Page 1

CREATIVE ARTS TEAM THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

101 W. 31ST STREET, 6TH FLOOR NEW YORK, NY 10001 P: 212.652.2800 F: 212.652.2809 WWW.CREATIVEARTSTEAM.ORG

CUNY • Creative Arts Team 2015-2016 Annual Report


Thanks To You… 17,624

Students, Teachers and Parents benefitted from

CAT programs in every New York City Council District in FY2016. Support for CAT FY16 Programs Provided By: The partnerships CAT has developed with the public and private sector have enabled CAT to reach young people and their families in all five boroughs. You are an essential partner in CAT’s innovative, critically important educational outreach, helping us provide interactive, issue-based programs that:

 Strengthen academic achievement;  Support youth development and social-emotional growth; and

 Increase resiliency in NYC’s young people. In 2017, we aim to continue to expand how CAT uses drama as a platform for positive youth development and the development of social emotional skills, particularly with at-risk populations and disenfranchised youth, and in partnership with CUNY, City and State agencies, and other nonprofit and community-based organizations. On behalf of the students, teachers, parents and Creative Arts Team members involved in our programs, we offer our sincere appreciation for your ongoing support. We are pleased with this successful year of service and look forward to expanding our efforts in FY 2017.

Thank you for your collective commitment to supporting the needs of young New Yorkers.

Birch Family of Services The City University of New York

Community Service Society of New York Homes for the Homeless Jewish Communal Fund The Lucille Lortel Foundation Morgan Stanley New York City Council Citywide Initiative: Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and 51 Council Members NYC Council Discretionary, Dropout Prevention, Anti-Gun Violence & CASA Grants: Costa Constantinedes, Robert Cornegy, Laurie Cumbo, Inez Dickens, Daniel Dromm, Mathieu Eugene, Vanessa L. Gibson, Andy King, Karen Koslowitz, Rory Lancman, Carlos Menchaca, I. Daneek Miller, Donovan Richards, Ydanis Rodriguez, Helen Rosenthal, James Vacca, Paul Vallone, Jumaane Williams, Ruben Wills NYC Department of Correction NYC Department of Cultural Affairs NYC Department of Education NYC Department of Youth & Community Development New York Community Trust: Brooke Astor Fund for NYC Education NYS Assemblymembers Michael Dendekker, Ron Kim, Aravella Simotas NYS Council on the Arts NYS Department of Health-AIDS Institute NYS Education Department Penguin USA RBC Wealth Management Serious Fun Afterschool Inc. Sheltering Arms Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts

2

Participating Schools, and many generous individuals

31


Inside this report… About CUNY-CAT ................................................................................... 5 CUNY-CAT in FY2016—by the numbers .............................................. 6 Early Learning.......................................................................................... 8 Middle Grades Literacy....................................................................... 10 Bullying Prevention ............................................................................... 12 After School Programs ......................................................................... 14

HIV Prevention ...................................................................................... 16 College Readiness & Success ............................................................ 18 Youth Theatre ........................................................................................ 20 Shakespeare ......................................................................................... 22 Professional Development .................................................................. 24 CUNY SPS Masters in Applied Theatre .............................................. 26 Where we were in FY2016 ................................................................... 28 Acknowledgments ............................................................................... 30

“I am prepared to have the hard conversations. The workshop was very informative.” – Participating Parent “I learned that acting out issues can make you feel like they are actually happening in your life, allowing you to sympathize/empathize with others.” – After-School Student “The workshop gave me different ideas of how you can contribute to your community as an individual.” – CUNY Student

30

3


Columbia Secondary School District 79 Office of Student Support Services Frederick Douglass Academy II Secondary School Guttman Community College High School for Health Professions and Human Services Hunter College Institute for Children, Poverty, & Homelessness John Jay College of Criminal Justice Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies Lucille Lortel Theatre Manhattan Early College School for Advertising Manhattan Youth Martin Luther King, Jr. High School for Arts and Technology Muscota New School New York City Department of Education NYU College Advising Corps PS 030 Hernandez/Hughes PS 033 Chelsea Prep PS 048 PO Michael J. Buczek PS 123 The Mahalia Jackson School PS 132 Juan Pablo Duarte PS 175 Henry H Garnet PS 96 Joseph C. Lanzetta School Renaissance Charter High School for Innovation Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center The Door UFT Headquarters

Queens Central Queens YM & YWCA Energy Tech High School George Motchan Detention Center High School for Construction Trades, Engineering and Architecture Hillcrest High School Information Technology High School IS 230 Magnet School for Civics in the Community IS 237 Rachel Carson Intermediate School JHS 185 Edward Bleeker John Adams High School LaGuardia Community College New Visions Charter High School for Advanced Math & Science IV Pan American International High School PS 002 Alfred Zimberg School PS 017 Henry David Thoreau PS 049 Dorothy Bonawit Kole PS 051 PS 054 Hillside PS 085 Judge Charles Vallone 4

PS 117 Keld/Briarwood School PS 127 Aerospace and Science Academy PS 134 Hollis The Langston Hughes School PS 150 Queens PS 166 Henry Gradstein PS 183 Dr. Richard R. Green PS 188 Kingsbury PS 212 PS 234 PS 38 PS/IS 78 Queens Academy High School Queens Museum Queens Public Library Queens Public Library- Far Rockaway Branch Queens Public Library- Jamaica Branch Queensborough Community College Renaissance Charter School Robert N. Davoren Center Rose M. Singer Center Saratoga Family Inn The Fortune Society Waterside Children's Studio School York College York Early College Academy

Staten Island College of Staten Island Port Richmond High School Targee Street Pre-K Center Tottenville High School United Activities Unlimited United Activities Unlimited (Richmond)

Other American Evaluation Association (Washington, DC) Fresno State: Joyce M Huggins Early Education Center Fansler Institute (Fresno, CA) Hilton Milwaukee City Center (Milwaukee, WI) Indiana Convention Center (Indianapolis, IN) The Laurel Hill School (Long Island, NY)

29


Where we were in FY2016...

About CAT

Bronx

WHO WE ARE: CAT uses the power of drama to inspire youth to learn. Since its founding in 1974, CAT

Astor Collegiate Academy BIRCH Family Services- Riverdale Early Childhood Center Bronx Community College Bronx Delta School Bronx Early College Academy for Teaching & Learning Bronx Engineering and Technology Academy Bronx Public Library Bronx Public Library- Mott Haven Branch Bronx Public Library-West Farms Branch Bronx School for Law Government and Justice Bronx Studio School for Writers and Artists Bronx Works Bronxdale High School CUNY Preparatory High School Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School Foreign Language Academy of Global Studies HERO (Health, Education, and Research Occupations) High School Hostos Community College In-Tech Academy (M.S./High School 368) Lehman College Morris Academy for Collaborative Studies New Visions Charter High School for Advanced Math and Sciences II Peace and Diversity Academy Prospect Family Inn PS 011x Highbridge PS 016x Wakefield PS 021X Philip H. Sheridan PS 160X The Disney School PS 196X PS 214X School For Excellence The Cinema School The Forward School The Highbridge Green School Urban Assembly Bronx Studio School for Writing and Arts

Brooklyn ALC at John Jay Campus Boys and Girls High School Brooklyn College Brooklyn College Academy Brooklyn Generation High School Brooklyn High School Of the Arts Brooklyn Lab School Brooklyn Public Library Brooklyn Public Library- Bedford Branch 28

Bushwick School for Social Justice City Polytechnic High School Of Engineering, Architecture, And Technology Clara Barton High School Cobble Hill School of American Studies Foundations Academy Franklin D. Roosevelt High School Fundamentals Academy High School for Service and Learning at Erasmus High School for Youth and Community Development at Erasmus JHS 259 William McKinley School Kingsborough Community College Kingsborough Early College School Medgar Evers College New York City College of Technology Park Place Academy Pre-K Center at 1258 65th Street Pre-K Center at 140 58th Street Pre-K Center at 7415 Fort Hamilton Parkway Pre-K Center at 8501 5th Avenue Pre-K Center at Bishop Ford School Site PS 015 Patrick F. Daly PS 105 The Blythebourne School PS 119 The Amersfort School PS 158 Warwick PS 184 Newport PS 188 Michael E. Berdy PS 217 Colonel David Marcus School PS 308 Clara Cardwell School PS 316 Elijah Stroud Red Hook Neighborhood School Ronald Edmonds Learning Center II, MS 484 Science, Technology and Research Early College School at Erasmus UFT Brooklyn Borough Office Urban Assembly School for Collaborative Healthcare Urban Assembly Unison School William E. Grady Career and Technical Education High School World Academy for Total Community Health High School YMCA Greater NY YMCA Greater NY- Y Roads Eastern District Young Women's Leadership School of Brooklyn

Manhattan Baruch College Borough of Manhattan Community College CAT Training Center City College Academy of the Arts City College of New York

has served more than a million young people, specifically marginalized, at-risk and ELL youth in all five boroughs of NYC, and has a proven track record of success in strengthening three important and interrelated life skills: literacy, critical thinking, and social-emotional competency. CAT is an educational outreach program at The City University of New York (CUNY), and in partnership with CUNY’s School of Professional Studies, offers the nation’s first M.A. in Applied Theatre – using theatre to facilitate, educate and activate.

WHAT WE DO: Theatre cultivates a unique skill set that is indispensable for the 21st Century – primarily communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity. CAT enriches the lives of our participants through a pedagogy which combines educational drama strategies with research-based theories and practices to create participant-centered, interactive drama experiences. The needs, strengths and learning styles of participants inform the actual content of workshops. CAT offers a wide range of programs for students (pre-K through college), educators, parents, schools, and communities that serve diverse needs, such as College Success and Workplace Readiness, Bullying Prevention, Literacy and Healthy Choices, as well as arts enrichment. With over four decades of dedicated school and community partnerships, professional development workshops, and our award-winning Youth Theatre, CAT has reached over a million students, educators, parents, community members and teaching artists in New York City, across the nation and around the world.

42 Years of CAT... by the Numbers 1 Founder and Executive Director

14 countries, including South Africa, UAE, Japan, South Korea, among others, have invited CAT to provide educational theatre work for young people and educators

200 average number of schools and community sites that receive CAT direct services every year

1,000+ teaching artists and administrators employed by CAT since 1974

2,000 average number of educators, parents and CBO staff who receive CAT professional development every year

15,000 average number of young New Yorkers who receive CAT workshops each year

100,000+ workshops and performances provided by CAT since 1974

1,250,000+ the number of young people, parents and educators whose lives have been impacted by CAT since 1974

5


FY2016—By The Numbers...

3,000 2,424 782 4,673 5,355 $0

High School and Non-Traditional Students participated in CAT’s College Readiness programs

standard-bearer

“...a for socially conscious artists in training.” (American Theatre Magazine) Elementary, Middle & High School students participated in CAT’s After-School Programs

High School and College Students received HIV/STI testing during CAT’s 5-year HIV prevention program, Project CHANGE

New Yorkers participated in CAT’s Theatre programs and/or performances

Pre-K—12th Graders and young adults throughout NYC participated in CAT’s literacy programs

cost to a student to participate in any CAT program

6

CUNY SPS Masters in Applied Theatre The MA in Applied Theatre (MAAT) degree program, the first of its kind in the nation, uses theatre as a medium for education and social development. Students use theatre and drama in a wide variety of non-traditional contexts and venues – including the justice system, healthcare, the political arena, community development, classrooms, museums, and social service agencies. The MA in Applied Theatre was founded in 2008 in partnership with the Creative Arts Team, and collaborates closely with its Youth Theatre and other programs. The goal of the program is to educate scholar-practitioners to become future leaders in the field of applied theatre. Students explore key theories in theatre, education, development, and community building, and acquire the skills and strategies necessary for creating and implementing the work. Students gain real-world experience by building and delivering community-based applied theatre projects to earn their degree. A bi-annual visiting artists program brings MAAT students and faculty to teach educational theatre techniques to drama teachers at the University of Rwanda.

MAAT Impact:      

64 Current Students 133 Alumni 63 Collaborative Thesis Projects 101 Community Partners 58 Students or Alumni who work, or have worked, with CAT

“The expansion of my imagination and creativity in the MA in Applied Theatre has changed my life. The visual literacy tools, academic resources and connections that I have made have become the grout that unites my life tiles as an artist, activist, mother, union organizer, and community member.” Current MAAT Student

5 Years of Project Rwanda 27


1,680 784 175

NYC Teachers participated in CAT’s Professional Development workshops

Non-Traditional participants included incarcerated & previously incarcerated youth, young adults on probation and homeless families.

Schools & Community Sites received CAT services in FY2016

3,414 3,385 17,624

Students benefitted from City Council grants awarded to CAT, via discretionary allocations, CASA, Dropout & Violence Prevention programs.

26

CUNY students participated in CAT workshops

Young People, Parents and Educators participated in CAT programs in FY2016 7


Professional Development 100% 93%

of participating Young Adult Literacy Providers said they were able to apply what they learned in their own classrooms and that the workshops helped them address the diverse learning needs of their students. A vital part of CAT’s mission is to share the interactive, student-centered teaching methods that make such an impact with young people, ensuring that our work doesn’t end when our actor-teachers leave the classroom. To that end, CAT has been providing professional development opportunities for educators and other youth development professionals for decades. CAT’s robust, practical workshops are enjoyable, hands-on, and tailored to address pertinent topics within the greater NYC community. In FY2016, CAT’s professional development outreach included workshops in Early Childhood Education, School Violence Prevention, HIV Prevention, Shakespeare, Dropout Prevention, as well as workshops for Homes for the Homeless educators. FY2016 also included presentations at several conferences, including: ICPH’s Beyond Housing Conference, UFT’s BRAVE Campaign Anti-Bullying Conference, Indiana Assoc. for the Education of Young Children Conference, American Evaluation Association Conference, United States Society for Education through Art Regional Conference, and the American Alliance for Theatre Education. FY2016 was CAT’s second year as Technical Assistance Provider for 16 Young Adult Literacy Programs (YALP) across all 5 boroughs. The overarching goals are to offer support and training in program and curriculum design, student recruitment and retention, partnership facilitation, and dissemination of best practices. YALP sites work with Pre -HSE youth—overaged, under-credited youth (16-24 year-olds reading at a 4th grade level), to put them on track for improving their skills and passing the High School Equivalency exam. CAT took the approach of integrating positive youth development principles, social emotional learning competencies, and employing service learning and relevant curriculum content at all YALP sites and, in FY16, saw a 12% overall increase in participants, a 118% increase in student participation in Service Learning and/or internships across sites; 70% of the students gained at least one grade level or more.

FY2016 Impact:

8

    

1,535 Educators and Youth Development Professionals 403 YALP Practitioners & Young Adults from 16 Sites 358 YALTA Workshops, Events & Observations 595 Conference Participants 307 Professional Development & Conference Workshops

“These services were invaluable to the success of our programs. We had super talented individuals who share the same passion for our students to succeed.” “All of our staff have found the CUNY LST workshops to be very useful. We also find brainstorming and planning with Erika to be fruitful, and enjoy learning from other program sites.” “CUNY has brought a creative approach to case management which allows staff to utilize individual talents which produce positive outcomes.” YALTA Participants 25


Early Learning 93%

of participating teachers reported that they learned questioning strategies that served to scaffold students’ thinking to a higher level. CAT’s Early Learning Program (ELP) uses interactive drama to strengthen literacy, critical thinking, and essential social-emotional skills among pre-k through 2nd grade students. Additionally, the ELP team trains teachers in participant-centered pedagogy and drama strategies to help them meet Common Core Standards and better engage children, including those who are traditionally harder to reach. In FY2016, with the support of the NYCT Brooke Astor Fund for NYC Education, ELP provided an intensive matrix of professional development workshops, in-class residences and parent workshops to 9 New York City public schools, to bolster literacy skills among high-poverty students. ELP also continued its partnerships with Birch Family Services, educational centers for young people with autism and other developmental disabilities; Homes for the Homeless, a group of Tier II transitional housing shelters for families; and with United Federation of Teachers, providing professional development workshops to its members. ELP’s groundbreaking work with early childhood students and their teachers continues to prompt requests from across the country and internationally for CAT staff to share their work. ELP’s director, Helen Wheelock, presented or led residencies for Fresno State, the Indiana Association for the Education of Young Children, and the Seoul National University of Education last year.

FY2016 Impact:  4,212 Early Learners from Head Start & Pre-K through 2nd Grade  852 Early Childhood Educators  234 Parents  39 Schools & Community Sites, including 2 Transitional Housing Sites  65 Emergent Literacy & Mentoring Residencies  214 Professional Development Workshops  17 Conference Presentation Sessions for 325 Participants  50 Parent Workshops 24

“I am a Dual Language teacher… The actor that worked with me gave me the option to do the different activities in Spanish. Using interactive drama strategies, oral language skills and vocabulary development in Spanish helped me to support my English-dominant students in their secondlanguage acquisition and to develop their essential socialemotional skills.” Participating Early Childhood Educator

9


NYC Student Shakespeare Festival 94%

of participating students reported that, after participating in the program, they are more familiar with the elements of theatre, have a better understanding of Shakespeare, are more comfortable listening to the ideas & opinions of others and working together to solve problems. Founded in 1993 on the belief that Shakespeare is best learned in the act of performing his words, CAT's NYC Student Shakespeare Festival (NYCSSF) has provided more than 10,000 young people and 400 teachers with a chance to create their own work of original theatre using Shakespeare's text and to perform their work on an off-Broadway stage. Participating teachers attend an interactive Professional Development series, followed by in-class residencies with our Shakespeare Festival teaching artists. Teachers and their students create a 10-minute scene, exploring an issue important to the students using only the words of Shakespeare. Students and teachers then come together to perform their scenes and participate in peer-to-peer feedback sessions at the culminating, multi-day Festival. In FY2016, NYCSSF added a new requirement: each piece had to include a rap, song, or rhythmic chant using Shakespeare’s text. This turned out to be a wildly successful experiment, with students age 6 to 18 rapping and singing their way through Shakespeare’s legendary poetry. Teachers found a beautiful balance of freedom and structure with their students, offering them a powerful expressive tool to share their feelings about such issues as bullying, racism, misogyny, and family tension, all through the words of William Shakespeare. CAT has found that addressing topical issues through the lens of Shakespeare often gives students (and teachers) more accessible ways to understand and love Shakespeare.

FY2016 Impact:

10

     

700 2nd-12th Grade Students 27 Teacher participants 28 Classes from 20 citywide participating Schools 130 Shakespeare in the Classroom Workshops

“I can’t even quantify how much doing the Shakespeare festival has developed me as a teacher. The process is completely student led and one of the most rigorous activities I’ve ever done with students. Adults would struggle in the process and the fact that students create and perform a piece from scratch is beyond any Common Core standard of rigor.” - Participating High School Teacher

3 all-day Professional Development Workshops 4 Culminating Festival Days at the Lucille Lortel Theatre

23


Literacy Through Drama 80%

of participating students improved their grades by 3 or more points in English Language Arts (ELA) or Social Studies. CAT’s Literacy Through Drama (LTD) program is anchored is using drama to examine the world; in doing so participants are provided opportunities to explore social and academic literacy. FY16 Youth Development Initiatives included year-long, intensive, in-school residencies in five high schools, year-long after-school programs in three middle schools, and shorter residencies in K-12 schools across the city. The in-school, project-based curriculum, developed in close coordination with classroom teachers, directly addressed academic learning objectives in accordance with the Common Core Standards in English Language Arts (ELA) and other subjects with the goal of improving academic skills, socio-emotional health, world readiness and active global citizenship. The after-school program gave students the ability to express themselves creatively in ways they did not often have during inschool hours. The program was a creative space where participants were accepted and their limits challenged through thoughtful, quality dramatic and creative experiences. The facilitators worked together to create a balance of structure and freedom while striving to meet the participants where they are, academically and socioemotionally.

FY2016 Impact:        

22

1,750 Direct Service Hours of Literacy Programming 367 In-School Students, Grades 3-6 85 In-School Students, Grades 6-8

“With CAT this year I learned how to work better with others. I also learned to be more confident with my writing. The program helps develop good listening skills. Thank you for teaching our class this year. I had a blast!” After-School LTD Participant

123 After-School Students, Grades 6-8 310 In-School Students, Grades 9-12 23 Literacy Residencies 8 Schools in Year-Long Programs 15 Schools & Community Sites, including 2 Transitional Housing Sites

11


Youth Theatre 100%

of CAT Youth Theatre Members reported that the program helped them strengthen their speaking and performance skills; 91% noted strengthened ability to devise, express their ideas and work with others. CAT Youth Theatre is an award-winning after-school program that helps young people to thrive–on stage and in life. Membership is free and there are no auditions required, just a commitment to be an active participant of the CAT Youth Theatre community. Members create socially relevant, artistically sophisticated original plays while learning vital life skills enabling youth to become self-confident, compassionate and accountable; to develop relationships across differences; build community; and be prepared to act as contributing citizens. The collaborative theatre process gives young people the opportunity to make new meanings from the material of their lives. Members learn theatre skills like improvisation and scene work, rehearsal, critical reflection, and group discussion as they look at the world around them, decide what they want their theatre to say, and what their role in the world should be. It inspires creativity, builds self-esteem and resiliency, broadens horizons, and develops social awareness. The Youth Theatre’s 2016 original show, WALLS, looked at the physical and metaphorical walls in our lives—and the lives of the young people. Many members of the audience commented on how timely it felt, how connected to current issues. Others talked about the passion they felt coming from the young people about the state of the world. Scenes explored a wide range of issues including technology, relationships, disability, mental health, the environment, transphobia, education, immigration, race, the prison system and our relationship with our history. CAT’s Youth Theatre program for middle school students, Junior Youth Theatre, presented three original performances throughout the year– CAMP ADVENTURES in August, NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU in December, and ELEMENTS in May. Youth Theatre alumni closed out FY16 with a performance by The Ensemble, a select group of skilled devisers and performers.

FY2016 Impact:  83 High School Students/Youth Theatre Members  67 Middle School Students/Jr. Youth Theatre Members  410 Hours of After-School Theatre Programming

“The issues we touched on are really important and not things we learn about in our common core education – so to get to express our ideas and show that as young people we can make a difference – audiences knew we really care about the issues that are affecting us as young people.” “Keep CAT open forever. Never found a real home until I came to CAT.” - Youth Theatre Members

 1,093 Audience Members attended the Youth Theatre production at Baruch Performing Arts Center 12

 283 Audience Members attended the three Jr. Youth Theatre shows

21


Violence Prevention 100%

of participating teachers said they felt more

empowered to be an ally for all students and 96% of participating parents felt more prepared to address bullying issues with their child after CAT workshops CAT works with students and adults to identify and address the root triggers for aggression and conflict -- from cyberbullying to gun violence. Drama-based workshops help participants identify what bullying and violence looks like in a variety of scenes and settings, and provides a space to practice critical thinking, de-escalation, and pro-social communication. Whether participants take the role of aggressor, victim or bystander, all come to see the consequences each one’s actions can have to improve the situation – or make it combust. In FY2016, with funding from the New York State Education Department, CAT delivered a sixth year of school violence prevention programming including in-school student workshops and professional developments to promote safe school environments. Informed by a restorative practices approach, the workshops gave participants a voice in defining healthy relationships, analyzing power dynamics, and examining hierarchies. CAT also delivered in-school residencies and parent workshops to PS 308 and Boys & Girls High School in Brooklyn as part of the City Council’s Anti-Gun Violence initiative, and brought violence prevention workshops to other sites by request, including middle schools, high schools, and transitional housing facilities.

FY2016 Impact:         20

1,498 Middle & High School Students & Community Members 224 Teachers 113 Parents 32 Residencies 399 Workshops for Students 40 Professional Developments 13 Parent Workshops 16 Schools & Community Sites, including 2 Transitional Housing Sites

“This activity made me think deeply about my choices and ask myself if the actions I take will benefit me or bring me down. This can help me in the future because life is a lesson and there will always be something to take care of.” - 7th grade student “I found that cyberbullying can advance into physical bullying and become dangerous.” - 8th grade student 13


College Readiness & Success 95%

of participating CUNY Students reported a clearer understanding of consent, after attending CAT’s Title IX workshops. CAT’s College and Adult Program (CAP) focuses on specific issues, circumstances and behaviors that create obstacles in our everyday lives, particularly as they affect academic and career opportunities. CAP workshops encourage participants to carefully examine the choices, decisions and consequences of these challenges to discover solutions and hone problem-solving, decision-making, self-advocacy, communication and critical thinking skills. CAP works with diverse traditional and nontraditional populations: high school students, incarcerated youth, formally incarcerated, people in transitional housing, immigrants and CUNY students. Success is scaffolded - preparing students for college, providing the skills to keep them there through graduation, and preparing them for entering the workforce. Partner programs include: CUNY LINCT, CUNY Prep, College Focus, Black Male Initiative, COPE/GSI, and Fatherhood Academy; as well as Homes for the Homeless and Rikers Island Detention Facilities. In 2015-16, CAT began offering workshops addressing Title IX Sexual Harassment and Hazing issues, adding to a menu of other workshops ranging from Financial Literacy and confronting our violent culture, to communicating effectively with a professor, or improving time management.

FY2016 Impact:

14

1,837 High School Students

2,238 College Students

225 Court-Involved, Incarcerated & Previously Incarcerated Youth

58 Sites, including 16 CUNY campuses, 28 High Schools, 3 Rikers Island Detention Facilities, 3 Alternative Learning Centers, and 2 Transitional Housing Sites

“I learned how important specificity is. I decided to go home and literally write my goals out to get a vivid image of my future. I need to start narrowing down my future because time is money. This was very motivational. I think it’s great that we discussed the basic issues of life because some things may be hard to endure because we haven’t taken time to reflect.” “This should be a class. Many people face challenges every day and don’t know how to take the first step. This teaches life lessons.” – CUNY Students

19


After-School Programs 99%

of after-school participants said they are better at listening to the opinions of others, and 92% said they are more comfortable expressing their own opinion, after participating in CAT’s year-long program. CAT brings a youth-driven, student-centered approach to hundreds of students in dozens of schools each year, through after-school drama programs that support NYS Arts Standards and NYC Blueprint theatre learning standards while fostering socialemotional and academic growth. In FY13, CAT developed the Theatre Arts Program (TAP), an ongoing after-school theatre-making program for the High School for Construction Trades, Engineering and Architecture, which had no previous theatre programming. Since then, CAT has developed several CASA (Cultural After School Adventures) programs, providing similar theatre-making models in elementary, middle and high schools across the city. In FY16, CAT’s 17 CASA programs throughout the city supported early learners in exploring and developing stories, and middle and high schoolers in identifying and sharing their opinions about the world around them. These ideas were then turned into original theatre. Students developed performance and public speaking skills, negotiated with others in their group to communicate their ideas, and then shared their ideas in an original piece of theatre for family, friends, and school staff. Additionally, CAT served 6 elementary schools in partnership with Serious Fun Afterschool, Inc. The program created opportunities for the young people to explore and develop different theatrical skills such as voice, movement, creative imagination through games, theatre activities, scene work, process drama, and narrative pantomime, as well as script writing. The first half of the program focused on developing theatre skills, the second half on preparation for performance. Culminating performances were shared with other students, parents, faculty, and staff.

FY2016 Impact:  31 After-School Residencies held in 24 Schools  820 Elementary, Middle and High School Students  3,190 Direct Service Hours 18

“It’s a program where you act, write your own stories, and have fun! It was awesome and they should do more of this so other kids could do it.” After-School Participant “The final performance was an example of what happens when dedicated and passionate artists work with dedicated and passionate students. The students produced a variety of poems, songs, scenes, and dialogues that were a prime example of the creativity, passion and hard work that they exemplify in every area of their lives. I was blown away by how professional and heartfelt the performances were.” - High School Community School Director 15


Health & Wellness: HIV Prevention 100%

of CHANGE Agents reported that, along with HIV/STI Prevention & Education knowledge, Project CHANGE helped them develop oral and written communication, collaboration, critical thinking, problem-solving and workplace readiness skills. For 25 years, CAT has partnered with the NYS Department of Health to use drama-based interventions to confront and address tough issues – domestic violence, drug abuse, HIV/AIDS – impacting health and wellness among youth and adults across the state. In 2015-16, CAT completed a six-year effort, called Project CHANGE (Community Health Actions for Growth and Empowerment). Project CHANGE trained students from CUNY’s York and Medgar Evers Colleges as adolescent sexual health advocates in high-need areas. Participating students, or CHANGE Agents, were trained and mentored in HIV/STI/STD Awareness & Prevention Education, Facilitation, Presentation and Workplace Readiness Skills. These Peer Educators and Community Activists for adolescent sexual health engaged in drama-based advocacy and education work that resulted in reaching close to 5,000 high school and college students and community members, brought thousands of safe sex kits to communities where HIV rates continue to be high, and encouraged nearly 800 people to get tested for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases. While FY16 saw the conclusion of this particular DOH grant, CAT continues to provide Health & Wellness workshops to teens and young adults, as part of our Life Skills programming.

FY11-16 Impact:

16

52 CHANGE Agents

1,325 Hours of Training/Mentoring

4,586 Participating High School & College Students

482 Workshops in Schools, Colleges, Health Fairs, Churches, Conferences and other Special Events

4,039 Participants Received Referrals for HIV/STI Screening or Counseling

782 Participants Tested for HIV/STI

“In the 5 years that I have been part of the program, I’ve grown from being a shy, close-minded individual to an outspoken openminded young woman with a great future ahead of me! Project CHANGE taught me how to work with various populations as well as how to embrace cultural differences. The experience paved the way for me to become a Case Manager for CAMBA. Because of Project CHANGE, I learned to develop the skills to be authentic and comfortable with different people, facilitate large groups and have greater sensitivity—I now feel confident to reach out to a broader community and am able to help more individuals than I ever thought possible!” - CHANGE Agent 17


Health & Wellness: HIV Prevention 100%

of CHANGE Agents reported that, along with HIV/STI Prevention & Education knowledge, Project CHANGE helped them develop oral and written communication, collaboration, critical thinking, problem-solving and workplace readiness skills. For 25 years, CAT has partnered with the NYS Department of Health to use drama-based interventions to confront and address tough issues – domestic violence, drug abuse, HIV/AIDS – impacting health and wellness among youth and adults across the state. In 2015-16, CAT completed a six-year effort, called Project CHANGE (Community Health Actions for Growth and Empowerment). Project CHANGE trained students from CUNY’s York and Medgar Evers Colleges as adolescent sexual health advocates in high-need areas. Participating students, or CHANGE Agents, were trained and mentored in HIV/STI/STD Awareness & Prevention Education, Facilitation, Presentation and Workplace Readiness Skills. These Peer Educators and Community Activists for adolescent sexual health engaged in drama-based advocacy and education work that resulted in reaching close to 5,000 high school and college students and community members, brought thousands of safe sex kits to communities where HIV rates continue to be high, and encouraged nearly 800 people to get tested for HIV and sexually transmitted diseases. While FY16 saw the conclusion of this particular DOH grant, CAT continues to provide Health & Wellness workshops to teens and young adults, as part of our Life Skills programming.

FY11-16 Impact:

16

52 CHANGE Agents

1,325 Hours of Training/Mentoring

4,586 Participating High School & College Students

482 Workshops in Schools, Colleges, Health Fairs, Churches, Conferences and other Special Events

4,039 Participants Received Referrals for HIV/STI Screening or Counseling

782 Participants Tested for HIV/STI

“In the 5 years that I have been part of the program, I’ve grown from being a shy, close-minded individual to an outspoken openminded young woman with a great future ahead of me! Project CHANGE taught me how to work with various populations as well as how to embrace cultural differences. The experience paved the way for me to become a Case Manager for CAMBA. Because of Project CHANGE, I learned to develop the skills to be authentic and comfortable with different people, facilitate large groups and have greater sensitivity—I now feel confident to reach out to a broader community and am able to help more individuals than I ever thought possible!” - CHANGE Agent 17


After-School Programs 99%

of after-school participants said they are better at listening to the opinions of others, and 92% said they are more comfortable expressing their own opinion, after participating in CAT’s year-long program. CAT brings a youth-driven, student-centered approach to hundreds of students in dozens of schools each year, through after-school drama programs that support NYS Arts Standards and NYC Blueprint theatre learning standards while fostering socialemotional and academic growth. In FY13, CAT developed the Theatre Arts Program (TAP), an ongoing after-school theatre-making program for the High School for Construction Trades, Engineering and Architecture, which had no previous theatre programming. Since then, CAT has developed several CASA (Cultural After School Adventures) programs, providing similar theatre-making models in elementary, middle and high schools across the city. In FY16, CAT’s 17 CASA programs throughout the city supported early learners in exploring and developing stories, and middle and high schoolers in identifying and sharing their opinions about the world around them. These ideas were then turned into original theatre. Students developed performance and public speaking skills, negotiated with others in their group to communicate their ideas, and then shared their ideas in an original piece of theatre for family, friends, and school staff. Additionally, CAT served 6 elementary schools in partnership with Serious Fun Afterschool, Inc. The program created opportunities for the young people to explore and develop different theatrical skills such as voice, movement, creative imagination through games, theatre activities, scene work, process drama, and narrative pantomime, as well as script writing. The first half of the program focused on developing theatre skills, the second half on preparation for performance. Culminating performances were shared with other students, parents, faculty, and staff.

FY2016 Impact:  31 After-School Residencies held in 24 Schools  820 Elementary, Middle and High School Students  3,190 Direct Service Hours 18

“It’s a program where you act, write your own stories, and have fun! It was awesome and they should do more of this so other kids could do it.” After-School Participant “The final performance was an example of what happens when dedicated and passionate artists work with dedicated and passionate students. The students produced a variety of poems, songs, scenes, and dialogues that were a prime example of the creativity, passion and hard work that they exemplify in every area of their lives. I was blown away by how professional and heartfelt the performances were.” - High School Community School Director 15


College Readiness & Success 95%

of participating CUNY Students reported a clearer understanding of consent, after attending CAT’s Title IX workshops. CAT’s College and Adult Program (CAP) focuses on specific issues, circumstances and behaviors that create obstacles in our everyday lives, particularly as they affect academic and career opportunities. CAP workshops encourage participants to carefully examine the choices, decisions and consequences of these challenges to discover solutions and hone problem-solving, decision-making, self-advocacy, communication and critical thinking skills. CAP works with diverse traditional and nontraditional populations: high school students, incarcerated youth, formally incarcerated, people in transitional housing, immigrants and CUNY students. Success is scaffolded - preparing students for college, providing the skills to keep them there through graduation, and preparing them for entering the workforce. Partner programs include: CUNY LINCT, CUNY Prep, College Focus, Black Male Initiative, COPE/GSI, and Fatherhood Academy; as well as Homes for the Homeless and Rikers Island Detention Facilities. In 2015-16, CAT began offering workshops addressing Title IX Sexual Harassment and Hazing issues, adding to a menu of other workshops ranging from Financial Literacy and confronting our violent culture, to communicating effectively with a professor, or improving time management.

FY2016 Impact:

14

1,837 High School Students

2,238 College Students

225 Court-Involved, Incarcerated & Previously Incarcerated Youth

58 Sites, including 16 CUNY campuses, 28 High Schools, 3 Rikers Island Detention Facilities, 3 Alternative Learning Centers, and 2 Transitional Housing Sites

“I learned how important specificity is. I decided to go home and literally write my goals out to get a vivid image of my future. I need to start narrowing down my future because time is money. This was very motivational. I think it’s great that we discussed the basic issues of life because some things may be hard to endure because we haven’t taken time to reflect.” “This should be a class. Many people face challenges every day and don’t know how to take the first step. This teaches life lessons.” – CUNY Students

19


Violence Prevention 100%

of participating teachers said they felt more

empowered to be an ally for all students and 96% of participating parents felt more prepared to address bullying issues with their child after CAT workshops CAT works with students and adults to identify and address the root triggers for aggression and conflict -- from cyberbullying to gun violence. Drama-based workshops help participants identify what bullying and violence looks like in a variety of scenes and settings, and provides a space to practice critical thinking, de-escalation, and pro-social communication. Whether participants take the role of aggressor, victim or bystander, all come to see the consequences each one’s actions can have to improve the situation – or make it combust. In FY2016, with funding from the New York State Education Department, CAT delivered a sixth year of school violence prevention programming including in-school student workshops and professional developments to promote safe school environments. Informed by a restorative practices approach, the workshops gave participants a voice in defining healthy relationships, analyzing power dynamics, and examining hierarchies. CAT also delivered in-school residencies and parent workshops to PS 308 and Boys & Girls High School in Brooklyn as part of the City Council’s Anti-Gun Violence initiative, and brought violence prevention workshops to other sites by request, including middle schools, high schools, and transitional housing facilities.

FY2016 Impact:         20

1,498 Middle & High School Students & Community Members 224 Teachers 113 Parents 32 Residencies 399 Workshops for Students 40 Professional Developments 13 Parent Workshops 16 Schools & Community Sites, including 2 Transitional Housing Sites

“This activity made me think deeply about my choices and ask myself if the actions I take will benefit me or bring me down. This can help me in the future because life is a lesson and there will always be something to take care of.” - 7th grade student “I found that cyberbullying can advance into physical bullying and become dangerous.” - 8th grade student 13


Youth Theatre 100%

of CAT Youth Theatre Members reported that the program helped them strengthen their speaking and performance skills; 91% noted strengthened ability to devise, express their ideas and work with others. CAT Youth Theatre is an award-winning after-school program that helps young people to thrive–on stage and in life. Membership is free and there are no auditions required, just a commitment to be an active participant of the CAT Youth Theatre community. Members create socially relevant, artistically sophisticated original plays while learning vital life skills enabling youth to become self-confident, compassionate and accountable; to develop relationships across differences; build community; and be prepared to act as contributing citizens. The collaborative theatre process gives young people the opportunity to make new meanings from the material of their lives. Members learn theatre skills like improvisation and scene work, rehearsal, critical reflection, and group discussion as they look at the world around them, decide what they want their theatre to say, and what their role in the world should be. It inspires creativity, builds self-esteem and resiliency, broadens horizons, and develops social awareness. The Youth Theatre’s 2016 original show, WALLS, looked at the physical and metaphorical walls in our lives—and the lives of the young people. Many members of the audience commented on how timely it felt, how connected to current issues. Others talked about the passion they felt coming from the young people about the state of the world. Scenes explored a wide range of issues including technology, relationships, disability, mental health, the environment, transphobia, education, immigration, race, the prison system and our relationship with our history. CAT’s Youth Theatre program for middle school students, Junior Youth Theatre, presented three original performances throughout the year– CAMP ADVENTURES in August, NOW PLAYING AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU in December, and ELEMENTS in May. Youth Theatre alumni closed out FY16 with a performance by The Ensemble, a select group of skilled devisers and performers.

FY2016 Impact:  83 High School Students/Youth Theatre Members  67 Middle School Students/Jr. Youth Theatre Members  410 Hours of After-School Theatre Programming

“The issues we touched on are really important and not things we learn about in our common core education – so to get to express our ideas and show that as young people we can make a difference – audiences knew we really care about the issues that are affecting us as young people.” “Keep CAT open forever. Never found a real home until I came to CAT.” - Youth Theatre Members

 1,093 Audience Members attended the Youth Theatre production at Baruch Performing Arts Center 12

 283 Audience Members attended the three Jr. Youth Theatre shows

21


Literacy Through Drama 80%

of participating students improved their grades by 3 or more points in English Language Arts (ELA) or Social Studies. CAT’s Literacy Through Drama (LTD) program is anchored is using drama to examine the world; in doing so participants are provided opportunities to explore social and academic literacy. FY16 Youth Development Initiatives included year-long, intensive, in-school residencies in five high schools, year-long after-school programs in three middle schools, and shorter residencies in K-12 schools across the city. The in-school, project-based curriculum, developed in close coordination with classroom teachers, directly addressed academic learning objectives in accordance with the Common Core Standards in English Language Arts (ELA) and other subjects with the goal of improving academic skills, socio-emotional health, world readiness and active global citizenship. The after-school program gave students the ability to express themselves creatively in ways they did not often have during inschool hours. The program was a creative space where participants were accepted and their limits challenged through thoughtful, quality dramatic and creative experiences. The facilitators worked together to create a balance of structure and freedom while striving to meet the participants where they are, academically and socioemotionally.

FY2016 Impact:        

22

1,750 Direct Service Hours of Literacy Programming 367 In-School Students, Grades 3-6 85 In-School Students, Grades 6-8

“With CAT this year I learned how to work better with others. I also learned to be more confident with my writing. The program helps develop good listening skills. Thank you for teaching our class this year. I had a blast!” After-School LTD Participant

123 After-School Students, Grades 6-8 310 In-School Students, Grades 9-12 23 Literacy Residencies 8 Schools in Year-Long Programs 15 Schools & Community Sites, including 2 Transitional Housing Sites

11


NYC Student Shakespeare Festival 94%

of participating students reported that, after participating in the program, they are more familiar with the elements of theatre, have a better understanding of Shakespeare, are more comfortable listening to the ideas & opinions of others and working together to solve problems. Founded in 1993 on the belief that Shakespeare is best learned in the act of performing his words, CAT's NYC Student Shakespeare Festival (NYCSSF) has provided more than 10,000 young people and 400 teachers with a chance to create their own work of original theatre using Shakespeare's text and to perform their work on an off-Broadway stage. Participating teachers attend an interactive Professional Development series, followed by in-class residencies with our Shakespeare Festival teaching artists. Teachers and their students create a 10-minute scene, exploring an issue important to the students using only the words of Shakespeare. Students and teachers then come together to perform their scenes and participate in peer-to-peer feedback sessions at the culminating, multi-day Festival. In FY2016, NYCSSF added a new requirement: each piece had to include a rap, song, or rhythmic chant using Shakespeare’s text. This turned out to be a wildly successful experiment, with students age 6 to 18 rapping and singing their way through Shakespeare’s legendary poetry. Teachers found a beautiful balance of freedom and structure with their students, offering them a powerful expressive tool to share their feelings about such issues as bullying, racism, misogyny, and family tension, all through the words of William Shakespeare. CAT has found that addressing topical issues through the lens of Shakespeare often gives students (and teachers) more accessible ways to understand and love Shakespeare.

FY2016 Impact:

10

     

700 2nd-12th Grade Students 27 Teacher participants 28 Classes from 20 citywide participating Schools 130 Shakespeare in the Classroom Workshops

“I can’t even quantify how much doing the Shakespeare festival has developed me as a teacher. The process is completely student led and one of the most rigorous activities I’ve ever done with students. Adults would struggle in the process and the fact that students create and perform a piece from scratch is beyond any Common Core standard of rigor.” - Participating High School Teacher

3 all-day Professional Development Workshops 4 Culminating Festival Days at the Lucille Lortel Theatre

23


Early Learning 93%

of participating teachers reported that they learned questioning strategies that served to scaffold students’ thinking to a higher level. CAT’s Early Learning Program (ELP) uses interactive drama to strengthen literacy, critical thinking, and essential social-emotional skills among pre-k through 2nd grade students. Additionally, the ELP team trains teachers in participant-centered pedagogy and drama strategies to help them meet Common Core Standards and better engage children, including those who are traditionally harder to reach. In FY2016, with the support of the NYCT Brooke Astor Fund for NYC Education, ELP provided an intensive matrix of professional development workshops, in-class residences and parent workshops to 9 New York City public schools, to bolster literacy skills among high-poverty students. ELP also continued its partnerships with Birch Family Services, educational centers for young people with autism and other developmental disabilities; Homes for the Homeless, a group of Tier II transitional housing shelters for families; and with United Federation of Teachers, providing professional development workshops to its members. ELP’s groundbreaking work with early childhood students and their teachers continues to prompt requests from across the country and internationally for CAT staff to share their work. ELP’s director, Helen Wheelock, presented or led residencies for Fresno State, the Indiana Association for the Education of Young Children, and the Seoul National University of Education last year.

FY2016 Impact:  4,212 Early Learners from Head Start & Pre-K through 2nd Grade  852 Early Childhood Educators  234 Parents  39 Schools & Community Sites, including 2 Transitional Housing Sites  65 Emergent Literacy & Mentoring Residencies  214 Professional Development Workshops  17 Conference Presentation Sessions for 325 Participants  50 Parent Workshops 24

“I am a Dual Language teacher… The actor that worked with me gave me the option to do the different activities in Spanish. Using interactive drama strategies, oral language skills and vocabulary development in Spanish helped me to support my English-dominant students in their secondlanguage acquisition and to develop their essential socialemotional skills.” Participating Early Childhood Educator

9


Professional Development 100% 93%

of participating Young Adult Literacy Providers said they were able to apply what they learned in their own classrooms and that the workshops helped them address the diverse learning needs of their students. A vital part of CAT’s mission is to share the interactive, student-centered teaching methods that make such an impact with young people, ensuring that our work doesn’t end when our actor-teachers leave the classroom. To that end, CAT has been providing professional development opportunities for educators and other youth development professionals for decades. CAT’s robust, practical workshops are enjoyable, hands-on, and tailored to address pertinent topics within the greater NYC community. In FY2016, CAT’s professional development outreach included workshops in Early Childhood Education, School Violence Prevention, HIV Prevention, Shakespeare, Dropout Prevention, as well as workshops for Homes for the Homeless educators. FY2016 also included presentations at several conferences, including: ICPH’s Beyond Housing Conference, UFT’s BRAVE Campaign Anti-Bullying Conference, Indiana Assoc. for the Education of Young Children Conference, American Evaluation Association Conference, United States Society for Education through Art Regional Conference, and the American Alliance for Theatre Education. FY2016 was CAT’s second year as Technical Assistance Provider for 16 Young Adult Literacy Programs (YALP) across all 5 boroughs. The overarching goals are to offer support and training in program and curriculum design, student recruitment and retention, partnership facilitation, and dissemination of best practices. YALP sites work with Pre -HSE youth—overaged, under-credited youth (16-24 year-olds reading at a 4th grade level), to put them on track for improving their skills and passing the High School Equivalency exam. CAT took the approach of integrating positive youth development principles, social emotional learning competencies, and employing service learning and relevant curriculum content at all YALP sites and, in FY16, saw a 12% overall increase in participants, a 118% increase in student participation in Service Learning and/or internships across sites; 70% of the students gained at least one grade level or more.

FY2016 Impact:

8

    

1,535 Educators and Youth Development Professionals 403 YALP Practitioners & Young Adults from 16 Sites 358 YALTA Workshops, Events & Observations 595 Conference Participants 307 Professional Development & Conference Workshops

“These services were invaluable to the success of our programs. We had super talented individuals who share the same passion for our students to succeed.” “All of our staff have found the CUNY LST workshops to be very useful. We also find brainstorming and planning with Erika to be fruitful, and enjoy learning from other program sites.” “CUNY has brought a creative approach to case management which allows staff to utilize individual talents which produce positive outcomes.” YALTA Participants 25


1,680 784 175

NYC Teachers participated in CAT’s Professional Development workshops

Non-Traditional participants included incarcerated & previously incarcerated youth, young adults on probation and homeless families.

Schools & Community Sites received CAT services in FY2014

3,414 3,385 17,624

Students benefitted from City Council grants awarded to CAT, via discretionary allocations, CASA, Dropout & Violence Prevention programs.

26

CUNY students participated in CAT workshops

Young People, Parents and Educators participated in CAT programs in FY2016 7


FY2016—By The Numbers...

3,000 2,424 782 4,673 5,355 $0

High School and Non-Traditional Students participated in CAT’s College Readiness programs

standard-bearer

“...a for socially conscious artists in training.” (American Theatre Magazine) Elementary, Middle & High School students participated in CAT’s After-School Programs

High School and College Students received HIV/STI testing during CAT’s 5-year HIV prevention program, Project CHANGE

New Yorkers participated in CAT’s Theatre programs and/or performances

Pre-K—12th Graders and young adults throughout NYC participated in CAT’s literacy programs

cost to a student to participate in any CAT program

6

CUNY SPS Masters in Applied Theatre The MA in Applied Theatre (MAAT) degree program, the first of its kind in the nation, uses theatre as a medium for education and social development. Students use theatre and drama in a wide variety of non-traditional contexts and venues – including the justice system, healthcare, the political arena, community development, classrooms, museums, and social service agencies. The MA in Applied Theatre was founded in 2008 in partnership with the Creative Arts Team, and collaborates closely with its Youth Theatre and other programs. The goal of the program is to educate scholar-practitioners to become future leaders in the field of applied theatre. Students explore key theories in theatre, education, development, and community building, and acquire the skills and strategies necessary for creating and implementing the work. Students gain real-world experience by building and delivering community-based applied theatre projects to earn their degree. A bi-annual visiting artists program brings MAAT students and faculty to teach educational theatre techniques to drama teachers at the University of Rwanda.

MAAT Impact:      

64 Current Students 133 Alumni 63 Collaborative Thesis Projects 101 Community Partners 58 Students or Alumni who work, or have worked, with CAT

“The expansion of my imagination and creativity in the MA in Applied Theatre has changed my life. The visual literacy tools, academic resources and connections that I have made have become the grout that unites my life tiles as an artist, activist, mother, union organizer, and community member.” Current MAAT Student

5 Years of Project Rwanda 27


Where we were in FY2016...

About CAT

Bronx

WHO WE ARE: CAT uses the power of drama to inspire youth to learn. Since its founding in 1974, CAT

Astor Collegiate Academy BIRCH Family Services- Riverdale Early Childhood Center Bronx Community College Bronx Delta School Bronx Early College Academy for Teaching & Learning Bronx Engineering and Technology Academy Bronx Public Library Bronx Public Library- Mott Haven Branch Bronx Public Library-West Farms Branch Bronx School for Law Government and Justice Bronx Studio School for Writers and Artists Bronx Works Bronxdale High School CUNY Preparatory High School Fannie Lou Hamer Freedom High School Foreign Language Academy of Global Studies HERO (Health, Education, and Research Occupations) High School Hostos Community College In-Tech Academy (M.S./High School 368) Lehman College Morris Academy for Collaborative Studies New Visions Charter High School for Advanced Math and Sciences II Peace and Diversity Academy Prospect Family Inn PS 011x Highbridge PS 016x Wakefield PS 021X Philip H. Sheridan PS 160X The Disney School PS 196X PS 214X School For Excellence The Cinema School The Forward School The Highbridge Green School Urban Assembly Bronx Studio School for Writing and Arts

Brooklyn ALC at John Jay Campus Boys and Girls High School Brooklyn College Brooklyn College Academy Brooklyn Generation High School Brooklyn High School Of the Arts Brooklyn Lab School Brooklyn Public Library Brooklyn Public Library- Bedford Branch 28

Bushwick School for Social Justice City Polytechnic High School Of Engineering, Architecture, And Technology Clara Barton High School Cobble Hill School of American Studies Foundations Academy Franklin D. Roosevelt High School Fundamentals Academy High School for Service and Learning at Erasmus High School for Youth and Community Development at Erasmus JHS 259 William McKinley School Kingsborough Community College Kingsborough Early College School Medgar Evers College New York City College of Technology Park Place Academy Pre-K Center at 1258 65th Street Pre-K Center at 140 58th Street Pre-K Center at 7415 Fort Hamilton Parkway Pre-K Center at 8501 5th Avenue Pre-K Center at Bishop Ford School Site PS 015 Patrick F. Daly PS 105 The Blythebourne School PS 119 The Amersfort School PS 158 Warwick PS 184 Newport PS 188 Michael E. Berdy PS 217 Colonel David Marcus School PS 308 Clara Cardwell School PS 316 Elijah Stroud Red Hook Neighborhood School Ronald Edmonds Learning Center II, MS 484 Science, Technology and Research Early College School at Erasmus UFT Brooklyn Borough Office Urban Assembly School for Collaborative Healthcare Urban Assembly Unison School William E. Grady Career and Technical Education High School World Academy for Total Community Health High School YMCA Greater NY YMCA Greater NY- Y Roads Eastern District Young Women's Leadership School of Brooklyn

Manhattan Baruch College Borough of Manhattan Community College CAT Training Center City College Academy of the Arts City College of New York

has served more than a million young people, specifically marginalized, at-risk and ELL youth in all five boroughs of NYC, and has a proven track record of success in strengthening three important and interrelated life skills: literacy, critical thinking, and social-emotional competency. CAT is an educational outreach program at The City University of New York (CUNY), and in partnership with CUNY’s School of Professional Studies, offers the nation’s first M.A. in Applied Theatre – using theatre to facilitate, educate and activate.

WHAT WE DO: Theatre cultivates a unique skill set that is indispensable for the 21st Century – primarily communication, collaboration, critical thinking and creativity. CAT enriches the lives of our participants through a pedagogy which combines educational drama strategies with research-based theories and practices to create participant-centered, interactive drama experiences. The needs, strengths and learning styles of participants inform the actual content of workshops. CAT offers a wide range of programs for students (pre-K through college), educators, parents, schools, and communities that serve diverse needs, such as College Success and Workplace Readiness, Bullying Prevention, Literacy and Healthy Choices, as well as arts enrichment. With over four decades of dedicated school and community partnerships, professional development workshops, and our award-winning Youth Theatre, CAT has reached over a million students, educators, parents, community members and teaching artists in New York City, across the nation and around the world.

42 Years of CAT... by the Numbers 1 Founder and Executive Director

14 countries, including South Africa, UAE, Japan, South Korea, among others, have invited CAT to provide educational theatre work for young people and educators

200 average number of schools and community sites that receive CAT direct services every year

1,000+ teaching artists and administrators employed by CAT since 1974

2,000 average number of educators, parents and CBO staff who receive CAT professional development every year

15,000 average number of young New Yorkers who receive CAT workshops each year

100,000+ workshops and performances provided by CAT since 1974

1,250,000+ the number of young people, parents and educators whose lives have been impacted by CAT since 1974

5


Columbia Secondary School District 79 Office of Student Support Services Frederick Douglass Academy II Secondary School Guttman Community College High School for Health Professions and Human Services Hunter College Institute for Children, Poverty, & Homelessness John Jay College of Criminal Justice Joseph S. Murphy Institute for Worker Education and Labor Studies Lucille Lortel Theatre Manhattan Early College School for Advertising Manhattan Youth Martin Luther King, Jr. High School for Arts and Technology Muscota New School New York City Department of Education NYU College Advising Corps PS 030 Hernandez/Hughes PS 033 Chelsea Prep PS 048 PO Michael J. Buczek PS 123 The Mahalia Jackson School PS 132 Juan Pablo Duarte PS 175 Henry H Garnet PS 96 Joseph C. Lanzetta School Renaissance Charter High School for Innovation Stanley M. Isaacs Neighborhood Center The Door UFT Headquarters

Queens Central Queens YM & YWCA Energy Tech High School George Motchan Detention Center High School for Construction Trades, Engineering and Architecture Hillcrest High School Information Technology High School IS 230 Magnet School for Civics in the Community IS 237 Rachel Carson Intermediate School JHS 185 Edward Bleeker John Adams High School LaGuardia Community College New Visions Charter High School for Advanced Math & Science IV Pan American International High School PS 002 Alfred Zimberg School PS 017 Henry David Thoreau PS 049 Dorothy Bonawit Kole PS 051 PS 054 Hillside PS 085 Judge Charles Vallone 4

PS 117 Keld/Briarwood School PS 127 Aerospace and Science Academy PS 134 Hollis The Langston Hughes School PS 150 Queens PS 166 Henry Gradstein PS 183 Dr. Richard R. Green PS 188 Kingsbury PS 212 PS 234 PS 38 PS/IS 78 Queens Academy High School Queens Museum Queens Public Library Queens Public Library- Far Rockaway Branch Queens Public Library- Jamaica Branch Queensborough Community College Renaissance Charter School Robert N. Davoren Center Rose M. Singer Center Saratoga Family Inn The Fortune Society Waterside Children's Studio School York College York Early College Academy

Staten Island College of Staten Island Port Richmond High School Targee Street Pre-K Center Tottenville High School United Activities Unlimited United Activities Unlimited (Richmond)

Other American Evaluation Association (Washington, DC) Fresno State: Joyce M Huggins Early Education Center Fansler Institute (Fresno, CA) Hilton Milwaukee City Center (Milwaukee, WI) Indiana Convention Center (Indianapolis, IN) The Laurel Hill School (Long Island, NY)

29


Inside this report… About CUNY-CAT ................................................................................... 5 CUNY-CAT in FY2016—by the numbers .............................................. 6 Early Learning.......................................................................................... 8 Middle Grades Literacy....................................................................... 10 Bullying Prevention ............................................................................... 12 After School Programs ......................................................................... 14

HIV Prevention ...................................................................................... 16 College Readiness & Success ............................................................ 18 Youth Theatre ........................................................................................ 20 Shakespeare ......................................................................................... 22 Professional Development .................................................................. 24 CUNY SPS Masters in Applied Theatre .............................................. 26 Where we were in FY2016 ................................................................... 28 Acknowledgments ............................................................................... 30

“I am prepared to have the hard conversations. The workshop was very informative.” – Participating Parent “I learned that acting out issues can make you feel like they are actually happening in your life, allowing you to sympathize/empathize with others.” – After-School Student “The workshop gave me different ideas of how you can contribute to your community as an individual.” – CUNY Student

30

3


Thanks To You… 17,624

Students, Teachers and Parents benefitted from

CAT programs in every New York City Council District in FY2016. Support for CAT FY16 Programs Provided By: The partnerships CAT has developed with the public and private sector have enabled CAT to reach young people and their families in all five boroughs. You are an essential partner in CAT’s innovative, critically important educational outreach, helping us provide interactive, issue-based programs that:

 Strengthen academic achievement;  Support youth development and social-emotional growth; and

 Increase resiliency in NYC’s young people. In 2017, we aim to continue to expand how CAT uses drama as a platform for positive youth development and the development of social emotional skills, particularly with at-risk populations and disenfranchised youth, and in partnership with CUNY, City and State agencies, and other nonprofit and community-based organizations. On behalf of the students, teachers, parents and Creative Arts Team members involved in our programs, we offer our sincere appreciation for your ongoing support. We are pleased with this successful year of service and look forward to expanding our efforts in FY 2017.

Thank you for your collective commitment to supporting the needs of young New Yorkers.

Birch Family of Services The City University of New York

Community Service Society of New York Homes for the Homeless Jewish Communal Fund The Lucille Lortel Foundation Morgan Stanley New York City Council Citywide Initiative: Speaker Melissa Mark-Viverito and 51 Council Members NYC Council Discretionary, Dropout Prevention, Anti-Gun Violence & CASA Grants: Costa Constantinedes, Robert Cornegy, Laurie Cumbo, Inez Dickens, Daniel Dromm, Mathieu Eugene, Vanessa L. Gibson, Andy King, Karen Koslowitz, Rory Lancman, Carlos Menchaca, I. Daneek Miller, Donovan Richards, Ydanis Rodriguez, Helen Rosenthal, James Vacca, Paul Vallone, Jumaane Williams, Ruben Wills NYC Department of Correction NYC Department of Cultural Affairs NYC Department of Education NYC Department of Youth & Community Development New York Community Trust: Brooke Astor Fund for NYC Education NYS Assemblymembers Michael Dendekker, Ron Kim, Aravella Simotas NYS Council on the Arts NYS Department of Health-AIDS Institute NYS Education Department Penguin USA RBC Wealth Management Serious Fun Afterschool Inc. Sheltering Arms Wolf Trap Institute for Early Learning Through the Arts

2

Participating Schools, and many generous individuals

31


CREATIVE ARTS TEAM THE CITY UNIVERSITY OF NEW YORK

101 W. 31ST STREET, 6TH FLOOR NEW YORK, NY 10001 P: 212.652.2800 F: 212.652.2809 WWW.CREATIVEARTSTEAM.ORG

CUNY • Creative Arts Team 2015-2016 Annual Report

CUNY Creative Arts Team FY16 Report  

Turn the page - see what we're all about! If you'd like to learn more about us, visit us at www.creativeartsteam.org

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you