Page 1

Curbside Splendor  e-­‐zine  |  May  2014  


Curbside Splendor      

May 2014  

  Curbside  Splendor  Publishing     Curbside  e-­‐zine   May  2014     ISSN  2159-­‐9475       Poetry:     Two  Poems  by  Norman  Toy   At  the  Home  for  Delinquent  Poems  by  Sandra  Kolankiewicz   Clockmaker  (Rivet  and  Pierce)  by  R.P.  Muha         Fiction:     Tomorrow’s  List  by  Mike  Murray       Cover  and  photography  by  Frank  Cademartori       Editors  –  Joey  Pizzolato  &  KC  Kirkley  

2


Curbside Splendor      

May 2014  

Norman Toy    

studied English  at  St.  John’s  University  and  Creative   Writing  at  Queens  College  and  then  spent  the  next  few   years  developing  and  managing  businesses.  He  never   abandoned  the  pen,  but  strayed  from  poetry  and  prose   during  that  time.  After  years  of  playwriting  he  recently   wrote  his  first  novel,  The  Seated  Man,  and  returned  to   poetry  and  the  short  story.    

 Photograph  by  Frank  Cademartori.  

3


Curbside Splendor      

Alfred  

May 2014  

Two Poems   by  Norman  Toy  

He can't  make  up  his  mind,  he  gets  confused   and  he's  ninety  and  I  understand.   It    happens  to  me  too;   I  don't  know  what  I  want  sometimes.   He  reaches  into  the  air  slowly,   his  old  bony  bruised  arm  lifts  his  shaky     thick  plumber  fingers,  indicating—   I  don't  know  what  he  means.       "Oh  boy,"  he  says  over  and  over.   A  joyless  morose  refrain,  “Oh  boy.”   He  scares  me.    He  was  mean.   He  still  has  steely  gray  mean  eyes,   only  he's  helpless  now.   A  union  activist.   Now  he's  ninety.  And  helpless.       Turquoise  plastic  sheets   and  matching  shorts.     Organs  wear  out  like  Frigidaire   compressors,  coils  and  fans.       The  ever  present     pungent  odor  of  urine   the  deluxe  cans  of  Lysol  can't  cut  through.   His  nurse   (not  a    friend  by  any  stretch)   says,  "He  leaks."  

4


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

  He  wants  someone  to  sleep  with  him,   a  phantasm  named  Irene.   “Some  dame,”  he  says,   he's  never  met,  never  known,  never  seen.   And  gravity's  pull  for  nearly  a  century   Has  drawn  his  testicles  down  near  to  his  knees.   And  his  prostate  cancer's   dormant  for  a  decade.   And  now  he  calls  in  earnest,  "Irene!"     And  when  you  get  to  know  him   he's  not  really  mean.   Doing  his  best  just   does  not  include  sociability.         When  eighty  years  ago  the  ten-­‐year-­‐old  boy  dreamed  of  his   future   did  he  dream  of  the  eighty  years   that  came  to  pass,   which,  with  gauzy-­‐vision  now  he  views  in  broken  images,   a  long,  long,  distant  past   he  doesn't  talk  about?  Can't  or  won't,   or  both,  a  platform  earned?    

 

5


Curbside Splendor     Queens  1961  

May 2014  

I like  to  say  I’m  from  New  York  City   But  I’m  from  Queens,   Which  is  New  York  City   But  it’s  not.    It’s  Queens.   A  house  in  the  woods  down  the  street  from  the  swamp.   Pollywogs  in  Springfield  Park.   Sunnies,  reds,  and  bamboo  and  cork;   And  skating  in  Springfield  Park.   Melancholy  summer  on  my  back,   Bored  by  the  sky.   Imprisoned  behind  chain  link   In  a  red  brick  fortress  –  P.S.  52.   Fistfights  were  a  thing  of  the  fifties,  even  in  the  sixties,   In  Queens.    Brooklyn  too.   Brooklyn  thought  they  were  tougher.   We  were  thinkin’  dumber.    You  know?   Even  though  my  legs  shook,   I  got  nauseous  and  scared,   I  fought  anyway,  and  always  wanted  to  puke  after.   We  all  had  duck’s  ass  hair  and  pompadours   Tight  black  pants  and  Lucky  Strikes.   It  was  a  scary  place.   Aunt  Dotty  still  lives  there   Even  though  it’s  all  black  now.   Nobody  hurt  Aunt  Dottie  after  all  these  years.   Funny.    That  surprises  everyone.   Queens  was  rural  once.   My  grandfather  owned  half  of  Springfield  Gardens   Until  real  estate  taxes.   That  cost  him  everything.   My  father  fought.    He  was  tougher  than  Brooklyn.   He  was  madder  than  Queens  and  Brooklyn  combined.   Maybe  ‘cause  his  father  lost  half  of  Springfield.  

6


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Or maybe  ‘cause  his  father  was  his  stepfather,   And  he  had  to  beat  the  hell  of  him   For  beating  the  hell  out  of  grandma.   So  I  grew  up  mad  too.    Not  as  tough  though.   There  were  no  beatings  in  my  kitchen.   No  physical  pain  in  our  fixed  suburban  parcels.   A  new  violence  inhabited  the  word.          

7


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Sandra Kolankiewicz     has  recently  had  poems  and  stories  accepted  by,  or   appeared  in,  New  World  Writing,  Per  Contra,  Bellingham   Review,  Gargoyle,  Pif,  and  Prick  of  the  Spindle.  “Turning   Inside  Out”  won  the  Black  River  Prize  from  Black   Lawrence  Press.  Blue  Eyes  Don't  Cry  won  the  Hackney   Award  for  the  Novel.  

Photograph  by  Frank  Cademartori.  

8


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

At the  Home  for  Delinquent  Poems   by  Sandra  Kolankiewicz   When  they  scratch                                                                                                at  the  door,  I  open  it,   invite  them  in,  thinking                                                                                                                  I’ll  fix  them  up,   nourish  and  release                                                                                                    them,  but  instead  of   getting  well,  they  soon                                                                                                                                take  full  advantage,   sulking  and  lounging                                                                                    on  my  sofa,  both   ignoring  and  sneering  at                                                                                                                      me,  the  old  stranger   in  bathrobe  and  slippers                                                                                                  doing  their  laundry  and   dishes  as  if  I’m                                                            their  servant  and  stuck                    

on some  old  vision,                                                                              loyal  despite  the  facts.

9


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Photograph  by  Frank  Cademartori.  

10


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Mike Murray    

is  currently  taking  classes  at  Grub  Street,  an  independent   writing  center  in  Boston,  where  he  attends  fiction   workshops.  He  teaches  literature  at  the  Cambridge  Adult   Learning  Center  in  Cambridge,  MA,  and  lives  and  writes  in   Cambridge,  MA.  This  is  his  first  publication.        

Photograph  by  Frank  Cademartori.  

11


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Tomorrow’s  List   by  Mike  Murray    

Eliot  watches  his  birth  certificate  dance  and  twirl  as  it  burns   in  the  ashtray.  He  lies  back  down  on  his  bed  and  finishes  his   cigarette,  takes  a  long,  crisp  drag  and  uses  it  to  light  another.   He  thinks  back  to  Ariel  and  their  first  apartment  on  West   32nd  with  the  chipped  plaster  paint,  yellow  tiled  kitchen,  and   the  wobbly  mahogany  coffee  table  that  broke  beneath  a  plate   of  nachos  at  their  first  dinner  party,  his  first  dinner  party.   Forward  is  where  he  should  be  thinking,  to  Byron,  to  Jules   and  some  place  that  isn’t  here.                      He  hears  a  knock  at  the  bedroom  door.       Journal  Entry  #4:  Recollections  of  Ariel     Holding  me  at  night,  warm  breath  on  my  neck.    Making  love   and  playing  “Eleanor  Rigby”  on  folk  guitar,  milky  legs   crossed,  hair  the  color  of  dark  coffee,  lips  like  cherry   blossoms.  She  smelled  like  vanilla  and  dryer  sheets.  Making   out  in  dark  halls  at  Club  Lust,  martinis,  taxis,  early  mornings,   No  Doze,  lattes,  long,  long  kisses  in  the  doorway.  The  night  I   proposed  her  eyes  were  the  color  of  foggy  windows.   -­‐    -­‐     “It’s  open.”  The  door  cracks  and  Jules’  face  appears.                     “Just  thought  I’d  poke  my  head  in.  How’re  you   holding  up?”  Eliot  waves  her  in.  She  lays  down  on  the  bed   next  to  him  and  throws  her  arm  over  his  chest.  Her  hand  

12


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

walks across  his  sternum  like  a  spider,  cheek  warm  against   his  shoulder.                     “Things’ll  be  fine,”  he  says.                     “I  know.”  The  silence  wraps  itself  around  them  like   an  arm,  save  the  din  of  Aunt  Rene’s  Bob  Dylan  vinyls  drifting   in  from  downstairs,  and  the  sound  of  passing  cars.  They   breathe  half  in  sync,  drifting  in  and  out  of  sleep,  her  hair   smelling  like  pine  trees.                     The  sound  of  rain  taps  on  the  window  as  her   fingertips  slide  up  his  ribs.  They  ride  up  over  the  bone  like   speed  bumps,  and  then  across  his  chest  and  stroke  his  face.   As  he  pulls  her  deep  into  the  kiss  he  can  feel  her  body  stiffen   and  then  release,  like  a  pumping  heart.  They  roll  themselves   into  a  cocoon  with  the  blanket  and  smile.  It’s  times  like  this   he’s  glad  the  room  is  small  with  few  things,  and  he  feels  it   close  them  in,  the  feeling  of  being  inside.                     “Lunch  is  ready.”  Rene  calls  from  downstairs.                     “Leave  it  in  the  oven.  We’ll  be  down  in  a  bit,”  Jules   says,  brushing  a  piece  of  hair  off  Eliot’s  forehead.  The  rain   picks  up  outside  the  window.       Journal  Entry  #11:  Recollections  of  Ariel  II     Empty  apartment.  The  glow  of  computer  screen  on  her  face,   clicking  of  keys.  Zoloft  and  Xanax,  and  flat,  sad  eyes,  the  color   of  rain  puddles.  Always  wanting  more  than  I  have.  Her  sigh   like  the  whoosh  of  cold  wind.   -­‐    -­‐    

13


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Eliot  examines  the  gold  band  still  on  his  finger.  Jules  looks  up   from  inside  his  shoulder.                     “Hey.”  She  gives  him  a  peck  on  his  ribs.  He  rubs  his   finger  over  the  smooth  gold  and  remembers  buying  it.  It  had   been  a  Thursday  and  clouds  hung  in  the  sky  like  clumps  of   gravel.  He  remembers  thinking  how  much  he  loved  cloudy   days,  the  coolness  of  them.  He  wiggles  the  ring  off  his  finger   and  puts  it  on  the  floor  next  to  the  mattress.  Jules  squeezes   and  smells  his  neck.                     “Mmmm.”  Then  Byron’s  cry  floats  in  from  the  other   room  like  a  gentle  nudge.  Jules  stiffens  and  her  cheeks  burn   pink.                     “C’mon.”  He  kisses  her  on  the  nose,  throws  off  the   blanket  and  places  his  wedding  ring  on  the  windowsill.  Jules   shakes  her  head  still  on  the  bed.  The  sound  of  Byron’s  crying   mingles  with  the  rain  tapping  on  the  windowpane,  and  the   music  from  downstairs.  Suddenly  the  room  is  a  clutter  of   sounds.  “C’mon.  You  can’t  be  scared  of  this.”    He  pulls  her  up   and  corrals  her  out  the  door  by  the  small  of  her  back.       Journal  Entry  #  23:  A  Conversation  with  Ariel     “You  want  to  have  it?”     “I  want  to  be  a  mother”     “But  not  now.”     “I’ll  be  a  good  mother.”    

14


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

“You couldn’t  take  care  of  a  geranium.”     “I’m  going  to  be  a  good  mother,  don’t  say  I  won’t.”      

“You won’t.”     “I  can  feel  it.”  

“Who  are  we  kidding.”     “You  can  be  cruel.  I’ll  love  my  baby.”     “You  love  yourself,  babe.”   -­‐    -­‐     Byron’s  football  body  is  warm  against  Eliot’s  bare  chest.  His   cry  fades  and  dies  in  his  father’s  arms.  Byron’s  small  chin  is   Eliot’s,  and  his  pointed  nose;  the  wide  jawline  grandpa’s,  thin   lips  his  grandma,  but  his  eyes,  the  green-­‐grey  swirl  that   changes  in  the  light,  that’s  Ariel.  Eliot  kisses  him  and  rocks   him  on  his  shoulder.  Jules  stands  by  the  door,  arms  folded   under  a  blanket,  smiling  her  grade  school  smile.                     “My  boys,”  she  says.                     “You  want  to  hold  him?”  Eliot  brings  him  closer,  still   the  gentle  rocking,  Byron’s  eyes  slowly  fluttering.                     “I  can’t,  he’s—”                     “Here.”  Eliot  slips  the  baby  into  her  folded  arms,   which  transform  into  a  cradle.  Byron  begins  to  wiggle.                     “I’m  going  to  wake  him.”  Eliot  puts  a  finger  to  her  lips,   and,  as  if  without  thought,  she  pulls  him  close  and  begins  

15


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

rocking. Her  face  registers  the  fear,  but  her  body,  short  and   long  limbed  with  delicate  features,  understands  maternity   without  the  labor  of  command.  Byron  nuzzles  himself  into   her  breast,  and  for  the  first  time  Jules’  face  takes  on  the  glow   of  someone  who  knows  she’s  special.                       Journal  Entry  #38:  Discovery     Each  bottle  had  a  sticky  note.  Adderall  said,  “3:00  a.m-­‐9:00   a.m;”  Ritalin,  “10:00  a.m-­‐4:00  p.m;”  Dexedrine,  “5:00  p.m-­‐ 11:00  p.m;”  Xanax,  “12:00  a.m-­‐3:00  a.m.”  She  said  it  was   under  control.  She  said  the  Adderall  gave  her  day  a  jump   start  with  at  least  two  hours  before  Byron  let  rip  his  first  cry,   that  the  Ritalin  was  for  working  on  emails  throughout  the   morning  while  nursing.  The  Dexedrine  was  for  cooking   dinner  and  washing  clothes  while  taking  a  conference  call   and  burping  Byron.  She  said  the  Xanax  was  to  counteract  the   Dexedrine  and  Ritalin.  I  told  her  it  was  her  job  or  her  baby,   that  sure,  fine,  she  could  ignore  me,  but  not  our  child  damn  it.   She  said  she  was  a  good  mother,  a  very  good  mother.  I  told   her  she  couldn’t  be  a  mother,  a  wife  and  department  head.   She  said  she’d  do  anything  for  her  baby.  I  said  she  was  a   junkie  and  junkies  can’t  be  mothers.   -­‐    -­‐     They  put  Byron  down  to  sleep  and  head  downstairs.  Rene  is   in  her  studio  painting  the  world  away,  blaring  Led  Zeppelin   from  her  speakers,  and  singing.  She  leaves  out  the  jam   covered  by  a  dishtowel  with  the  oven  on  low.  They  open  the   door  and  smell  the  biscuits,  a  wave  of  hot  and  sweet.  They   take  all  of  it  to  the  table  and  begin  eating.    

16


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

              “I  have  a  secret,”  he  says  between  mouthfuls  of   biscuit.  Jules  raises  her  eyebrows.  Eliot  takes  from  his  wallet   a  beat  up  picture  and  she  leans  in  to  look.                     “That’s  one  of  my  favorites.  We  should  frame  that   one.”                     “I  kept  this  with  me  while  Ariel  and  I  were,  you   know.”  Jules  swallows  a  large  chunk  of  biscuit.  “It  helped  me,   when  she  would  storm  off.  I’d  look  at  it.”                     “That  was  a  good  day.”  Jules  smiles  and  returns  to   eating.  The  picture  shows  them  arm  in  arm  in  front  of  the   flying  swings  at  the  Westchester  Carnival.  White  crease  lines   weave  through  it  in  a  four-­‐box  pattern.  That  was  the  year  he   and  Ariel  abolished  the  no  laptops  in  bed  rule  and  Ariel  went   to  the  gym  more.  That  was  also  the  year  Eliot  met  Jules  at  the   Library  Book  Club.  They  started  a  conversation  over  Truman   Capote  and  watery  coffee.                       “I  suppose  we  should  frame  it  now.”  He  places  it  to   the  side  of  the  table  so  both  of  them  can  admire  it.                     “We  should,”  Jules  says,  her  mouth  full  of  biscuit.                     Eliot  thinks  about  the  last  two  years  of  his   hemorrhaging  marriage,  and  how  the  picture  got  him   through.                     Jules  considers  the  possibilities  of  a  navy  blue  frame.            

17


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Journal Entry  #42:  Ariel’s  Rehab,  Byron’s  Escape     Seeing  Byron  gone  for  good  may  very  well  kill  her.  When  I   told  Dad  he  said  Ariel  deserved  better,  that  I  was  being  rash.   Mom  was  Mom  and  didn’t  say  anything  except,  “I  see.”  I  know   this  is  the  right  thing.  Pillheads  can’t  be  mothers.       Journal  Entry  #51:  The  Things  of  My  Life     It’s  not  that  they  weren’t  important.  I  just  couldn’t  take  them   with  me.  There’s  my  suit  collection  and  silver-­‐plated  shaving   kit.  I  left  my  last  pack  of  Pall  Malls  and  my  Bob  Dylan  records   we  came  later  to  call  ours.  Left  behind  and  laying  about  in   that  empty  apartment  are  my  clients’  case  files  in  a   padlocked  chest,  an  evergreen  loveseat  and  matching  sofa   that  demanded  three  hours  at  IKEA,  and  our  shoe  box  of  sand   dollars  and  sea  glass  from  our  vacation  in  St.  Thomas.  The   one  thing  I  forgot  was  the  only  thing  Ariel  ever  sewed,   Byron’s  blue  stitched  blanket.      -­‐    -­‐     That  night  after  dinner  the  three  of  them  play  gin  rummy   over  grocery  store  wine  and  angel  food  cake.  Rene  wins,  five   games  to  Eliot’s  two  and  Jules’  one.  Rene  kisses  both  of  them   on  the  forehead  and  goes  upstairs  to  read.  That,  Eliot  thinks,   is  a  woman  meant  to  be  a  grandma.                         A  sadness  then  drapes  him  like  a  heavy  quilt.  He   washes  the  dishes  and  broods  over  the  sink.  Felons  don’t   wash  dishes,  he  thinks,  but  he  doesn’t  feel  like  a  felon,  or  a   thief,  or  still  married.  Dad,  that’s  the  name  Eliot  can  fit  into   like  a  comfortable  tennis  shoe,  a  name  he  can  worm  around   in,  get  to  know,  inhabit  like  a  nest.  There  is  much  to  do,   though,  and  the  thought  of  name  changes,  bank  accounts,  

18


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

license plates,  insurance  bills,  all  the  paper  of  life,  burned,   changed,  lost  in  the  chase.  Countries  filter  through—France,   Spain,  Korea—places  where  they’d  be  lost  in  the  shuffle,  a   small  town  where  they  could  buy  a  house  and  burrow,  shop   for  groceries  at  the  market,  and  drink  wine  in  the  evenings.   Turning  off  the  sink  and  placing  the  dishes  neatly  on  the  rack,   Eliot  thinks  of  a  home,  the  beauty  of  such  a  concept,  the   perpetual  feeling  of  sun  and  feet  buried  in  cool  sand.                     He  marches  upstairs,  running  his  fingers  over  the   mahogany  glossed  railing.  Tomorrow’s  list  is  long,  but   tonight’s  is  simple:  kiss  his  son,  kiss  his  future  wife,  and  drift   into  dreams  of  a  small  cottage  kitchen,  the  smell  of  roasted   garlic,  his  boy  doing  somersaults  and  pulling  up  grass  in  the   front  yard.   -­‐    -­‐    

19


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

R.P. Muha    

is  26  years  old  and  lives  in  Valparaiso,  Indiana  with  his   wife  and  three  kids;  and  by  kids  he  means  cats.  He’s  been   writing  since  he  can  remember,  for  better  or  worse.  His   work  has  been  published  in  Journal  of  Modern  Poetry  and   On  the  Brink...Volume  1.      

Photograph by  Frank  Cademartori.  

 

20


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

Clockmaker (Rivet  and  Pierce)   by:  R.P.  Muha  

Grandfather  walks  around                                                                                    with  a  smug  look  on  his  face                                                                                                                                                                                                almost  daily   He  doesn’t  make  a  sound                                                                                    when  displaying  that                                                                                                                                                                  shocking  revelation     He  stands  firm  claiming  awareness;  constant  and  true     Little  does  he  know                                                  that  he  is  only  an  interpretation                                                                                                                        of  what  we  think  we  can  prove     We  watch  him  with  either  embrace  or  impatience                                                                                                                                                      depending  on  the                                                                                                                                                                            present  situation     Grandfather  walks  around  speaking  in  codes  we  only  notice     When                       time                              seems                            to                                            slow  

21


Curbside Splendor    

May 2014  

About the  Artist     Frank  Cademartori   Lights  and  Lines        

Frank Cademartori  has  spent  much  of  his  twenties   traveling  East  Asia,  but  now  resides  in  Chicago,  Illinois.  He   spends  his  time  achieving  amateur  status  at  various   activities  and  has  chosen  to  daily  relive  the  horrors  of   Middle  School  from  the  other  side  of  the  teacher's  desk.   More  of  his  photography  can  be  found  here   (http://endlessframe.wordpress.com/).  

         

22


Curbside Splendor      

May 2014  

     

www.curbsidesplendor.com        

23

Curbside Splendor E-Zine May 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you