stepped forward and read glowing accounts of how hard everyone is working and what a great job the mayor is doing. “Today we continue to build upon great progress made over the last 18 months,” intoned Victor Hoskins, the deputy mayor for planning and economic development, setting the tone for the next speakers. But stop the music. The Notebook can hear supporters of the mayor pounding on the table in frustration. Isn’t the mayor doing what he’s supposed to be doing, rallying the whole government? And aren’t there some real initiatives in there for improving special education, environmental sustainability and job development? Doesn’t the mayor mean well? Yes, yes and yes. The point is not that the mayor isn’t doing many good things. Ardent supporters of former Mayors Fenty and Anthony Williams are pleased that Gray is focused on economic development and education when many feared he wouldn’t be. For example, last Thursday, the mayor presided over the groundbreaking for a desperately needed health clinic in Ward 8.

But all of this good news is occurring on a shaky stage that could fall at any time. Federal prosecutors are grinding away like termites, discovering fresh evidence of the massive conspiracy carried out to help elect Gray in 2010. No amount of positive spin on what the mayor is doing will wipe away this deadly fact. The mayor won’t explain publicly either how his campaign — to his shock — went off the rails, or what his role was in his own flawed election. We guess the prosecutors will soon. And then, there may be another ballet performance. Many think he might cue up a swan song. ■ Crowd control. NBC4 also reported last week that the mayor’s security detail — after expressions of concern from the chief’s office — is stepping up its effort to create a little more space between the mayor and the swarm of reporters now surrounding him with every scandal development. Don’t be shocked, but most reporters think it’s a germ of a good idea. It certainly makes for good television when reporters are hounding a mayor or other official as he escapes into an elevator or behind a closed door. Some viewers at home see the official on the run, a pack of journalists nipping at the heels. Other viewers see a rude, unruly mob. Whatever your characterization, reporters chase someone because there’s news to be made. Last week, the mayor turned his biweekly news conference into the bureaucratic breast-beating marathon discussed above. But the mayor’s own agenda showed that the event was to conclude with general questions on any topic from the reporters. The mayor took exactly two such questions before bolting. When reporters angrily complained, his staff said the mayor had answered questions for an hour and 20 minutes. Reporters pushed back, noting that 70 of the 80 minutes were on the mayor’s topics, not theirs. Gray and most mayors are generally available to the press at public events or when coming to and going from the Wilson Building. But every mayor we’ve ever covered has tried various ways to escape the local media. Marion Barry switched cars. Sharon Pratt once refused to get out of her car as we stood in front of it. Anthony Williams tried to sneak out the back loading dock of a building at the University of the District of Columbia. Adrian Fenty would just stare blankly at you, or offer one-word answers: “yes” or “no.” Such evasive tactics never work. Let’s repeat that: They never work. Reporters can be civil, and reporters can wait to ask questions of a mayor. But if they feel that someone is ducking them, then all bets are off. Tom Sherwood, a Southwest resident, is a political reporter for News 4.

TOM SHERWOOD’s

Notebook

Letters to the Editor Council should act on tech start-up bill

The Technology Sector Enhancement Act proposed by Mayor Vincent Gray is a great idea [“Tax breaks for high-tech firms encounter opposition on D.C. Council,” July 11]. Economists have proved that when taxes go down, revenue goes up. In supply-side economics, this trend is what’s known as the Laffer Curve.

Our economy improves when businesses, especially small startups, pay lower taxes. The more business owners must spend on paying taxes, the less they can reinvest in their own businesses. Lowering taxes for small tech start-ups means freeing up more money for employers to spend on expanding their businesses. This means more jobs. More jobs means more money for people to spend on local products and ultimately more people at different levels of the economy engaging in successful, voluntary market transactions. According to a report by the

Kaufmann Foundation, the number of adults launching businesses in 2011 was the highest it has been in the past 15 years. With 340 out of every 100,000 adults launching a business, there were about 565,000 start-ups monthly. The D.C. Council and Ward 4 member Muriel Bowser should stop delaying the vote on this bill and instead approve the cut to capital gains taxes. It will mean that more tech start-up companies can open offices in D.C., instead of in Virginia. Maryan Escarfullett Research Associate, Capital Research Center


The Current

Proposed ABC bill would harm residents VIEWPOINT mark rosenman

A

s chair of the Committee on Human Services, Ward 1 D.C. Council member Jim Graham recently held a hearing on his proposed Omnibus Alcoholic Beverage Regulation Amendment Act of 2012 [â&#x20AC;&#x153;Graham bill sets up major ABC changes,â&#x20AC;? July 25]. Sections of this bill, applauded by industry and â&#x20AC;&#x153;nightlifeâ&#x20AC;? representatives, were strongly opposed by representatives from various advisory neighborhood commissions and civic groups across the District. Yet the council member repeatedly declined to consider changing any parts of his draft since they were recommended by a task force that he had convened. What does this mean for ordinary residents? As currently proposed, the amendments would bar you from protesting the issuance or renewal of an alcohol license if you live outside a 400-foot radius (less than most city blocks) of an applicant establishment even if you are profoundly affected by its operation. Draw a 400-foot circle around the alcohol-serving restaurant, bar or club nearest you and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice a couple of things. First, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll likely find yourself and certainly the vast majority of concerned residents outside the circle. Second, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll notice that since such establishments are on main streets, that radius will include much more of the commercial strip than it does of residential side streets. Furthermore, under the new amendments, even residents within that meager boundary would lose some of their rights if the Alcoholic Beverage Control Board accepted a voluntary agreement endorsed by a neighborhood commission. Drunken patrons screaming to friends on side streets as they look for their cars or while relieving themselves against the sides of homes, departing customers engaged in raucous chatter as they pass our bedrooms at 3 a.m., and the street criminals attracted to our neigh-

Letters to the Editor Charging park fees needs further review

I would like to respond to the July 25 article â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legislation would impose fees on boot-camp operators, other park users.â&#x20AC;? This bill may appear innocuous, but it would have significant negative implications. It would overturn existing law, which states: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The use of public recreational facilities shall not be granted for commercial uses, for private profit, or for money-raising purposes.â&#x20AC;? Thus, the Department of Parks and Recreation is currently prohibited from issuing field and facility permits to private, for-profit companies or organizations. If this legislation were to proceed, the agency would gain the authority to enter into contracts with private companies to offer programs for overused and in-demand public recreation space; and to allow forprofit companies â&#x20AC;&#x201D; based in D.C. or not â&#x20AC;&#x201D; to obtain permits to utilize D.C. taxpayer-funded infrastructure. This bill is essentially selling our taxpayer-funded public recreation

borhoods in search of easy nightlife prey (according to Metropolitan Police Department Assistant Chief Diane Groomes) arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t likely to observe that 400-foot limit. The effort to impose this distance limit is ostensibly presented to correct the provision in the current regulations that allows any five residents to protest the issuance or renewal of a license. But wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it be more reasonable to raise the number of required neighborhood protestants a bit rather than to exclude the huge majority of those affected by an alcohol-serving business? Astoundingly, the amendments would also continue the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s current practice of protecting applicants trying to license an additional establishment. It refuses to consider the applicantsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; own record of alcohol violations and police incidents at their currently owned business in determining whether or not they are of â&#x20AC;&#x153;good characterâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;fit for the responsibilitiesâ&#x20AC;? of a new or transferred license. No matter how many citations or arrests at the currently licensed business, residents are powerless in using that documentation to prevent or moderate replication of those practices. Finally, the bill protects the industry by continuing to deny residents a voice to protest the transfer of an existing license to a new owner, even if that new owner has a profoundly different business model representing a significant change from the current operation and creates new problems for a neighborhood. This is a real issue for Cleveland Park with the closing of Irelandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Four Fields, as recently reported in The Current. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not too late to fix these and other problems or stop this bill. The D.C. government needs to show that it cares as much for its people as it does for its businesses. Concerned residents should contact Council member Graham and other members of this committee (Ward 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Yvette Alexander, Ward 8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Marion Barry, atlarge member Michael A. Brown and Ward 6â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tommy Wells) as well as their own council member. Mark Rosenman is a Cleveland Park Citizens Association board member.

space to the highest bidder. The agency is seeking this expanded authority despite a total lack of consultation with public recreation facility users or advisory neighborhood commissions, and without conducting any other outreach efforts with D.C. citizens. It is incumbent upon agency officials to present information on other city permit fees, rental arrangements and management issues at public forums and prepare a report before the D.C. Council considers this legislation. It would also be interesting to know what constituencies have gone on record to support use of D.C. public recreation properties by private, for-profit companies. It is one thing to discuss increased facility and permit fees to use public recreation space, but it is an expansive and unprecedented policy shift to allow private companies to use our taxpayer-funded facilities. There will be significant consequences and management issues if this legislation is enacted. As to the boot camp operation discussed in the article, Dr. Ranit Mishori is quoted as saying that it is conducted at 6 a.m. and has 10 or fewer participants for one hour. Under the departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s existing

policy, the gathering of up to 10 participants for less than one hour is exempt from permit requirements. This activity does not interfere with public access to the park and clearly should be allowed. Imposing a permit requirement for this activity or requiring contractual arrangement to offer workout sessions is bureaucracy-gone-wild with no benefit to the publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s health, welfare or safety. The department sorely needs to add more transparency to its existing permit program, provide better services and be more responsive to D.C. residents. Mitch Dubensky

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

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President, First Touch Soccer and the DC Youth Futbol Club

Trail shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be named for Carson

It is an ironic tribute to scientific ignorance that there is a drive on to rename a trail in Glover Archbold Park for Rachel Carson, whose misguided and poorly researched fight against DDT has cost the lives of millions in the Third World and sickened and impoverished even more who live there. Clarice Feldman Washington, D.C.

Letters to the editor The Current publishes letters and Viewpoint submissions representing various points of view. Because of space limitations, letters should be no more than 400 words and are subject to editing. Letters and Viewpoint submissions intended for publication should be addressed to Letters to the Editor, The Current, Post Office Box 40400, Washington, D.C. 20016-0400. You may send email to letters@currentnewspapers.com.

9

Thomas L. Sacks, MD

Sonya V. Chawla, MD

Herman J. Junker, MD, MSc

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The CurreNT

ETHICS: New board must staff, house office before beginning operations this fall

From Page 2

tration forms, interpret the city’s code of conduct, give formal and informal advice on ethics and conflict-of-interest questions, enforce open-government laws, mediate Freedom of Information Act disputes, and make recommendations for new or amended ethics legislation. And that’s on top of its most prominent role — investigating allegations of ethical misconduct by city officials and employees. The board can recommend civil penalties,

including fines, censure or removal from office, and can also refer criminal allegations to the U.S. attorney. Misuse of government funds is subject to a triple penalty. Some of that ground has already been plowed. Currently the Office of Campaign Finance handles — and supposedly scrutinizes — financial disclosure and lobbyist reporting forms. So the new board will “inherit” those forms, Spagnoletti said. “At least the process is in place, and initially, it works. It’s a great running start.” The Campaign Finance Office, an arm of the Board of

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Elections, will retain oversight of campaign funding. But other duties for the new board include writing new rules and procedures, and setting up a “matter management system” to track complaints, documents, evidence and appeals. A job description for the most critical position, director of the new ethics office, was posted late last week, and a general counsel and director of open government must also be hired. “We have no rules yet. We’re in a Catch-22. We have no staff,”

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Spagnoletti said. The challenge was highlighted during the first meeting, held in a tiny borrowed conference room on the 11th floor of One Judiciary Square. When a handful of reporters funneled in, an administrative aide from the office outside refused to let them bring in any more chairs. The D.C. Council created the board late last year after a series of ethical missteps, including allegations that Mayor Vincent Gray’s 2010 campaign paid a minor candidate to attack his opponent; that his top staff placed their own children in government jobs; and that thenWard 5 member Harry Thomas was misusing city funds earmarked for youth programs. But it took months to choose the three-member board, as Gray struggled to find qualified candidates who were willing to serve. In the interim, Thomas and then-Council Chairman Kwame Brown resigned in the face of criminal charges, and Gray came under more fire after reports that a “shadow campaign” had raised and spent more than $500,000 — unreported — on his behalf. Once the board nominees were announced, Spagnoletti himself faced questions about possible conflicts of interest, since he had represented Gray in a fence permitting case, and since his law firm helps some clients navigate the District government bureaucracy. Spagnoletti said later that only 2 percent of his firm’s work involves the District government, and that “I

would obviously recuse myself if I or my firm ever touched” a case coming to the ethics board. Of the mayor, he said he would initially recuse himself from any matter involving Gray. “But I have a sixyear term, so I’ll outlive Gray’s first term,” he said on WAMU’s DC Politics Hour last Friday. At the board’s kickoff meeting, Spagnoletti faced more questions about whether the new office’s actions will have any teeth. He and other members noted that the board is empowered to impose civil fines of up to $5,000 per violation, and to seek censure or removal from office of a violator in D.C. Superior Court, as well as to refer criminal allegations to the U.S. attorney. The board also has jurisdiction reaching back five years and broad subpoena power, he said. In the past, the Office of Campaign Finance often investigated allegations, but the public rarely saw violations prosecuted. Spagnoletti said the new board can’t compel the U.S. attorney to pursue criminal charges, but it can keep investigations moving, and in the public eye. And the board will always spell out the results of its investigations, he pledged, although the names of complainants may be kept confidential. Whether an allegation is “deemed unsupported, unfounded or resolved, it becomes a matter of public record,” Spagnoletti said. The meeting ended with a closed session to discuss personnel matters.


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August 1, 2012 ■ Page 11

New Cadets coach aims to get team to next level By BRIAN KAPUR Current Staff Writer

Sean McAloon had coached at Benedictine High School in Richmond since 2005 and was in an ideal and comfortable situation. He had no plans to leave his post unless a unique opportunity arose. That situation presented itself in the spring, when St. John’s parted ways with boys basketball coach Paul DeStefano to search for a replacement. “I wasn’t going to make a change unless it was something that I thought would be better in the long run,” said McAloon. “And I think [St. John’s] can be up at the top consistently in my mind. It’s really just our job to bring it there.” So far the new coach and his staff have been trying to lay a foundation for that goal during summer league play. McAloon has worked to install the new scheme and, perhaps more importantly, form a bond with the players. “The first thing I was trying to do was create a rapport with the kids, let them know that I’ll be there for them,” he said. “That’s a big thing — trust — between coach and player.” McAloon inherits a talented team that came within a basket of ousting eventual Washington Catholic Athletic Conference champion Paul VI from the semifinals of the league tournament last season. That gives the new staff the advantage of a strong base to build on, but it also creates pressure to push the team to the next level. “I think they can take that experi-

ence from last year and work it towards this year,” said McAloon. “Obviously you have to throw a big shoutout and a thank you to Paul [DeStefano] and his staff for what they did to bring them where they were. Our job is to kind of bring them over the hump a little bit.” McAloon decided to give his players a clean slate and didn’t watch any film from last winter. So far several Cadets have already caught the new coach’s eye. “Lennard Freeman has played great,” said McAloon. “James [Mitchell] has been unbelievable. He’s really had a great summer. He’s really bought in to the defensive concept and is playing hard.” The coach also mentioned Tre Campbell as a summer standout. The Cadets have already caught on to McAloon’s intense system while playing in the Rock Summer

Sports Desk Sidwell names new tennis coach

Sidwell recently named Randy de Guzman its interim tennis coach. De Guzman comes to the District after serving as an assistant coach for the women’s tennis team at the University of Maryland at College Park last spring. Before that, De Guzman was the head coach at Miriam High School in the Philippines. He has also coached professional players in the Philippines and has 11 years of experience playing professionally.

Plans for new state-level football tourney begin to take shape

D.C. statewide athletic director Clark Ray clarified some of the nuances of D.C.’s new state football championship — including that

Brian Kapur/The Current

Sean McAloon took over the Cadets’ basketball program after a successful six-year stint at Benedictine High School in Richmond, Va. He has used the summer circuit to begin to put his stamp on the program. League at High Point High School in Maryland. The squad advanced to the semifinals showing some of the hallmarks of McAloon’s scheme: effort and hustle. “I just want to coach effort and defensive intensity,” he said. “We’re going to be unselfish, we’re going to move the ball, we’re going to play motion, screen, and we’re going to move. There isn’t going to be any standing and one-on-one.” The coach hopes to carry over some strategies from his last post. “Defensively, we’re really going to

teams must sign a “standards of competition clause” to be eligible for the title game — in a recent Washington Post report. Gonzaga has already agreed to join, but with a caveat. “Gonzaga will play if it does not conflict with the [league’s] playoffs,” Eagles’ athletics director Joe Reyda said in an email. Other schools did not respond to requests for comment. The D.C. Interscholastic Athletic Association champion, which will still be decided by the Turkey Bowl on Thanksgiving Day, will play the winner of a four-team

get into people,” he said. “That’s something we did at Benedictine that was successful. I think it could translate here in this league.” Joining St. John’s and the WCAC has meant a couple of changes for McAloon on the hardwood. His Benedictine teams played with a shot clock only on rare occasions, but the feature is standard at St. John’s. “I like it, to be honest with you,” said McAloon. “It makes you play the game. I’m excited about it.” The other big adaptation for McAloon was the brand switch,

bracket of charter, independent and private schools. The semifinals for the non-public schools will be played on Nov. 17. The winners of those games will face off on Nov. 24 to determine who advances to the state championship game, slated for Dec. 1. The plan would have the higher seed hosting the game. Gonzaga and St. John’s, which are both in the Washington Catholic Athletic Conference, may have to opt out of the game if they reach their league’s championship game. The conference title game is also slated for Nov. 17.

Keys win Palisades softball title

On the diamond, the game isn’t over until the final out is recorded. In the recent Palisades Slowpitch CoRec Softball League championship game, the Keys proved that point when they railed from a six-run deficit in the bottom of the ninth

from Nike at Benedictine to Under Armour at St. John’s. “I threw away all my Nikes. … All I have now is Under Armour,” said McAloon. “Everyone else in our league is Nike pretty much. We’re the only one that’s different.” Despite the change in leadership for the Cadets, one motivation has remained consistent: the desire for redemption after last season ended in heartbreaking fashion. “They’re a hardworking group that’s hungry,” said McAloon. “With that, you can do a lot.”

inning to top Murphy 14-13. The Keys faced a seemingly impossible hole in the final inning and quickly racked up two outs. But the squad rallied to cut the lead to 13-11. Then — with two teammates on base — Kristof Grina launched a walk-off home run for the go-ahead score to give the Keys the Bob Smith Trophy and the win.

Under-14 travel soccer team looking for players

The DC Stoddert rising U14 Blue Metros boys soccer team is looking for talented, motivated and committed players. The Metros compete in the Virginia Club Champions League. The squad trains all year, three times a week. Interested players born between Aug. 1, 1998, and July 31, 1999, should contact coach Mohamed Bennani for tryout information at 202-2852788 or simousoccer@hotmail.com.


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BABEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S: Zoning Commission will consider six-story project for former billiards site

From Page 1

The application does include a request for one car-sharing space. And residents of the new building, dubbed â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Bond at Tenley,â&#x20AC;? would get subsidies for transit and access to 25 bike-parking spots. But the residents would be ineligible for a residential parking permit that would allow them to park cars on neighborhood streets. Douglas Development already

vetted this position with the community last year, asking neighbors whether they preferred to see retail or parking in the new project â&#x20AC;&#x201D; because there wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t room for both. The majority supported retail. But zoning commissioners Monday had some doubt that Tenleytown residents would truly embrace the parking proposal. Commissioner Michael Turnbull pointed to parking-related spats that arose during plans for the new

American University law school location near the Metro. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In this area, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of concern by residents about parking,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I guess Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m not convinced.â&#x20AC;? Representatives of the Office of Planning, which supported Douglas Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s application, said they had received â&#x20AC;&#x153;overwhelming positive feedback.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;This particular part of the city is not shy,â&#x20AC;? said the agencyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jennifer Steingasser, yet the office didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x153;get

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one callâ&#x20AC;? before Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hearing. Zoning commissioner Peter May initially questioned whether the proposal was ready for public hearings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is a very hard leap, frankly,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m trying to understand â&#x20AC;Ś why we want to deal with [something] that could be quite controversial.â&#x20AC;? Steingasser responded that the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retail community â&#x20AC;&#x153;is fairly immature,â&#x20AC;? so residents support more growth. Another planner noted that if the zoning code is updated as currently proposed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the city is now undergoing a major rewrite â&#x20AC;&#x201D; this type of parking plan could proceed without a formal waiver. May later said he wanted more information on how the proposal will play out in practical terms. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People who live close to the Metro do sometimes have cars,â&#x20AC;? he said, or eventually â&#x20AC;&#x153;decide they want a car.â&#x20AC;? In the past, Douglas Development representatives have said theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d look into the possibility of leasing some parking spaces in nearby buildings. In addition to the parking issue,

the project is seeking various other zoning permissions, including the right to exceed the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lot-occupancy limits. Since the project is offered as a

â??In this area, thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a lot of concern ... about parking.â?&#x17E; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michael Turnbull planned-unit development, the developers will have to provide community amenities in exchange for any zoning leeway granted. They are now offering new street furniture, bike racks, plantings and a transportation coordinator, among other benefits. The building is also designed to score a silver ranking under Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design standards. Despite the concerns, the four zoning commissioners present on Monday night all voted in favor of holding public hearings.


The People and Places of Northwest Washington

August 1, 2012 ■ Page 13

Event revisits Army days of Garrison Elementary

By DEIRDRE BANNON Current Staff Writer

P

assing by the open field at Garrison Elementary, one could call the site nondescript: There’s no marker indicating its history, and Hari Jones, curator and assistant director of the African American Civil War Museum, thinks most people are unaware of its importance. But the museum’s hoping to change that. It recently won a grant to conduct an archaeological study at the site, and plans for the dig are under way. A proposed redesign of the school grounds, which would take place after the archaeological study is complete, is expected to include a memorial along with a plaque to explain the site’s history. What would the plaque commemorate? Back in the 1860s, the site housed Camp Barker, an Army outpost that became a “freedman’s village” for former slaves. And on a summer afternoon in 1862, President Abraham Lincoln visited the village — an event that the African American Civil War Museum celebrated last weekend with a 150th-anniversary re-enactment. Sunday’s event was complete with period costumes and songs and prayers reflecting accounts of that day. Arriving by horse-drawn carriage was an actor portraying Lincoln, as well as museum director Frank Smith, who was playing the part of Union Army Lt. Col. Alexander Augusta, a black doctor whom Lincoln appointed to be an Army surgeon. The choir from the Vermont Avenue Baptist Church, representing freed and runaway slaves who once lived at the village, welcomed the “president” by singing “My Country, ’Tis of Thee.”

Bill Petros/The Current

Sunday’s event re-created President Lincoln’s visit to a “freedman’s village” at what is now Garrison Elementary. Museum director Frank Smith, near right, portrayed a doctor appointed as an Army surgeon by Lincoln, an actor stood in for the president, and Civil War-era re-enactor Patricia Tyson, top right, led things off with a prayer. “When we talk about the greater U Street corridor, it begins as this camp,” said Jones. “The African-American presence as a community begins here — it starts as a camp for runaways and becomes the most affluent African-American neighborhood within 30 years, which is quite noteworthy.” Jones said many “Civil War personalities” were attracted to the U Street neighborhood and settled there, including Charles and Lewis Douglass, sons of Frederick Douglass; former Louisiana Gov.

Pinckney Pinchback, the first black governor of a U.S. state; and William Syphax, a Department of the Interior staffer who advocated for African-American education in the District. At the start of the Civil War, the Union Army set up a soldiers’ camp on the site. In April 1862, after Congress passed legislation freeing all slaves in the District of Columbia, freed and runaway slaves from surrounding areas flocked to the city seeking freedom, and many populated the area near Camp Barker. The site evolved into a “freedman’s village,” located adjacent to the Army barracks, and was more commonly called a “contraband camp” — the latter referring to a term for escaped slaves. At the time of Lincoln’s 1862 visit, Jones estimates, between 1,000 and 3,000 former slaves were living at the camp; by October of that year, that number is thought to have jumped to 5,000.

The village became a central location where black men signed up to join the Union Army. The camp’s proximity to the Army barracks was attractive to the former slaves because the Army served as a sort of “federal police,” offering some measure of protection for those who lived in the village, which included children. Camp residents established a school and a medical clinic, which Augusta ran, on the site. “Aunt” Mary Dines, an escaped slave from Maryland who served as Lincoln’s cook at his summer cottage on Rock Creek Church Road, is said to have invited the president to the camp, where she lived. Accounts of that day said Lincoln was moved to tears by the residents’ song and prayer; it’s believed he returned several times while writing the Emancipation Proclamation, issued in 1863. Jarrod Burks, the archaeologist conducting the study, said at Sunday’s event that “pearls of his-

tory” could be found on the site. He recently conducted a two-day survey using geographic information system technology to take images akin to X-rays of the layers beneath the ground’s surface, which provided a roadmap of the site. The dig is expected to begin once the museum staff and Burks review and decide on the most promising areas for excavation. Museum director Smith, who is a former Ward 1 representative on the D.C. Council, said he’s excited about what lies ahead for the site and what it will mean for the community. “We’re standing on sacred ground here, where sweat and tears were shed by people fighting for freedom,” he said Sunday. “It’s a reminder of what our trials and tribulations were, and what got us to where we are today — and I hope it will serve as an inspiration to Garrison students and community members to learn more about our history.”


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Northwest Real Estate POWER: Pepco undergrounding projects on hold pending new selection criteria

From Page 1

Although the issue of undergrounding power lines has long been debated in the District, the push to bury the wires gathered fresh steam after tens of thousands of residents faced extended power outages in the wake of the June 29 â&#x20AC;&#x153;derechoâ&#x20AC;? storm. The D.C. Council is preparing to consider legislation that would expedite the process, and Mayor Vincent Gray has convened a task force to study the issue. Pepco lists selective undergrounding â&#x20AC;&#x201D; burying certain failure-prone power lines â&#x20AC;&#x201D; as one point in its much-publicized reliability improvement plan. The feeders along Oregon and Michigan avenues

were to have been the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first such projects, costing $1.3 million and $4.6 million, respectively. The Public Service Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s order doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop Pepco from carrying out the projects. But its reluctance to endorse the utilityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s methodology makes it less likely that Pepco could raise its rates to recoup the investment, according to officials with Pepco and the commission. Pepco is seeking an overall $42.5 million rate increase to fund a series of reliability improvements, including selective undergrounding projects. Some residents have protested that the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s performance doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t merit higher rates and noted that Pepco has remained profitable even when earning low reliability

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scores. Pepcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plan was to look at the feeders â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the high-voltage lines serving large areas â&#x20AC;&#x201D; that it had identified as having high failure rates, and from there determine which faced the most issues. Because of the high cost of burying lines, estimated at $3 million to $12 million per mile, the selective undergrounding would target solely problematic lines whose many failures could be solved only by burying them underground. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We looked at feeders where we have done other remedial steps to improve reliability but they didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take,â&#x20AC;? Michael Maxwell, Pepcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vice president for asset management, said in an interview. On Oregon Avenue, for instance, the presence of many large trees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; including those in Rock Creek Park â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are clearly to blame for the outages, and simply trimming branches or strengthening poles and wires wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be enough, Maxwell said. The Oregon plan would have moved 1,600 feet of the feeder underground, though power lines serving homes in that immediate vicinity would stay above ground. This would prevent a fallen tree on Oregon from having a larger impact in Chevy Chase while reducing costs and allowing homes to still connect

to the wires above ground. Pepco also identified a feeder running along MacArthur Boulevard and Sherier Place in the Palisades as a good candidate under most of its proposed criteria, but it failed a â&#x20AC;&#x153;constructabilityâ&#x20AC;? requirement: Existing underground pipes would need to be relocated to make room for power lines, further increasing an already substantial cost. In rejecting the methodology, the Public Service Commission said it wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t convinced that Pepco couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t solve many of its reliability problems through increased treetrimming and other relatively inexpensive measures. It also said Pepco eliminated too many possible candidates for selective undergrounding, and should also consider power lines serving fewer homes that fail often. Maxwell said Pepco is working to revise its methodology and will submit a new filing to the commission, but he said itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too early to say how soon that might occur. Had the commission supported the plan, he said, the company would have moved quickly to carry out its first two proposals, learn from those examples and identify future sites. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We wanted to get them in the pipe and give the commission time to look at it, so we did all the engineeringâ&#x20AC;? for the feeders along

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Oregon and Michigan avenues, said Maxwell. â&#x20AC;&#x153;And obviously if they saw value in it and it was successful, then we would have done a lot more.â&#x20AC;? Pepco spokesperson Bob Hainey emphasized that the company is not blaming the commission for a delay in undergrounding utilities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They disapproved the methodology; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the way it goes,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s up to us to go back and figure something out.â&#x20AC;? One area where Pepco and the commission agree â&#x20AC;&#x201D; but where many residents do not â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is that aesthetics should not be a factor in choosing to underground power lines. For instance, wherever tree pruning would work to improve reliability, Pepco is expected to take that cost-effective measure rather than considering burying the lines. The Office of the Peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Counsel, which advocates for ratepayers in Public Service Commission proceedings, submitted testimony saying that the office supports undergrounding for Oregon and Michigan avenues. But agency head Sandra Mattavous-Frye said in a statement to The Current that the commission is behaving prudently by seeking revisions to Pepcoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s proposed criteria because the high cost of undergrounding demands caution.

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A Look at the Market in Northwest Washington

August 1, 2012 â&#x2013;  Page 15

Logan Circle gem offers views of neighborhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vitality

T

he address of this on-themarket penthouse in a grand historic home is an appropriate one. One Logan Circle, built in

foot roof deck, a large expanse thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen a recent renovation with new decking, flashing, railings and more. One smart design feature is a take-away tip: The railing outlines a niche sized to fit a grill, meaning that the hulking piece doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t interrupt the deckâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s traffic flow. Inside, a landing once housed a wet bar, said Realtor Thomas Holbrook. Though plumbing remains behind a wall, the spot is now deployed as a home office. The homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main level also offers treehouse views through its more than 20 windows. An openplan living, dining and kitchen area gets light from two exposures â&#x20AC;&#x201D; three, counting the skylight â&#x20AC;&#x201D; adding to the sense of light and volume in the lofty-ceilinged spot. Despite the open footprint, clear zones make decorating easier. The kitchen, with its light wood cabinets and black granite countertops, segues into a small breakfast spot lit by two tall windows. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also room to perch at the peninsula that separates the kitchen from the living room. The large space gets help focusing from a wood-burning fireplace thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centered on a long, windowfilled wall. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a good idea to

ON THE MARKET Carol BuCkley

1888 by Ulysses S. Grant Jr., is a well-known neighborhood gem and in 1997 became the first on the then-languishing circle to undergo redevelopment. Since Bethesda-based developer PN Hoffman tackled that project, the neighborhood has changed immensely, with prices rising as one Victorian after another was reclaimed from decline. The areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s retail boomed, with shop and restaurant owners following close on the heels of Whole Foodsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; P Street outpost. But in other ways, development has led to more of a restoration than a rethinking of Logan Circle. The spot is the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only circle that has only residential properties on its perimeter. The result is a quiet, ageless respite from the bustle of nearby 14th Street. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to catalog whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s changed â&#x20AC;&#x201D; and what hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t â&#x20AC;&#x201D; from this propertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1,000-square-

Carol Buckley/The Current

This Logan Circle penthouse condo is priced at $1,149,000. keep lighting fixtures constant in an open space; two airy, sculptural chandeliers unify this room and will convey with the home. Hardwood floors run seamlessly throughout the property â&#x20AC;&#x201D; another way to reduce visual clutter. The unit was once a two-bedroom space, but owners removed a wall to create a den thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open to the homeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s main room. New owners may wish to keep that arrangement, but if not, the wall and door are available to be reinstalled. Potential buyers will want to

NEW LISTINGS

notice doors here; hardware is substantial, attractive and period. A hall bath is clean and bright in a largely white palette. A master bath is also largely white, and a few touches add luxury, including a separate shower and a spa tub set beneath a sunny window. The master bedroom is a retreat, with a private balcony accessible from a glass door here. Built-in custom bookshelves flank

another window, and a large walkin closet offers ample storage. Another closet near the master suite holds a washer and dryer. Unit 7 at 1 Logan Circle is offered for $1,149,000. Monthly fees are $598. An open house will be held Sunday from 1 to 4 p.m. For more information, contact Thomas Holbrook of RE/MAX Allegiance at 202-297-9692 or thomasholbrook@mris.com.

   

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Brilliant Design

Palisades. Marvelous new home designed by Chryssa Wolfe. High style & environmentally friendly. 4 levels, 6000+ sf of luxurious living space.  6 BRs, 5 FBAs, 2 HBAs.  Gorgeous pool w/multilevel patios, outdoor frpl & dramatic landscaping. $2,935,000  Nancy Hammond 202-262-5374 g

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Colonial Classic

Woodacres, Bethesda, MD. Renovated Colonial w/large addition in great neighborhood just minutes to DC. 5 BRs, 4.5 BAs. 1st flr office, kit w/brkfst area. Screen porch & patio. Gorgeous pool. $1,099,000 Delia McCormick  301-977-7273

Simply Elegant

Chevy Chase, MD. 1918 beauty w/6 BRS, 3 BAs & 2 HBAs. Large kitchen open to family rm. Finished walk-out LL. Screen porch, deck & patio. Lge lot less than a mile to Metro & shops. $2,080,000 Marcie Sandalow   301-652-7949 Catarina Bannier  202-487-7177 isting New L

Sunny Choice

Kenwood Park, Bethesda, MD Contemporary Rambler on huge gorgeous flat lot. Sun drenched on 2 levels. Renov. kitchen, 1st flr library/office. Walk-out LL w/in-law suite incl. kit, lge rec rm. $998,000 Linda Chaletzky  301-938-2630

CHEVY CHASE 4400 JENIFER STREET NW 202-364-1700

Show Stopper

Bethesda/NIH. The ultimate in new construction! Extraordinary residence by The Kelly Co. High end finishes in this spacious 4 level home. Designer kit & BAs. $1,349,000 Eric Murtagh   301-652-8971 Marina Krapiva  301-792-568

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Space & Light

Chevy Chase, DC. Impeccable 1930 Colonial. Spacious rms & high ceilings. 4 BRs, 3.5 BAs on 4 finished levels.Fam rm, bkf rm & LL rec rm w/full kit. Det. garage. $975,000 Ellen Abrams 202-255-8219 Judy Meyerson 202-276-0755

DUPONT 1509 22ND STREET NW 202-464-8400

 

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ch 16 Wednesday, August 1, 2012 T he Current

Northwest Real Estate

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The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 15, at St. Mary Armenian Apostolic Church, 42nd and Fessenden streets NW. For details, visit anc3e.org. ANC 3/4G ANCChase 3/4G Chevy â&#x2013;  CHEVYâ&#x20AC;&#x2C6;CHASE

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The commission will meet at 7:30 p.m. Monday, Sept. 10, at the Chevy Chase Community Center, Connecticut Avenue and McKinley Street NW. The chair will call a special meeting if action is needed prior to then. For details, send an email to chevychaseanc3@verizon.net or call 202-363-5803. ANC 4A ANC Village 4A Colonial â&#x2013;  colonial village / crestwood Shepherd Park Shepherd Park / brightwood Crestwood 16th street heights

The commission will meet at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 11, at Fort Stevens Recreation Center, 13th and Van Buren streets NW. For details, call 202-450-6225 or visit anc4a.org. ANC 4C ANC 4c Street Heights Petworth/16th â&#x2013;  petworth/16th Street Heights Crestwood crestwood

At the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s July 11 meeting: â&#x2013;  commission treasurer Michael Yates announced the commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fiscal year spending was â&#x20AC;&#x153;on track.â&#x20AC;? â&#x2013;  commission secretary Zachary Hartman said he would post an unofficial report of commission meetings within 72 hours of the meeting on area listservs and via email to those who request it. He also announced that no local police service area meetings are scheduled for July or August. â&#x2013;  commission chair Joseph Vaughan reminded residents that petitions to run for seats on the commission must include 25 signatures and be delivered to the D.C. Board of Elections. â&#x2013;  Julie Wineinger announced that her womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clothing shop, Willow Fashion, has opened at 825 Upshur St. She said the store will add housewares and gifts when it moves to 843 Upshur St. in the near future. â&#x2013;  a representative of the D.C. Department of the Environment announced a July 18 meeting on preliminary design plans for a pilot landscaping project to enhance the neighborhood and reduce stormwater entering the sewer system. Design completion is planned for the end of summer, with construction to start in the fall and finish next spring. â&#x2013;  commissioner Shanel Anthony announced that E.L. Haynes Public Charter School will be using modular units for its eighth- and ninthgraders until renovation work on its

Chevy Chase Citizens Association

This Tuesday is the 29th annual National Night Out against crime. Organizers again hope to heighten support for crime- and drug-prevention awareness; generate support for and participation in local anticrime programs; strengthen neighborhood spirit and police-community partnerships; and send a message to criminals, letting them know that neighborhoods are organized and fighting back. Last year, residents in our community were among the more than 37 million people in the United States, Canada and military bases worldwide who participated in the event. On Tuesday, the Chevy Chase community will join with thousands of D.C. residents, police officers and other community leaders to celebrate National Night Out with community cookouts, open houses, block parties, candlelight vigils and athletic events. Communities in all seven D.C. police districts have scheduled National Night Out events during the late afternoon and evening hours. To see the entire listing, please visit mpdc.dc.gov/nno. The Metropolitan Police Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2nd District, which includes Chevy Chase, is celebrating National Night Out at the 2nd District Police Headquarters, 3320 Idaho Ave. NW, from 5 to 7 p.m. The 2nd District will sponsor a Community Safety Awareness Event with car seat checks and installations, burglary safety inventory kits, McGruff the Crime Dog, food, fun and entertainment. For more information, please contact Officer Rhonda Hardy at rhonda.hardy@dc.gov or 202270-2286. The 2nd District event is also an opportunity to meet and greet police officers in the community and learn about Neighborhood Watch programs. We hope you will join us. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; George Corey building is completed in October. â&#x2013;  Metropolitan Police Department Officer Eric Cross reported that a suspect has been charged in connection with a July 4 murder on Gallatin Street, which involved rival gangs. He said there have been no arrests so far in a June 23 murder in the 500 block of Crittenden Street. Cross also said a Quincy Street house that used to be a drug haven is scheduled to be sold soon, which is â&#x20AC;&#x153;very good news for the community.â&#x20AC;? A developer plans to gut and renovate it. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously approved a $1,000 grant for an Aug. 25 boxing event at Upshur Park sponsored by Cease Fire, a local organization that works to dissolve gang activity. Cease Fire founder Al-Malik Farrakhan said similar events in the past have not required police presence. â&#x2013;  commissioners voted 8-2, with Jean Badalamenti and Timothy Jones opposed, to support AT&Tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s plans for a 126-foot-tall cellular monopole at Roosevelt High School in exchange for a $10,000 payment to the school and monthly lease payments to the D.C. Public Schools system. AT&T attorney Tracy Williams said the tower would emit less than 1 percent of the radio waves the Federal Communications Commission has found to be the maximum safe level. An 8-foot fence would surround equipment at the base of the pole. Williams said the firm needs more monopoles due to the increase in data transmissions. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously supported the Neighborhood Development Co.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s planned renovation of the Preparatory School of D.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus at 209 Upshur St., which will be financed through grants from the D.C. Department of Housing and Community Development.

â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously agreed to write a letter supporting traffic-calming devices, speed cameras and more police enforcement along New Hampshire Avenue north of Grant Circle. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously approved a call for relocation of a Metrobus stop from the 5800 block of Georgia Avenue to the 5900 block. Commissioner Michael Yates said the new stop would be close to a crosswalk and would discourage jaywalking. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously supported allowing vendors with permits to operate at parks if they provide services or sell items consistent with the mission of the parks. That approval was contingent on allowing volunteer organizations to give away park-related items without acquiring permits. Commissioners rejected a proposal to allow ads in the parks. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously agreed to write a letter of support for additional programming at the Petworth Recreation Center. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously agreed to grant up to $600 for a Community Day in Triangle Park on the last Saturday in August, and to write a letter of support for the festivities to the D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation. â&#x2013;  commissioners unanimously agreed to write to Pepco seeking information about power outages following the June 22 and June 29 storms. The commission plans to ask how many days of service were lost in the commission area, how many customers lost service and how long it took to restore power. The commission will meet at 6:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 8, at the Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. For details, call 202-723-6670 or visit anc4c.org.


The CurrenT

Wednesday, auGusT 1, 2012 17

ColdwellBanker

®

CBMove.com

Wesley Heights – 4519 Klingle Street NW. Splendid Wesley Heights home, beautifully renovated. Sun-filled open layout with two story foyer, large LR with fireplace, charming study, inviting dining-family-breakfast room with adjoining chef's kitchen leading to private deck and lovely level garden, ample lower level & 2 car garage. 5BRs, 3 Full BAs, 2 Half BAs. $1,750,000. Chadley Toregas 240.421.1787 CBMove.com/DC7869937

Logan – 1447 Q Street NW. UNDER CONTRACT. Situated among one of DC’s most sought-after and vibrant neighborhoods, this home is the perfect marriage of classic design and top-of-the-line modern finishes. $1,049,555.

Mt. Vernon – 1215 4th Street NW. Gorgeous 3-level, 2600 sq ft 4 BR / 3.5 BA row home offers a taste of the good life. High ceilings, chef’s kitchen, landscaped yard, wet bar, 3rd floor deck and custom details throughout. $949,555.

Mandy Mills & David Getson 202.379.9619 CBMove.com/DC7887565

Mandy Mills & David Getson 202.379.9619 CBMove.com/DC7887493

Palisades – 1607 45th Street NW. Spacious Contemporary home in Palisades, renovated in 2010. Separate In-law suite w/ private entrance. Custom cabinetry @ wet bar with sink/ refrig granite tops. Gourmet Kitchen. Large dining room & 3 side glazed family room in a modern open floor plan looking out to patio/garden. $948,000. Richard T. Ross 202.438.0051 CBMove.com/DC7879649

AROUND THE CORNER AROUND THE COUNTRY AROUND THE WORLD Kalorama – 2230 California Street NW #4B-E. Sophisticated, high-end renovation at the St Nicholas! All best appliances/finishes. 3BRs, 3 BAs, 2 private balconies, wood-burning fireplace, wood floors, extra storage, New Pella windows & exterior doors. DEEDED PARKING. Move right in! All urban amenities yet quiet, tree-lined neighborhood. No pets. $1,395,000. Sylvia Bergstrom & Marin Hagen 202.257.2339 CBMove.com/DC7882063

Adams Morgan – 1831 Belmont Road NW #402. This charming unit has a great kitchen (granite, stainless, Maple cabinetry) and is located on the quiet side of the building - 1BR and 1BA on top floor of Beaux Arts building (2004 renov.). Incredible location: minutes away from the nightlife and restaurants of Adams Morgan and in between 2 Metro stops. $315,000. Gilbert Stockton 703.696.5089 CBMove.com/DC7889929

Work with the international leader.

Adams Morgan – 1851 Columbia Road NW #408. Bright and Lovely unit on the 4th floor. All south-facing windows, good storage, well-run building in the heart of Adams Morgan and convenient to Downtown/Connecticut Avenue. Comes with parking. $349,000. Willie Parker 202.316.1236 CBMove.com/DC7838782

Logan – 1101 L Street NW #102. New ListingSpacious, Sunny 1 BR in Charming Mid-Rise Building. Wood Floors, High Ceilings, Updated Kitchen, Blocks to Metros, Downtown. $310,000.

Chevy Chase 202.362.5800

Elizabeth Blakeslee 202.625.3419 CBMove.com/DC7893281

American University Park – 4301 Massachusetts Avenue NW #A-311. Sunny, bright southfacing 1BR apt with a wall of windows in living room/dining area. Wood floors, built-in cabinets, freshly painted, updated kitchen, ceramic tile bath. Luxury bldg w/ 24-hour front desk. Near AU. $285,000. Pilar Lamadrid 202.445.5137 Gregory Ennis 202.276.1778 CBMove.com/DC7885634

Dupont 202.387.6180 CBMove.com

Cathedral Heights / Observatory – 4101 Cathedral Avenue NW #106. Wonderful two bedroom, two bathroom layout in an excellently maintained building. Like living in your private home with glorious lawn off your first floor terrace. $269,500. Carol Harris 202.309.1956 CBMove.com/DC7806560

Georgetown 202.333.6100

© 2012 Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Operated by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Previews International, the Previews International logo and “Dedicated to Luxury Real Estate” are registered and unregistered service marks owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


&

18 Wednesday, August 1, 2012 The Current

Events Entertainment

Wednesday, Aug. 1

Wednesday august 1 Concerts â&#x2013;  Czech pianist Alice FiedlerovĂĄ will perform works by Smetana, NovĂĄk and Chopin. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Washington International Piano Festival will present a showcase of competition prizewinners, at 6:45 p.m.; and a performance by JosĂŠ Feghali (shown), gold medalist at the 7th Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, at 7:30 p.m. $20; $10 for seniors and students. Ward Recital Hall, Rome School of Music, Catholic University, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. washingtonpianofest.com. â&#x2013;  The weekly Harbour Nights concert series will feature the poprock band Hand Painted Swinger. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Plaza, Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202295-5007. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Band will perform. 8 p.m. Free. West Terrace, U.S. Capitol. 202433-4011. Films â&#x2013;  A screening of â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Grateful Dead Movieâ&#x20AC;? will mark Jerry Garciaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 70th birthday. 7 p.m. AMC Mazza Gallerie, 5300 Wisconsin Ave. NW. fathomevents.com. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;NoMa Summer Screenâ&#x20AC;? will present Steven Spielbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1993 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jurassic Park,â&#x20AC;? starring Sam Neill and Laura Dern. 7 p.m. Free. 2nd and L streets NE. nomasummerscreen.com.

â&#x2013;  The Panorama of Greek Cinema series will present Sotiris Goritsasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 2011 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Welcome to â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;All Saints,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? about a young medical intern as he begins his career at a hospital. 8 p.m. $11; $9 for students; $8.25 for seniors; $8 for ages 12 and younger. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Films on the Vernâ&#x20AC;? outdoor film series will feature Martin Scorseseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2011 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hugo,â&#x20AC;? about an orphan who is wrapped up in a mystery involving his late father and an automaton. 8:30 p.m. Free. Pool, George Washington University Mount Vernon Campus, 2100 Foxhall Road NW. 202-242-6670. Performance â&#x2013;  Director Joan Vail Thorne and actors Kathleen Chalfant, Mary Beth Peil and Tamara Tunie will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;History Matters/Back to the Future,â&#x20AC;? a concert reading of scenes from plays by celebrated women writers including ZoĂŤ Akins, Rachel Crothers, Edna Ferber, Angelina GrimkĂŠ, Lillian Hellman, Fay Kanan and Edith Wharton. 7:30 p.m. Free. Gonda Theatre, Davis Performing Arts Center, Georgetown University, 37th and O streets NW. 202687-3838. Sale â&#x2013;  A pop-up retail shop, Edited for Goodwill, will feature clothing and other items from Goodwill of Greater Washington. Noon to 7 p.m. Free admission. Pepco Edison Place Gallery, 702 8th St. NW. pepco.com. The sale will continue Thursday and Friday from noon to 7 p.m. Sporting events â&#x2013;  The 2012 Citi Open tennis tournament will feature Mardy Fish, Alexandr Dolgopolov, Kevin Anderson, Tommy Haas and Sam Querrey, among others. 4 p.m.

E V I T A E R C IMAGES Y PH A R G O T O PH

Portraits Conferences Events Publicity

$45 to $70. William H.G. FitzGerald Tennis Center, 16th and Kennedy streets NW. 202-397-7328. The tournament will continue through Sunday at various times. â&#x2013;  The Washington Nationals will play the Philadelphia Phillies. 7:05 p.m. $5 to $65. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Thursday at 7:05 p.m. Aug. 2 Thursday, Thursday august 2 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x2013;  The Bubble Lady will explain the science of bubbles as she sculpts bubble hairdos and helmets and encloses a volunteer in a huge bubble (for children ages 5 through 12). 10:30 a.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. Class â&#x2013;  The Washington International Piano Festival will present a master class led by JosĂŠ Feghali. 10 a.m. $20; $10 for seniors and students. Ward Recital Hall, Rome School of Music, Catholic University, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. washingtonpianofest. com. Concerts â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Live! on Woodrow Wilson Plazaâ&#x20AC;? will feature a tribute to go-go star Chuck Brown, featuring the Familiar Faces, KK, Bugs from Junk Yard and Sugar Bear from E.U. Noon to 1:30 p.m. Free. Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202312-1300. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lunchtime Music on the Mallâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D; sponsored by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, the National Park Service and the office of D.C. Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton â&#x20AC;&#x201D; will feature the D.C.based a cappella group The Light. Noon to 1 p.m. Free. Near the Smithsonian Metro station on the National Mall at 12th Street SW. â&#x2013;  Participants in the 2012 Washington International Piano Festival will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600.

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â&#x2013;  The Yvonne Johnson Trio will perform as part of the Jazz on Jackson Place series. 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. $25. Decatur House, 1610 H St. NW. 202-633-3030. â&#x2013;  The Fort Reno concert series will feature performances by Chain & the Gang, Manta Ray and Triage. 7 p.m. Free. Fort Reno Park, 40th and Chesapeake streets NW. fortreno.com. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Army Concert Band will perform works by Sousa and others as part of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunsets With a Soundtrackâ&#x20AC;? series. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. 703696-3399. The concert will repeat Friday at 8 p.m. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Marine Band will perform. 8 p.m. Sylvan Theater, Washington Monument grounds, 15th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-433-4011. Demonstration â&#x2013;  U.S. Botanic Garden staff members will show carnivorous plants in the collection and explain how they have adapted to their environments. 1 to 1:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. usbg.gov. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  U.S. Botanic Garden volunteer Todd Brethauer will discuss the evolution, history, ecology and physiology of the passive

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Wednesday, august 1 â&#x2013;  Discussion: Amor Towles will discuss his novel â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rules of Civility.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-3641919.

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trap group of carnivorous plants. Noon and 6:30 p.m. Free; reservations required. Conservatory Classroom, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. usbg.gov. The lecture will repeat Saturday at 10:30 a.m. â&#x2013;  The Mystery Book Group will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Holy Thiefâ&#x20AC;? by William Ryan. 6:30 p.m. Free. Barnes & Noble, 555 12th St. NW. 202-347-0176. â&#x2013;  Bill Wasik (shown) and Monica Murphy will discuss their book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rabid: A Cultural History of the Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Most Diabolical Virus.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-3641919. Special events â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phillips After 5â&#x20AC;? will feature the second annual Food Truck Fiesta; an exploration of American Sign Language imagery in recent prints by Jasper Johns through sign language classes and silent films; a performance by the Duende Quartet; and gallery talks about â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jasper Johns and Popular Imagery.â&#x20AC;? 5 to 8:30 p.m. $12; $10 for seniors and students. Reservations suggested. Phillips Collection, 1600 21st St. NW. phillipscollection.org/calendar. â&#x2013;  Italian chef Amy Brandwein will present a five-course dinner showcasing heirloom tomatoes. 7 to 9 p.m. $50; $90 with wine pairings. Cork Market & Tasting Room, 1805 14th St. NW. 202-265-2675. Tour â&#x2013;  A tour will focus on the damage at the Washington National Cathedral caused by the magnitude 5.8 earthquake in August 2011. 3 p.m. $10; reservations suggested. Washington National Cathedral, Massachusetts and Wisconsin avenues NW. 202-537-6200. The tour will repeat Sunday at 1:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 3

Friday august 3

Class â&#x2013;  The Washington International Piano Festival will present a master class led by Leon Fleisher. 10 a.m. $20; $10 for seniors and students. Ward Recital Hall, Rome School of Music, Catholic University, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. washingtonpianofest.com. Concerts â&#x2013;  The Friday Noon Concert series will feature the William Montgomery Flute Master Class Flute Choir and Flute Ensembles. Noon. Free. Arts Club of See Events/Page 19    


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The Current

Events Entertainment

Continued From Page 18 Washington, 2017 I St. NW. 202-3317282. â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jazz in the Gardenâ&#x20AC;? series will feature jazz saxophonist Chris Vadala. 5 to 8:30 p.m. Free. Sculpture Garden, National Gallery of Art, 7th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. â&#x2013;  Participants in the 2012 Washington International Piano Festival will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The Freiburg Cathedral Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Choir will perform. 7:30 p.m. Free. The United Church, 1920 G St. NW. 202-331-1495. Film â&#x2013;  The 17th annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Made in Hong Kong Film Festival: Hong Kong Classicsâ&#x20AC;? will feature Stanley Kwanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1988 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rouge.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Meyer Auditorium, Freer Gallery of Art, 12th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-1000. The film will be shown again Sunday at 2 p.m. Performances â&#x2013;  Teens will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portraits Alive!â&#x20AC;? featuring original plays that bring the National Portrait Galleryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s collection to life. 2:15 p.m. Free. F Street lobby, National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F streets NW. 202633-1000. â&#x2013;  Participants in GALA Hispanic Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s youth programs will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hidden Reality,â&#x20AC;? an original bilingual production directed by Quique Aviles. 7 p.m. Free. GALA Theatre, 3333 14th st. NW. 202-234-7174. â&#x2013;  Comedian Jerry Seinfeld will perform his signature stand-up routine. 7 p.m. $69 to $88. Concert Hall, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. The performance will repeat Saturday at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sporting event â&#x2013;  The Washington Nationals will play a doubleheader against the Miami Marlins. 4:05 p.m. $5 to $65. Nationals Park, 1500 South Capitol St. SE. 888-632-6287. The series will continue Saturday at 7:05 p.m. and Sunday at 7:05 p.m. Tours â&#x2013;  A â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lunchtime Tour of the Conservatoryâ&#x20AC;? will explore the links between the exotic plant world and everyday life. Noon to 1 p.m. Free. Conservatory Garden Court, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. usbg.gov. The tour will repeat Monday and Wednesday at noon. â&#x2013;  Arts in Foggy Bottom will present a twilight tour of its exhibit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sculpting Outside the Lines,â&#x20AC;? led by curator Laura Roulet. 8 p.m. Free. New Hampshire Avenue and I Street NW. foggybottomassociation.com. 4 Saturday, SaturdayAug. august 4 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs â&#x2013;  Children will hear a story about artist

Andy Warhol and create a special piece of art. 1 to 4 p.m. Free. National Portrait Gallery, 8th and F streets NW. 202-6331000. The program will repeat Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arts for Familiesâ&#x20AC;? will feature a session on how to dye a pillowcase by using shibori, the Japanese art of shaped resist dyeing. 2 to 4 p.m. Free. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-667-0441, ext. 64. Classes and workshops â&#x2013;  The Corcoran Gallery of Art will present a silk painting workshop inspired by Richard Diebenkornâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s geometric abstractions in the Ocean Park Series. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. $25; reservations required. Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. 202-639-1770. â&#x2013;  The Double Nickels Theatre Company and the Corcoran Gallery of Art will present a workshop on â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sharing Stories,â&#x20AC;? about the connections between visual art and the written and spoken word. 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Free; reservations suggested. Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. 202-639-1770. Concerts â&#x2013;  The Washington International Piano Arts Council will present a piano competition. 10:30 a.m. Free. The United Church, 1920 G St. NW. 202-331-1495. â&#x2013;  The Washington International Piano Festival will present a closing concert of the 2012 participants. 11 a.m. Free. Ward Recital Hall, Rome School of Music, Catholic University, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. washingtonpianofest.com. â&#x2013;  The Washington International Piano Festival will present performances by pianist Yoshio Hamano, at 3:15 p.m.; and by pianist Alexander Kobrin (shown), at 4 p.m. $20; $10 for seniors and students. Ward Recital Hall, Rome School of Music, Catholic University, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. washingtonpianofest.com. â&#x2013;  The Philadelphia Jazz Orchestra, comprised of standout high school and college musicians, will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. â&#x2013;  The 11th annual Memorial Concert in Honor of Susanna â&#x20AC;&#x153;Susieâ&#x20AC;? Kim will feature the Metropolitan Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Choir and guest artists in a program of classical music. 7:30 p.m. $40. Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Shaw Reading Club, which focuses on the works of Nobel laureates in literature, will hold its monthly meeting. 10 a.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. â&#x2013;  Weaver Michael Heilman will discuss and demonstrate tools developed or invented since 1870 in the United States

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Western art to new areas of cultural study. 2:30 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215.

Saturday, august 4 â&#x2013;  Concert: Musician Wendell Kimbrough will perform at a benefit concert for As We Forgive, a nonprofit group that promotes post-genocide reconciliation in Rwanda. 8 p.m. $15 in advance; $18 at the door. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993.

for use in making rugs in the weaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home. 10:30 a.m. Free. Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. 202-667-0441, ext. 64. â&#x2013;  Historian Jonathan Conlin will discuss BBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1972 series â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ways of Seeingâ&#x20AC;? and how it opened up the social history of

Films â&#x2013;  The â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ballet in Cinemaâ&#x20AC;? series will feature â&#x20AC;&#x153;La Bayadereâ&#x20AC;? from the Paris Opera Ballet. 11 a.m. $18.80. West End Cinema, 2301 M St. NW. 202-419-3456. The film will be shown again Monday at 7 p.m. â&#x2013;  Maximize Good will present Ellie Waltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2003 documentary â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chocolate City,â&#x20AC;? about families fighting displacement from the Arthur Capper housing project in the Capitol Hill neighborhood. A discussion with Walton will follow. 1 p.m. Free. Watha T. Daniel-Shaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-727-1288. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Musical Summer at TenleyFriendshipâ&#x20AC;? will feature Bob Fosseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1972 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cabaret,â&#x20AC;? starring Liza Minnelli and Michael York. 2 p.m. Free. TenleyFriendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. 202-727-1225. â&#x2013;  As part of the Fresh Produce festival, Panda Head will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;End of Summer Bummer,â&#x20AC;? an evening of shorts by local filmmakers. 8 to 11 p.m. $6. The Fridge DC, 516 1/2 8th St. SE. endofsummerbummer.eventbrite.com. Performances â&#x2013;  Writer and director Stacy Jewell Lewis

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

19

will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Stolen: From Playgrounds to Streetlights,â&#x20AC;? about sex trafficking and prostitution in America. 3 and 8 p.m. $25; $15 for students. Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. 202-399-7993. â&#x2013;  Genre-hopping performers and directors Holly Bass and Jaamil Kosoko will present new works. 8 p.m. $22; $17 for seniors, teachers and artists; $10 for college students; and $8 for ages 17 and younger. Dance Place, 3225 8th St. NE. 202-269-1600. The performance will repeat Sunday at 7 p.m. Sporting event â&#x2013;  D.C. United will play the Columbus Crew. 7:30 p.m. $23 to $52. RFK Memorial Stadium, 2400 East Capitol St. SE. 202-397-7328. 5 Sunday, SundayAug. august 5 Concerts â&#x2013;  The weekly Steel Drum Sundays concert series will feature Roger Greenidge. Noon to 3 p.m. Free. Plaza, Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202-295-5007. â&#x2013;  The Washington Performing Arts Society Children of the Gospel Choir will perform. 2 p.m. Free. National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. 202-272-2448. â&#x2013;  Dahlak Restaurant will host its weekly â&#x20AC;&#x153;DC Jazz Jamâ&#x20AC;? session. 6:30 to 9:30 See Events/Page 20


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20 Wednesday, August 1, 2012 The Current

Events Entertainment

Continued From Page 19 p.m. Free. 1771 U St. NW. 202-527-9522. Discussion â&#x2013;  National Gallery of Art lecturer David Gariff will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spectatorship and Voyeurism in the Art and Films of Hopper and Hitchcock.â&#x20AC;? 2 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202737-4215. Film â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;From Vault to Screen: Recent Preservationâ&#x20AC;? will feature Herbert Brenonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1923 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Spanish Dancer,â&#x20AC;? with live accompaniment by pianist Andrew Simpson. 4:30 p.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202737-4215. Performance â&#x2013;  The Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Metro Review,â&#x20AC;? featuring standout performers from the Washington area. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202467-4600. Monday, Aug. 6

Monday august 6 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s programs â&#x2013;  Blue Sky Puppets will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goldy Bear and the Three Locks.â&#x20AC;? 10:30 a.m. Free. Palisades Library, 4901 V St. NW. 202-282-3139. â&#x2013;  Blue Sky Puppets will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Goldy Bear and the Three Locks.â&#x20AC;? 1:30 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232. Concerts â&#x2013;  Janka Nabay and the Bubu Gang will

perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Navy Band will present an alumni reunion concert. 8 p.m. Free. U.S. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-737-2300. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The American History Book Club will meet. 6:30 p.m. Free. Watha T. DanielShaw Library, 1630 7th St. NW. 202-7271288. â&#x2013;  Wall Street Journal economics editor David Wessel will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Red Ink: Inside the High-Stakes Politics of the Federal Budget.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202364-1919. â&#x2013;  The Chevy Chase Book Club will discuss â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mildred Pierceâ&#x20AC;? by James M. Cain. 7 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. Films â&#x2013;  A foreign film series will feature the 1998 Brazilian film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Central Station,â&#x20AC;? about a young boy whose mother is killed near Rio de Janeiroâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Central Station. 2 p.m. Free. Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Looking at You, Bogartâ&#x20AC;? will feature John Hustonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1951 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;The African Queen.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free; tickets required. Helen Hayes Gallery, National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-783-3372. â&#x2013;  A classic film series will feature

Terrace Theater, Kennedy Center. 301-3152283. Tuesday, 7 TuesdayAug. august 7 Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Japan-in-a-Suitcaseâ&#x20AC;? will feature a chance to learn about Japanese culture, try using chopsticks, play traditional games and see and touch clothing from Japan. 2 p.m. Free. Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. 202-727-0232.

Tuesday, august 7 â&#x2013;  Concert: The Chicago-based ensemble Third Coast Percussion will perform the music of John Cage. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. Morton DaCostaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1958 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Auntie Mame.â&#x20AC;? Free. Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-0021. â&#x2013;  The Screen on the Green festival will feature Alfred Hitchcockâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1960 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Psycho.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. Free. National Mall between 8th and 14th streets. friendsofscreenonthegreen.org. Performances â&#x2013;  Taffety Punk Theatre Company will stage its â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bootleg Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;? production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamlet, the Bad-ass Quarto,â&#x20AC;? presented after a single rehearsal on the same day of the show. 7 p.m. Free; tickets required. Folger Shakespeare Theatre, 201 East Capitol St. SE. taffetypunk.com. â&#x2013;  The America & China International Foundation will present the 2012 ChineseAmerican Youth Arts Festival, featuring dance, music and martial arts performances. 7:30 p.m. Free; tickets required.

Concerts â&#x2013;  The weekly Harbour Kids Series will feature Mr. Don. 10:30 a.m. to noon. Free. Plaza, Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202-295-5007. â&#x2013;  The Tuesday Concert Series will feature pianists Jacob Clark and Sujung Cho. 12:10 p.m. Free. Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. 202-347-2635, ext. 18. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Coast Guardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Dixieland Jazz Band will perform. 8 p.m. Free. U.S. Navy Memorial, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-737-2300. â&#x2013;  The U.S. Air Force Bandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Airmen of Note will perform. 8 p.m. Free. West Steps, U.S. Capitol. 202-767-5658. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  The Bread & Roses Labor Series will focus on â&#x20AC;&#x153;What Every Diner Should Know About the People Who Feed Us.â&#x20AC;? The event will include a promotional video for Saru Jayaramanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Behind the Kitchen Doorâ&#x20AC;? and a discussion of efforts to improve conditions for restaurant workers and diners. 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Cullen Room, Busboys and Poets, 1025 5th St. NW. 202-387-7638. â&#x2013;  Sander Hicks will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Slingshot to the Juggernaut: Total Resistance to the Death Machine Means Complete Love of the Truth.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Langston Room, Busboys and Poets, 2021 14th St. NW. 202-387-7638. â&#x2013;  Eric Nuzum will discuss his book

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giving Up the Ghost: A Story About Friendship, 80s Rock, a Lost Scrap of Paper, and What It Means to Be Haunted.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. Wednesday, Aug. 8

Wednesday august 8

Concerts â&#x2013;  Fiddlers Patrick Ross and Jean Theroux will perform tunes and songs drawn from their French-Canadian heritage. Noon. Free. Coolidge Auditorium, Jefferson Building, Library of Congress, 10 1st St. SE. loc.gov. â&#x2013;  French-Canadian fiddler Patrick Ross will perform. 6 p.m. Free. Millennium Stage, Kennedy Center. 202-467-4600. â&#x2013;  The weekly Harbour Nights concert series will feature singer-songwriter Jason Masi. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Plaza, Washington Harbour, 3050 K St. NW. 202-295-5007. Discussions and lectures â&#x2013;  Mike Lofgren will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Party Is Over: How Republicans Went Crazy, Democrats Became Useless, and the Middle Class Got Shafted.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. Politics and Prose, 5015 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-364-1919. â&#x2013;  In honor of Julia Childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centenary, biographer Bob Spitz will discuss his book â&#x20AC;&#x153;Child, Dearie: The Remarkable Life of Julia Child.â&#x20AC;? 7 to 8:30 p.m. $25. Ring Auditorium, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, 7th Street and Independence Avenue SW. 202-633-3030. Films â&#x2013;  As part of a childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s film series, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Classic Looney Tunesâ&#x20AC;? will feature animated shorts such as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Opera, Doc?â&#x20AC;? 10:30 a.m. Free. East Building Auditorium, National Gallery of Art, 4th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. 202-737-4215. The films will be shown again Saturday at 10:30 a.m. and Sunday at 11:30 a.m. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;NoMa Summer Screenâ&#x20AC;? will present Mimi Lederâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 1998 film â&#x20AC;&#x153;Deep Impact.â&#x20AC;? 7 p.m. Free. 2nd and L streets NE. nomasummerscreen.com. â&#x2013;  The Lions of Czech Film series will feature â&#x20AC;&#x153;Eighty Letters.â&#x20AC;? 8 p.m. $11; $9 for students; $8.25 for seniors; $8 for ages 12 and younger. Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-966-6000. Meeting â&#x2013;  The group Parents, Families & Friends of Lesbians and Gays will host a meeting of its Northwest DC Support Group. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church, 3401 Nebraska Ave. NW. ltagmiles@aol.com. Performance â&#x2013;  As part of the National Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Community Vaudevilleâ&#x20AC;? program, entertainer Keith Fulwood will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;An Evening of Laughs and Heart-Warming Insights.â&#x20AC;? 6:30 p.m. Free. Friendship Terrace Retirement Community, 4201 Butterworth Place NW. 202-244-7400. Special event â&#x2013;  Sticky Fingers Sweets & Eats, a vegan bakery and cafe, will present â&#x20AC;&#x153;Italian Nightâ&#x20AC;? as part of a series of Wednesday night suppers featuring organic ingredients from local farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; markets. 6:45 and 8 p.m. $28; reservations required. Sticky Fingers Sweets & Eats, 1370 Park Road NW. 202-299-9700.


&

The Current

Wednesday, August 1, 2012

Events Entertainment

21

Jubilee exhibition spotlights Jamaican artists

â&#x20AC;&#x153;O

utward Reach: Seven On exhibit Jamaican Photographers and New Media Artists,â&#x20AC;? celebrating the lights the work of 38 guest artists. golden jubilee of Jamaican indepen- â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer Samplerâ&#x20AC;? presents dence with works by seven of the works in diverse media by the galcountryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s artists who leryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s member artists. live in the U.S., will An opening recepopen today at the Art tion will take place Museum of the Friday from 6 to 8:30 Americas and continue p.m. through Sept. 28. Located at 901 New An opening recepYork Ave. NW, the galtion will take place lery is open Wednesday today at 6 p.m. through Friday from 11 Located at 1889 F a.m. to 6 p.m. and St. NW, the gallery is Saturday and Sunday open Monday through from noon to 5 p.m. 202-347-2787. Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202-463-0203. Willard Wiganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tiny â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;1001 Inventions: Discover the Golden â&#x2013;  Touchstone Gallery hummingbird is part will open two shows Age of Muslim of an exhibit at tomorrow and continCivilization,â&#x20AC;? exploring Parish Gallery. ue them through Aug. inventions made in 30. Muslim countries from â&#x20AC;&#x153;MiniSolos@Touchstoneâ&#x20AC;? highthe seventh to the 17th century, will

open Friday at the National Geographic Museum and continue through Feb. 3. Located at 1145 17th St. NW, the museum is open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Admission is $8 for adults; $6 for seniors, students and military personnel; $4 for children ages 5 through 12; and free for children ages 4 and younger. 202-8577588. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art in the Eye of a Needle,â&#x20AC;? highlighting the tiny works of the micro-sculptor Willard Wigan, will open Friday at Parish Gallery and continue through Jan. 31. A viewing fee of $5 will be charged to see the sculptures through a microscope. An opening reception will take place Friday from 6 to 8 p.m. Located at 1054 31st St. NW, the gallery is open Tuesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202994-2310. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizens of the Republic: Portraits From the Dutch Golden

Cosmo Whyteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;High Tideâ&#x20AC;? is part of an Art Museum of the Americas exhibit of work by Jamaican artists living in the United States. Age,â&#x20AC;? featuring 17th- and 18th-century portrait engravings of Dutch citizens, will open Saturday in the West Building of the National Gallery of Art and continue through Feb. 3. Located at 6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW, the museum is open Monday through

Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 202737-4215. â&#x2013;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Altered Statesâ&#x20AC;? opened recently at Studio Gallery, presenting works by gallery artists that explore the concept of alteration, transformation and metamorphosis. The See Exhibits/Page 25

Scena stages European comedy â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Mein Kampfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

S

cena Theatre will stage George Taboriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dark comedy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mein Kampfâ&#x20AC;? through Aug. 19 at the H Street Playhouse. Popular in Europe but rarely

On STAGE

produced in the United States, the play tells the story of a young, down-and-out painter Adolf Hitler and his relationship with two Jews in a Viennese flophouse circa 1900. Robert MacNamara directs the production, which began as part of the Capital Fringe Festival. Performance times are 8 p.m. Scena Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mein Kampf,â&#x20AC;? a dark comedy set in Thursday through Saturday and 3 Vienna, will continue through Aug. 19. p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $25 to Washington DC Jewish Community â&#x2013;  Theater J will present Annie $35. The H Street Playhouse is located at 1365 H St. NE. 703-683- Bakerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Body Awarenessâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 25 Center, 1529 16th St. NW. 800-4948497; theaterj.org. through Sept. 23. 2824; scenatheater.org. The Obie Award-winning author â&#x2013;  The GLBT Arts Consortium â&#x2013;  Rorschach Theatre will present and Capitol Hill Arts Workshop of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Circle Mirror Transformationâ&#x20AC;? the area premiere of â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Maze,â&#x20AC;? will present Gilbert and Sullivanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s has created a new comedy about Rob Handelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s labyrinthine tale that â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Gondoliersâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 2 through Body Awareness Week explores the interconat Shirley State College 11. nectedness of life, art This summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s production conin Vermont. and obsession, Aug. 10 tinues the Capitol Hill Arts Psychology profesthrough Sept. 9 at the Workshopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s tradition of presenting sor Phyllis is deterAtlas Performing Arts slightly twisted versions of Gilbert mined to make it a Center. and Sullivan shows. thought-provoking and A young girl runs, a healing experience, but Performance times are 7 p.m. rock band struggles for she finds herself viscer- Thursday through Saturday and 3 inspiration and a graphp.m. Saturday. Tickets cost $20. ally opposed to one of ic novelist draws and The Capitol Hill Arts Workshop is the weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s exhibitions: draws and draws. As Keeganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;August: located at 545 7th St. SE. 202-547a controversial collecthe walls of the maze Osage Countyâ&#x20AC;? 6839; chaw.org. tion of female nude shift around them, are â&#x2013;  Keegan Theatre will present portraits taken by visitthey getting closer to opens Aug. 3. Tracy Lettsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;August: Osage ing photographer and the end, or are they Countyâ&#x20AC;? Aug. 3 through Sept. 2 at house guest Frank Bonitatibus. just venturing deeper inside? Performance times are generally the Church Street Theater. Performance times are 8 p.m. A vanished father, a pill-popping 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Wednesday and Thursday through Saturday and 3 mother and three sisters harboring Thursday; 8 p.m. Saturday; and 3 p.m. Sunday except Sunday, Aug. shady little secrets â&#x20AC;&#x201D; when the 12, when the show will be at 8 p.m. p.m. Sunday. Ticket prices start at large Weston family unexpectedly $25, except during pay-what-youTickets cost $15 to $25. The Atlas reunites after Dad disappears, their can previews Aug. 27 and 28. is located at 1333 H St. NE. 202See Theater/Page 25 Theater J performs in the 399-7993; rorschachtheatre.com.

     



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THEATER From Page 21 Oklahoman family homestead explodes in a maelstrom of repressed truths and unsettling secrets. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday as well as 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 7. Tickets cost $30 to $35. The Church Street Theater is located at 1742 Church St. 703892-0202; keegantheatre.com. ■ Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company will close Mike Daisey’s “The Agony and the Ecstasy of Steve Jobs” Aug. 5. Following a recent controversy in which Daisey came under fire for fabricating details of his story on the radio show “This American Life,” his monologue about the founder of Apple returns to Woolly “strong, sharper, and more important than ever,” according to a news release. An all-new version “cuts the contested material and addresses the controversy head on.” Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak will join Daisey for a post-show discussion Aug. 4. Performance times are 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Ticket prices start at $40. The theater is located at 641 D St. NW. 202-3933939; woollymammoth.net. ■ Studio 2ndStage has extended emo rock musical “Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson” through Aug. 19. This irreverent musical imagines President Andrew “Old Hickory” Jackson as a rock star, following him from his boyhood home to the spotlight of the White House and beyond.

Performance times are 8:30 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday and 7:30 p.m. Sunday. Tickets cost $38 to $43. Studio Theatre is located at 1501 14th St. NW. 202-332-3300; studiotheatre.org. ■ Arena Stage will present “Red Hot Patriot: The Kick-Ass Wit of Molly Ivins,” starring Kathleen Turner, Aug. 23 through Oct. 28 in the Kogod Cradle. Written by twin journalists Margaret and Allison Engle, “Red Hot Patriot” stars Turner as Molly Ivins, a dyed-in-the-wool liberal from Texas whose rapier wit made her one of American’s highestregarded columnists, satirists and beloved rabble-rousers. Performance times vary. Tickets cost $46 to $94. Arena Stage is located at 1101 6th St. SW. 202488-3300; arenastage.org. ■ The Shakespeare Theatre Company will present its 22nd annual “Free for All” production — “All’s Well That Ends Well” — Aug. 23 through Sept. 5 at Sidney Harman Hall. This production, set in the World War I era, tells of Helena, the daughter of a physician, who cures the ailing king of France using the skills her late father taught her. In return, the king promises her the husband of her choice, unaware that the noncommittal Count Bertram is the object of her affection. Performance times are 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Tuesday and Wednesday; 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; and 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Tickets are free and can be obtained by online lottery or in person. Visit shakespearetheatre.org or call 202547-1122 for details. Sidney Harman Hall is located at 610 F St. NW.

show will continue through Aug. 11. A “First Friday” reception will take place Friday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Located at 2108 R St. NW, the gallery is open Wednesday through Friday from 1 to 7 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 6 p.m. 202-2328734. ■ “Investigating Where We Live,” featuring photographs, writings and artwork by teenage participants in a summer architecture program, opened last week at the National Building Museum. Focusing on Anacostia, the show will continue through May 26. Located at 401 F St. NW, the museum is open Monday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission costs $8 for adults and $5 for youth, students and seniors. 202-272-2448. ■ “Humans and Other Animals,” an exhibit organized by Art Enables of works by Nonja Tiller, Egbert Evans, Paul Lewis and Max Poznerzon, opened last week at Art 17, where it will continue through Sept. 4. Located in the offices of Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage at 1606 17th St. NW, the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. 202554-9455. ■ The Washington Studio School will close an exhibit Friday of 30 handmade empty cradles from the Cradle Project, which highlights the plight of children orphaned by the AIDS epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa. Located at 2129 S St. NW, the gallery is open Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 202234-3030. ■ The Center for Green Urbanism recently sent out a call for entries for its second annual show for SCRAP-DC, set for September. Titled “Fallout Shelter: A Refuge for DC’s Scrap,” the show will highlight the city’s debris in works made from recycled materials. More information is available at eastcityart.com. ■ “Immortal Decay,” an installation by Olivia Rodriguez of hyper-realistic discrete sculptural objects that explore the process of decomposition, will close Saturday at Curator’s Office. Located at 1515 14th St. NW, Suite 201, the gallery is open Wednesday through Saturday from noon to 6 p.m. 202-387-1008. ■ “Washington Living,” highlighting the nine winners in this year’s Washington Residential Design Awards, will close Saturday at the District Architecture Center’s Sigal Gallery. Located at 421 7th St. NW, the gallery is open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. 202-347-9403.


26 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1, 2012

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wedNesday, augusT 1, 2012

27

POLICE: Agency prepares for National Night Out From Page 3

present to judges. One of the organizations with a table will be the Office of Unified Communication, better known as the 911 call center. Representatives will be signing residents up for the new Smart 911 technology, a national database that allows households to pre-load their information into the system for quicker emergency responses, said the office’s Wanda Gattison. At the same time, across the city, each police district’s National Night Out events will be tailored for its specific community. In the 3rd District, where bicycle theft has been a concern recently, the first 30 bicycle owners to arrive will get free registration with the National Bike Registry, which normally charges a fee, said the police department’s Marco Santiago, the event’s coordinator. The 3rd District’s event, at 3200 Hiatt Place NW, will also feature a moon bounce, a water slide and a community safety poster contest for kids. It will try to address the issue of youth bullying, providing anti-bullying coloring books to kids, Santiago said. Another awareness push is to educate residents about the dangers of leaving valuables visible in cars. “A majority of the time we come and we see the windows smashed, and that’s usually the main way they get inside

the vehicle,” Santiago said. The 2nd District’s event, which will take place at the police station at 3320 Idaho Ave. NW, will offer inventory kits to prevent burglaries and will help families check and install car seats. In the 4th District, the event at the Emery Recreation Center at 5701 Georgia Ave. NW will include registration for the Dog Walkers Club and Orange Hat Patrol. The National Association of Town Watch initially received a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to organize its National Night Out events when the program “was in the infancy stage,” said Smith. Individual police districts purchase materials like T-shirts from a National Night Out superstore. Through a newsletter, the organization provides help and advice throughout the year for cities preparing to host National Night Out events. The organization has also introduced a competitive element: Each year, it ranks the jurisdictions that hosted the best events. The District’s police department has staff members who compile a report, replete with pictures, to send to the National Association of Town Watch detailing the city’s accomplishments. “Law enforcement really gets competitive with this,” Smith said. “We’re seeing other law enforcement agencies around this area looking for the same resources that we are.”

SCORES: Citywide proficiency at 49 percent From Page 1

But citywide, the scores on tests administered in April show modest gains over 2011. For public schools, math scores were up 2.8 percent, science scores were up 5.3 percent and reading scores were up a slight 0.5 percent. Still, that’s a five-year high, and it continues a trend of rising scores since the Public Education Reform Amendment Act was implemented, transferring education responsibility to the mayor and his appointed chancellor, and increasing emphasis on student and teacher performance. “Today is a good day for DCPS,” Chancellor Kaya Henderson said from the stage of Thomas Elementary in Ward 7. “While I won’t be satisfied until all our students are proficient, I am completely and totally optimistic.” Henderson noted that District schools are now using a more challenging “common core curriculum,” and still seeing scores go up. “I can’t live or die by each year’s scores. The real story is in the fiveyear data,” which shows steady, if not spectacular, progress, Henderson said. She also noted how far there still is to go. “We have a very specific goal: 70 percent proficiency by 2017. Today we’re at 49 percent.” For charters, there was slower progress over the past year, with composite scores up 1.4 percent in math, but down 0.9 percent in science and 0.3 percent in reading. Still, charter leaders hastened to note that proficiency rates are higher in charters — which now enroll 41 percent of the public school population here — than in traditional public schools. While disappointed that growth in reading skills was “smaller than we would like,” said Brian Jones, chair of the D.C. Public Charter School Board, “we’re proud that charters are outperforming — 5.7 percent above the state average in

math, 3.8 percent above in reading — while serving a higher percentage of disadvantaged children.” Mayor Vincent Gray was quick to point out that this year’s results, for the first time, appear to show that students who had enrolled in early childhood education programs are scoring higher in third and fourth grade than their peers. Gray championed a “universal pre-k” initiative as council chairman, and he said the District is now a national leader in providing pre-kindergarten slots. “We now have evidence that kids in pre-k get higher scores,” the mayor said. “The growth from our third- and fourth-grade students is directly proportionate to the expansion of our early learning initiatives.” This year’s score announcements, made in front of a large crowd of students, teachers and administrators, came at a time of transition. Last month the city won a waiver from rigid federal No Child Left Behind requirements, which would have required all schools to make “adequate yearly progress” in test scores, across all sub-groups, or face an escalating series of sanctions. The goal of the controversial law is for all students to score proficient in reading and math by 2014, a standard many educators say is unrealistic. Last year only a smattering of District schools achieved “adequate yearly progress” in both reading and math. They included some selectiveadmission schools like School Without Walls and Banneker Academic High School, some special-education schools that use a different test, and a handful of highachieving elementary schools in Northwest: Janney, Key, Oyster and Mann. So this time around, waiver in hand, District officials rolled out a new category for recognizing achievement: “reward schools,” des-

ignated either because student proficiency levels are among the highest in the city, or because students made the greatest progress, no matter what the starting base. The new list, again, heavily favors schools in the western part of the city. Of 19 public schools honored as reward schools last Thursday, 13 are in wards 1, 2, 3 or 4. They include Walls and Banneker, Deal Middle, Oyster-Adams Bilingual, and Eaton, Hyde-Addison, Janney, Key, Lafayette, Mann, Marie Reed, Murch and Stoddert elementary schools. Thomas Elementary in Parkside, where the announcement was made, was also honored as a reward school because its students posted a 21 percent gain in math scores and a 14 percent gain in reading, even though only 43.6 percent scored proficient in reading and math. Meanwhile, Henderson noted, three schools — Key and Lafayette, as well as McKinley Technology High School in Ward 5 — crossed the 90 percent threshold in student proficiency, “which is huge,” the chancellor said. Education officials have been working not only to raise standards, but also to provide equal opportunities for students citywide. But some note that the school reform and multimillion-dollar modernization effort have increased the popularity of high-achieving schools west of Rock Creek Park. And with enrollments exceeding capacity there, many such schools can accept fewer “out of boundary” students from areas of the city where neighborhood schools are not performing as well. Henderson said the No Child Left Behind waiver will give the system more flexibility to place resources in areas of greatest need. “It recognizes we’re coming from very different places. We have a better chance of meeting growth metrics, instead of absolute metrics,” she said.


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