Page 1

SPAR Cover, PrePlacement Checklist, Attendance and Coverage

Placement Supplement

CAF (Common assessment Framework

SPAR FOLDER EXEMPLAR

My Developmental Targets

Weekly Reviews

Lesson Observations (Formal and Informal)

Cumbria Teacher of Reading

Organise your SPAR Placement File using dividers labelled as above. Keep this file through B, D and E placements simply adding to each section, forming a complete Journey to QTS. Keep one copy of the CAF throughout and highlight in different colours for each placement.

End of Placement Reports

School Information, Policies and Class Data

AOB


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What I need to Print File 1 – SPAR – Student Progress Assessment Record (You will use this file for B, D and E Placements You will need labelled dividers with 10 sections Ref 0.1

Document SPAR front cover and 2 page introduction

Number of prints X1

0.2

Pre-placement check list

X1

0.3

Attendance Record

X1

0.4

Curriculum Coverage (General Primary) or Curriculum Coverage (Early Years)

X1

0.5

Placement Supplements - (Beginning, Developing or Extending)

X1 Per Phase

0.6

CAF – Common Assessment Framework

X1

0.7

Trainee Development Targets - plus a few extra copies of the second page as it’s an ongoing record over placements

X1

0.8

Weekly Review

0.9

Lesson observation Pro Forma

x1 per week of placement

0.10 Trainee Observing Teacher form

x2 Beg; x3 Dev; x4 Ext x4 – As a minimum

0.11 Cumbria Teacher of Reading booklet

you will already have been given this so do not print

0.12 End of Placement Reports

you will be given these so no need to print but need a section in your folder

0.13 Additional Experiences Record - list any events extra to your teaching eg CPD attended, trips, staff meetings, parents’ evenings, residential, visitors to your class, displays etc. Do include photographs! 0.14 Safeguarding training certificates - file under AOB 0.15 Additional school information - any documents or information about the school that will be useful to be able to refer to eg. OfSTED report, Safeguarding policy (read, sign, date and file)

All documents can be downloaded here Other documentation that you need to look at: (Print if you find useful to reference) 0.16 Effective Target Setting for ITE document - Before meeting with your UPT, it would be helpful if you have read this document and have some idea of what you want your targets to be for your beginning placement.


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SPAR Front Cover, Pre-Placement Check List, Attendance Record and Curriculum Coverage

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“Aspirational training to achieve inspirational teachers with pupils’ learning and well-being at the heart of our partnership”

EarlyYears&Primary Initial Teacher Education SPAR:Student Progress Assessment Record Information: Trainee: Year/ Programme (e.g.PGCE): Placement (B,D,E): School/Setting: Mentor: Class Teacher: University Partnership Tutor (UPT)/PPL: Age Range taught: Start / Finish Dates of Placement: Signatures: In order for you to start your placement you must have the following signatures: Personal Tutor(PT)/PPL: during target-setting meeting with trainee prior to placement. Mentor: on or following final visit day or by end of first day of placement at latest (see also ‘Pre-Placement Check List’ in this pack). Personal Tutor/PPL: Mentor*:

*or other nominated school-based colleague who also complete the Pre-Placement Checklist with the student

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STUDENT PROGRESS ASSESSMENT RECORD Introduction The SPAR is designed to track, monitor and evidence your journey from the start of your QTS course through to the end. It is to support you in tracking your progress and in meeting the required Teachers’ Standards. This is the key record of your professional and academic development and has been designed so that all tracking and assessment documentation is recorded and stored in one place. The SPAR:  is your record and you are responsible for ensuring that it is completed in an accurate and timely manner.  comprises all of the documentation that is completed during each placement phase (B, D orE)  should be kept in section 2 of your file and should be available for the Mentor and UPT to refer to and use as relevant  should be retained in paper form during all placement phases  individual forms are available in electronic form from http://tiny.cc/UOCPartnershipPaperwork Placement information Trainee Teachers' Standards Assessment Descriptors

Development Targets Running Record

Pre-placement check list Attendance record Curriculum coverage Class data summary

Class progress tracking sheet Group progress tracking sheet Lesson observation observers form Reflective log

Focused pupil progress review

Complete before placement and obtain the required signatures. Also referred to as the Common Framework. Use with your Mentor and UPT to discuss and track progress over time against the Teachers’ Standards by highlighting areas of strength and identifying areas for development in order to set short-term and longer-term developmental targets Use to record the targets set at your Pre-placement tutorial. These should be based upon areas for development identified at the end of your previous placement (continuing trainees only). For Beginning trainees these targets are based on prior experience and placement expectations. Update after each Mentor meeting and add new target(s) agreed. Complete before each placement. Mentor should sign to confirm that you are ready to undertake the placement Log attendance on a daily basis and total at the end of the placement. Your Mentor should sign to confirm your attendance at the end of the placement. Complete during each placement to record different aspects of curriculum coverage. Refer to detailed Tracking Complete at the very beginning of your Pupil Progress placement to help you plan for the class. You Guidance should collect the data from the class teacher.

Use to record your formative assessment for the class and track pupils` progress. Use to record your formative assessment for different groups. This could also be used by the TA or other support staff. Complete when observing colleagues’ teaching

There is an expectation on all phases of placement that you will keep an ongoing reflective log of impact on pupil progress, use the prompts in the TPP guidance as starters, please devise your own format for this. Use as prescribed on B, D, E placements (see TPP guidance) to demonstrate Back to First Page your impact on pupil progress and learning over time. 8


form Weekly Review template Observation proforma Pupil profile log

Complete prior to your weekly tutorial with your Mentor.

End of Placement Report Post placement forms

Completed by the Mentor at the end of all placements of four weeks or more. UG trainees only – Forms to be completed and shared with your personal tutor post placement

Completed by the Mentor or UPT, or other observer, after each observation Use to record your pupil profiles – 3 pupils on B, D and E placements. Refer to detailed Pupil Profiling Guidance

Key Assessment Points* The Common Framework involves use of the descriptors at 3 Key Assessment Points (KAPs) during the period of training, regardless of the chosen Programme: post graduate, undergraduate, full or part time. Using the terms adopted by the University of Cumbria to describe the stages in school- based experience, the KAPs occur: KAP B - At the end of the assessed “Beginning” Placement KAP D - At the end of the assessed “Developing” Placement KAP E - At the end of the assessed “Extending” placement The specific timings of Key Assessment Points for each Programme are as follows: Programme KAPB KAPD End of Beginning End of Developing BAQTS 3 placement in Year 1 placement in year Year 2 End of Beginning End of Developing BAQTS 4 placement in Year 1 placement in year Year 3 (Although a Formative grading is to be given in Y2/4 also) End of Beginning End of Developing PgCE Fulltime/SD placement placement

KAPE End of Extending placement in Year 3 End of Extending placement in Year 4

End of Extending placement

*Often the KAP grading points land in the penultimate week of each placement phase. This is designed to allow adequate time for Mentor, student and UPT (or PPL) to effectively moderate grading and ensure that forms are returned to the university in good time to meet academic examination boards (effectively allowing students to progress or graduate). It is essential that all grades and comments regarding trainee progress are aligned with the grade descriptors for the grade being awarded in the "Common Framework". It is essential that all involved in the assessment process, including the trainees, fully understand and can explain how the assessment guidance and criteria are applied to ensure accuracy and consistency.

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PRE-PLACEMENT CHECK LIST For Assessed placements only Revised Sept 2018

The Trainee and Associate Tutor/mentor should agree and sign-off this form pre-placement before they sign the front of this pack Trainee Name

Programme & Year group

THE FOLLOWING ARE PRESENT IN THE PROFESSIONAL FILE SPAR File:

Placement Phase Signature of Trainee

Signature of Mentor

SPAR Front cover signed Pre-placement Checklist signed off CAF for this placement Attendance tracker Curriculum Tracker Developmental Targets Record signed by PT Placement Supplement Weekly Review proforma Formal and Informal observations proformas Safeguarding Policy (read, signed, dated) GDPR Policy (read, signed, dated) General information about the placement setting/school, class information

All observations, reports, CAF and Action Plans from previous placements

Planning File:

Class timetable per week identifying teaching % UoC Planning document for reference Medium term plans for placement Planning proformas to be used For EYFS Trainees: Areas of learning For KS1/2 Trainees: English; Mathematics; Science; Computing; RE; Range of Non-Core Subjects. • Weekly Planning Sheets • Daily/Organisational Plans Lesson Plans (for first 2 days)

Tracking Pupil Progress File:

Class Data Summary completed Pupil Profile information for 3 children Class/ Group trackers printed ready to complete Focused Review proforma

Trainee is adequately prepared to begin his/ her placement

Trainee is not adequately prepared to begin his/ her placement and is therefore at risk of failure

Signature of AT/Mentor:

Date:

Areas for attention 1. 2. 3. The areas for attention, indicated above, must be addressed during the first few days of the Block Placement If the planning is still not adequate, the trainee may Back not be allowed to start the placement. to First Page 10


ATTENDANCE Sept 2017

Name of trainee

Placement B/D/E:

W/B

W/B

W/B

W/B

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Tue

Tue

Tue

Tue

Wed

Wed

Wed

Wed

Thurss

Thurs

Thurs

Thurs

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

W/B

W/B

W/B

W/B

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Tue

Tue

Tue

Tue

Wed

Wed

Wed

Wed

Thurs

Thurs

Thurs

Thurs

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

W/B

W/B

W/B

W/B

Mon

Mon

Mon

Mon

Tue

Tue

Tue

Tue

Wed

Wed

Wed

Wed

Thurs

Thurs

Thurs

Thurs

Fri

Fri

Fri

Fri

Total number of days for this placement:

AT/Mentor signature:

PG Programme: Please note PG SEL days count towards your time spent in school

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CURRICULUM COVERAGE Sept 2017

RE

Art

PSHCE

Music

MFL

History

Geography

D&T

PE

Computing

Science

Maths

SPAG

Guided Reading

Phonics

Literacy

Beginning Placement

English/

Name of trainee:

Observed teacher Participated Planned and taught a lesson Mentor Lesson Observation Form Completed

SPAG

Maths

Science

Computing

PE

D&T

Geography

History

MFL

Music

PSHCE

Art

RE

SPAG

Maths

Science

Computing

PE

D&T

Geography

History

MFL

Music

PSHCE

Art

RE

Phonics Phonics

Guided Reading

Literacy Literacy

Guided Reading

English/ English/

Developing Placement

Observed teacher Participated Planned and taught a lesson Created MTP and taught unit Mentor Lesson Observation Form Completed

Target curriculum coverage on next placement:

Extending Placement

Observed teacher Participated Planned and taught a lesson Created MTP and taught unit Mentor Lesson Observation Form Completed

Target curriculum coverage in NQT year:

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EYFS COVERAGE of Areas of Learning Sept 2017

Expressive Arts & Design

Indoors

Outdoor

Care Routines – sleep and rest

Care routines – food and drink

Care routines – personal hygiene

Partnership parents

Partnership – other prof

Expressive Arts & Design

Indoors

Outdoor

Care Routines – sleep and rest

Care routines – food and drink

Care routines – personal hygiene

Partnership parents

Partnership – other prof

Indoors

Outdoors

Care Routines – sleep and rest

Care routines – food and drink

Care routines – personal hygiene

Partnership - parents

Partnership – other prof

Maths Maths Maths

Expressive Arts & Design

Literacy Literacy Literacy

Understanding the World

Personal, Social, Emotional Personal, Social, Emotional Personal, Social, Emotional

Understanding

Physical Development Physical Development Physical Development

Beginning Placement

Communication

Name of trainee:

Observed teacher/key person/ practitioner Participated Planned and taught an adult-led activity/experience Planned and facilitated an enhancement to continuous provision – adult led activity/experience Planned and facilitated an enhancement to continuous provision – child led activity/experience Retrospective planning capturing the spontaneous learning from child-initiated activity/experience

Developing Placement

Communication

Mentor Observation Form Completed

Observed teacher/key person/ practitioner Participated Planned and taught an adult-led activity/experience Planned and facilitated an enhancement to continuous provision – adult led activity/experience Planned and facilitated an enhancement to continuous provision – child led activity/experience Retrospective planning capturing the spontaneous learning from child-initiated activity/experience Mentor Observation Form Completed

Communication

Extending Placement

Understanding the World

Target possible coverage on next phase/placement:

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Observed teacher/key person/ practitioner Participated Planned and taught an adult-led activity/experience Planned and facilitated an enhancement to continuous provision – adult led activity/experience Planned and facilitated an enhancement to continuous provision – child led activity/experience Retrospective planning capturing the spontaneous learning from child-initiated activity/experience Mentor Observation Form Completed

Target development for post qualifying year:

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Placement Supplements

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BEGINNING Placements For Student teacher (Early Years and Primary Programmes) Beginning Placement context: For all student teachers on all ITE Programmes. •

Provide student teachers with their first school based experience and opportunity to support professional development since the start of their course.

Where possible it is expected that students will stay in the same school / setting throughout and may be in pairsor small groups (up to 4 students)

Gain experience of working across the school with different foci.

Teach up to 50% of the time spent in schools- This will often be in the same class / with same group- to help the students develop an understanding of profiling and progression.

Academic Year 2017/18

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Key Expectations (of Students) e.g. S4= Standard 4 Students on this placement will be expected to: • S4 Support and lead learning for individuals, small groups and, eventually, whole classes adopting a limited range of teaching styles as appropriate. • S4 Develop plans that identify clear learning objectives, activities, assessment opportunities and organisation. • S3 Demonstrate sound personal understanding of relevant areas of learning and a growing awareness of how these are taught. • S6 Use a limited range of assessment opportunities to identify and inform feedback and planning (e.g. observation, marking and questioning). • S1 Select and use resources and space effectively to support safe and active learning. • S5 Become aware of, and take into account different abilities, backgrounds and needs. • S7 Model and set expectations for good behaviour throughout the school environment in keeping with existing policies and routines. • S2a,b,S4d, S8d Begin and sustain a systematic approach to reflection and evaluation of their teaching and its impact. • S8 Demonstrate an early ability to work with colleagues and other professionals: seeking and accepting advice and sharing outcomes. PLACEMENT ROLESANDRESPONSIBILITIES StudentTeachers Ensure pre-placement contact with the Mentor and Partnership Tutor (UPT)/ Partner Programme Lead (PPL); and to notify UPT / PPL of any concerns. Maintain a professional demeanour and appearance. Sustain a timely cycle of: planning, preparation, teaching and evaluation. Develop appropriate and constructive relationships with learners and other professionals. Seek and take into account advice and guidance from experienced colleagues. Engagement in reflection on professional development, tracking pupilprogress and target setting. To maintain a Placement File and complete the weekly review in the Student Progress Assessment Record (SPAR) directly linked to the teacher standard grid. To profile 3 children (see Profiling Guidance) Schools, Mentors and Class Teachers [CT] To provide an appropriate setting and context for the student to develop the necessary experienceincluding: An effective welcome / induction opportunity Guidance and materials to inform the student’s preparation, teaching and contribution to children’s learning and welfare. Opportunity, feedback and guidance to support and engage the student in reflection, target setting To undertake weekly tutorials and review sessions focused on Trainee’s impact on pupil progress. To ensure that at least 2 formal observations of teaching and learning occur over the phase. (weekly if a student is flagged as CFC) Monitor Student’s files and completion of Student Progress Assessment (SPAR) To complete the assessment requirements as set out in the relevant Assessment Schedule below. To raise any formal “Cause for Concern in keeping with the guidance (See Guidance for Students who are a “Cause for Concern”) To liaise with the assigned University Partnership Tutor (UPT) / Partner Programme Lead (PPL) University Partnership Tutors [UPT] / Partner Programme Lead [PPL] for SD Alliances Ensure pre-placement contact with student teacher. Provide contact details. Make early contact with the Mentor to support the start of the placement as appropriate. Respond to placement issues as required and support the formal process for dealing with a “Cause for Concern” if raised. Conduct QA visits to moderate grades Assist in the moderation of placement assessment. Ensure that all grades are collated in time for module assessment boards and are presented to PAd In School Direct Alliances, being a UPT and Personal Academic Tutor is part of the role of the Partner Programme Lead (PPL). Back to First Page 18


CONTACTS

Placement Offers,

Allocations, Students

(Lancaster Students & SD) Placement Unit University of Cumbria Bowerham Road Lancaster LA1 3JD

Placement Unit University of Cumbria Fusehill Street CA1 2HH

Tel 01524 385697 Email partnershiplancaster@cumbria.ac.uk

Tel 01228 616258 Email partnershipcarlisle@cumbria.ac.uk

(Lancaster Students & SD) Return Reports & KAP Grade Forms

(Carlisle Students)

(Carlisle students)

kaplancaster@cumbria.ac.uk

kapcarlisle@cumbria.ac.uk

copy to PPL or UPT

Written enquiries to Programme Administration (PAd)

Written enquiries to Programme Administration (PAd)

(London Students) Placement Unit University of Cumbria East India Dock Road London E146JE Tel 0207 4804 Email partnershiplondon@cumbria.a c.uk (London Students) (as above) kaplondon@cumbria.a c.uk

PLACEMENTDEVELOPMENTANDDOCUMENTATION

1. Student Progress Assessment Record [SPAR]: This standalone booklet builds and retains a record of the student’s development throughout each placement. It contains: •

• • • • •

Placement Weekly Review forms to stimulate and capture the student’s reflection on progress against the Assessment Criteria and informed by self-evaluation, feedback and tutorials. The process incorporates a systematic engagement in reviewing and setting targets. Trainee Development Targets Running Record: for students to enter agreed (with Mentor) targets based on feedback, discussion, scrutiny of files and their wider reflection on their progress. Register where the Mentor monitors attendance on placement. Common Framework Assessment Descriptors forannotating, assessing and tracking progress to support feedback, reflection, target setting and summative assessment. Key Assessment Point Grade Record completed by the Mentor for capturing summative assessment. Placement Report Performa Tracking Pupil Progress[TPP]- Working with individuals and groups; This may be parts of lessons…; Specific focus on gathering/evaluation of pupil progress in week 2&4; Keep an ongoing reflective evaluation log; Annotate learning plans to show impact of teaching on progress. Link to Cumbria Teacher of Reading (CTOR)- You will be teaching a sequence of 3 sessionsevaluate your impact on pupil progress.

The student is responsible for collating and completing this record (See Below: “Completion and Return ofDocumentation”)

2. The Placement File: From first contact (visit days) and throughout the placement each student is

required to maintain a file which typically holds: • Current SPAR • Sections as specified in pre placement checklist. • Placement Tasks (where relevant). N.B. This collection of lesson observation feedback, weekly reviews and annotation of the assessment descriptors will monitor and trackthe student’s professional development and provide a regular assessment profile which will readily inform and build up the required summative assessment of the placement. Mentors and University Partnership Tutors / Partner Programme Lead are asked to keep a check on the student’s completion of theseimportantdocuments. COMPLETION ANDRETURNOFPLACEMENT DOCUMENTATION

All assessment placement forms (below) can be downloaded from the Partnership Website and completed in electronicformat. Visit: http://tiny.cc/UOCPartnershipPaperwork All students have (hardcopy) Student Placement Assessment Record. Schools/settings should email completed Key Assessment Point Grade Record (KAPs) / end of Placement Reports to kaplancaster@cumbria.ac.uk (Lancaster students & SD) or kapcarlisle@cumbria.ac.uk(Carlisle students) kaplondon@cumbria.ac.uk(Londonstudents)and your UPT / PPL.

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ASSESSMENTSCHEDULE Mentor

Destination

Due

Preplacement Checklist

1 copy to student*

1st week in school.

Observation Proforma [OP]

1 copy to student*

At least 2 over beginning phase

Key Assessment Point ( KAP B) Grade Record – Beginning KAP

1 copy to Student* 1 copy to University & UPT / PPL

End of Penultimate week of placement.

Cause for Concern Referral form (If Needed)

1 copy to Student* 1 copy to UPT / PPL 1 copy to PAd”campus”@cumbria.ac.uk

At any point that gives a student appropriate time to improve on targets set (usually flagged by mid-point)

Placement Report including KAP

Hard copy to be signed by Mentor and student and held in SPAR Email copy to University** Copy to UPT / PPL

With KAP grades

* To be held in SPAR **Email addresses: kaplancaster@cumbria.ac.uk (Lancaster students) or SD

Student

To make a complete record of all assessment, feedback and reflections in the SPAR Retain a copy for presentation on future placements Make a copy to be discussed and submitted to your Personal tutor at your post placement tutorial Carry out a placement evaluation as specified on back page of SPAR

kapcarlisle@cumbria.ac.uk (Carlisle students) kapLondon@cumbria.ac.uk (London students)

BEGINNING PLACEMENTS: WEEK AT A GLANCE All Beginning Placements: Each student will • • • • • • • • •

Dem onstrate a professional approach to appearance, behaviour, timekeeping and attendance. Arrive at least 30 m inutes before the start of the school/setting day. Allow time for completing relevant responsibilities at the end of the day(not to leave before 4.30pm unless circumstances are agreed with school) Follow the guidance set out in the Generic Placement Handbook for giving notice of absence. Be directly involved in teaching and learning support for up to 50% of the weeklytimetable. Allocate the remaining timeto observing teaching; familiarisation withschool organisation / routines; planning and preparation and evaluation of progress. Observe theteaching of Systematic Synthetic Phonics and Guided Reading. Beobserved (with feedback) teaching Phonics and Guided Reading. Undertake small scale Professional Developm ent Activities (PD A)set bytutors: to be shared and discussed with the Mentor at the beginning of the placement Maintain a reflective log of pupil progress targets and annotate session plans.

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UNDERGRADUATE1stEXPERIENCES Q3 – 2 weeks/Q4 -3weeks Week

Student’s Role

Week 1 •

Week 2

Observe lessons / sessions taught by the Class Teacher and discuss pedagogy, management and professional issues. Work with a small group and reflect on their learning

Observe the wider life of the setting e.g. playtimes

Discuss and prepare your Professional Development Activities (PDA)

Assist with teacher planned activities

Read a story to a group Or class

Where possible, supervise a group working independently on teacherled activities.

Gain an understanding of the children and their learning.

Email your UPT/PPL to Provide an update. an update.

As week 1  Support teacher plannedgroup activities.  Read whole class story

Mentors Role • Ensure student(s) have the necessary information to prepare for their placement.

 Weekly Tutorial, individually, pairs or group as applicable.

No formal observation required for this experience

 Raise CFC where necessary.

behaviour management, pedagogy, professional issues

 As week 1&2

UPT / PPL’s Role

 Arrange suitable opportunity to work with children.

 Assist / visit as necessary in response to issues that arise.

 Disseminate necessary information.  Support trainee in settling into a professional role.

 Observe your classteacher-notice

Week 3 Q4 students only

Class Teacher’s Role

 There is no end of

placement report forthis experiential placement.

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 Provide opportunities for the student(s) to observe your teaching and to work with children (including opportunities to gain experience and confidence in supporting reading development -phonics and group reading)

 Make telephone contact with the Mentor/Setti ng during the placement.  QA a sample of schools.


UNDERGRADUATE KAPB PHASE AND ALL POSTGRADUATE Week Visit week ( 3 days only for PGCE)

Student’sRole

Share your SPAR with Mentor/CT

Prepare and maintain a placement file.

Ensure you gather the information to support your placement preparation

Collect class data see TPP guidance

Identify 3 profile children including 1 pupil premium child where possible. Refer to guidance in SPAR

Identify your placement teaching timetable and content including PPA time

Observe lessons / sessions taught by the CT and discuss pedagogy, behaviour management and organisation.(Utilise “observing a colleague “profoma found in SPAR

Support learning in a TA role as directed by the CT

Mentors Role

 Ensure student(s) have the information necessary to prepare for their placement. Ensure Pre-placement Checklist is complete and sign. If not email UPT / PPL to discuss.

ClassTeacher’s role

UPT/PPL’ sole R

Arrange suitable opportunity to work with children.

Give contact details and advice/ support to all as required.

Disseminate necessary information to aid initial planning. Discuss initial planning ideas Support trainee in settling into a professional role.

Assist / visit as necessary in response to issues that arise.

• Discuss and prepare your Professional Development Activities (PDA) e.g. profiling and any university school based set assignments 

Week 1

Email your UPT / PPL. Providean update.

 Plan and teach a variety of activities to support learning in a range of curriculum areas.  Be directly involved in teaching and learning for up to 50% of the timetable. Balance of student’s own planning/following teacher plans

(From Week 2)

Undertake 2 observations during this placement. provide copy of your OP for student’s SPAR Provide weekly tutorial on key issues: Ongoing progress; Pupil Progress and

 Work with a small group and collect evidence of their learning. (See Tracking Pupil Progress [TPP] guidance)

impact of trainee’s

 Develop your awareness and possible involvement in the wider life of the school.

Review student’s file and completion of the SPAR.

 Observe at least 1 SSP / Guided reading lesson.

Contact UPT if any concerns arise. Raise CFC where necessary.

teaching Teaching of phonics and Guided Reading;

 Maintain Placement File.  Complete Weekly Review (SPAR) discuss in tutorial with Mentor and agree targets.

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Provide opportunities for the student(s) to observe your teaching and to work with children (including opportunities to gain experience and confidence in supporting reading development -phonics and group reading)

Ensure QA contact is conducted and logged. Review SPAR and file & discuss progress. Keep in touch and respond as necessary Support KAP assessment as necessary


Week 2

As week 1

Give feedback on teaching of phonics and Guided Reading during the placement

 Plan and teach daily activities to support literacy or numeracy and Foundation subjects e.g. Topic/theme- some whole class teaching, as appropriate.

Complete CFC referral form where necessary.

 Plan and teach 3 sequential SSP & guided reading sessions and receive feedback (CTR booklet)

Week 3

Week 4/5/6/7

PG students: Discuss and complete

As week 2 Focus weekly meeting on analysis of pupil progress. (See Tracking Pupil Progress [TPP] guidance)

As week 1 Provide opportunity for developing experience in teaching and learning, including some whole class teaching.

As week 2

Beginning KAP B Grades / End of Placement report. PG student and Mentor to sign.

What was it about your teaching that impacted on this progress? How do you know?

Email copy of report including grades to University & UPT / PPL

As week 3,4,5 Plan and teach daily activities to support literacy and numeracy including some whole class teaching.

Discuss and complete Beginning KAP Grades / End of Placement report. (Undergrad students) student and Mentor to sign Email copy of report including grades to University & UPT / PPL

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As week 3 Liaise as appropriate to inform and support completion of the KAP/End of Placement report


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Common Framework

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I

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Trainee Teachers' Standards Assessment Descriptors: Common Framework2017/18

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TRAINEE TEACHERS`STANDARDSASSESSMENT DESCRIPTORS: “COMMON FR AMEWORK”: 2017 – 2018 Making judgements about trainee attainment

Introduction The Common Framework is designed to support the University of Cumbria Partnership in securing accuracy and consistency in the assessment of their trainees. It is written in line with guidance from the NASBTT “Training and Assessment Toolkit” (2015). It is to be used in conjunction with UoC Partnership SPAR (Student Progress Assessment Record) and TPP (Tracking Pupil Progress) paperwork. The Common Framework is intended to enable all school and university trainers and Cumbria Trainee Teachers to discuss and track progress over time against the Teachers’ Standards and provide a formal recording mechanism for Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress and the impact of their teaching on pupil progress; The key factor in judging the quality of teaching over time is the impact trainees’ teaching has on the quality of pupils’ learning & progress. When assessing the quality of trainees’ teaching over time reference should be made to the teachers’ standards in full and the bulleted sub headings should be used to:

track trainees’ progress against the teacher’sstandards,

identify trainees ‘strengths

determine areas for additionaldevelopment,

enable the identification of aspects of outstanding practice for ‘good’ (grade 2) trainees and good practice for trainees who ‘require improvement’ (grade 3) in order to show that they are exceeding the minimum in aspects of the Teachers’ standards

The standards need to be applied as appropriate to the role and context within which the trainee is practising and they should be assessed against the standards in a way this is consistent with what could reasonably be expected of a trainee teacher prior to the award of QTS and for the stage of their training. Trainees’ teaching over time should be assessed holistically using professional judgements and focusing on the impact they have on the progress and learning over time of the pupils they teach. Judgements should take into account the context and content of their teaching over sequences of lessons taking into account the full range of evidence. This evidence may include planning, discussions with trainees and pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and in their work books, marking and feedbacketc. It is essential that all grades and comments regarding trainee progress are aligned with the grade descriptors for the grade being awarded in the "Common Framework". It is essential that all involved in the assessment process, including the trainees, fully understand and can explain how this assessment guidance and criteria are applied to ensure accuracy and consistency.

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Guidance notes: Reaching a judgement about a teacher trainee’s attainment •

The standards provide a benchmark of the minimum requirements that should be expected of trainees (andteachers).

The Standard descriptors should be used formatively by those assessing trainees to identify and monitor achievement and to support progress against the Standards. In practice they may be used to highlight the need for further observations, the focus for tutorials, and the process of target- setting. They will also confirm where a trainee is already demonstrating good and outstanding practice and provide direction to achieve grade 1.

The standards descriptors are a central aid in supporting students in their reflection and evaluation of their progress towards gaining QTS. They are to be used by all trainees in a systematic review of feedback, professional dialogue and personal evaluation which informs their understanding of achievement and identifies next steps. They help to place the trainee at the centreoftheprocess.

The Standard descriptors, are to be used to assess the outcome grade for the trainee at relevant stages using a ‘best fit’ approach. However, all descriptors must be graded 3 (minimum expectations) or higher by the conclusion of the training programme for the recommendation of the award of QTS and evidence against the descriptors commensurate with the grade must be provided at each assessedstage.

These grades along with identification of strengths and areas for development are recorded at each KAP using the End of placement report. Mentors are also asked to grade the impact that trainees` teaching has on pupils` progress over time.

The expectation is that all trainee teachersshouldaspire to be at least ‘good’ by the end of their training

The ‘how well does the trainee’ questions should be used formatively as the basis of discussions related to trainee progress.

Guidance for Part two: Personal and Professional Conduct •

A teacher is expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct. The statements in part two of the Standards define the behaviour and attitudes that set the requiredstandard for conduct throughout a teacher’s career.

Much of the evidence for this section will be found in other Standards and evidence specific to this section will be exemplified on a day to day basis. Please note that additional evidence does not need to be collated for this standard.

Teachers’ Standards (2012) Assessment Descriptors for Trainee Teachers

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Roles and responsibilities at a glance UoC Partnerships should: • • •

exercise a duty of care for all of their trainees, their personalised training needs and their well-being; support trainees withrespect, being mindful of the stage of their training and how this is impacting on the challenges they might be facing; ensure that trainees are equipped to enjoy the rewards and challenges of the teaching profession and recognising the need to nurture the next generation of committed, resilient, high-qualityteachers.

Trainees should: • understand and take responsibility for the impactof their teaching on pupil progress and learning over time; • utilise all aspects of their training, in school, in the centre and in independent study, to support their progress as reflective practitioners alongside their professional development towards becomingoutstandingteachers. School-based staff should: • provide effective school-basedtraining; • support trainees so that they have a positive impact on pupil progress and learning from the outset; • identify and addresstrainees’ needs to support them in becoming good or outstanding NQTs. Provider staff should: • work with all members of the partnership to ensure that all traineesmake good or better progress; • utilise partnership data to inform training that impacts positivelyon trainee outcomesand the progressof the pupils they teach

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University of Cumbria- Assessment of QTS standards for Trainees Trainees’ progress will be assessed through reviewing the impact of the trainees’ teaching on pupil progress and learning over time which, in turn, informs trainees’ ongoing achievement and final attainment. Accurate and consistent judgements of Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress, achievement and final attainment are achieved by the use of the ‘Common Framework’ (Teachers’ Standards Assessment Grid) by all trainers/ mentors across the partnership. The grid provides a shared language to discuss and track Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress through their training programme and into their NQT year. The Teachers’ Standards, Part One (graded 1-4) and the subheadings are set out in the Common Framework (Teachers’ Standards Assessment Grid). Part Two states that professional and personal conduct is expected to be at least good from the start of the course. Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ teaching is assessed in relation to: • • •

The context and content of their teaching over sequences of lessons. Judgements are not made on individual lessons. The contribution it makes to pupil progress over time (including tracking through class and pupil profiling paperwork); good or better than expected pupil progress = grade 1, at least expected pupil progress =grade2 The full range of evidence, (including for example, pupils’ responses in lessons and from their work books; the quality and impact of marking). The bulleted subheadings of the eight Teachers’ Standards are used to track progress against the Teachers’ Standards formatively. Aspects where trainees are demonstrating ‘higher level’, ‘good level’, ‘requires improvement’ or ‘inadequate’ elements of their practice are identified. This supports the ongoing cycle of determining strengths and areas for targeting additional development. The Teachers’ Standards are applied to the context of the school and phase within which a Cumbria Trainee Teacher is practising. Assessment against the Teachers’ Standards is consistent with what can reasonably be expected of a Trainee Teacher prior to the award of QTS. •Assessments are informed by evidenced professional judgements. Judgements need to reflect trainees’ overallcompetence.

The Common Framework is intended to enable all school and university trainers and Cumbria Trainee Teachers to discuss and track progress over time against the Teachers’ Standards and provide a formal recording mechanism for Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress and the impact of their teaching on pupil progress. Areas of strength and areas for development are highlighted in order to Identify short-term and longer-term developmental targets. The standards descriptors are a central aid in supporting trainees in their reflection and evaluation of their progress towards gaining QTS. They are used by all trainees in a systematic review of feedback, professional dialogue and personal evaluation which informs their understanding of achievement and identifies next steps. They help to place the trainee at the centre of the process. The Standard descriptors are used to assess the outcome grade for the trainee at phase stages using a ‘best fit’ approach. However, all descriptors must be graded 3 (minimum expectations) or higher by the conclusion of the training programme for the recommendation of the award of QTS and evidence against the descriptors commensurate with the grade must be provided at each assessed stage. The Student Progress Assessment Record (SPAR) and Professional Portfolio are the key locations for storage of all evidence arising from the progress review and assessment cycle. It is always available for scrutiny by trainers and external moderators. At the end of each placement each standard is graded 1-4 resulting in Key Assessment Points (KAP) grades leading to the setting of clear developmental targets linked to pupil progress with specific actions to support trainee progress. Targets from extending phase placement are aligned to a trainees Career Entry action plan in readiness for their NQT year. The final grade is determined by taking into account the individual grades for each standard (all standards are equally weighted) using a ‘best fit’ approach; based on the trainees teaching impact on pupil progress. Moderation of trainee outcomes, within and across schools is directly supported by the University Partnership Tutor (UPT), the Partnership Leads and external examiners. 5 Back to First Page 31


The profile of the trainees will develop as follows: By the end of Beginning assessment phase, in the age phase they have taught: • • •

• •

it is anticipated that all trainees will meet the minimum levelof practice expected; for any trainees struggling to meet the minimum level at this stage, consideration should be given as to whether the UoC cause for concern procedure should be instigated or whether there is mentor/tutor agreement that intensive support and targeted are likely to secure rapid progress togood a significant number of trainees will `Require improvement’ through intensive and targeted advice and support to move their teaching to good/higher level as their teaching is not yet good and the impact on pupil progress over time is not always as expected. This is likely as they are still at an early stage of their training. Tracking would indicate that they are on a trajectory to be at least good by the end of the programme; for some trainees, much of their teaching over time is good; some is at a higher level; the pupils they teach make at least expected progressover time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure greaterconsistency and to move their teaching to a higher level; for a small number of trainees, teaching over time is at a higher level and never less than consistently good; the pupils they teach make good or better than expected progress over time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching.

By the end of the Developing assessment phase, in the age phase they have taught • • •

• • •

it is expected that all trainees will meet the minimum level of practice expected; if any trainees are still struggling to meet the minimum level, they should be placed on cause for concern if this has not already been actioned. a small number of trainees may ‘Require improvement’ through intensive and targeted advice and support to move their teaching to good/higher as their teaching is not yet good and the impact on pupil progress over time is not always as expected. Tracking would indicate that they are on a trajectory to be at least good by the end of the programme; for the majority of trainees, much of their teaching over time is good; some is at a higher level; the pupils they teach make at least expected progress over time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure greater consistency and to move their teaching to ahigherlevel; for the remainder of trainees, teaching over time is at a higher level and never less than consistently good; the pupils they teach make good or better than expected progress over time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching.

By the end of the Extending assessment phase, in the age phase they have taught • all trainees will exceed the minimum level of practice expected in order to be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS); • none of the trainees should ‘Require improvement’. In the exception, intensive and targeted advice and support will be provided to move any grade 3 trainee’s teaching to good, including, targets set to support into the NQT year and employingschoolasrequired; • for some trainees, much of their teaching over time is good; some is at a higher level; the pupils they teach make at least expected progress over time; they will have agreed targets to take into their NQT year which will be forwarded to the employing school; • for the majority of trainees, teaching over time is at a higher level and never less than consistently good; the pupils they teach make good or better than expected progress over time; they will have agreed targets and associated advice to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop the quality of their teaching. • Strengths and targets for the NQT year will be forwarded to the employing school or setting. UoC will offer ongoing support as appropriate to the context in which the partnership operates. Back to First Page 6 32


Assessing trainees: important considerations (NASBTT: Training and Assessment Toolkit (Second Edition, March 2016) A. The key factor in judging the quality of teaching over time is the impact teaching has on the quality of learning of pupils/learners. (ITEIH, Paragraph 125) B. When assessing the quality of primary and secondary trainees’ teaching over time, reference should be made to the Teachers’ Standards in full. The bulleted sub-headings should be usedto: • track progress against theTeachers’Standards;* • determine areas for additionaldevelopment;* • identify strengths which indicate excellentpractice;* • enable the identification of aspects of, for example, outstanding practice for ‘Good’ (grade 2) trainees and good practice for trainees with ‘ Requires improvement’ (grade 3) in order to show that they are exceedingthe minimum in aspects of the Teachers’ Standards. * ITEIH, Paragraph 129, paraphrased. C. ‘The standards need to be applied as appropriate to the role and context within which a trainee or teacher is practising. Providers of initial teacher training (ITT) should assess trainees against the standards in a way that is consistent with what could reasonably be expected of a trainee teacher prior to the award of QTS.’ (Teachers’ Standards, Paragraph6) D. Trainees’ teaching over timeshould be assessed holistically focusingon: • the impact they have on the progress and learning over time of the pupils for whichthey are responsible; • the context and content of their teaching, over sequences of lessons; the quality of teaching must be judged in terms of attainment in relation to the relevant Teachers’ Standards and not on individuallessons. When making judgements, the full range of evidence should be utilised, including planning, discussions with trainees and pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and in their work books, the quality and impact of trainees’ marking and feedback, trainees’ assessment and planning records and evidence of their own and their pupils’ progress and learning over time. E. Assessment must be informed by evidenced, professional judgements which are accurate and rigorous. Judgements need to be based on the quality of the trainees’ teaching overall and reflect their impact on pupil progress and learning over time. F. It is essential that all grades, comments (regarding trainee and pupil progress and learning) and targets are aligned with the grade descriptors for the grade being awarded. G. All trainees must be prepared in accordance with C2.2 of the ‘ITT criteria supporting advice’, June 2015: “Training must enable trainees to acquire the knowledge and skills they need to teach within the phase [and full ability range] for which they are training.”

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Guidance for the weekly meetings: reviewing progress and assessment On a weekly basis whilst in school, trainees must have a formal weekly review meeting with their mentor and, as appropriate, their partnership tutor during QA visits. This will feature discussion about the trainees’ and pupils’ well-being and be a celebration of successes and classroom highlights based on fostering pupil curiosity and the love of learning. Trainees must bring evidence of their progress and the progress and learning of the pupils they teach for discussion and appraisal. The following need to be considered when evaluating the quality of trainees’ teaching over time and its impact: •the context and content of the sessions/lessons; where they fit within a sequence of lessons; • the contribution of trainees’ teaching to the learning of the pupils and the progress they make over time: good or better than expected pupil progress =grade 1, at least

expected pupil progress = grade 2; • observations of pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and pupils’ workbooks, with particular reference to the quality and impact of the trainees’ marking, the trainees’ assessment

records and annotated planning; trainees’ strengths against the Teachers’ Standards and sub-headings of the Teachers’ Standards and how they can improve. It is critical to avoid an atomistic approach; initial discussions should focus on the quality of the trainees’ teaching and its impact on pupils’ progress and learning over time and the aspects ofthe trainees’ teaching which support this or need to be developed further. This can then be mapped to the Teachers’Standards. Each weekly meeting should also include: • •

• • •

monitoring of impact and progress; reviewing and agreeing appropriately challenging short and longer term developmental targets, along with agreeing and recording what needs to be done by the trainee and others to enable him/her to achieve his/her targets. Targets need to be fit for purpose, have a Standards focus and, as appropriate, be subject-specific. Targets should be written using the language of the Standards and gradedescriptors; identifying evidence of progress; agreeing and recording related training and actions; agreeing and recording the impact of the training on the trainees’ teaching and, consequently, on pupil progress and learning over time.

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Inadequate (4)   

The trainee cannot carry outor exemplify the standard. They are to be deemed as a CFCin these standards. Pupils make no (or little)progress over time.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3) 

 

The trainee shows an abilityto carry out or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Trainees would be targeted to ‘move to good or better’outcomes in these standards. Pupils do make progress overtime; but not always as expected.

Traineesmeetingthe expectations for QTS at a Good level (2)   

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard most ofthe time. Sometimes teaching is judgedas better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progressover time.

Traineesmeetingthe expectations for QTS ata High level(1)  

The trainee can carry outor exemplify the standard consistently. Pupils make good (orbetter) progress over time

It is vital that a student is considered as a training teacher when using this framework. They are not yet fully qualified teachers. The standards need to be applied as appropriate to the role and context within which the trainee is practising and they should be assessed against the standards in a way that is consistent with what could reasonably be expected of a trainee teacher prior to the award of QTS and for the stage of their training.

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 

The trainee cannot carry out or exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progressover time.

Inadequate(4)

S1: Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge

S1

Standard Prompts a) Establish a safe and Is unable to establish a safe and stimulating stimulating environment for environment for pupils. pupils, rooted in mutual respect.

 

The trainee shows an ability tocarryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3) Is able to establish a safe and stimulating environment for pupils, rooted in mutual respect; some of the time.

b) Set goals that stretch and Is unable to set goals that stretch and challenge Some of the time, is able to set goals that challenge pupils of all pupils of all backgrounds, abilities and stretch and challenge pupils of all backgrounds, abilities and dispositions. backgrounds, abilities and dispositions. dispositions. c) Demonstrate consistently Is unable to demonstrate consistently the the positive attitudes, positive attitudes, values and behaviour which valuesand behaviour which are expected of pupils. are expected ofpupils.

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judged as better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progress overtime.

Traineesmeetingthe expectations for QTS ata Good level(2) Uses a range of strategies to establish a safe environment which, much of the time, is stimulating and rooted in mutual respect.

Sets goals that stretch, challenge and motivate pupils. Much of the time uses strategies to support the learning and progress of underperforming groups. Is able to demonstrate the positive attitudes, Much of the time demonstrates and models the values and behaviour which are expected of positive attitudes, values and behaviour which pupils. (some of the time) are expected of pupils.

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 

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better)progress over time

Traineesmeetingthe expectations for QTS ata High level(1) Consistently uses innovative strategies to establish a safe and stimulating environment for pupils, rooted in mutual respect, which motivates and inspires pupils to learn and enjoy the subject.

Consistently sets goals that stretch, challenge and motivate pupils. uses effective strategies to support the learning and progress of underperforming groups. Consistently and effectively demonstrates and models the positive attitudes, values and behaviour which are expected of pupils.


S1: Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

Planning documentation • Clear classroomrisks, resources and routinesidentified • Resources planned to engage and stimulatesensitivethe needs ofpupils • Activitiesplanned that are challenging and engagingforall pupils

• • • • • •

• • •

Establishfair,respectful,trusting,supportiveandconstructiveprofessional relationshipswithpupils? Help learnersto showrespect and sensitivityin theirrelationshipswith oneanother and theteacher? Demonstrate apurposefuland safeatmospherecharacterisedby respectand cooperation? Succeed in teaching learners to co-operate, to collaborateand listentoothers? Plan work ata suitablyhighlevel forage and ability and to externalbenchmarks such as NCleveldescriptors that stretch and challengeall pupils? Maintainhighexpectationsandpersonalisethelearningtakingaccount arangeof diverseneedsthrough aninclusiveapproach? Understand and demonstrate the values and attitudes that they expect from pupils, respect for others, positive attitude towards learning, care for the environment and social responsibility? Resolveconflictsandindividual learner’sproblemssensitively toprotecttheirselfesteem? Establish high expectation forlearner’sbehaviour? Demonstrate an understanding oftheneedsofall pupilsand minoritygroups?

Reflective Documents • Evaluationsreflect upon thelearning environment • Evaluationsidentify differentprogressbetween pupilsand groupsofpupils Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • Health and safetyriskscommunicated to pupils • • • •

Pupilsaware of tasks and on task Expectationsmadeclear topupils Trainee iscourteousto all pupilsand demonstratesenthusiasm Traineechallengesinappropriatebehaviourincludingsexist,racist,homophobicor otherinappropriatepersonalcomments

Pupilassessmentrecords • Assessmentisundertaken regularlyandpupilprogressmonitoredinorderplan future learning • Includeappropriatetargetsin pupilbooks

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 

The trainee cannot carry out orexemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progressover time.

Inadequate (4) S2

Standard Prompts a) Be accountable for pupils’ attainment, progress and outcomes.

Is unable to take accountability for pupils’ attainment, progress and outcomes.

 

The trainee shows an ability to carryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3)

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard most ofthe time. Sometimes teaching is judgedas better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progressover time.

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS ata Good level (2)

Is able to take accountability for pupils’ Is accountable for pupils’ attainment, attainment, progress and outcomes; some of progress and outcomes. the time. Follows school policy and practice. Aware of school policy and practice and is broadly in line with this. Beginning to annotate Lesson plans identifying pupil progress and outcomes.

progress and

S2: Promotegood

b) Plan teaching to build on pupils’ capabilities and prior knowledge.

Is unable to demonstrate an awareness of Some of the time aware of pupils’ capabilities Has a good understanding of the pupils’ pupils’ capabilities and their prior knowledge, and their prior knowledge, and plans teaching capabilities and their prior knowledge. and is unable to plan teaching to build on these. to build on these. Assess pupils’ achievement and plan and Some of the time uses previous planning to teach lessons that enable pupils, including inform next steps. those who are disabled and those who have special educational needs, to make at least expected progress. Plans are annotated to support progression for all learners. Is able to guide pupils to reflect on the Pupils are offered intervention and feedbac progress they have made and their emerging which, much of the time, enables them t needs, some of the time identify the progress they have made an understand what they need to do t improve.

c) Guide pupils to reflect on the progress they have made and their emerging needs.

Is unable to guide pupils to reflect on the progress they have made and their emerging needs.

d) Demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how pupils learn and how this impacts on teaching.

Is unable to demonstrate knowledge and Is able to demonstrate knowledge and understanding of how pupils learn and how this understanding of how pupils learn and how impacts on teaching this impacts on teaching, some of the time.

e) Encourage pupils to take a responsible and conscientious attitude

Is unable to encourage pupils to take a responsible and conscientious attitude to their own work and study.

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better)progress over time

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at aHigh level (1) Is consistently accountable for pupils’ attainment, progress and outcomes. Fully understands and is able to model schoollevel policy and practice and guide other professional colleagues such as teaching assistants. Provides extensive, varied examples of how sustained progression for all groups of learners has been secured. Contributing to comprehensive pupil teaching system. Has a detailed understanding of the pupils’ capabilities and their prior knowledge. Learning plans how: Plan – do – review cycle. demonstrate through their planning and teaching that their pupils, including those who are disabled and those who have special educational needs, make good progress.

Pupils are consistently offered high quality intervention and feedback which enables them to identify the progress they have made and understand what they need to do to improve.

Much of the time makes good use o Pupils consistently and effectively able to use knowledge and understanding of how pupils knowledge and understanding of how pupils learn learn to inform their teaching. to improve their teaching. Able to use well targeted interventions to facilitate learning for all groups.

Some of the time is able to encourage pupils to take a responsible and conscientious attitude to their own work and study.

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Much of the time encourages pupils, to take a responsible and conscientious attitude to work and study by setting expectations.

Consistently and effectively encourages pupils, by setting specific high expectations, to take a responsible and conscientious attitude to work and study.


S2: Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

• • •

Planning documentation • Assessmentdata isused to informplanning • Planningofhigh orderanddiagnosticquestions • Linkinglearning sequences • Lesson planning takesaccountof wider objectiveslinked to socialand personal skills • Lessonplanspromoteindependentandcollaborativeworking • Structure oflessonthat reflects theneeds ofpupilsand their learning e.g.appropriate pace andresources Reflective Documents • Evaluationsidentify futurelearningtargets • Awarenessofsocial,emotional,culturalandlinguisticfactorsthatinfluencepupil performance Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • Observation identifiesclear introduction andsequencesoflearning • Questioningbuildson answersand pupilsasked to build uponand reflectupon their answers • Effective use ofplenariesto reflect upon learning • Pupilsareattentiveat the start of episodesof learning • Opportunitiesbuiltinto lessonsto celebrate success Pupilassessmentrecords • Summativeandformativeassessmentisundertaken regularly • Record keepingisup to dateand used formatively • Constructive verbaland written feedback provided topupils • Buildinginopportunitiesforpupilstoreflectupontheirprogressandidentifyareas for development

• • •

• •

Have a secureunderstanding ofhowlearners learn? Take account ofpriorlearningin planning and teaching? Constructandscaffoldlearningand analyselearner’sprogressand makeaccurate assessmentsoftheir learningand achievements? Monitorandassessprogressand givefeedback sothat allpupilsmakegood progressin their learning? Plan for continuity and progressionacrossthekey stage(s)buildingon pupils’prior knowledgeand attainment? Devise opportunities for individuals, groups and whole classes to recall, review and draw conclusionsabout what they have achievedand guide and supportthemin what they needto do next to improve? Encourage pupilsto takepridein their workand achievements? Engagelearnersin settingobjectivesforthedevelopmentoftheirownlearningand development?

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 

The trainee cannot carry outor exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progress overtime.

Inadequate (4)

S3

The trainee shows an ability to carry outor exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Does not have a secure knowledge of the relevant subject(s) and curriculum areas, does not foster and maintain pupils’ interest in the subject, and does not address misunderstandings.

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judged as better/higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progress overtime.

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better) progress overtime

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a Good level (2)

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a High Level (1)

Has a secure knowledge of the relevant Teach well, demonstrating: subject(s) and curriculum areas. Some of the - good subject and curriculum knowledge; time fosters and maintains pupils’ interest in - phase expertise. the subject, and addresses misunderstandings.

Consistently teach exceptionally well, demonstrating: - strong subject and curriculum knowledge; - phase expertise.

TraineeRequiresImprovement (3)

Standard Prompts a) Have a secure knowledge of the relevant subject(s) and curriculum areas, foster and maintain pupils’ interest in the subject, and address misunderstandings

S3: Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge

Works within the current and new curriculum Is confident to work within the current and new curriculum. arrangements. Much of the time demonstrates the ability to address misunderstandings and maintain pupils’ interest.

b) Demonstrate a critical understanding of developments in the subject and curriculum areas, and promote the value of scholarship

Is unable to demonstrate a critical understanding of developments in the subject and curriculum areas, and does not promote the value of scholarship.

Demonstrates, some of the time, a critical Demonstrates, much of the time, critical understanding of developments in the subject understanding of developments in the subject and curriculum areas, and promotes the value and curriculum areas. of scholarship. Much of the time promotes the value of scholarship.

c) Demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility forpromoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialistsubject

Is unable to demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject.

Is able to demonstrate a basic understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject.

d) If teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding ofsystematic synthetic phonics

Is unable to, if teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding of systematic synthetic phonics.

Is able to, if teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding of systematic synthetic phonics.

Demonstrates the ability to address misunderstandings and maintain pupils’ interest in the subject by delivering engaging teaching episodes, ensuring progression is made by all learners. Effectively demonstrates consistent and critical understanding of developments in the subject and curriculum areas. Consistently and effectively promotes the value of scholarship.

Demonstrates a good understanding of how to Consistently demonstrates a thorough develop the reading, writing, communication … understanding of how to teach reading, writing, skills of the pupils they teach. communication … effectively to enhance the progress of pupils they teach. Much of their teaching demonstrates an Consistently demonstrates an understanding of understanding of and takes responsibility for and takes responsibility for promoting high promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct and the correct use of Standard English, use of Standard English, whatever the teacher’s whatever the teacher’s specialist subject. specialist. Trainee can teach early reading, systematic Trainee can teach early reading, systematic synthetic synthetic phonics, communication and language phonics, communication and language development … with increasing confidence and development … confidently and competently so that competence so that pupils make at least expected pupils make good or better than expected progress. progress. Consistently demonstrates a thorough understanding of the role of systematic synthetic phonics in the teaching Demonstrates a good understanding of the role of of early reading. systematic synthetic phonics in the teaching of early reading.

e) If teaching early mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate teaching strategies. *‘Early’ is frequently replaced by‘Primary’

Is unable to, if teaching early* mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate teaching strategies.

Is able to, if teaching early mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate teaching strategies.

Trainee can teach primary mathematics … with Trainee can teach primary mathematics … increasing confidence and competence so that confidently and competently so that pupils make pupils make at least expected progress. good or better than expected progress. Demonstrates a good understanding of strategies for the teaching of early mathematics.

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Consistently demonstrates a thorough understanding of appropriate teaching strategies for the teaching of early mathematics.


TRAINEE TEACHERS`STANDARDSASSESSMENT DESCRIPTORS: “COMMON FR AMEWORK”: 2017 – 2018 Making judgements about trainee attainment Introduction The Common Framework is designed to support the University of Cumbria Partnership in securing accuracy and consistency in the assessment of their trainees. It is written in line with guidance from the NASBTT “Training and Assessment Toolkit” (2015). It is to be used in conjunction with UoC Partnership SPAR (Student Progress Assessment Record) and TPP (Tracking Pupil Progress) paperwork. The Common Framework is intended to enable all school and university trainers and Cumbria Trainee Teachers to discuss and track progress over time against the Teachers’ Standards and provide a formal recording mechanism for Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress and the impact of their teaching on pupil progress; The key factor in judging the quality of teaching over time is the impact trainees’ teaching has on the quality of pupils’ learning & progress. When assessing the quality of trainees’ teaching over time reference should be made to the teachers’ standards in full and the bulleted sub headings should be used to:

track trainees’ progress against the teacher’sstandards,

identify trainees ‘strengths

determine areas for additionaldevelopment,

enable the identification of aspects of outstanding practice for ‘good’ (grade 2) trainees and good practice for trainees who ‘require improvement’ (grade 3) in order to show that they are exceeding the minimum in aspects of the Teachers’ standards

The standards need to be applied as appropriate to the role and context within which the trainee is practising and they should be assessed against the standards in a way this is consistent with what could reasonably be expected of a trainee teacher prior to the award of QTS and for the stage of their training. Trainees’ teaching over time should be assessed holistically using professional judgements and focusing on the impact they have on the progress and learning over time of the pupils they teach. Judgements should take into account the context and content of their teaching over sequences of lessons taking into account the full range of evidence. This evidence may include planning, discussions with trainees and pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and in their work books, marking and feedback etc. It is essential that all grades and comments regarding trainee progress are aligned with the grade descriptors for the grade being awarded in the "Common Framework". It is essential that all involved in the assessment process, including the trainees, fully understand and can explain how this assessment guidance and criteria are applied to ensure accuracy and consistency.

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Guidance notes: Reaching a judgement about a teacher trainee’s attainment • The standards provide a benchmark of the minimum requirements that should be expected of trainees (andteachers). • The Standard descriptors should be used formatively by those assessing trainees to identify and monitor achievement and to support progress against the Standards. In practice they may be used to highlight the need for further observations, the focus for tutorials, and the process of target- setting. They will also confirm where a trainee is already demonstrating good and outstanding practice and provide direction to achieve grade 1.

• The standards descriptors are a central aid in supporting students in their reflection and evaluation of their progress towards gaining QTS. They are to be used by all trainees in a systematic review of feedback, professional dialogue and personal evaluation which informs their understanding of achievement and identifies next steps. They help to place the trainee at the centreoftheprocess.

• The Standard descriptors, are to be used to assess the outcome grade for the trainee at relevant stages using a ‘best fit’ approach. However, all descriptors must be graded 3 (minimum expectations) or higher by the conclusion of the training programme for the recommendation of the award of QTS and evidence against the descriptors commensurate with the grade must be provided at each assessedstage.

• These grades along with identification of strengths and areas for development are recorded at each KAP using the End of placement report. Mentors are also asked to grade the impact that trainees` teaching has on pupils` progress over time.

• The expectation is that all trainee teachersshouldaspire to be at least ‘good’ by the end of their training • The ‘how well does the trainee’ questions should be used formatively as the basis of discussions related to trainee progress. Guidance for Part two: Personal and Professional Conduct •

A teacher is expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct. The statements in part two of the Standards define the behaviour and attitudes that set the requiredstandard for conduct throughout a teacher’scareer.

Much of the evidence for this section will be found in other Standards and evidence specific to this section will be exemplified on a day to day basis. Please note that additional evidence does not need to be collated for this standard.

Teachers’ Standards (2012) Assessment Descriptors for Trainee Teachers

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Roles and responsibilities at a glance UoC Partnerships should: • • •

exercise a duty of care for all of their trainees, their personalised training needs and their well-being; support trainees withrespect, being mindful of the stage of their training and how this is impacting on the challenges they might be facing; ensure that trainees are equipped to enjoy the rewards and challenges of the teaching profession and recognising the need to nurture the next generation of committed, resilient, high-qualityteachers.

Trainees should: • understand and take responsibility for the impactof their teaching on pupil progress and learning over time; • utilise all aspects of their training, in school, in the centre and in independent study, to support their progress as reflective practitioners alongside their professional development towards becomingoutstandingteachers. School-based staff should: • provide effective school-basedtraining; • support trainees so that they have a positive impact on pupil progress and learning from the outset; • identify and addresstrainees’ needs to support them in becoming good or outstanding NQTs. Provider staff should: • work with all members of the partnership to ensure that all traineesmake good or better progress; • utilise partnership data to inform training that impacts positivelyon trainee outcomesand the progressof the pupils they teach

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Trainee Teachers' Standards Assessment Descriptors: “Common Framework” 2017/18

University of Cumbria- Assessment of QTS standards for Trainees Trainees’ progress will be assessed through reviewing the impact of the trainees’ teaching on pupil progress and learning over time which, in turn, informs trainees’ ongoing achievement and final attainment. Accurate and consistent judgements of Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress, achievement and final attainment are achieved by the use of the ‘Common Framework’ (Teachers’ Standards Assessment Grid) by all trainers/ mentors across the partnership. The grid provides a shared language to discuss and track Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress through their training programme and into their NQT year. The Teachers’ Standards, Part One (graded 1-4) and the subheadings are set out in the Common Framework (Teachers’ Standards Assessment Grid). Part Two states that professional and personal conduct is expected to be at least good from the start of the course. Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ teaching is assessed in relation to: • • •

The context and content of their teaching over sequences of lessons. Judgements are not made on individual lessons. The contribution it makes to pupil progress over time (including tracking through class and pupil profiling paperwork); good or better than expected pupil progress = grade 1, at least expected pupil progress =grade2 The full range of evidence, (including for example, pupils’ responses in lessons and from their work books; the quality and impact of marking). The bulleted subheadings of the eight Teachers’ Standards are used to track progress against the Teachers’ Standards formatively. Aspects where trainees are demonstrating ‘higher level’, ‘good level’, ‘requires improvement’ or ‘inadequate’ elements of their practice are identified. This supports the ongoing cycle of determining strengths and areas for targeting additional development. The Teachers’ Standards are applied to the context of the school and phase within which a Cumbria Trainee Teacher is practising. Assessment against the Teachers’ Standards is consistent with what can reasonably be expected of a Trainee Teacher prior to the award of QTS. •Assessments are informed by evidenced professional judgements. Judgements need to reflect trainees’ overallcompetence.

The Common Framework is intended to enable all school and university trainers and Cumbria Trainee Teachers to discuss and track progress over time against the Teachers’ Standards and provide a formal recording mechanism for Cumbria Trainee Teachers’ progress and the impact of their teaching on pupil progress. Areas of strength and areas for development are highlighted in order to Identify short-term and longer-term developmental targets. The standards descriptors are a central aid in supporting trainees in their reflection and evaluation of their progress towards gaining QTS. They are used by all trainees in a systematic review of feedback, professional dialogue and personal evaluation which informs their understanding of achievement and identifies next steps. They help to place the trainee at the centre of the process. The Standard descriptors are used to assess the outcome grade for the trainee at phase stages using a ‘best fit’ approach. However, all descriptors must be graded 3 (minimum expectations) or higher by the conclusion of the training programme for the recommendation of the award of QTS and evidence against the descriptors commensurate with the grade must be provided at each assessed stage. The Student Progress Assessment Record (SPAR) and Professional Portfolio are the key locations for storage of all evidence arising from the progress review and assessment cycle. It is always available for scrutiny by trainers and external moderators. At the end of each placement each standard is graded 1-4 resulting in Key Assessment Points (KAP) grades leading to the setting of clear developmental targets linked to pupil progress with specific actions to support trainee progress. Targets from extending phase placement are aligned to a trainees Career Entry action plan in readiness for their NQT year. The final grade is determined by taking into account the individual grades for each standard (all standards are equally weighted) using a ‘best fit’ approach; based on the trainees teaching impact on pupil progress. Moderation of trainee outcomes, within and across schools is directly supported by the University Partnership Tutor (UPT), the Partnership Leads and external examiners. 5 Back to First Page 44


The profile of the trainees will develop as follows: By the end of Beginning assessment phase, in the age phase they have taught: • • •

• •

it is anticipated that all trainees will meet the minimum levelof practice expected; for any trainees struggling to meet the minimum level at this stage, consideration should be given as to whether the UoC cause for concern procedure should be instigated or whether there is mentor/tutor agreement that intensive support and targeted are likely to secure rapid progress togood a significant number of trainees will `Require improvement’ through intensive and targeted advice and support to move their teaching to good/higher level as their teaching is not yet good and the impact on pupil progress over time is not always as expected. This is likely as they are still at an early stage of their training. Tracking would indicate that they are on a trajectory to be at least good by the end of the programme; for some trainees, much of their teaching over time is good; some is at a higher level; the pupils they teach make at least expected progressover time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure greaterconsistency and to move their teaching to a higher level; for a small number of trainees, teaching over time is at a higher level and never less than consistently good; the pupils they teach make good or better than expected progress over time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching.

By the end of the Developing assessment phase, in the age phase they have taught • it is expected that all trainees will meet the minimum level of practice expected; • if any trainees are still struggling to meet the minimum level, they should be placed on cause for concern if this has not already been actioned. • a small number of trainees may ‘Require improvement’ through intensive and targeted advice and support to move their teaching to good/higher as their teaching is not yet good and the impact on pupil progress over time is not always as expected. Tracking would indicate that they are on a trajectory to be at least good by the end of the programme; • for the majority of trainees, much of their teaching over time is good; some is at a higher level; the pupils they teach make at least expected progress over time; they will need targeted advice and support to ensure greater consistency and to move their teaching to ahigherlevel; • for the remainder of trainees, teaching over time is at a higher level and never less than consistently good; the pupils they teach make good or better than expected progress over time; • they will need targeted advice and support to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop their teaching. By the end of the Extending assessment phase, in the age phase they have taught • all trainees will exceed the minimum level of practice expected in order to be recommended for Qualified Teacher Status (QTS); • none of the trainees should ‘Require improvement’. In the exception, intensive and targeted advice and support will be provided to move any grade 3 trainee’s teaching to good, including, targets set to support into the NQT year and employing schoolasrequired; • for some trainees, much of their teaching over time is good; some is at a higher level; the pupils they teach make at least expected progress over time; they will have agreed targets to take into their NQT year which will be forwarded to the employing school; • for the majority of trainees, teaching over time is at a higher level and never less than consistently good; the pupils they teach make good or better than expected progress over time; they will have agreed targets and associated advice to ensure that they maintain this consistency and continue to develop the quality of their teaching. • Strengths and targets for the NQT year will be forwarded to the employing school or setting. UoC will offer ongoing support as appropriate to the context in which the partnership operates. 6 Back to First Page 45


Assessing trainees: important considerations (NASBTT: Training and Assessment Toolkit (Second Edition, March 2016) A. The key factor in judging the quality of teaching over time is the impact teaching has on the quality of learning of pupils/learners. (ITEIH, Paragraph 125) B. When assessing the quality of primary and secondary trainees’ teaching over time, reference should be made to the Teachers’ Standards in full. The bulleted sub-headings should be usedto: • track progress against the Teachers’Standards;* • determine areas for additionaldevelopment;* • identify strengths which indicate excellentpractice;* • enable the identification of aspects of, for example, outstanding practice for ‘Good’ (grade 2) trainees and good practice for trainees with ‘ Requires improvement’ (grade 3) in order to show that they are exceedingthe minimum in aspects of the Teachers’ Standards. * ITEIH, Paragraph 129, paraphrased. C. ‘The standards need to be applied as appropriate to the role and context within which a trainee or teacher is practising. Providers of initial teacher training (ITT) should assess trainees against the standards in a way that is consistent with what could reasonably be expected of a trainee teacher prior to the award of QTS.’ (Teachers’ Standards, Paragraph6) D. Trainees’ teaching over timeshould be assessed holistically focusingon: • the impact they have on the progress and learning over time of the pupils for whichthey are responsible; • the context and content of their teaching, over sequences of lessons; the quality of teaching must be judged in terms of attainment in relation to the relevant Teachers’ Standards and not on individuallessons. When making judgements, the full range of evidence should be utilised, including planning, discussions with trainees and pupils, pupils’ responses in lessons and in their work books, the quality and impact of trainees’ marking and feedback, trainees’ assessment and planning records and evidence of their own and their pupils’ progress and learning over time. E. Assessment must be informed by evidenced, professional judgements which are accurate and rigorous. Judgements need to be based on the quality of the trainees’ teaching overall and reflect their impact on pupil progress and learning over time. F. It is essential that all grades, comments (regarding trainee and pupil progress and learning) and targets are aligned with the grade descriptors for the grade being awarded. G. All trainees must be prepared in accordance with C2.2 of the ‘ITT criteria supporting advice’, June 2015: “Training must enable trainees to acquire the knowledge and skills they need to teach within the phase [and full ability range] for which they are training.”

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 

The trainee cannot carry outor exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progress overtime.

Inadequate (4)

S3

The trainee shows an ability to carry outor exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

TraineeRequiresImprovement (3)

Standard Prompts a) Have a secure knowledge of the relevant subject(s) and curriculum areas, foster and maintain pupils’ interest in the subject, and address misunderstandings

S3: Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge

Does not have a secure knowledge of the relevant subject(s) and curriculum areas, does not foster and maintain pupils’ interest in the subject, and does not address misunderstandings.

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judged as better/higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progress overtime.

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a Good level (2)

Has a secure knowledge of the relevant Teach well, demonstrating: subject(s) and curriculum areas. Some of the - good subject and curriculum knowledge; time fosters and maintains pupils’ interest in - phase expertise. the subject, and addresses misunderstandings. Works within the current and new curriculum arrangements.

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better) progress overtime

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a High Level (1) Consistently teach exceptionally well, demonstrating: - strong subject and curriculum knowledge; - phase expertise. Is confident to work within the current and new curriculum.

Demonstrates the ability to address misunderstandings and maintain pupils’ interest in the subject by delivering engaging teaching episodes, ensuring progression is made by all learners. b) Demonstrate a critical Is unable to demonstrate a critical Demonstrates, some of the time, a critical Demonstrates, much of the time, critical Effectively demonstrates consistent and critical understanding of understanding of developments in the subject understanding of developments in the subject understanding of developments in the subject understanding of developments in the subject developments in the subject and curriculum areas, and does not promote the and curriculum areas, and promotes the value and curriculum areas. and curriculum areas. and curriculum areas, and value of scholarship. of scholarship. promote the value of Much of the time promotes the value of Consistently and effectively promotes the value scholarship scholarship. of scholarship. Much of the time demonstrates the ability to address misunderstandings and maintain pupils’ interest.

c) Demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility forpromoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialistsubject

Is unable to demonstrate an understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject.

Is able to demonstrate a basic understanding of and take responsibility for promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct use of standard English, whatever the teacher’s specialist subject.

d) If teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding ofsystematic synthetic phonics

Is unable to, if teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding of systematic synthetic phonics.

Is able to, if teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding of systematic synthetic phonics.

Is unable to, if teaching early* mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate teaching strategies.

Is able to, if teaching early mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate teaching strategies.

Demonstrates a good understanding of how to Consistently demonstrates a thorough develop the reading, writing, communication … understanding of how to teach reading, writing, skills of the pupils they teach. communication … effectively to enhance the progress of pupils they teach. Much of their teaching demonstrates an Consistently demonstrates an understanding of understanding of and takes responsibility for and takes responsibility for promoting high promoting high standards of literacy, articulacy standards of literacy, articulacy and the correct and the correct use of Standard English, use of Standard English, whatever the teacher’s whatever the teacher’s specialist subject. specialist. Trainee can teach early reading, systematic Trainee can teach early reading, systematic synthetic phonics, communication and language synthetic phonics, communication and language development … with increasing confidence and development … confidently and competently so competence so that pupils make at least expected that pupils make good or better than expected progress. progress. Consistently demonstrates a thorough Demonstrates a good understanding of the role of understanding of the role of systematic synthetic systematic synthetic phonics in the teaching of phonics in the teaching of early reading. early reading.

e) If teaching early mathematics, demonstrate a clear understanding of appropriate teaching strategies. *‘Early’ is frequently replaced by‘Primary’

Trainee can teach primary mathematics … with Trainee can teach primary mathematics … increasing confidence and competence so that confidently and competently so that pupils make pupils make at least expected progress. good or better than expected progress. Demonstrates a good understanding of strategies for the teaching of early mathematics.

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Consistently demonstrates a thorough understanding of appropriate teaching strategies for the teaching of early mathematics.


S3: Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

• •

Planning documentation • Subjectknowledge,key concepts and principlesidentified • Lesson plans, schemes of work and resourcesproviding examplesof howpupilliteracy isbeingdeveloped • Differentiatedresourcesplanned andutilised

• • • • • •

Have securepedagogicaland subject/phaserelated knowledgeand understanding? Have knowledgeofrecent NCframeworksanddevelopmentsincludingnational strategiesand initiativesandcritically evaluateandreflectupon theuseofthese? Plan and setsubject/phaserelated targets for individualsand groupsoflearners? Break down ideasandconceptsand sequencethemlogically tosupportthe developmentoflearners’knowledgeand understanding? Answerlearners’ questionsconfidentlyandaccurately? Constructandscaffoldlearning, knowwhen tomakeeffectiveinterventionsand respond to learners’common misconceptionsand mistakes? Supportlearnersin usingand developingliteracy, numeracyand ICT skillsin their subjectarea/phase? Demonstrate depth ofknowledgeand understandingof earlyreading, and SSP and use a range of strategies for the teaching of early reading and SSP and critically evaluate and reflectuponthese? Demonstratedepth ofknowledgeandunderstandingofearlymathematicsandusea range ofstrategies for theteachingof early mathematics andcritically evaluateand reflect uponthese?

Lesson observations from mentors and tutors •

Demonstrationofclearsubjectknowledgeand theabilitytodevelop pupil understanding • Useof guided reading and developmentofappropriatesubject specificvocabulary • Questioningbuildson answersand pupilsasked to builduponand reflectupon their answers Pupilassessmentrecords • Assessmentincludeslanguage andliteracylearning • Summative, formativeand diagnosticassessmentofpupil understanding Additional evidence • Subjectknowledgeaudits • Assignments

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 

The trainee cannot carry out or exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progressover time.

Inadequate (4)

S4: Plan and Teach well-structured Lessons

S4

Standard Prompts

 

The trainee shows an ability tocarryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3)

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard most ofthe time. Sometimes teaching is judgedas better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progressover time.

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS ata Good level (2)

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better) progressover time

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a High level (1)

a) Impart knowledge and develop under-standing through effective use of lesson time.

Is unable to impart knowledge and develop understanding through effective use of lesson time.

Is able to impart knowledge and develop Much of the time imparts knowledge and understanding through effective use of lesson develops understanding through using time some of the time. lesson time to good effect.

b) Promote a love of learning and children’s intellectual curiosity.

Is unable to promote a love of learning and children’s intellectual curiosity.

Some of the time, is able to promote a love of Much of the time promotes a love of Consistently and effectively promotes a love of learning and children’s intellectual curiosity. learning and children’s intellectualcuriosity. learning and children’s intellectual curiosity. Interactions are carefully planned to allow learners to develop and apply knowledge, skills, understanding, interests and enthusiasm to a range of situations

Consistently and effectively imparts knowledge and develops understanding through using lesson time to great effect.

Takes risks when making learning interesting. Pupils see the relevance of their learning and this stimulates their intellectual curiosity.

c) Set homework and plan other out-of-class activities to consolidate and extend the knowledge and understanding pupils have acquired.

Is unable to set homework and plan other outof-class activities to consolidate and extend the knowledge and understanding pupils have acquired.

Some of the time, is able to set homework and Much of the time plans differentiated plan other out-of-class activities to consolidate homework/out-of-class activities that and extend the knowledge and understanding consolidates and extends existing pupils have acquired. knowledge and understanding.

Consistently and effectively plans differentiated, purposeful homework/out-of-class activities that consolidates and extends existing knowledge and understanding.

d) Reflect systematically on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching

Is unable to reflect systematically on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching

Is able to reflect on the effectiveness of lessons and approaches to teaching

Is systematically and critically reflective in analysing, evaluating and improving their practice (paraphrased).

Is systematically able to reflect in order to improve their practice. Is able to judge the effectiveness of their lessons and impact on all groups of pupils. Is reflective in discussion with colleagues, accepts and acts upon advice and support

e) Contribute to the design and provision of an engaging curriculum within the relevant subject areas.

Is unable to contribute to the design and provision of an engaging curriculum within the relevant subject area(s).

Is able to accurately judge the effectiveness of their lessons and impact on all groups of pupils. Acts upon advice and guidance to develop their professional mentor.

Is able to contribute to the design and Makes good contributions to the design and Consistently makes effective contributions to the provision of an engaging curriculum within the provision of an engaging curriculum within design and provision of an engaging curriculum relevant subject area(s). the relevant subject area(s). within the relevant subject area(s). Collaborates with colleagues.

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S4: Plan and Teach well-structured Lessons How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

Planning documentation • Planswhich showchallenginglearningobjectivesbased uponpriorlearning • Planningshowsdifferentiationand effectiveuse oftime • Homework that issuitably challengingand engaging • Planning that demonstrates an understanding of school, national curriculum, examination requiremen ts • Lesson planning takesaccountof wider objectiveslinked to socialand personal skills • Documentation supportingoutofclasslearning • Lessonplanspromoteindependentandcollaborativeworking • Evidence in lesson plansofappropriateuseof time • Lesson plansare amendedin light ofevaluation and reflection • Evidence ofplanning for additionaladults’ rolein furtheringpupil learning

• • • • • • •

Select and adaptteaching stylesand strategiesto suitthe stage ofthe lesson, and the learningofindividuals, groupsand whole classesas appropriate? Managethetimingandpaceoflessons,intervene effectivelyand changedirectionand the shiftin emphasisto supportlearning? Usea variety ofimaginativeresourcesandinnovativelearning activitiesthat interest and challengepupils’ learningand put thisinto thecontext of thereal world? Design homework and out of class work that takes account of learners’ attainment, needsandinterestthatcanbecompletedindependently orwithappropriatesupport? Usethefeedback frommoreexperiencescolleaguesand theexperienceofobserving others to identify ways of improvingtheir practice? Seekopportunitiesto engagein collaborativeplanning and teaching? Understand theneed to considertheroleofparentsand carersin supportinglearners withhomework? Knowabouttheappropriatearrangementsandriskassessmentsrequiredfor out of classactivities?

Reflective Documents • Accurateevaluationsconsistentwithcolleague’sjudgements • Reflectionactivitiesthatactivelyseekstoimprovepractice • Evaluationsandreflectionsthathaveled toimprovements Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • Observation identifiesenthusiasmforteaching • Observations ofout of classactivities • Lessonsutilising appropriateteachingandlearningstrategies • Teachingdemonstrates well-judgedinterventionswhichseemtodeveloppupils’ understanding • Teaching whichpromotespupils’ loveoflearningand stimulatesintellectual curiosity. Pupilassessmentrecords • Assessmentofhomework consistent with subject/schoolpolicy • Appropriateand timelyfeedbackto learners

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 

The trainee cannot carry out or exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progressover time.

Inadequate (4)

S5: Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils

S5

Standard Prompts

 

The trainee shows an ability tocarryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3)

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judged as better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progressover time.

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS ata Good level (2)

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better)progress over time

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at ahigh level (1)

a) Know when and how to differentiate appropriately, using approaches which enable pupils to be taught effectively

Does not know when and how to differentiate appropriately.

b) Have a secure understanding of how a range of factors can inhibit pupils’ ability to learn, and how best to overcome these.

Does not have a secure understanding of how a Has an understanding of how a range of understand how to challenge and motivate Understand the causes of low achievement; range of factors can inhibit pupils’ ability to factors can inhibit pupils’ ability to learn, and pupils where attainment is low and use challenge and motivate pupils where attainment learn, and how best to overcome these. how best to overcome these. strategies to support underperforming groups. is low; and use effective strategies to support underperforming groups. Respects and accommodates individual differences between pupils and has a good Respects and accommodates individual understanding of a range of factors that can differences between pupils and has a very inhibit pupils’ ability to learn and adapts good understanding of a range of factors that teaching well to help overcome these. inhibit pupils’ ability to learn and adapts teaching very well to help overcome these. Has a good level of understanding of the Has a thorough understanding of the challenges challenges and opportunities of teaching in and opportunities of teaching in a diverse society. a diverse society.

c) Demonstrate an awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of children, and know how to adapt teaching to support pupils’ education at different stages of development

Is unable to demonstrate an awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of children, and does not know how to adapt teaching to support pupils’ education at different stages of development.

Some of the time, is able to demonstrate an awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of children, and knows how to adapt teaching to support pupils’ education at different stages of development.

Demonstrates an awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of pupils and, much of the time, adapts teaching to support pupils’ education at different stages of development.

Consistently and effectively demonstrates clear awareness of the physical, social and intellectual development of children, and effectively adapts teaching to support pupils’ education at different stages of development.

d) Have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils, including those with special educational needs; those of high ability; those with English as an additional language; those with disabilities; and be able to use and evaluate distinctive teaching approaches to engage and support them.

Does not have a clear understanding of the needs of all pupils, including those with special educational needs; those of high ability; those with English as an additional language; those with disabilities; and is not able to use and evaluate distinctive teaching approaches to engage and support them.

Some of the time, has a clear understanding of Much of the time evaluates and adapts the needs of all pupils, including those with teaching to support all pupils, including those special educational needs; those of high with special educational needs, high ability ability; those with English as an additional (including Gifted and Talented), English as an language; those with disabilities; and is able to additional language, disabilities and pupils use and evaluate distinctive teaching eligible for the pupil premium (including Free approaches to engage and support them. School Meals). understand how to challenge and motivate pupils where attainment is low and use strategies to support underperforming groups. Much of the time uses and evaluates distinctive teaching approaches to engage and support pupils.

Consistently and effectively evaluates and adapts teaching to meet the needs of all pupils, including those with special educational needs, high ability (including Gifted and Talented), English as anadditional language, disabilities and pupils eligible for the pupil premium (including Free School Meals).

Some of the time, knows when and how to Much of the time differentiates appropriately Consistently and effectively differentiates differentiate appropriately, using approaches using approaches which enable pupils to be appropriately using timely approaches which which enable pupils to be taught effectively. taught effectively. enable pupils to be taught effectively.

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Challenge and motivate pupils where attainment is low; and use effective strategies to support underperforming groups. Consistently and effectively uses and evaluates distinctive teaching approaches to engage and support pupils.


S5: Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils How well does the Trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

Planning documentation • Planningbased uponpriorassessments • Planningidentifiescleardifferentiation strategies • Clear Assessmentfor Learning(AfL) strategiesplanned

• • • •

Takeintoaccount thekey factorsthatcontributetothedevelopment and wellbeingof learners? Understandtheextentto which differentbackgroundsandinfluencesmay havean impact onlearning? Knowandunderstandthefactorsthatcanpresentbarrierstolearning, progressand well beingand howthesebarriersmight beovercome? Interpret and useschoollevel data to identifytargets for learners? Knowhowtoidentifytheneedsofpupilsanddifferentiatetasks, activities, resources effectively tosupportlearnersincludingthosewithspecialeducationalneeds,those with disabilities, those for whom English is an additional language and those form diverse social,cultural, ethnic, religiousand linguisticbackgrounds? Recognisedifferencesin theratesofprogressand attainment ofpupilsexperiencing challenging circumstances?

Reflective Documents • Awarenessof socialand emotionalfactorsand cultural andlinguisticfactorsthat influencepupilperformance Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • • • • •

Observation identifiesclear introduction andsequencesoflearning Questioningbuildson answersand pupilsasked to build uponand reflectupon their answers Effective use ofplenariesto reflect upon learning Pupilsareattentiveat the start ofepisodesof learning Supportstaffemployedappropriately

Pupilassessmentrecords • Assessmentisundertaken regularly • Record keepingisup to dateand used formatively • Use of school data e.g.FSM, EAL, SEN

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 

The trainee cannot carry out or exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progressover time.

Inadequate (4)

S6: Make accurate and productive use of assessment

S6

a) Know and understand how to assess the relevant subjectand curriculum areas, including statutory assessment requirements

Does not know and understand how to assess the relevant subject and curriculum areas, including statutory assessment requirements.

b) Make use of formative and summativeassessment to secure pupils’ progress

Is unable summative progress.

c) Use relevant data to monitor progress, set targets, and plan subsequent lessons

Is unable to use relevant data to monitor progress, set targets, and plan subsequent lessons.

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The trainee shows an ability tocarryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3)

Standard Prompts

d) Give pupils regular feedback, both orally and through accurate marking, and encourage pupils to respond to the feedback.

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judged as better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progress over time.

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a Good level (2)

Knows and understands how to assess the relevant subject and curriculum areas, assess pupils’ achievement in the relevantsubject including statutory assessment requirements. and curriculum areas, including statutory assessment requirements. Uses well developed subject knowledge and accurate assessment of pupils’ prior skills, knowledge and understanding to plan effectively and set challenging tasks.

to make use of assessment to

formative and Is able to make use of formative and secure pupils summative assessment to secure pupils’ progress some of the time.

Is able to use relevant data to monitor progress, set targets, and plan subsequent lessons.

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standardconsistently. Pupils make good (orbetter) progress over time

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS ata High level (1) accurately assess achievement and attainment in relevant subject and curriculum areas, including statutory assessment requirements, using new curricula … examinations and assessment arrangements.

Much of the time uses formative, continuous assessment and summative tests to secure progress through a sequence of lessons over time.

Consistently and effectively uses formative, continuous assessment and summative tests to great effect to secure progress for all pupils, through a sequence of lessons over time.

Uses a range of relevant data including school progress data to monitor pupil progress and learning over time.

Consistently and effectively uses a range of relevant data, including school progress data, to monitor pupil progress and learning over time.

Records of pupil progress and learning and attainment are accurate and up-to-date and, much of the time, are used to inform future planning and target setting.

Is unable to give pupils regular feedback, both orally and through accurate marking, and does not encourage pupils to respond to the feedback.

Records of pupil progress and learning and attainment are accurate and up-to-date and used to inform future planning and target setting.

Assesses pupils’ progress regularly and accurately; discusses assessments with them so that learners know how well they have done and what they need to do to improve. Is able to give pupils regular feedback, both Uses a range of methods to give pupils regular Consistently uses a range of effective orally and through accurate marking, and feedback and the opportunity to respond to it. methods to give pupils regular and encourages pupils to respond to the feedback. constructive feedback and the opportunity (Some of the time) Accurate and regular marking and oral feedback to respond to it. contributes to pupil progress and learning over time. Accurate and timely marking and oral feedback contributes to pupil progress and learning over time. 20 Back to First Page 53


S6: Make accurate and productive use of assessment How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

Planning documentation • Clearclassroomroutinesidentified • Assessmentdata isused to informplanning • Planningofhigh orderanddiagnosticquestions • Linkinglearning sequences • Lessonplanning takesaccountof wider objectiveslinkedto social and personalskills • Lessonplanspromoteindependent andcollaborativeworking. Reflective Documents • Evaluationsidentify futurelearningtargets Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • Theuseof effective feedback at individual, smallgroup and whole classlevel • Questioningbuildson answersand pupilsasked to build uponand reflectupon their answers • Effectiveuseofplenariestoidentify pupilunderstanding • Learnersreflecton learningand set/ reviewown targets • Observespupilactivityandmakesappropriateresponses Pupilassessmentrecords • Assessmentisundertaken regularly • Useoftests, mockexaminationsandcontrolledassessmentsto provideappropriate feedback • Record keepingisup to dateand used formatively • Pupilsknowhow to progressto thenext level Additional evidence • Assignments

• • • • • • •

Knowtheassessmentrequirementsandarrangementsforthesubjects/phaseincluding thosefor examinations? Make effectiveuseofthe schools;monitoring, assessment andrecordingpolicy? Knowhowto preparepupilsfor assessmentactivity? Knowthe NClevelsofattainment and usethese appropriatelyand effectivelyto monitor progressand attainmentand developand extendlearning? Relateassessmenttolearningobjectives,learningactivitiesandlearningoutcomes? Usearangeofassessmentstrategiesincludingselfandpeerassessmenteffectively? Giveappropriateandtimelyoraland writtenfeedback tomotivateandreinforce learning and help pupilsto set targetsto improve? Know, understand anduseavailabledatasetstoimprovethe qualityofteachingand learning and setappropriatetargets for pupils?

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 

The trainee cannot carry outor exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progress over time.

 

The trainee shows an ability tocarryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

  

Inadequate (4)

S7 a) Have clear rules and routines for behaviour in the classroom, and take responsibility for promoting good and courteous behaviour in the classroom and around the school, in accordance with the school’s behaviour policy

Does not have clear rules and routines for behaviour in classrooms, and does not take responsibility for promoting good and courteous behaviour in classrooms and around the school, in accordance with the school’s behaviour policy.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3) Some of the time, has clear rules and routines for behaviour in classrooms, and takes responsibility for promoting good and courteous behaviour in classrooms and around the school, in accordance with the school’s behaviour policy.

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplifythe standard consistently. Pupils make good (or better)progress over time

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS ata Good level (2)

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a High level (1)

In accordance with the school’s behaviour policy: Takes responsibility for and is able to promote and manage behaviour in the classroom well to ensure a good and safe learning environment; Encourages pupils to behave well in the classroom and around the school and display good levels of courtesy and cooperation;

In accordance with the school’s behaviour policy: Takes responsibility for and has the knowledge, understanding and skills to promote and manage behaviour effectively and create an excellent climate for learning; Actively encourages pupils to behave well in the classroom and around the school and display high levels of courtesy and co-operation;

Can effectively tackle bullying, including cyber Is able to tackle bullying, including cyber and prejudice-based (and homophobic) bullying. and prejudice-based (and homophobic) bullying.

environment

S7: Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning

Standard Prompts

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judgedas better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expectedprogress over time.

b) Have high expectations of behaviour and establish a framework for discipline, consistently and fairly, with a range of strategies, using praise, sanctions and rewards consistently and fairly c) Manage classes effectively, using approaches which are appropriate to pupils’ needs in order to involve and motivate them

Does not have high expectations of behaviour, and does not establish a framework for discipline with a range of strategies.

Has high expectations of behaviour, and Sustains high expectations of behaviour. establishes a framework for discipline with a range of strategies, using praise, sanctions and Establishes and maintains or applies the school’s framework for discipline, using rewards consistently and fairly. a range of strategies.

Consistently sustains high expectations of behaviour.

Is unable to manage classes effectively.

Is able to manage classes effectively, usin Manages a good level of pupil approaches which are appropriate to pupil motivation and involvement using a needs in order to involve and motivate them. range of approaches appropriate to the pupils’ needs.

Consistently manages a high level of pupil motivation and involvement using a range of effective approaches appropriate to the pupils’ needs.

d) Maintain good relationships with pupils, exercising appropriate authority, and acts decisively when necessary

Is unable to maintain good relationships with Is able to maintain good relationships with pupils, does not exercise appropriate pupils, exercising appropriate authority, and authority and/or act decisively when acts decisively when necessary. necessary.

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Demonstrates good relationships with pupils and exercises appropriate authority, and acts decisively when necessary. Makes timely and effective interventions to maintain good discipline.

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Establishes and maintains or applies theschool’s framework for discipline consistently and fairly, using a wide range of effectivestrategies.

Consistently demonstrates strong and effective relationships with pupils exercising appropriate authority, and acts decisively when necessary.


S7: Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

Planning documentation • Seatingplansand clearclassroomroutinesidentified • Planningshowingthe effective useofadditionalclassroom support • Planningshowingconsiderationofclear behaviourmanagementstrategies

• • • •

Make useoftherelevant school behaviourpolicyand beableto employ a range of effective strategies to secure appropriate learning behaviour, self-control and independence sothat all learnerscan makeprogress?? Ensurethat pupilsknowtheboundariesofacceptablebehaviour and understand the consequencesoftheiractions? Minimisethe impact ofnegativebehaviourof some pupilson teaching andthelearning ofothers? Establishand maintaineffectiverelationshipsin theclassroombetweenteacher to pupil, other adult topupil andpupil to pupil? Understandthelinkbetweenlearners’ behaviourandtheirinvolvementand engagementwithlearning?

Reflective Documents • •

Evaluationsidentify futurelearningtargets Awarenessof socialand emotionalfactorsand culturalandlinguisticfactorsthat influencepupilperformance

Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • Highexpectationsandeffectiveandappropriatebehaviourmanagement strategies observed • Variety of styles, variationoftone and language appropriateto audience • Effective relationshipswithpupilsbeingdeveloped • Schoolpoliciesforbehaviourused appropriately • Awelcomingphysical environment • Display ofrules and orroutines which you expectfrom pupils • Good workingknowledgeofthe school’sbehaviourpolicy • Effective use ofpraiseand sanctions • Examplesof where you havehad animpacton behaviourbeyond own classroom ieplaytimes/lunchtimes/outof school/evidencein pupilprofiles • Awareness of bullyingin all its forms • Variety of styles, variationoftone and language appropriateto audience • Awarenessof socialand emotionalfactorsand culturalandlinguisticfactorsthat influencepupilperformance Pupilassessmentrecords • Recordsofsanctionsanddisruptivepupilsmaintained

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 

The trainee cannot carry out or exemplify the standard. Pupils make no (or little) progressover time.

Inadequate (4)

S8 Standard Prompts Make a positive contribution to the curricular enhancement and ethos of the school.

 

The trainee shows an ability tocarryout or exemplify the standard; but not always consistently. Pupils do make progress over time; but not always as expected.

Trainee Requires Improvement (3)

Is unable to make a positive contribution to the Is able to make a positive contribution to the wider life and ethos of the school. wider life and ethos of the school.

What (are) is the trainee adding to he school community above/beyond classroom?

  

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standard most of the time. Sometimes teaching is judged as better/ higher than ‘good’. Pupils make expected progressover time.

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a Good Level (2)

 

The trainee can carry out or exemplify the standardconsistently. Pupils make good (orbetter) progress over time

Trainees meeting the expectations for QTS at a High level (1)

Is consistently proactive and makes a Is proactive and makes a positive contribution positive contribution to the wider life and to the wider life and ethos of the school. ethos of the school. Has a good understanding of teachers’ legal responsibilities. Has a clear understanding of teachers’ legalresponsibilities. Be involved in extracurricular activities Suggest, plan, implement a lunchtime/after school club or visit, recognizing school policy.

b) Develop effective professional relationships with colleagues, knowing how and when to draw on advice and specialist support

Is unable to develop effective professional relationships with colleagues, and does not know how and when to draw on advice and specialist support.

c) Deploy support staff effectively

Is unable to deploy support staff.

Is able to develop effective professional relationships with colleagues, knowing how and when to draw on advice and specialist support.

Professional relationships with colleagues are Professional relationships with colleagues good. are consistently effective.

Consults with colleagues as appropriate, Consistently and effectively consults with knowing when and how to draw on theiradvice colleagues as appropriate, knowing when and specialist support. and how to draw on their advice and specialist support. Is able to deploy support staff effectively some Deploys support staff effectively to supportthe Consistently and effectively deploys support of the time. learning of pupils. staff to maximise the learning of pupils. Evidence of professional dialogue with Teaching Assistant prior to lesson.

d) Take responsibility for improving teaching through appropriate professional development, responding to advice and feedback from colleagues .

e) communicate effectively with parents with regard to pupils’ achievements and well-being

Is unable to take responsibility for improving teaching through appropriate professional development, and is unable to respond toadvice and feedback from colleagues.

Is able to take responsibility for improving teaching through appropriate professional development, responding to advice and feedback from colleagues.

Takes responsibility for improving their own teaching through professional development. Respects and responds to the advice and guidance offered by colleagues.

Is unable to communicate effectively with Some of the time, is able to communicate Communicates effectively with parents and parents with regard to pupils’ achievements and effectively with parents with regard to pupils’ carers about pupils’ achievements and wellachievements and well-being. well-being. being.

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Is consistently proactive in taking full responsibility for improving their own teaching through professionaldevelopment. Is open to coaching and mentoring and respect the advice and guidance offered by colleagues; clear evidence that this is used to secure improvements in professional practice; can assess their progress – self regulating development / improvement. Proactively and consistently communicates effectively with parents and carers about pupils’ achievements and well-being.


S8: Fulfil Wider Professional Responsibilities

How well does the trainee:

Evidence for this standard may be demonstrated by:

Planning documentation • Participation injointlyplannedactivities • Development andsharingofresources

• • • • • • •

Involve themselvesin the wider role of the school through pastoral/formtutor work. PSHCE, assemblies, out ofschoollearning, extra-curricular activity, staffmeetings and CPD activity? Seeksupportand communicateeffectivelywith other colleagues? Recognisethe value,expertise and benefitsto learningof co-operative working? Plan for, brief and deploy effectivelyother adultsin and out oftheclassroom? Reviewtheir professionallearning and practiceon a regularbasisand identify strategiestoimprove? Seek out guidance and supportfrom mentors andother colleaguesand usethe feedback toimprovepractice? Demonstratesensitivitytohomebackground, ethnicity,cultureandreligionwhen communicatingwith parentsandcarers? Acknowledgethecontributionthat parentsand carerscan maketothe children’s learningand well-beingdespitehome circumstancesorexperiencesofeducation?

Reflective Documents • Effective useof feedbackfrom mentors/tutors • Identification ofprofessionaldevelopment(CPD) needs • Evaluateand act upon advice and suggestions Lesson observations from mentors and tutors • • • • •

Participationinwiderschoolactivities Taking ofassemblies, formtime, PSHCE Consultationswithparents,pastoralstaff, SENCO, otherteacherstosupportandplan for thepupilsthey teach Teamteaching Understandsandimplementswholeschoolpoliciese.g.dresscode, communication with parents, assessmentand recordingprocedures

Pupil assessment records • Parentsconsultationandgeneralcommunicationwithparentsinlinewithschoolpolicy and procedures Additional evidence • Assignmentsandaudits

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PART TWO: Personal and Professional conduct -Trainees embarking on a programme of ITE will have demonstrated that they possess the required attitudes and behaviours as an element of the selection process. No matter which route to QTS they follow all trainees are expected to demonstrate high professional standards from the outset. For that reason the guidance on the standards in Part Two is not graded.

Standard Prompts Teachers uphold public trust in the profession and maintain high standards of ethics and behaviour, within and outside school:

Scope •

• • •

Teachersmusthave proper andprofessional regardtothe ethos, policies and practices of the school in which they teach, and maintain high standards in their ownattendance and punctuality

Key Questions

• Does the trainee have a commitment to upholding the high standards of the teaching profession, within and treating pupils with dignity, building relationships rooted in mutual respect, and outsideschool? at all times observing proper boundaries appropriate to a teacher’s professional • Doesthe traineedevelop appropriateprofessional position relationships with colleagues and pupils? havingregard for theneed to safeguard pupil’s well-being, in accordance with • Isthetrainee ableto safeguard pupils’ well-being, in statutoryprovisions accordancewith statutory provisions? showing tolerance of and respect for the rights of others • Does thetraineeunderstand that schools arerequired to notundermining fundamental British values, including: democracy, theruleof develop pupils’ wider understandingofsocialand cultural law, individualliberty and mutualrespect, and toleranceofthose with different diversity, tolerance for others and respect for different faiths andbeliefs faiths and beliefs, in line with the maintenance of ensuringthat personal beliefs arenot expressed in ways which exploitpupils’ fundamentalBritish values? vulnerability or might lead them to break the law. • Does thetrainee understand the challenges ofteaching in modern Britishschools? • Isthe trainee aware of the Prevent strategy and its implications? • Does thetrainee understand theresponsibility teachers hold in relation to theexpression ofpersonal beliefsand the impact these could have on pupils and their consequentactions? • Does thetraineeunderstand and adhereto the school’s and provider’sVLE/internet safety policy, including the safe and responsible use of social media? • The trainee’s conduct demonstrates a highly professional approach to • Does thetraineedisplay high standardsofpersonal teaching, understanding and demonstrating that their own conduct is and professional behaviour, inside and outside appropriateat all times. school, including attendanceand punctuality at all times? • The trainee reads, understandsand appliesschool policies at all times, e.g. health and safety, risk assessments before trips, homework, etc. • Does thetrainee understand and apply the range of policies that support school practice and act on • The trainee is punctual for school, lessons, meetings, etc. these in their planning, teaching and wider • The trainee always informs the school/colleagues of reasons for any noninvolvement in the life of the school? attendance involving his/her teaching obligations or other professional • Does thetrainee takeappropriateresponsibility for meetings and responsibilities in line with school policy. their own and pupils’ well-being in the classroom • The trainee’s language and dressarehighly professional and in linewith and during off-site activities or visits? school policy

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Teachers must have an understanding of, and always act within, the statutory frameworks which set out their professional duties and responsibilities.

• • •

The trainee isableto articulate, and abideby, the roles and responsibilities of theteacher in relation to statutory frameworks. The trainee isaware ofhis/her responsibilitiesin relation to, for example, equality legislation, dutiesand safeguarding. The trainee isable to judge when they may need advice and help in matters of Child Protection or confidentiality.

Is the trainee aware of and does the trainee act in thecontext oftheprofessional dutiesof teachers as set out in the statutory School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions document? Has the trainee received relevant training in Child Protection/safeguarding?Can he/shearticulatethe school’s policy if reporting a concern?

A teacher is expected to demonstrate consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct. The following statements define the behaviour and attitudes which set the required standard for conduct throughout a teacher’s career. (Teachers’ Standards, Part Two: Personal and professional conduct) Part Two of the Teachers’ Standards is about personal and professional conduct. All trainees are required to maintain consistently high standards of personal and professional conduct at all times. Where this is not the case, a cause for concern procedure will be instigated and will potentially result in disciplinary procedures. Personal and professional conduct is included as a focus for discussion as Interview: part of the interview process. In accepting the offer of a place on the programme, prospective trainees agree to adhere to high standards of personal and professional conduct; The requirements for Part Two of the Teachers’ Standards will be introduced Induction: and discussed in detail to include consideration of each aspect and its implications for trainees and teachers; At the start of a Trainees must familiarise themselves with the individual school’s codes of conduct and safety policies, including safeguarding, and ensure they understand new placement: and adhere to them; The trainees’ ability to consistently maintain high standards of personal and At each review point (End of B, D & phases): professional conduct are discussed. Any areas for development are addressed and appropriate targets set; Should issues arise in relation to the appropriateness of the trainees’ At any time: conduct, action will be taken which may lead to a cause for concern procedure being instigated.

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My Development Targets

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DEVELOPMENT TARGETS RUNNING RECORD Name of Trainee:

Targets

Placement: B/D/E

Links to Standards

Actions to be taken by Student

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Date to Achieve

Review Target & Progress Comment

Sign and date: student/PT/AT/PPL


Targets

Links to Standards

Actions to be taken by Student

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Date to Achieve

Review Target & Progress Comment

Sign and date: student/PT/AT/PPL


Trainee’s Placement Weekly Review

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TRAINEE’ S PLACEMENT WEEKLY REVIEW Revised Sept 2016

This reflection document should refer to the descriptors in the ‘Common Framework’ Criteria. You should comment on pupils’ progress and your own progress in relation to previous targets. It should be central to the professional conversation with your mentor at the weekly review meeting . Targets set here feed directly into the trainee development target sheet. Trainee Name

Placement

Week

Mentor

School/ Setting

Choose an item.

Attendance this week:

Reflect on the following questions toconsider pupil progress in relation to the impact of either your own or others` teaching. You should also include links to the Common Framework and evidence from across your programme in relationto your ownprogress. What progress are the pupils making?

Links to relevant standards

What evidence do I have for this?

What progress have I made this week?

Links to relevant standards

Where is the evidence for this progress?

Proposed Targets to inform my next steps: (To be confirmed at this meeting).

How will I demonstrate this?

Transfer target/s to and actions Development Target Running record and complete time frame Trainee Signature:

Date: Click or tap to enter a date.

AT / Mentor Signature:

PPT/PPL signature ( if present):

File Comment:

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.

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Observation Proforma

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.

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OBSERVATION PROFORMA Revised Sept 2016 You should hand this completed proforma to the observer(s) with your session plan prior to observation. The completed proforma should be held in your SPAR. For a Beginning placement at least 2 formal observations should take place; a Developing placement at least 3 formal observations; an Extending placement at least 4 formal observations should take place. Trainee Name: University Programme

Setting/School:

Choose an item.

Age range:

Curricular focus:

Observer

Role

Date:

No. in Group

Click or tap to Time: enter a date

Agreed Observation Focus (linked to weekly targets) – Trainee to complete prior to session:

Professional File up to date?: Yes ☐

No ☐

Time or note particular standards achieved:

Key observations and analysis, with evidence of: *Quality of pupil learning/pupil progress *Quality of trainee’s teaching *Trainee teacher subject knowledge

Strengths of the session

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Targets detailing impact on pupil progress (linked to Common Framework):

Impact on pupils’ progress. Judgment on overall pupil progress (please indicate): 4 Inadequate / little/ no

3 Some Pupils make progress as

2 Pupil progress as expected

progress: ☐

expected over time: ☐

over time: ☐

1 Good or better pupil progress over time: ☐

Summary of key areas: (ONLY COMPLETE WHERE NECESSARY)

Pupil`s learning including impact of trainee’s SK and specific pupil progress groups (St2&3) also Part 2 of standards

Quality of planning , teaching and assessment (St 1,4,5 ,6 & 8)

Behaviour and safety of pupils (St7)

Spiritual , moral social and cultural links (St7)

Trainee Signature & Date

Mentor Signature & Date

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UPT/PPL Signature & Date


Suggested format for use when observing colleagues’ teaching. Trainee’s Name

Teacher Observed

Class

Lesson /Theme

Date and Time

Starting the lesson/transitions within the lesson

Links made to Previous Learning

Teaching Strategies

Pupil’s Activities/Opportunities for Learning

Organisation of the Learning

Use of Resources (including use of IT) Role of Other Adults

Management of Pupils

Strategies for Assessing Pupil’s Learning

Consideration of Inclusion

Teacher Presence in the Classroom

Summarising and Extending the Learning

Concluding the Lesson

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Starting the lesson/session/transitions within the lesson/session  Movement of pupils  Strategies to gain pupils` attention  Introduction of lesson objective and possible use of success criteria (WALT and WILF)  Organisation of room to facilitate start  What are other adults in the class doing?  Changing subject mid-session

Links made to previous learning  Does the teacher check prior knowledge?  Recall/ use of warm ups  Questioning to determine understanding  Demonstrating previous learning in a different context

Teaching strategies  Explaining  Questioning  Modelling  Discussion  Demonstration  Scaffolding  Interactive/ didactic

Pupil’s activities/Opportunities for Learning

Organisation of the learning  Groupings: mixed, ability, friendship, higher ability/ low ability  Individual, pairs, collaborative group, whole class  Differentiation  Does the teacher work with one group of many?  What are other adults doing?  Structure of lesson – timings, introduction, development and plenary

Use of resources (including use of ICT)/ Role of other adults  ICT  Access to resources  Library  Use of resources after school

Management of pupils  How does the teacher welcome and direct the pupils?  How does the teacher keep the pupils on task?  What sanctions does the teacher use?  What reward systems are used?  How do the pupils get their resources?  What does the teacher do if a pupil is not paying attention?  Lunchtimes/ midday supervisors

Strategies for assessing pupil learning  How do pupils know how well they have done?  Use of questioning  Use of peer and self-assessment  Feedback from teacher  Marking to the objective

Consideration of Inclusion  Differentiation  Use of other adults  Support  Resources

Teacher presence in the classroom  Voice  Body language  Movement and circulation  Appropriate use of space

Summarising and extending the learning  What is the signal for this phase of the lesson?  What learning is revisited?  Is there homework?  Does assessment take place?  Is the next lesson referred to?  How long does this phase of the lesson last?  What do other adults in the class do?

Concluding the lesson/ session  What strategies are used for tidying the classroom?  How does the teacher dismiss the class?

Type of task, e.g. investigation

Adapted from Medwell, J. (2005) Successful Teaching Placement - Primary and Early Years: Exeter, Learning Matters © 2005 Jane Medwell, Mary Briggs, Julie Neale, Nigel Palmer and George Raper

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Cumbria Teacher of Reading

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Name……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….... Student Number ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….… Training

Base

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

Programme and Cohort …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….... Group ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….............

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Contents 2-3

Introduction

4-7

Overview of phases

8-9

Key principles

10-15

Beginning phase

16-23

Developing phase

24-31

Extending phase

32 33-36

Self-evaluation and reflection Resources

Appendices: Phase 1 Observation and Feedback Grid Phase 6 Observation and Feedback Grid Guided Reading Observation and Feedback Grid

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Dear student-teachersand school-based colleagues, Due to the continued focus on the role of systematic synthetic phonics in the teaching of reading and spelling and the emphasis given to this in the standards for teachers, all our primary QTS studentteachers are required to engage with ‘The Cumbria Teacher of Reading’ units over the full course of their programme at the appropriate point. The units are split into a beginning, developing and extending phase to integrate into school-based learning. We recognise that student-teachers’ training takes place both in centre-based elements and on school-based placements and want to make sure that all our student-teachers draw on the excellent practice in our partnership schools, to provide them with a broad and rich learning experience. This booklet is designed to support this process. For each phase, it includes a summary of centre-based elements to inform schoolbased colleagues and a range of professional development activities for student-teachers to support both centrebased and school-based training. It is the responsibility of the studentteacher to ensure that the professional development activities are completed with support from school-based colleagues in scheduling these and identifying relevant colleagues. Wewould like to thank school-based

colleagues for guiding student-teachers through this learning process. The units focus on teaching children to read with an emphasis on systematic synthetic phonics. They complement other modules which together form a much larger picture of the effective teaching of reading, such as reading a range of texts and reading for pleasure. A mapping document which illustrates how the units link with other modules is available on the studentteachers’ programme blackboard site and on the partnership website. We are confident that through this collaborative approach, our studentteachers will develop their skills, knowledge and competence to become excellent ‘Cumbria Teachers of Reading’ which all of our children deserve. If you would like to discuss this booklet, school based-colleagues, please contact your partnership tutor in the first instance and student-teachers; please contact your module tutor or universityProgrammeLeader. An electronic copy of this booklet is available on the student teacher’s programme Blackboard site and the partnership website.

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Introduction The Cumbria Teacher of Reading module is designed to meet standard 3: A teacher must demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge - if teaching early reading, demonstrate a clear understanding of systematic syntheticphonics(Teachers’StandardsDfE 2011)

In order to meet this standard a student- teacher should, by the end of their training and with appropriate induction support: • know and understand the: recommendations of the Rose Review; and the Simple View of Reading and be able to apply this understanding to their teaching of reading and writing. (The Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading, Final Report, DfES 2006) • know and understand the alphabetic code; • know and understand the Criteria for assuring high quality phonic work (DfE, 2011) and be able to recognise how they are met in a range of phonic programmes

Prior to starting the units: please read aspect 1 of Rose. J (2006) The Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading accessed through the link below. This will provide you with essential background knowledge for the units. http://bit.ly/NtmBOt The set texts for the units: Waugh, D and Harrison-Palmer, R (2013) Auditing Phonic Knowledge and Understanding. London: Sage Jolliffe,W, Waugh, D and Carss, A (2015) Teaching Systematic Synthetic Phonics in primary Schools. 2nd Ed. London: Sage. You should purchase these texts.

• be able to apply their knowledge and understanding of the Criteria to the teaching and assessment of phonics using a range of strategies to inform future planning and ensure pupil progress. • be able to identify and provide targeted support for, children making progress both beyondand below the expected level. • understand the complexityof learning to read.

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Overview ofindicativecontentfor eachphaseforcentre-based delivered elements; school based training and professional development activities (PDAs) Relevant chapters to be read will be provided by your tutor and available on the Blackboard site for The Cumbria Teacher of Reading.

Beginning: introduction to synthetic phonics, simple view of reading and a synthetic phonics lesson (QTS3Y1,QTS4Y1,PgCEandPGCE)

PDA Readrelevantchaptersfromcoretexts. Introduction to the module via video. Pronouncing the sounds and practicing. Read the ‘Letters and Sounds’ notes of guidance accessedthrough thefollowinglink: https://docs.google.com/file/ d/0Bykm2b37siP7YklXMHhIZlJZSmc/edi t?usp=sharing These activities are designed to develop

Developing: application of synthetic phonics for reading and spelling, best practice, progression and synthetic phonics schemes (QTS3 Y2, QTS4 Y2/3, PgCE and PGCE)

Lecture

Extending: assessment and planning next steps and supporting children with reading difficulties (QTS3 Y3, QTS4 Y4,PgCEand PGCE) PDA

• Children’s phonological progression (Phases 1 – 6) • Adjacent consonants • Revisit encoding and decoding • Defining best practice inteaching synthetic phonics. • Formative assessment • Technical vocabulary • Differentiation strategies for whole-class teaching.

Complete reading for the lecture from the Blackboard site. Complete the extending phase audit and print a copy to bring to the following seminar (results of the audit will have an impact on adaptations for content) Look at the information about Y1 phonics screening at https://www.gov.uk/government/policies/ reforming-qualificationsand-the-

your understanding of synthetic phonics

curriculum-to-better-prepare-pupils-forlife-afterschool/ supporting-pages/statutory-phonicsscreening-check

terminology and the ‘Simple View of Reading’

Lecture

Seminar

Lecture

• The Simple View of Reading in the context of the six key principles of the Cumbria Teacher of Reading (see pg 11) • The simpleviewof reading and implications for teaching • The alphabetic code (see pg 42) • Synthetic phonics skills: blendingand segmenting. • Decoding and encoding • Tricky words

• Explore Phase 5 subject knowledge. • Alternative GPC’s - complex code

• Tracking and using data to inform future planning.

• Split vowel digraphs

• Assessment methods

• Application of phonics into spelling within a teaching session. Segmenting skills for spelling (Phase 6)

• Phonics screening.

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Seminar

Lecture

Seminar

• Complete and review the beginningphase audit. • Phonological awareness for young children and EAL learners (Phase 1) • The importance of developingspeaking and listening skills • Rose’s principles for theeffective teaching of synthetic phonics.

• Introduction of core criteria for Systematic Synthetic phonics schemes. • Guided reading • Application of phonics through guided reading • The ‘Guided Reading Observation Grid’

• Analysing data

Lecture

PDA

Seminar

• Planning a teaching sequence for synthetic phonics (pg 35)

• Research how phonics isassessed across different schemes of work.

• Introduction to the ‘Synthetic Phonics Lesson Observation Feedback grid.’

• Be prepared to present your findings to your peers.

• Target setting for extending placement and preparing for interview questions around early reading. • Analysis of wider reading strategies.

• Letters andSounds activitiesforphases 2 and 3.

• Assessment and recordkeeping analysis • Moving into comprehension

• Observations of good practice • Focus on terminology

Seminar

• Model phase 2/3 lesson withanalysis and commentary • Letters and Sounds activities • Skills focus: Blend and segment cvc, split vowel digraphs. • Introduce the use of sound buttons and phoneme frames.

Seminar

PDA

Model phase 6/spelling lesson with analysis and commentary. Formative assessment – Introduction of running reading record for use on placement. Subject Knowledge audit and review.

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• Preparation for lecture • Engage with readings on intervention(see Blackboard) • Revisit aspect 3 in Rose. J (2006) The Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading accessed through the link below. This will further develop your understanding of supporting children with reading difficulties


PDA

Lecture

• Working in groups of 3 use the synthetic phonics planning proforma (see pg. 35) to plan and prepare to team-teach a synthetic phonics lesson from a given phase inLetters and Sounds accessed through the link below https://www.education.gov.uk/ publications/standard/publication detail/page1/DFES-00281- 2007 • You may also find the following website useful http://www.letters-and-sounds.com.”

• Intervention strategies • Differentiation through workingwith additional adults • Supporting struggling readers.

Seminar • Introduce the use of sound buttons and phoneme frames. • Mini teach • Two groups of three arrive for given 30 minute time slot and team- teach a section of their lesson (approx. 10 mins) • The ‘Synthetic Phonics Lesson Observation Feedback Grid’ willbe used for discussion andfeedback.”

Centre-based training (you should

Centre-based training (you should

Centre-based training (you should

expect to spend approx. 20 hrs. on this during your centre-based training)

expect to spend approx. 20 hrs. on this during your centre-based training)

expect to spend approx. 20 hrs. on this during your centre-based training)

Observe at least one synthetic phonics and guided reading lesson. Be observed teaching one of a minimum of three sequential synthetic phonics, guided reading or spelling lessons. If you are unable to carry this out in your school please contact your partnership tutor to discuss alternative arrangements. Using The CumbriaTeacher of Reading: effective teaching of reading (6 key principlesfor observing and teaching reading). Find out how your school approaches the teaching of reading and evaluatetheschemes and resources used. Gather evidence to present andfeedback againstthecore criteria.

Observe, at least, one synthetic phonics and guidedreadinglesson. Be observedteaching one of a minimum of three sequential synthetic phonicsandguidedreadinglessons.If you are unable to carry this out in your school please contact your partnershiptutor todiscuss alternative arrangements. Discuss possible answers toyour two questions (see above) with arange of school-based co l leagues. Effective teaching of reading days (2 days): collect evidence of and find out about how your schoolapproaches yourchosenkeyprincipleacross all age phases.

Seminar

• Phonics audit • Subject knowledge session

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Observe, at least, onesynthetic phonics and guided reading lesson. Be observedteaching one of a minimum of three sequential synthetic phonics and guided reading lessons. If you are unable to carry this out in your school please contact your partnership tutor to discuss alternative arrangements. Include a struggling reader as one of your profile children and assess and record progress and planning


By the end of this phase you should have developed: • understanding of terminologyassociated with teaching synthetic phonics; • a basic understanding of the Simple View of Reading in the context of the Cumbria Teacherof Readingsixkeyprinciples forthe effective teaching of reading; • understanding oftheskills (segmenting and blending/encoding and decoding) and knowledge (the alphabetic code)associated with synthetic phonics; • understanding of Rose’s (The Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading, Final Report, DfES 2006)) principles of the effective teaching of synthetic phonics; • knowledge of apossiblesynthetic phonics teaching sequence; • knowledge of the importance of developing speaking and listeningskills as a precursor to and an integral part of learning and teaching synthetic phonics.

By the end of this phase you should have developed: • understanding of the application ofsynthetic phonics for reading and spelling; • understanding of best practice inthe learning and teaching of synthetic phonics; • understanding of planning for progression ina systematic way; • knowledge of the core criteria for evaluating synthetic phonics schemes; • knowledge of a range of synthetic phonics schemes; • an ability to plan and teach aseries of synthetic phonics lessons.

By the end of this phase you should have developed: • knowledge and understanding of the: recommendations of the Rose Review; and the Simple View of Reading and be able to apply this understanding to your teaching of reading and writing (The IndependentReview of the Teaching of Early Reading, Final Report, DfES 2006); • knowledge and understanding of the alphabetic code; • knowledge and understanding of the Criteria for assuring high quality phonic work (DfE, 2011) and be able to recognise how they are met in a range of phonic programmes; • an ability to apply your knowledge and understanding of the Criteria to the teaching and assessment of phonics using aschool’s phonic programme; • an abilityto identify, and provide targeted support for,childrenmaking progress both beyond and belowthe expected level.



Reading 1 completed



Reading 1 completed



Reading 1 completed



Reading 2 completed



Reading 2 completed



Reading 2 completed



Reading 3 completed



Reading 3 completed



Reading 3 completed

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The Cumbria Teacherof Reading: effectiveteaching of reading 6 keyprinciples for observing and teaching reading P.1Use appropriate subject knowledge e.g. the Simple View of Reading (SVOR) • Plans clear learning objectives linked to word recognition or language comprehension • Teaches word recognition using a systematic approach to teaching synthetic phonics through an appropriate programme e.g. Letters and Sounds • Able to explain the effective feature of thesynthetic phonics programme used

• Teacheslanguage comprehension through: the explicit teaching of comprehension strategies (prediction, questioning, clarifying, imagining, and summarization talking about reading). • Provides opportunities toapply word recognition or language comprehension strategies • Models the use of wordrecognition and language comprehension processes • Uses knowledge of the children and knowledge of the SVOR to plan for differentiation

P.2 Read a range of texts for a range of purposes. • Children aware/made aware ofthe purpose of the text type/genre • Has secure subject knowledge of the structural and languagefeature of the text type/genre • Provides opportunitiesforimporting the content of other curricular areas into a English lesson and exporting skill from literacy lessons into other curricular areas. • Provides a relevant andinteresting context for children’s learning • Make use of and teaches how to usedigital literacies incorporatingsound and images as well as text • Provides opportunities for independent reading for purpose and pleasure • Shares their own readingpractices with children • Have different text types/genres available for children to read independently (including comics, children’s newspapers, jokebooks etc...)

P.3 Develop children’s reading for pleasure

• Engages and enthuses the children • Builds on and makes use of the children’s reading preferences • Demonstratesknowledge ofarange of children’sliterature • Plans exciting experiences linked to reading e.g. library visits, book shops to purchase books for the school library • Regularly reads to children, with expression and enthusiasm, toenjoy stories and to introduce children to a range of genre and authors. • Allows children to express their own opinions of a text and ask their own questions.

P.4 Integrate a r an g e of a s s e s s m e nt st r at eg i es

P.5 Model and promote a language rich curriculum

P.6 Promote and develop home/community/school partnership

• Makes notes about a target group of children in relation to learning objectives • Uses a range of questions to assess and develop language comprehension of word recognition e.g. inferential deductive, evaluative. • Involves children in their own assessment

• Provides opportunities for talk forlearning e.g. talk partners, collaborative work • Teaches vocabularydevelopment through literature and crosscurricular work • Makesuse oftheclassroom environment to promote and support the skills of wordrecognition, language comprehension and reading for pleasure • Supports reading through theuse of drama e.g. role play, hotseating, puppet.

• Uses effective system of communication between homeand school • Provides opportunities for parents/ carers to develop their own knowledge and understanding of the teaching ofreading

• Uses relevant data to track progress and set

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Beginning phase: record of both university and school based progress and personalised learning

University or c e nt r e - based learning In response to the beginning audit what is your first beginning phase target?

In response to your feedback from the small group teaching activity, what is your second beginning phase target?

Write two questions you have about teaching synthetic phonics on your beginning placement here. 1.

2.

School-based Following your observation of a class teacher teaching a synthetic phonics lesson, make a note of implications for your own learning below.

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Following the associate tutor/class teacher observation of you teaching a synthetic phonics lesson (may be to a small group), summarise below the subject specific feedback you received based on the ‘Synthetic Phonics Lesson Observation Feedback Grid’ highlighted by your associate tutor/class teacher on the following pages. Please note which synthetic phonics scheme you used and the phase taught. Please note what impact your teaching had on children’s learning and the evidence to support this.

With reference to ‘The Cumbria Teacher of Reading: effective teaching of reading (6 key principles for observing and teaching reading)’, note here how your beginning placement school approaches the teaching of reading.

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Beginning placement synthetic phonics: lesson observation feedbackgrid This gridisdesignedtosupportassociatetutors when observing students teaching synthetic phonics and providing subject specificfeedback

Student:

Tutor:

Date:

Age group:

Questions/ Prompts

Beginning

Developing

Extending

Planning and post-lesson discussion Are the learning objectives appropriate for the session?

The student is clear about what the children will learn within the lesson.

Thestudenthasplannedlearning within the lesson around an appropriate learning objective.

The student has planned for the progression of learning within asequence of lessons and can provide a justification.

Is assessment for learning opportunities built into the session?

Therearesomeassessmentfor learning opportunities builtinto the lesson

There’s clear evidence of assessment for learning opportunities being used in the lesson

Assessment for learningis used to inform future planning

Is the student able to discuss individual children’s progress?

Thestudent is abletodiscuss children’s learning

Thestudentisabletodiscuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled.

Thestudentisabletodiscuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled and to identify next steps for them.

Does the student ensure that children practice phonemes/ learning already taught?

The student attempts to revisit and review phonemes/learning already taught.

Thestudent ensures thatchildren revisit and review phonemes/ learning already taught

The student ensures that children revisit and review phonemes/ learning already taught in a systematic way.

Is it kept active and well-paced?

The review attempts to be well paced and active.

The review is well paced and active.

The review is well paced and active.

Are all children encouraged to contribute?

All of thechildren are encouraged to contribute

Children are encouraged to contribute at an appropriate level

Childrenare encouraged to contribute at their level with appropriate differentiation for the lessableandmore able. Additional adults contribute to the learning and/or assessment

Thestudentdemonstratesthe correct articulation of phonemes some of the time

Thestudentdemonstratesthe correct articulation of phonemes most of the time

The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes consistently

Lesson Observation Revisit and Review

Teach Is the articulation of phonemes correct?

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Does thestudent ensurechildren articulate phonemesthemselves?

The children practice articulating phonemes

The children practice articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation.

The children practice articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation andif necessaryuses thistoinform future planning

Are the children being taught how to blend and/or segment?

The student teaches the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

The student teaches andmodels the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

Thestudentteaches and models the skills of segmenting and/ or blending as part of the lesson andaddressesanydifficultiest hat children may be having

Is there evidence of newlearning, not just consolidation?

The student has planned for new learning.

Thestudentshares newlearning with the children.

Children are clear about what they are learning.

Are children given opportunities to read graphemes in words to practice the phoneme?

The studentplans opportunities for children to read graphemes in words to practice the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for andmodelsreadinggraphemesin words to practice the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for andmodelsreadinggraphemesin words to practice the phoneme. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities to blend phonemes to read words?

The studentplans opportunities for children to blend phonemes all through the word in order to read.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order toread.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order to read. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities tosegment words into phonemes/ graphemes for spelling?

The student plans opportunities for children to segment words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes forspelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words?

The student plans opportunities for children to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Do children have opportunities to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing activities?

The studentplans opportunities for children to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing activities

The student plans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing

The studentplans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Doactivities promotespeaking and listening?

The activities integrate speaking and listening strategies to support reading and writing.

The student makes explicit howthe speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing.

The student makes explicit how the speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

The student incorporates fun,multisensory interactive activities.

The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which are designed to support the learning objective.

The student incorporates fun, multi- sensory interactive activities which effectively support the learning objective.

Practice

Apply

Throughout the lesson Is the session multi-sensory, fun and interactive but tightly focused on the learning objective?

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Other comments, awareness, unde rsta ndi ng anduse of assessment

Following discussionwith the associate tutor/class teacher, please use the highlighting on the grid above to agree an appropriate target

Target:

Back to First Page 90


The Cumbria Teacher of Reading: end of beginning phase self-evaluation To be completed in the session Please highlight the statements below: Green – I feel that I have achieved this. Amber – I feel that I have achieved this to an extent. Red – I don’t feel that I have achieved this.

• I understand the terminology associated with teaching synthetic phonics. • I have a basic understanding of the Simple View of Reading. • I understand the skills (segmenting and blending/encoding and decoding) and knowledge(the alphabetic code) associated with synthetic phonics. • I have developed my understanding of Rose’s (The Independent Review of the Teaching of Early Reading, Final Report, DfES 2006)) principles of the effective teaching of syntheticphonics. • I can plan and deliver a short series of phonics sessions in order to become familiar with the synthetic phonics teaching sequence and can plan for progress. • Observe how speaking and listening is used in the teaching of synthetic phonics. • How would you rate this phase in the Cumbria Teacher of Reading? Please circle one of the below

Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Please provide further comments on your training in systematic synthetic phonics below.

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Developing phase: record of both centre and school based progress and personalised learning

University or c e nt r e - based learning Note what you have learned about learning and teaching in synthetic phonics through your university and school training.

In response to the results of your beginning phase self-evaluation audit and your notes above, what is your first developing phase?

target?

In response to your feedback from the small group teaching activity, what is your second developing phase target?

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Write two questions. One in relation to the application of synthetic phonics and another on the use of synthetic phonics programmes. 1.

2.

School-based Discuss possible answers to your two questions (see above) with a range of school-based colleagues. Note what you have learned from this below. 1.

2.

Following your observation of a class teacher teaching a synthetic phonics lesson, make a note of implications for your own learning below.

Back to First Page 93


Followingtheassociatetutor/classteacher observation ofyou teaching a synthetic phonics lesson, summarise belowthe subject specificfeedbackyoureceivedbasedonthe‘Synthetic Phonics Lesson Observation Feedback Grid’ highlightedbyyourassociatetutor/ class teacher on the following pages. Please note which synthetic phonics scheme you used and the phase taught. Please note what impact your teaching had on children’s learning and the evidence to support this.

Back to First Page 94


Developing placement synthetic phonics: lesson observation feedback grid

This gridisdesignedtosupportassociatetutors when observing students teaching synthetic phonics and providing subject specificfeedback

Student:

Tutor:

Date:

Age group:

Questions/ Prompts

Beginning

Developing

Extending

Planning and post-lesson discussion Are the learning objectives appropriate for the session?

The student is clear about what the children will learn within the lesson.

Thestudenthasplannedlearning within the lesson around an appropriate learning objective.

The student has planned for the progression of learning within asequence of lessons andcan provide a justification.

Are assessment for learning opportunities built into the session?

Therearesomeassessmentfor learning opportunities builtinto the lesson

There’s clear evidence of assessment for learning opportunities being used in the lesson

Assessmentforlearningis usedto inform future planning

Is the student able to discuss individual children’s progress?

Thestudent is abletodiscuss children’s learning

Thestudentisabletodiscuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled.

Thestudentisabletodiscuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled and to identify next steps for them.

Does the student ensure that children practicephonemes/ learning already taught?

The student attempts to revisit and review phonemes/learning already taught.

Thestudent ensures thatchildren revisit and review phonemes/ learning already taught

Thestudent ensures thatchildren revisit and review phonemes/ learning already taught in a systematic way.

Is it kept active and well-paced?

The review attempts to be well paced and active.

The review is well paced and active.

The review is well paced and active.

Are all children encouraged to contribute?

All of thechildren are encouraged to contribute

Children are encouraged to contribute at an appropriate level

Childrenare encouraged to contribute at their level with appropriate differentiation for the lessableandmoreable. Additional adults contribute to the learning and/or assessment

Lesson Observation Revisit and Review

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Teach Is the articulation of phonemes correct?

Thestudentdemonstratesthe correct articulation of phonemes some of the time

Thestudentdemonstratesthe correct articulation of phonemes most of the time

The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes consistently

Does thestudent ensurechildren articulate phonemesthemselves?

The children practice articulating phonemes

The children practice articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation.

The children practice articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation andif necessaryuses thistoinform future planning

Are the children being taught how to blend and/or segment?

The student teaches the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

The student teaches andmodels the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

Thestudentteaches andmodels the skills of segmenting and/ or blending as part of the lesson andaddressesanydifficultiesthat children may be having

Is there evidence of newlearning, not just consolidation?

The student has planned for new learning.

Thestudentshares newlearning with the children.

Children are clear about what they are learning.

Are children given opportunities to read graphemes in words to practice the phoneme?

The studentplans opportunities for children to read graphemes in words to practice the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for andmodelsreadinggraphemesin words to practice the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for andmodelsreadinggraphemesin words to practice the phoneme. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities to blend phonemes to read words?

The studentplans opportunities for children to blend phonemes all through the word in order to read.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order toread.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order to read. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities tosegment words into phonemes/ graphemes for spelling?

The student plans opportunities for children to segment words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes forspelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words?

The student plans opportunities for children to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Do children have opportunities to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing activities?

The studentplans opportunities for children to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing activities

The student plans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing

The studentplans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Doactivities promotespeaking and listening?

The activities integrate speaking and listening strategies to support reading and writing.

The student makes explicit howthe speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing.

The student makes explicit how the speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

The student incorporates fun,multisensory interactive activities.

The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which are designed to support the learning objective.

The student incorporates fun,multisensory interactive activitieswhich effectively support the learning objective.

Practice

Apply

Throughout the lesson Is the session multi-sensory, fun and interactive but tightly focused on the learning objective?

Back to First Page 96


Other comments, awareness, unde rsta ndi ng anduse of assessment

Following discussionwith the associate tutor/class teacher, please use the highlighting on the grid above to agree an appropriate target

Target:

Back to First Page 97


The Cumbria Teacher of Reading: end of developing phase self-evaluation To be completed in the session Please highlight the statements below: Green – I feel that I have achieved this. Amber – I feel that I have achieved this to an extent. Red – I don’t feel that I have achieved this.

• I understand what constitutes best practice in the learning and teaching of synthetic phonics • I can analyse a phonics program used in school and consider how it supports assessment and progression to planfor progression in a systematic way. • I can observe and plan the teaching of phonics and track, record and discuss progress • I have developed my knowledge of a range of synthetic phonics schemes and the need to embed them in my

classroom practice • I feel able to plan and teach a series of synthetic phonics lessons • I have developed my understanding of the application of synthetic phonics for reading and spelling focusing on segmenting for spelling skills.

• How would you rate this phase in the Cumbria Teacher of Reading? Please circle one of the below Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Please provide further comments on your training in systematic synthetic phonics below.

Back to First Page 98


Extending phase: record of bothuniversity and school based progress and personalised learning University or c e nt r e - based Note what you have learned about learning and teaching in synthetic phonics through your university and school training.

In response to the results of your developing phase self-evaluation audit and your notes above, what is your first extending phase target?

In response to your feedback and targets from developing placement from, what is your second extending phase target?

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In response to your learning in extending phase write two questions. One in relation to the assessment of synthetic phonics and another supporting struggling readers.

1.

2.

School based Discuss possible answers to your two questions (see above) with a range of school-based colleagues. Note what you have learned from this below. 1.

2.

Following your observation of a class teacher teaching a synthetic phonics lesson, make a note of implications for your own learning below.

Back to First Page 100


Following the associate tutor/class teacher observation ofyou teaching a synthetic phonicslesson, summarise below the subject specificfeedbackyoureceivedbasedonthe‘Synthetic Phonics Lesson Observation Feedback Grid’ highlightedbyyourassociatetutor/ class teacher on the following pages. Please note which synthetic phonics scheme you used and the phase taught. Please note what impact your teaching had on children’s learning and the evidence to support this.

Back to First Page 101


Extending placement synthetic phonics: lesson observation feedback grid

This gridisdesignedtosupportassociatetutors when observing students teaching synthetic phonics and providing subject specificfeedback

Student:

Tutor:

Date:

Age group:

Questions/ Prompts

Beginning

Developing

Extending

Planning and post-lesson discussion Are the learning objectives appropriate for the session?

The student is clear about what the children will learn within the lesson.

Thestudenthasplannedlearning within the lesson around an appropriate learning objective.

The student has planned for the progression of learning within asequence of lessons andcan provide a justification.

Are assessment for learning opportunities built into the session?

Therearesomeassessmentfor learning opportunities builtinto the lesson

There’s clear evidence of assessment for learning opportunities being used in the lesson

Assessmentforlearningis usedto inform future planning

Is the student able to discuss individual children’s progress?

Thestudent is abletodiscuss children’s learning

Thestudentisabletodiscuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled.

Thestudentisabletodiscuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled and to identify next steps for them.

Does the student ensure that children practice phonemes/ learning already taught?

The student attempts to revisit and review phonemes/learning already taught.

Thestudent ensures thatchildren revisit and review phonemes/ learning already taught

Thestudent ensures thatchildren revisit and review phonemes/ learning already taught in a systematic way.

Is it kept active and well-paced?

The review attempts to be well paced and active.

The review is well paced and active.

The review is well paced and active.

Are all children encouraged to contribute?

All of thechildren are encouraged to contribute

Children are encouraged to contribute at an appropriate level

Childrenare encouraged to contribute at their level with appropriate differentiation for the lessableandmoreable. Additional adults contribute to the learning and/or assessment

Lesson Observation Revisit and Review

Back to First Page 102


Teach Is the articulation of phonemes correct?

Thestudentdemonstratesthe correct articulation of phonemes some of the time

Thestudentdemonstratesthe correct articulation of phonemes most of the time

The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes consistently

Does thestudent ensurechildren articulate phonemesthemselves?

The children practice articulating phonemes

The children practice articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation.

The children practice articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation and if necessary uses thistoinform future planning

Are the children being taught how to blend and/or segment?

The student teaches the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

The student teaches andmodels the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

The student teaches and models the skills of segmenting and/ or blending as part of the lesson andaddressesanydifficultiesthat children may be having

Is there evidence of new learning, not just consolidation?

The student has planned for new learning.

The student shares new learning with the children.

Children are clear about what they are learning.

Are children given opportunities to read graphemes in words to practice the phoneme?

The studentplans opportunities for children to read graphemes in words to practice the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for andmodelsreadinggraphemesin words to practice the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for andmodelsreadinggraphemesin words to practice the phoneme. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities to blend phonemes to read words?

The studentplans opportunities for children to blend phonemes all through the word in order to read.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order toread.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order to read. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities tosegment words into phonemes/ graphemes for spelling?

The student plans opportunities for children to segment words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes forspelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Are children given opportunities to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words?

The student plans opportunities for children to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Do children have opportunities to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing activities?

The studentplans opportunities for children to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing activities

The student plans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing

The studentplans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Doactivities promotespeaking and listening?

The activities integrate speaking and listening strategies to support reading and writing.

The student makes explicit howthe speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing.

The student makes explicit how the speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

The student incorporates fun,multisensory interactive activities.

The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which are designed to support the learning objective.

The student incorporates fun,multisensory interactive activitieswhich effectively support the learning objective.

Practice

Apply

Throughout the lesson Is the session multi-sensory, fun and interactive but tightly focused on the learning objective?

Back to First Page 103


Other comments, awareness, unde rsta ndi ng anduse of assessment

Following discussionwith the associate tutor/class teacher, please use the highlighting on the grid above to agree an appropriate target.

Target:

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The Cumbria Teacher of Reading: end of extending phase self-evaluation To be completed in the session Please highlight the statements below: Green – I feel that I have achieved this. Amber – I feel that I have achieved this to an extent. Red – I don’t feel that I have achieved this.

• I feel secure in my knowledge and understanding of the: recommendations of the Rose Review; and the Simple View of Reading and feel able to apply this understanding to my teaching of reading and writing. • I feel secure in my knowledge and understanding of the alphabetic code; • I know what constitutes effective phonics teaching. • I feel that I would be able to apply my knowledge and understanding of effective phonics teaching to the teaching and assessment of phonics using a school’s phonic programme • I would be ableto use my knowledge of the Simple View of Reading and assessment, to identify, and provide targeted support for, children making progress both beyond and below the expected level • I feel confident in my ability to use my knowledge of phonics to develop children’s skills in English • How would you rate this phase in the Cumbria Teacher of Reading? Please circle one of the below Very good

Good

Satisfactory

Unsatisfactory

Please provide further comments on your training in systematic synthetic phonics below.

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Self-evaluation and reflection of your journey to becoming a Cumbria Teacher of Reading You may like to include in your reflection, some discussion around the following points: • • • • • • •

How has your subject knowledge improved? How has your teaching of reading improved? What has surprised you? What has inspired you? What do you want to develop further? What is the most important thing that you have learned? What impact has your teaching had on children’s learning and how do you know?

My impact grade from final block placement report is:

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Resources Synthetic Phonics Daily Plan My target for this session is‌

Phase and learning objective

Resources

Daily discrete teaching session Introduction

Revisit and review recently and previously learned letters andsounds

Teach new letters and sounds

Practice

Apply their phonics learning while reading/writing

Review

This is based on the Letters and Sounds suggested daily sequence. If your school uses a different phonics programme you may want to use their own planning proforma.

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Synthetic phonics: Phase 1 observation feedback grid This grid is designed to support associate tutors when observing students teaching synthetic phonics and providing subject specific feedback Student: Questions/ Prompts

Tutor:

Date: Beginning

Age group: Developing

Extending

Planning and post-lesson discussion Are the learning objectives appropriate for the session taking into account the developmental needs of the children?

The student is clear about what the children will learn within the session.

The student has planned learning within the session around an appropriate learning objective.

The student has planned for the progression of learning within a sequence of sessions and can provide a justification.

Are assessment for learning opportunities built into the session?

There are some assessment for learning opportunities built into the session

There’s clear evidence of assessment for learning opportunities being used in the session

Assessment for learning is used to inform future planning

Is the student able to discuss individual children’s progress?

The student is able to discuss children’s learning

The student is able to discuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled.

The student is able to discuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled and to identify next steps for them.

Can the student plan for progression at a range of levels?

The student is able to plan a discrete session for a small group based on 1 or more aspects from Phase 1.

The student provides opportunities for developing phonic awareness in both adult led and child initiated play-based learning.

The student plans creative learning opportunities in a range of areas of provision building clearly upon on the skills covered in previous adult led activities.

Session Observation Does the student model and support good listening and speaking skills?

The student is aware of the need to listen carefully to encourage talking and demonstrates this is in their practice.

Students actively encourage children to talk and listen. They consciously model these skills.

Students listen carefully to encourage children to talk, model good listening and provide good models of spoken English.

Are all children encouraged to listen attentively and contribute confidently at their own level?

All of the children are encouraged to contribute.

Children are encouraged to contribute at an appropriate level.

Children are encouraged to contribute at their level with appropriate differentiation for the less able and more able. Additional adults contribute to the learning and/or assessment.

Does the student enable children to develop and extend their vocabulary through opportunities to speak to a range of adults and children?

The student is aware of the need to plan for opportunities for children’s talk with the purpose of extending their vocabulary.

In small group work, student’s enable children to speak confidently and use a developing range of vocabulary. They are also aware of their role in supporting talk in the wider environment?

The student enables children make the most of planned and incidental opportunities to speak confidently to others and provides resources and experiences which enrich and enlarge children’s vocabulary.

Does the student provide opportunities for children to discriminate phonemes and orally reproduce

The student is aware of the need to support children in developing the skills of phoneme discrimination.

The student plans for activities which enable children to discriminate phonemes.

The student provides well planned, purposeful activities and experiences which enable children to learn and practice phoneme

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them through songs, games and rhymes? Does the student provide opportunities for children to reproduce audibly the phonemes they hear, in order, all through the word and use sound talk to segment words into phonemes – w here

discrimination at the appropriate level. The student is able to plan for children to sound words out using oral segmenting

The student is able to plan for and support the children in developing the skills of oral segmenting.

The student provides systematic, well planned, purposeful activities and experiences which enable children, where appropriate, to hear and say the sounds in order all through the word, segmenting orally. They are able to model this appropriately.

appropriate Is it kept active and wellpaced?

The student’s input attempts to be well paced and active.

The input is well paced and active.

The input is well paced and active.

Does the student optimise planned assessment opportunities?

The student is able to ask questions which focus on learning.

The student is able to ask differentiated questions which help children to focus on their learning.

The student uses observations and well differentiated questioning to assess children’s learning and is able to act on this in the session.

Is the articulation of phonemes correct?

The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes some of the time

The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes most of the time

The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes consistently

Does the student ensure children articulate phonemes themselves?

The children practise articulating phonemes

The children practise articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation.

The children practise articulating phonemes and the student addresses any incorrect articulation and if necessary uses this to inform future planning

Is there evidence of new learning, not just consolidation?

The student has planned for new learning.

The student shares new learning with the children.

Children are clear about what they are learning.

In independent learning experiences/activities Do children have opportunities to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading mark making in literate learning environment indoors and out?

The student provides opportunities for children to apply their phonic knowledge and skills in reading and mark making in a range of areas of continuous provision.

The student activelysupports children’s learning and models how to apply phonic knowledge and skills in reading and mark making in a range of areas of continuous provision.

The student actively supports children’s learning by engaging them in creative and developmentally appropriate experiences modelling a range of applications phonic knowledge and skills in reading and mark making. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

Throughout the session Is the session multisensory, fun and interactive but tightly focused on the learning objective?

The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities.

The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which are designed to support the learning objective.

Other comments:

Please use the highlighting on the grid above to identify an appropriate target

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The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which effectively support the learning objective.


Target:

Synthetic phonics: Phase 6 observation feedback grid This grid is designed to support associate tutors when observing students teaching synthetic phonics and providing subject specific feedback Student: Questions/ Prompts Are the learning objectives appropriate for the session?

Are assessment for learning opportunities built into the session? Is the student able to discuss individual children’s progress?

Does the student ensure that children practise phonemes/learning already taught? Is it kept active and well-paced?

Tutor:

Date: Beginning Developing Planning and post-lesson discussion The student is clear about The student has planned what the children will learning within the lesson learn within the lesson. around an appropriate learning objective. There are some assessment for learning opportunities built into the lesson The student is able to discuss children’s learning

There’s clear evidence of assessment for learning opportunities being used in the lesson The student is able to discuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled.

Lesson Observation Revisit and Review The student attempts to The student ensures that revisit and review GPC’s children revisit and review already taught. GPC’s already taught

Does the student ensure children articulate phonemes and letter names themselves?

The review attempts to be The review is well paced well paced and active. and active. Teach The student demonstrates The student demonstrates the correct articulation of the correct articulation of phonemes and letter phonemes and letter names some of the time. names most of the time The children practise The children practise articulating phonemes articulating phonemes and letter names. and letter names and the student addresses any incorrect articulation.

Are the children being taught how to blend and/or segment fluently?

The student teaches the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

The student teaches and models the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson

Is there evidence of new learning, not just consolidation?

The student has planned for new learning.

The student shares new learning with the children.

Is the articulation of phonemes and letter names correct?

Are children given opportunities to read graphemes in words to practise the phoneme?

Are children given opportunities to blend phonemes to read words?

Practise The student plans The student plans opportunities for children opportunities for and to read graphemes in models reading words to practise the graphemes in words to phoneme practise the phoneme

The student plans opportunities for children to blend phonemes all through the word in order to read.

The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order to read.

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Age group: Extending The student has planned for the progression of learning within a sequence of lessons and can provide a justification. Assessment for learning is used to inform future planning The student is able to discuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled and to identify next steps for them.

The student ensures that children revisit and review GPC’s already taught in a systematic way. The review is well paced and active. The student demonstrates the correct articulation of phonemes and letter names consistently The children practise articulating phonemes and letter names and the student addresses any incorrect articulation and if necessary uses this to inform future planning The student teaches and models the skills of segmenting and/or blending as part of the lesson and addresses any difficulties that children may be having Children are clear about what they are learning.

The student plans opportunities for and models reading graphemes in words to practise the phoneme. Appropriate differentiation is evident. The student plans opportunities for and models blending phonemes all through the word in order to read. Appropriate differentiation is evident.


Are children given opportunities to segment words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling?

The student plans opportunities for children to segment words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling

Are children given opportunities to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words?

The student plans opportunities for children to write the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words

Do children have opportunities to apply their phonic knowledge and spelling skills in reading and writing activities across the curriculum?

The student plans opportunities for children to apply their phonic knowledge and spelling skills in reading and writing activities

Do activities promote speaking and listening?

The activities integrate speaking and listening strategies to support reading and writing.

Is the session multisensory, fun, interactive and investigative but tightly focused on the learning objective?

Apply The student plans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and spelling skills in reading and writing

Throughout The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities.

The student plans opportunities for and models segmenting words into phonemes/graphemes for spelling. Appropriate differentiation is evident. The student plans opportunities for and models writing the grapheme or graphemes in order to spell words. Appropriate differentiation is evident. The student plans opportunities for and models how to apply phonic knowledge and spelling skills in reading and writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

The student makes explicit how the speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing.

The student makes explicit how the speaking and listening strategies will support the children with reading and/or writing. Appropriate differentiation is evident.

the lesson The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which are designed to support the learning objective.

The student incorporates fun, multisensory interactive activities which effectively support the learning objective.

Other comments:

Please use the highlighting on the grid above to identify an appropriate target Target:

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Guided reading: lesson observation feedback grid This grid is designed to support associate tutors when observing students teaching Guided Reading and providing subject specific feedback

Student: Questions/ Prompts Are the learning objectives appropriate for the session?

Are assessment for learning opportunities built into the session?

Is the student able to discuss individual children’s progress?

Is the text/task well matched to the reading ability of the group?

Does the student ensure the children activate their prior knowledge of the main features of the topic/text type?

Are children supported in addressing new and tricky words in the text?

Does the student give the children clear objectives to focus on when they read?

Tutor:

Date: Beginning Developing Planning and post-lesson discussion The student is clear about what The student has planned the children will learn within the learning within the lesson lesson. around an appropriate learning objective. There are some assessment There’s clear evidence of for learning opportunities built assessment for learning into the lesson. opportunities being used in the lesson. The student is able to discuss children’s learning.

The student is able to discuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled.

Lesson Observation Book Introduction The student has an awareness Student selects task/text of the children’s ability and with appropriately based on support from the class teacher knowledge of students. can choose a suitable text/task. Student uses knowledge of children’s ability to match task. The student has an awareness Student has an understanding of the main features of the text of different genres and recaps type. Some strategies used to on prior knowledge. They help develop the children’s children to make links between knowledge of text. Links are the text and their own beginning to be made to the experiences children’s experience.

Student draws attention to tricky words and key vocabulary in the text

Tricky words and key vocabulary are planned for and children are encouraged to make links to helpful resources and prior learning Key learning points/strategy check The student is aware of what The student shares clear objectives the children need to objectives with the children and focus on. they know what they are focusing on in their text/task.

Does the student encourage children to use their phonic knowledge to blend and segment?

Student is aware that phonic knowledge is necessary to read. Student demonstrates phonic knowledge. Children are encouraged to blend and segment.

Student has planned opportunities for children to blend and segment and models it appropriately.

Does the student monitor the reading behaviour and strategies used by the children?

The student is aware of different reading behaviour and strategies and is beginning to recognise and support them in use.

Student is aware of and monitors different strategies. Effective reading behaviour and strategies are modelled and monitored.

Does the student give the children opportunities to read independently and for a purpose?

Are more able children extended and challenged?

Independent reading Some opportunities are Independent reading planned provided for independent for. The purpose is shared and reading explored with the children.

Student knows which children are more able. With support they can provide experiences which challenge children.

Student plans interactive opportunities and activities to challenge more able.

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Age group: Extending The student has planned for the progression of learning within a sequence of lessons and can provide a justification. Assessment for learning is used to inform future planning.

The student is able to discuss children who had difficulties and those who excelled and to identify next steps for them.

Student independently chooses a text/ task that is matched to the reading abilities of the children. Choice of texts linked to assessment focus. Recaps on prior knowledge and is able to react to and address needs during session. Student enables children to discuss and identify different genres. They use the children’s own experiences to encourage meaningful connections with the text. Children actively scan for unfamiliar and tricky words and use a range of strategies to support their decoding and comprehension Clear objectives are given to the children and reinforced, success criteria are shared. There is evidence of new learning and not consolidation. Children are encouraged to self-assess. Children blend and segment at their own level with differentiation. Children are given the confidence to tackle a range of unfamiliar words. Student plans for and supports the use of a wide range of strategies to decode new words. Student consistently monitors and understands strategies. AFL is used effectively and children are aware of how they read.

Purposeful independent reading and engagement with the text is a key aspect of the lesson. Student develops fluent, skilful readers who show a love of reading. More able children are challenged appropriately. Children are enthused and want to read stretching/stimulating books.


Is the session interactive and multi-sensory?

Student is aware of the need for sessions to be interactive.

Do the children have the opportunity to discuss the strategies they used?

Return to the text and response The children are not asked The student asks children about the strategies they have about the strategies they have used. used.

Does the student encourage the children to reflect on what they have read and offer interpretations?

The student has planned for discussion opportunities and helps children to talk about their reading.

Student plans and models ways of responding to reading. Children are encouraged to engage in focuseddiscussions.

Does the student ask and encourage children to ask higher order questions?

The student uses a range of questions that encourage children to discuss their reading.

The student uses a range of open ended questions and encourages children to so too.

Are the children prepared for the next session?

The session is a self-contained unit.

Planning has ensured that progress is evident and the children know what they are going to do in the next session.

Are all children encouraged to contribute throughout?

Throughout the session All of the children are Children are encouraged to encouraged to contribute. contribute at an appropriate level.

Does the student give feedback on success and areas for development?

Student is aware that feedback needs to be given and praises children’s success in reading.

Student gives individualised on children’s reading, comprehension and discussion contributions.

Class management

The student manages the learning and behaviour of the group they are working with.

The student aware of what all groups of children are doing and is able to monitor and manage their learning and behaviour.

Children are engaged in actively exploring the text through a range of different activities.

Other comments:

Please use the highlighting on the grid above to identify an appropriate target Target:

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Children are provided with a range of differentiated, interactive learning activities which enable them to develop their reading and comprehension skills. Where necessary extension activities are provided linked to the main session. Children discuss the strategies they have used and are able to discuss which are more appropriate. Children are able to engage in debate about their reading offering evidence for their views Student plans for children to respond and differentiates appropriately. Children ask high order questions independently and use these to develop their discussions and understanding. Next steps are planned for and shared with the children. They are clear about how their learning will develop and what they can do to ensure progress. Children are encouraged to contribute at their level with appropriate differentiation for the less able and more able. Feedback/success for development is a key aspect of the session. It is clearly linked to AFL and next steps. The student has planned for the learning of all children and is able to assess all children’s learning.


The AlphabeticCode complex code simple code Teach. th.is first.

40+phonemes (sounds) of spokenEnglish & key words

(1) Ch.oose an order of introduction of letter/s-sound correspondences for a version of a simple code. Teach. 3 to 6 correspondences per week. Provide a cumulative word bank (for th.e simple code) for modelling blending allth.rough.-th.e-wordfor reading, and segmenting all-th.rough.-th.e-spoken-word for spelling. Th.e 'simple code', in effect, is part of th.e complex code but it is just a 'jlrst step' of introducing th.e complexities of th.e English. writing system for reading and spelling. (2) Keep th.e simple code revised and begin to introduce spelling and pronunciation variations of th.e complex code at a rate appropriate to th.e age and stage of th.e pupils. Th.e alph.abetic code is not an 'exact science' and accents need to be taken into account at all times along with. th.e notion of 'twea king pronunciations' wh.en decoding to reach. th.e regional or preferred pronunciation of th.e target word. Tweaking pronunciations also h.elps to raise awareness of th.e 'sch.wa effect' (unstressed syllables) wh.ereby in reality th.e sound /u/ is th.e spoken translation of th.e written code in words such. as ' sofa' (sofu), 'faster ' (Jastu), 'little ' (littul), 'around' (uround). Th.e reverse of th.is is th.e need to be aware of th.e spelling possibilities wh.en segmenting spoken words for writing - particularly with. regards to th.e sch.wa effect. Th.e ability to spell accurately relies on a growing knowledge of word banks (words with. th.e same spelling and sound variations) and th.is knowledge takes much. longer to acquire th.an learning to decode well. Always emph.asise th.e relationsh.ip between sounds and letters wh.en teach.ing spelling rath.er th.an relying on visual memory of letter order. main graphemes (spelling variations) & key words

/al ant

bb bat

rabbit

1'

cat

k

CR

ch

qu

que

kitten

back

chemist

marquee

plaque

c

dd

ed

doq

ladder

coloured

/el

ea

eqq

head

fish I

¡

gate

ff

ph

9h

fluff

graph

rough

99

9h

9u

digger

ghost

guard

hat

/i/

y

in k

cygnet

.

9e

.

jug

cabbage

l

-d9e 9 (soft) 9 (soft) 9 (soft) qy psy ger m gir affe hedge

) e '-,

I leq

'schwa' effect

-LL

I

.

map

bell

mm

mb

mn

hammer

thumb

hymn

-le

-il

-al -el

-ol

table

pencil

animal

symbol

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label


I

nn

kn

gn

nut

funny

knock

gnat

Joi

(w) a

octopus

wasp

(w h)a (qu)a what

quad

rr

wr

rh

curry

wrist

rhyme

ss

se

ce

kiss

house

palace

.

pp

n

apple

• I queen rat I

I sun tin

/u/ umbrella

SC scent

tt

ed

bt

pt

otter

jumped

debt

receipt

0 love

OU

ps psychic

C (soft) certa in

C (soft) cit y

famous

-ve van

qive I

wh

wing

wheel

.• box Iv

-ks

-k-s (gz)

books

cakes

exam

s

se

was

please

breeze

ch

ti

ci

ssi

chef

station

musician

mission

a

a-e

ey

yellow

zz

I

zoo

buzz

ze

tch patch

chin ('

shell

' moth

'

this I

. J

nk (ng+k)

rinq

drink

/ai/

ay

aim

tray

table

/eel

ea

eel

.

eat

/igh/ Le

eigh ea

qate

qrey

eight

e

y

ey

e-e

me

rain y

key

swede

y

l

.

.

L-e

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.

steak

Le

thief

. eL

.

vein

l

radio

C (soft) c_y_cle


light

pie

fly

blind

bike

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Joa/

ow

oe

o-e

ough

oak

0 gold

blow

toe

rope

dougn

/ue/

u

ew

u-e

statue

unicorn

news

cube

Joo/

oul

u

book

snould

put

Joo/

ew

ue

u-e

ui

moon

brew

blue

flute

fruit

/ou/

ow

ough

out

owl

bouqn

/oi/

oy

oil

boy

/er/

ir

ur

ear

(w)or our

-re

nerbs

qirl

purse

eartn

worm

journe4

centre

Jar/

(a)

al

arm

(grass)

calm

/or/

aw

au

al

oor

ore

our

(w)ar oar

ornament

claw

sauce

cnalk

door

snore

four

wart

/air/

ear

are

ere

eir

heir

aircra

tear

snare

tnere

tneir

neirloom

Jeer/ ear

ere

ier

cneerful

nere

pier

.., • L•

ea rs

.

oar

SL s z television azure treasure Cnaracteristics of tile Englisn writing system include: 1. 2. 3.

one sound can be represented by o ne, two or more letters (e.g. z, p, sh, ng, igh) one sound can be represented by different spellings (e.g . o, oa, ow, oe, o-e, ough) one spelling can represent multiple sounds (e.g. ough - though, thought, through, bough)

In the alphabetic code chart above, slashes // denote phonemes (sounds) and ke y words provide an example word for each letter/s-sound correspondence. Grey correspondences denote consonant phonemes and black correspondences denote vowel phonemes. Different phonics programmes have different versions of a 'simple code' therefore the order of introduction of any letter/s-sound correspondences should be determined b4 the chosen proqramme and decodable readinq books.

NOTE.

• • •

Treat the letter 'x' as one unit of sound although it is really two: 'x' = /k/+/s/ = ks; but look at words such as 'box', 'fox', 'ox' and compare with words such as 'books' and 'likes' where letter 'k' and letter 's' each represent one unit of sound Treat the letters 'qu' as one unit of sound for teaching at the simple code level: 'qu' = /k/+/w/ = kw Treat the letters 'nk' as one unit of sound for early teaching although it is really two: 'nk' =/ng/+/k/ The letters 'ue' can be an /oo/ sound or two sounds: /y/+/oo/ = yoo but treat the letters flexibly by trying 'yoo' or the loo/ sound when reading and consider the 'ue' as in words such as 'statue' as if it was one sound unit

www.syntheticphonics.com www.n-f.org.uk www.dyslexics.org.uk

© Debbie Hepplewhite 2006

Debbie Hepplewhite's website The Reading Reform Foundation Susan Godsland's award-winning site Back to First Page 117


Pleasekeepa running record of your school experience here: Beginning Phase: School

Year Group(s) taught

Phases taught

Scheme(s) used

Year Group(s) taught

Phases taught

Scheme(s) used

Year Group(s) taught

Phases taught

Scheme(s) used

Developing Phase: School

Extending Phase: School

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End of Placement Reports

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Page Intentionally Blank

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END OF PLACEMENT REPORT For all EYFS / KS1&2 Placements- Length: 4 Weeks or More Revised Sept 2017 THIS FORM CAN BE SAVED ON YOUR OWN COMPUTER BEFORE BEING COMPLETED BY THE ASSOCIATE TUTOR AND THEN MUST BE RETURNED VIA EMAIL TO THE UNIVERSITY (SEE THE END OF THIS DOCUMENT), BY THE DATE SPECIFIED IN THE PLACEMENT BOOKLET

Trainee Name

University Programme

Choose an item.

If School Direct please include alliance Name University Year Group

Choose an item.

Age Range Taught

Setting/ School

No. of Children Taught

Mentor

University Partnership Tutor / PPL

Class Teacher Name

Class

For mixed Key Stage classes please indicate number of pupils in each Key Stage KAP Point and Placement Dates

Placement Outcome (2 Results Required)

Choose an item.

From:

To:

Click or tap to enter a date.

Click or tap to enter a date.

Professional Practice

Placement File/ Reflection

Choose an item.

Choose an item.

A trainee would be deemed to have failed where no / insufficient progress has been made against targets set in B and D phases. In E phase a grade 4 in any standard indicates fail.

OVERALL SUMMARY STATEMENT [THIS WILL BE USED AS A BASIS FOR AN INTERIM OR FINAL REFERENCE] Please note: This statement should be informed by the Trainee’s attainment against grade assessment criteria and the Trainee Teacher Standards. Please comment directly on the Trainee’s impact on children’s learning. Please type your statement here:

The Trainee’s Teaching has had ‘Impact on children’s learning and progress over time’. Please indicate below: 4 Little / No Impact ☐

3 Pupils make some progress as expected over time.

2 Pupil progress as expected over time-Impact

Comments to be drawn from the Common Assessment Framework: Teacher Standard: Comment: S1: Set high expectations which inspire, motivate and challenge pupils. Back to First Page 121

1 Good or better pupil progress over time- Impact ☐

KAP Grade:

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S2: Promote good progress and outcomes by pupils

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S3: Demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge

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S4: Plan and teach well-structured lessons

Choose an item. S5: Adapt teaching to respond to the strengths and needs of all pupils

Choose an item.

S6: Make accurate and productive use of assessment

Choose an item.

S7: Manage behaviour effectively to ensure a good and safe learning environment

Choose an item.

S8: Fulfil wider professional responsibilities

Choose an item.

Part Two: Personal & Professional conduct. Trainees embarking on a programme of ITE will have demonstrated that they possess the required attitudes and behaviours as an element of the selection process. No matter which route to QTS they follow all trainees are expected to demonstrate high professional standards from the outset. For that reason the guidance on the standards in Part Two are not graded. All trainees to be awarded QTS will have demonstrated high standards of professional behaviour and that: They have a commitment to the teaching profession, and are able to develop appropriate professional relationships with colleagues and pupils. They have regard to the need to safeguard pupils’ well-being, in accordance with statutory provisions. They understand that by law that schools are required to teach a broad and balanced curriculum and they are beginning to develop learners’ wider understanding of social and cultural diversity.

Has the Trainee demonstrated an acceptable level of personal and professional conduct?

Choose an item. Comment:

They are willing to assume an appropriate degree of responsibility for the implementation of workplace policies in the different settings in which they have trained. They adhere to school policies and practices, including those for attendance and punctuality. They have a broad understanding of their statutory professional responsibilities, including the requirement to promote equal opportunities and to provide reasonable adjustments for pupils with disabilities, as provided for in current equality legislation. They are aware of the professional duties of

teachers as set out in the statutory School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions document.

A signed copy should be retained in the Trainee’s file as part of the ‘Student Progress Assessment Record’ Back to First Page 122


Key Agendas: Please use this box to comment directly on the Trainee’s confidence and competence in the understanding and teaching of A) Systematic Synthetic Phonics and Reading; B) Writing; C) Mathematics Please type your statement here:

Placement File Please comment on the trainee’s reflection and organisation of their file Please type your statement here:

IDENTIFICATION OF STRENGTHS AND PRIORITIES FOR FURTHER DEVELOPMENT: For inclusion in the Career Entry & Development Profile or Target Setting for future placements, as appropriate). [Please identify up to 3 strengths and 3 priorities for development in relation to the Trainee's teaching.] Strengths:

Priorities for Further Development Targets

RELEVANT

ACTIONS TO

SUCCESS

TIMESCALE

STANDARDS Drawn from Common Framework

BE TAKEN BY TRAINEE

CRITERIA How will you know it has been achieved?

FOR ACHIEVEMENT

REVIEW OF TARGET (Dated)

1.

2.

3.

A signed copy should be retained in the Trainee’s file as part of the ‘Student Progress Assessment Record’

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HEADTEACHER'S or MENTORS ADDITIONAL COMMENTS (Not Compulsory): Please type your statement here:

Number of absences from placement Signature of Trainee (Who must be provided with a copy of the report) Signature of Mentor

Please email this form from the School email address to your University Partnership Tutor/PPL and to: Carlisle Campus

Lancaster Campus

London (EIDR) Campus

School Direct

KAPcarlisle@cumbria.ac.uk

KAPlancaster@cumbria.ac.uk

KAPLondon@cumbria.ac.uk

‘Your PPL’

A signed copy should be retained in the Trainee’s file as part of the ‘Student Progress Assessment Record’ Back to First Page 124


School Information, Policies and Class Data

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Page Intentionally Blank

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CONTENTS 1 2 3 4

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6 7 8 9 11-16 17 18

19 20-21 22 23 24 25

26 Appendix 1 Appendix 2

Contents Introduction School Ethos A Brief History Contact Details Teaching Staff Classroom Support Staff Support Staff Instrumental Music Teachers Students Governing Body Community Links Pupils with Disabilities Security Visiting Arrangements Times of the School Day Current School Organisation Teaching and Learning Curriculum Subject Statements Extra Curricular Activities Homework Children with Special Educational Needs Religious Education and Worship Sex and Relationships Education School Rules Code of Conduct for Behaviour Behaviour and Discipline Parent/Teacher Conferences Pastoral Care School Dress School Meals ‘MOSAICS’ Out of School Provision St. Mark’s School P.T.A. (Parent Teacher Association) Attendance and Absence Charging for School Activities Insurance Matters Secondary Education Formal Complaints Disclaimer School Holiday Dates 2016/2017 and 2017/2018 School Admissions Policy

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INTRODUCTION

The winged lion, symbol of St Mark, represents the strength we can all find in God combined with the potential to achieve great things and ‘soar on wings like eagles.’

St Mark’s is a successful, happy and welcoming rural school serving the children of Natland, the Oaks, the Beeches, Oxenholme and beyond. Our most recent Ofsted inspection report (September 2011) judged St Mark’s to be a good school with outstanding features. The opening paragraph of the report states, ‘St Mark’s is a good school with a friendly and welcoming environment. The Headteacher has established a good climate for learning and a clear focus on raising achievement.’ We are very proud of our school and its place at the heart of the local community. We build everything that we do on a set of 15 Christian values: compassion creation endurance fellowship forgiveness friendship hope humility justice peace reverence service thankfulness trust wisdom Our focus this year will be on: humility, creation and reverence. These values, looked at over a four year rolling programme, form the basis for the worship life of the school, underpin our approach to discipline and our expectations for behaviour and influence the way in which all members of the school community conduct themselves. Our aim is to maintain high academic standards year on year but more importantly work hard to ensure good progress is made by all children. Consistent with our caring and inclusive ethos, any child with particular or special needs is well supported by our dedicated team of support staff. Being a Voluntary Aided (V.A.) Church school provides many opportunities for independence, flexibility and creativity within a clear moral framework that puts individual self-worth and our 15 Christian Values at the heart of all teaching and learning. We try to provide as many and as wide a variety of opportunities in sports and the arts for all pupils during each school year. As an accredited Healthy School we actively promote healthy eating, healthy lifestyles and pupil involvement in decision making. Catering is provided by local company Orian with the majority of our children regularly eating hot, healthy meals freshly prepared on the premises.

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Walking the Labyrinth SCHOOL ETHOS We aim to provide a safe, caring and inclusive environment in which everyone is able to learn, try new things and grow as a fully rounded individual: finding strength in God and soaring on wings like eagles. We aim to provide education in accordance with the principles and practices of the Church of England. Worship, good quality religious education and spiritual development are at the heart of every aspect of the work of our school. Celebration, inclusion, forgiveness, grace and mercy are some of the key aspects of school life that give it a distinctive Christian ethos. We are currently working to develop our understanding of the values that underpin the work of a church school. The focus this school year will be on: humility, creation and reverence. Such values operate as a filter for decision making at every level and help to guide the activities and life of the school. A brief summary of the vision statement for St. Mark’s appears, in no particular order, below:  to foster a clear Christian ethos  to support, recognise and celebrate the achievement and progress of all children in the school  to encourage progress, maintain high standards and constantly strive for improvement  to be a focal point, support and resource for the community  to have close and mutually supportive links with the local church  to develop strong links with other educational providers  to work openly and in partnership with the Kendal Collaborative Partnership (our cluster of local schools)  to be welcoming, accessible and actively encouraging of parental involvement  to participate enthusiastically in educational initiatives  to participate in a wide range of sporting and cultural events  to provide high quality, relevant professional development for all staff  to maintain the fabric of the building and its environment to ensure safety and inspire learning  to build our educational practice on recent rigorous research

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St Mark’s Church of England Primary School, Natland

A BRIEF HISTORY Our School has occupied its present building since 1967 with additions in 1972, 1989 and 1994. It is believed to be the fourth school building in the village. Records show the existence of a school in 1881, 1825 and possibly further back to the 17th century. In 2003 a new school hall was added along with other alterations giving an additional classroom and a new corridor linking the two main sections of the school. In 2006 a seventh classroom was established by re-working existing rooms and the library was brought to the centre of the school. A dedicated outside area for the younger children was created in 2007 as an extension to the Reception classroom. More recent work has included re-roofing, replacement of the main heating boilers, toilet refurbishment and an extension to the car park. In 2014 new office space and a new school entrance were added. Work has recently been undertaken on alterations to two classrooms and a new classroom is currently being built. The school roll is likely to grow as large housing projects are completed in the catchment area and so the recent projects have been carried out to ensure that we have 7 teaching spaces able to accommodate 30 pupils. The school is set in extensive grounds incorporating a large playground, playing field, adventure play area, an outside classroom, kitchen garden planters and a wildlife area. Each year we harvest a wide range of home grown fruit and vegetables as our ‘Hidden Haven’ has become established. CONTACT DETAILS School Address Telephone Fax E-mail Website Headteacher

TEACHING STAFF Mr P Barfoot Mrs J Grant Mrs D Thorne Mrs E Mukerji Mrs S Robinson Mrs J Yarker Mrs H Cook Mrs K Hardy Mrs C Burrow Mrs C Millington Mrs L Whittaker Mrs R Shone Mr C Fonth

St. Mark's Church of England Primary School Oxenholme Lane, Natland, Kendal, LA9 7QH. 015395 60719 015395 61769 admin@st-marks.cumbria.sch.uk www.stmarksschoolnatland.co.uk Mr. Peter Barfoot

Headteacher Deputy Headteacher / Year 1 EYFS Reception Special Needs Co-ordinator (0.4) Year 2 (0.5) Year 2 (0.5) Year 3 Year 4 (0.6) Year 4 currently on maternity leave Year 4 (0.4) maternity leave cover Year 5 (0.6) Year 5 (0.4) Year 6

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CLASSROOM SUPPORT STAFF Mrs M Bell Higher Level Teaching Assistant Mrs K Keech Higher Level Teaching Assistant Mrs J Sharpe Senior Teaching Assistant Mrs M Hicks Senior Teaching Assistant Mrs S Paxton Senior Teaching Assistant Mrs R Wheeler Senior Teaching Assistant Mrs K Chapman Teaching Assistant SUPPORT STAFF Mrs M Illingworth Mrs D Clark Mr I. Walker

School Business Manager Administrative Support Cleaner / Caretaker

MIDDAY STAFF Mrs I. Askew Mrs A Inman Mrs G Forshaw Mrs A Paul Mrs S Hannah Mrs S Hopton

Midday Supervisor Midday Supervisor Midday Supervisor Midday Supervisor Midday Supervisor Midday Supervisor

INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC TEACHERS Mrs S Foxcroft Brass Mrs D Howrie Violin Mrs C Scott Woodwind Ms P Legat / Mrs J Knaggs Keyboard Mr R Dewsbury Guitar STUDENTS We work in partnership with the University of Cumbria and regularly welcome trainee teachers on placement in school. The KCP (Kendal Collaborative Partnership) group of local schools, working with the Queen Katherine Teaching School Alliance, hosts a number of post-graduate trainee teachers in our own schools. This is in conjunction with the University of Cumbria and is part of a government drive through the School Direct programme to offer alternative routes into the profession. We often have child care or trainee teaching assistant students from Kendal College or Lancaster and Morecambe College on placement in school. In the Summer term we often welcome students on work experience placements from local secondary schools.

Sportshall Athletics October 2016

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GOVERNING BODY – September 2016 Name Category Mr T Ward Chair (Foundation Governor) Mrs D Whitehead Foundation Governor Mrs D Outhwaite Vice Chair (Foundation Governor) Mrs I Askew Associate Member Mr S Ibbs Foundation Governor Mr A Thiedeman Local Authority Governor Mr G. Field Parent Governor Mrs J Whiteley Parent Governor Ms C Watson Foundation Governor Mrs J Grant School Staff Governor Mr S Barber Foundation Governor Mr P Barfoot Ex Officio (Headteacher) Canon A Whittaker Ex Officio A ‘Foundation‘ governor is one appointed on the recommendation of the Parochial Church Council

CLERK TO THE GOVERNING BODY: Mrs L Rudelhoff Scott

Lantern Festival

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COMMUNITY LINKS St Mark’s School is at the heart of the community. We welcome and value the support of a great many local volunteer helpers into school on a regular basis. We maintain good links with the following businesses and organisations:  St Mark’s Church  Natland Table Tennis Club  St Mark’s PCC  United Utilities  Natland Parish Council  Asda Stores  Natland and Oxenholme Pre-School  Morrisons  Cumbria Police  South Lakeland District Council  Cumbria Fire Service  Appletree School  Lighting Up the Natland Night  Kendal Torchlight  Chestnut Events  Kendal Care Home  Age UK  Brewery Arts Centre

PUPILS WITH DISABILITIES St. Mark’s is equipped with adequate facilities to admit pupils with disabilities, i.e. ramps and an adapted toilet. At St. Mark’s we treat pupils with disabilities equally with others and aim to give them equal access to all areas of the curriculum.

Year 4 Woodland Camp – Summer 2016 SECURITY A security system and protocol is in place which aims to prevent unauthorised entry and unauthorised pupil exit. Once the school is in session access to the school is only possible at the main door where visitors are processed by office staff before door magnets are released to provide entry. All other entrances are locked during the school day. All visitors are given a labelled badge to wear for the duration of their visit. The Headteacher and School Business Manager’s offices are situated by the main door. VISITING ARRANGEMENTS We value the involvement and co-operation of parents in the education of their children. We like to feel at St Mark’s that parents are always welcome to visit, but ask for consideration in making contact with the staff so that interruptions to lessons at the start of the school day are kept to a minimum. Appointments to see staff should be made through the school office.

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The Headteacher is always willing to meet with parents and show the school at work. An open day and ‘drop-in’ session is held during the Autumn term when parents of prospective EYFS children have the opportunity to see the school at work and ask any questions they may have. For those children offered a place to start school in September there is a special meeting held in the preceding June.

Key Stage 2 Production July 2016 – ‘Cinderella Rockerfella’

TIMES OF THE SCHOOL DAY (MOSAICS provides Breakfast Club provision from 7.45 a.m. each school day) 8.45 9.00 10.30 10.45 11.45 12.00 1.00 2.20 2.35 3.20 3.30

Playground supervision School session 1 Break School session 2 Lunch break (Reception) Lunch break (all other classes) School session 3 Break School session 4 End of school day(Reception) End of school day (all other classes)

We take responsibility for your children 15 minutes before and after the school day

At the end of the day all children should be met at the front door of the school by a parent or nominated adult.

(MOSAICS provides After School care between 3.30 and 6.00 p.m. each school day) Please note that children should not be at School before 8.45 a.m. as we are not legally responsible for them before this time. When the children arrive at school we ask that they go straight to the playground where appropriate supervision is in place. Children in the Reception class go straight to their classroom on arrival from 8.45 a.m. Children need to be collected promptly at the end of the school day. If for any reason you have difficulties in bringing or collecting children at the correct times please let us know.

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CURRENT SCHOOL ORGANISATION The children are divided into seven year groups based on their chronological age. In this current academic year we have been able to arrange rooms and staff to ensure that each year group is taught in a dedicated single age class group. Foundation Stage Reception

Mrs. D. Thorne

Key Stage One Year 1 Year 2

Mrs J. Grant Mrs S Robinson (0.5) Mrs J Yarker (0.5)

Key Stage Two Year 3 Year 4 Year 5 Year 6

Mrs H Cook Mrs K Hardy (0.6) Mrs C Millington (0.4) Mrs C Burrow (0.4)currently on maternity leave Mrs L Whittaker (0.6) Mrs R Shone (0.4) Mr C Fonth

Year 5 Visit to White Scar Caves – Summer 2016

TEACHING AND LEARNING At St Mark’s we try to provide a broad and balanced curriculum through which children have the opportunity to learn and grow in a happy and safe environment. We aim to enhance this curriculum with a wide range of experiences and activities outside the classroom and the involvement of professionals, experts, artists and volunteers. We endeavour to work within a framework that is “balanced and broadly based.” A balance is maintained through organisation of time and resources and through the development of knowledge, concepts, skills and attitudes. Breadth is achieved by providing areas of learning and experience in Religious Education, Literacy and Speaking, Numeracy, Science, Computing, History and Geography, Design Technology, Art, Music, Personal, Social and Health Education, Citizenship, Foreign Languages (French in KS 2) and Physical Education and Activities. We aim to provide all children with equal opportunities. Wherever possible we seek to inform and involve parents with regard to their children’s education at School.

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Our aims are to:  prepare children for the opportunities, responsibilities and experiences of adult life.  provide a safe and secure environment where meaningful and joyful learning can take place.  promote the spiritual, moral, cultural, intellectual and physical development of each child to his/her full potential.  foster in every child a desire and enthusiasm for learning, the development of interests and an enquiring mind.  promote good standards of social behaviour such as honesty, truthfulness, tolerance, and respect and consideration for others.  foster close links between home and school thereby encouraging the more complete progress of the individual child.  provide a framework within which each and every child has scope for success and praise.  promote an environment in which the individual child can contribute, is selfmotivated and has a measure of autonomy. In September 2016 we introduced a cross-curricular, topic based approach to much of the learning across the whole school. We hope this will help children to:  maintain interest and enthusiasm in their learning  make links between different types of learning  see subjects as ways of thinking and approaching learning rather than completely separate areas of study (so, instead of dividing the timetable into

   

distinct, traditional subjects we will approach all learning as writers, readers, mathematicians, scientists, geographers, historians, artists, athletes, dancers, designers, musicians or believers. explore ideas and questions more deeply in their own time share their interest and learning with parents and others at home and outside school understand that there are certain skills for learning used across many different subjects see where our Christian values and aspects of global learning fit with every activity in school

Lantern Festival

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CURRICULUM SUBJECT STATEMENTS 2016 - 2017 Much of this work will be included in the half-termly cross-curricular topics. Where content is not covered, discreet units of work will be taught to ensure coverage and understanding. The Early Years Foundation Stage Teaching and Learning in the EYFS (Reception Class) are based on the four principles in the current government framework for the EYFS:  A unique child  Positive relationships  Enabling environments  Learning and Developing The three specific and four prime areas of learning in the curriculum are delivered through planned, purposeful play with a good balance of child initiated and adult led activities both in and outdoors. The EYFS classroom is organised to allow children to explore and learn securely and safely, encouraging each child to flourish and reach their full potential. Mathematics The maths curriculum is delivered based on the new Primary National Curriculum (2014) and the framework for EYFS. The current Y2 and Y6 cohorts are being taught the programmes of study from the old National Curriculum as their end of Key Stage assessments will be assessing both current learning and learning from previous years. We aim to provide all pupils with some significant direct teaching every school day which is oral, interactive, fun and stimulating. The variety of teaching styles and lessons structures used provide opportunities for pupils to consolidate their previous learning, use and apply their knowledge, understanding and skills, pose and ask questions and investigate mathematical ideas and solve problems. Children are encouraged to reflect on their own learning and apply maths knowledge and skills in a real life context, in other lessons and, where possible, beyond the confines of the traditional classroom. English It is our aim at St Mark’s to develop children’s abilities to become competent, confident and effective communicators in English. We achieve this through the specific teaching of the key strands of:     

Reading Writing Speaking and listening Spelling (including synthetic phonics) Handwriting

We aim to inspire children to read with deep understanding for both pleasure and the acquisition of knowledge and to value our literary heritage. We strive to create a genuine love of language and enjoyment of the process of reading.

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In the teaching of writing children are encouraged to produce work of a high standard taking care with grammar, spelling, punctuation and handwriting. The emphasis is on clear and relevant communication of ideas with a sense of audience and a control of language. In order to encourage the use of whole texts in the teaching of literacy we subscribe to the Power of Reading, an organisation providing cross curricular resource materials for teaching good quality literature from Reception to Year 6. Speaking and listening skills are developed in part through drama and role play. We encourage creativity, discussion, empathy with the ideas and opinions of others, positive listening and clarity of speech. These skills should begin to equip children for lifelong learning and effective functioning in a diverse and challenging modern world. Each class has a daily Literacy lesson with a strong emphasis on the further development of skills in the context of learning in other areas of the curriculum. Beyond the literacy lessons there are daily reading sessions (for individual, whole class, paired or group guided reading or spelling related activities. Children also have short daily phonics or spelling sessions in mixed age ability groups.

Summer 2016 – Year 3 Visit to Hadrian’s Wall

Spring 2016 – Year 3 Gardening in the Hidden Haven

Science Our science curriculum is based on the current EYFS Framework and the new Primary National Curriculum (2014) with an aim to ensure continuity and progression from Reception to Year 6. We aim to develop the children’s scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding in biology, chemistry and physics. We place a strong emphasis on working scientifically and use an enquiry based approach to ensure that children develop rigorous scientific skills while learning more about the world around them. We teach about the lives and achievements of important scientists and aim to help the children understand the possible uses and applications of science today and in the future. Above all we endeavour to make learning science practical, exciting and fun! History In the teaching of History through an enquiry based approach we aim to foster in children genuine curiosity and a long, lasting interest in the past. We work to enable them to understand the details of significant events and to ask and research questions about how and why the world has changed over time. We try to develop inquiring minds that ask questions about different beliefs and cultures and the ways in which they have shaped the development of our country. Through study of the past we hope that children will learn more about themselves as individuals and members of society in modern Britain.

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Geography At St Mark’s Geography, like History, is an enquiry based subject which is designed to inspire curiosity, awe and wonder. Geography offers our children a chance to investigate the world around them and gain an understanding of the people with whom they share it. Units of study allow children to: discover and explore patterns and processes  ask why things are as they are  consider how places have changed  consider how places might continue to change  begin to understand their own roles and place in in the modern world as global citizens We believe strongly that learning in Geography should be real and relevant and as a result much of our teaching has a link to our local area. The children have the opportunity to enjoy learning outside, developing field work skills and learning through hands on experience. This learning is recorded in a variety of ways and may be supported through work in other areas of the curriculum. The curriculum for Geography offers ample opportunity for progression with the scope of places studied extending from the local area to the wider region, the country in which they live and the wider world. Art Children experience many opportunities to develop their understanding, knowledge, skill and appreciation of art, craft and design. They explore a variety of tools, media and techniques to create sculptures, drawings, paintings, collages, prints and textiles. Children are encouraged to express their ideas and feelings using these skills and techniques, even in other areas of the curriculum. Over time they will have looked closely at and responded to the work of a large range of artists local, past and present. Each week there is a chosen piece of art that is displayed in the hall during collective worship as well as in each classroom. A short introduction to the artist and their work is given in the whole school assembly at the beginning of each week.

Year 4 - Egyptians at Tullie House

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St Mark’s Church of England Primary School, Natland

Design Technology (DT) Work in Design Technology provides children with the opportunity to experience a range of natural and man-made materials. It develops a child’s physical manipulative, creative and critical skills. At Key Stage 1 children are encouraged to design and make models using reclaimed materials, food and textiles. Projects include making pop up books, moving toys, model houses and real pizzas. At Key Stage 2 greater emphasis is placed on design and the evaluation of a finished product. Typical projects include: making vehicles with a motor, designing and making a pair of slippers, making card photo frames and bread-making. Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) and Citizenship Through the PSHE and Citizenship curriculum we aim to provide children the knowledge, skills and understanding they need to lead confident, healthy, independent lives and to become informed, active, responsible citizens. We take a whole school approach to PSHE and Citizenship reflected in our promotion of good health throughout the school and our carefully planned health curriculum with links to other subjects, particularly RE and Science. We include half termly Social and Emotional Aspects of Learning (SEAL) themes. Where relevant our schemes of work include aspects of Sex and Relationships, Drug and Alcohol Education and Citizenship as identified within non-statutory government guidance. We enhance our provision through visits from the Life Education Mobile Classroom and a programme of education in Year 3 known as Kidsafe. E-Safety is supported with annual Kendal wide schools refresher training for staff and a series of government sponsored projects completed in each class. Children learn about the process of western democracy with annual elections for House Captains and School Council representatives. The School Council meets regularly to share issues from class council meetings and to consider ideas for development of aspects of the school environment and school life. Members of the St Mark’s School Council meet termly as part of the Kendal- wide ‘Cool Council’ run for primary schools by older children from the local secondary schools. Each year we invite our local Member of Parliament to meet with the School Council to explain the importance of representation and how it works in the UK parliamentary system. Every year we take the whole School Council to London to visit the Houses of Parliament and witness the structure and process of UK government. Our emphasis on the chosen 15 Christian values coupled with our open, inclusive ethos helps to ensure a balanced and tolerant approach to people from minority cultures. We welcome children of the Christian faith, other faiths and no faiths into school as pupils with no discrimination. Racist incidents and use of pejorative language are challenged and recorded. They are very rare in deed. Religious Education (RE) RE is an essential subject at the core of all learning in school in that it encourages children to consider what it means to be human. By building on the school-wide development of the spiritual elements of life, RE takes children on a journey into the ways in which people have 14 sought to answer the big philosophical questions Back to First Pageat the heart of our existence. 140 As a Church of England school our emphasis is on the teaching of Christianity as a reasonable faith with a balance of narrative, thematic and doctrinal elements. We look at


two other world faiths in detail in order to make comparisons and develop deep understanding and appreciation of difference. Judaism and Islam, in teaching, heritage and as monotheistic religions, have much in common with Christianity and thematic teaching will often draw on all three. Our current syllabus is based on schemes of work produced by the Cumbria SACRE and Carlisle Diocese. We take an enquiry based approach to the teaching of RE, encouraging the children themselves to raise questions for discussion, with a balance between learning from and learning about religion. In all teaching we seek to provide opportunity for open dialogue and pupil self-expression in response to the ideas, issues and challenges raised. In the current climate of fear of extremism and a fragile geopolitical context we seek to provide open, honest and challenging RE built on a shared set of Christian values. Computing Computing is a relatively new subject in the Primary National Curriculum 2014. The overarching aim is to transform children’s experience with IT from simply using computers to understanding how they work and learning how to write code and simple programs. Our emphasis is on equipping young people with the skills and knowledge they will need for living in a modern and rapidly changing world. They need a wide set of skills to enable them to function in the digital world. The new curriculum will develop both skills and knowledge through three elements: computer science, information technology and digital literacy. These strands are developed discreetly as well as through learning in other subjects where ICT is used to enhance teaching and learning. Key Stage1 children will have the opportunity to learn how to write and test simple programs. They will learn how computers work and how to program them to organise, manipulate and store digital content. In Key Stage 2 children will learn about computer networks (including the internet) and the services these networks are able to provide. Throughout their learning an emphasis is placed on the safe use of ICT equipping children with the knowledge they need to access the digital world confidently and safely. Physical Education (PE) We follow the Lancashire Scheme of Work for PE. PE develops children’s physical competence and confidence and their ability to use these to perform in a range of activities. It promotes skilfulness, physical development and an understanding of the ‘body in action’. Children are encouraged to be creative and competitive and to face different challenges as an individual as well as in groups and teams. Children learn endurance, perseverance and resilience in the structured context of games and sports. We help them to learn how to lose with grace and learn from failure and making mistakes. PE helps to promote the habits of a healthy lifestyle. In PE lessons children also learn useful skills that have applications in other aspects of learning: planning, performing and evaluating actions and ideas and improve on quality and effectiveness.

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We have carefully structured schemes of work for gymnastics and games development. Elements of dance are included in these units. Each Year 6 class has the opportunity to work with trained dance specialists to choreograph an original dance piece for performance at the Kendal Brewery Arts Centre’s annual dance festival. All children in Key Stage 2 have a series of swimming lessons at Kendal Leisure Centre. The emphasis is on personal survival skills, based on the development of good breaststroke. This year we also plan to take Year 2 swimming. Competitive swimming is also encouraged in the fielding of teams to represent the school in the annual Kendal primary schools swimming gala. We encourage a mixture of individual skills development and competition. With the KCP family of local schools we are able to access a wide range of sports festivals and competitions. Teams from St Mark’s have won local competitions in Football. Tag Rugby, Table Tennis and Swimming in recent years. We regularly acknowledge the achievements of individual children who pursue sports out of school time by re-awarding cups, medals and certificates in our weekly celebration assembly.

Reception Class – Pedal and Scoot 2016 EXTRA-CURRICULAR ACTIVITIES We offer a number of extra activities, listed below, running at different times over a school year. These are principally for older children although we do try to give opportunities to as many children as possible. Activities take place at different times during lunch breaks and after school.  Lego / K’Nex Club  Choir  Athletics / Sports Hall Athletics  Hockey  Multi-Skills  Film Club  Coding Club  Bikeability - Cycling Proficiency (Autumn term Y6)  Table Tennis Club  Philosophy Club  Canoeing (Summer term Y5)  Instrumental tuition: brass, violin, woodwind, guitar and keyboard

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Reception Class – Summer 2016 HOMEWORK St. Mark's has a policy for homework, a copy of which is available on request. Your child is expected to take books home to read and enjoy with parents and carers. Occasionally children will be asked to prepare items at home and older children will be expected to continue or develop their class work at home, with regular tasks for Literacy and Maths. Children will be asked to learn spellings and times table facts. CHILDREN WITH SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS and DISABILITY (SEND) For children who have particular difficulties in their learning, provision is made for them to receive extra help. Many children need extra support at some time during their period with us. Where possible we provide additional help and resources for children with such difficulties. Links with parents are maintained through informal meetings, meetings to prepare Individual Pupil Plans (I.P.Ps) and more formal review meetings. Some pupils who need further help may be referred for statutory assessment with a view to receiving support in school. This process may take some time. Some may be assessed by the school and other professionals as having particular difficulties and receive an Educational Health and Care Plan (EHCP) often resulting in additional resources and extra support in school. We work closely with external agencies – Educational Psychology, Speech and Language, Early Years, Emotional and Behavioural Support, English as an Additional Language, Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy, the Hearing Impaired Advisory Service and the Primary Mental Health Worker Service. The school has a Gifted, Talented and More Able Pupil Policy, which addresses the issues of identification and provision for able/gifted pupils. Copies of the new national SEN Code of Practice (2014) and our school Special Needs Policy are available on request.

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Tri Golf – Summer 2016 RELIGIOUS EDUCATION AND COLLECTIVE WORSHIP Through a carefully planned programme of teaching and collective worship we aim to help children to learn and grow as individuals in a complex society enabling them to experience the love of God in a Christian community. We want to help children to think for themselves and reflect on their own experiences. We are keen that in their time at St Mark’s children will hear the whole of God’s story as recorded in the bible. It is our hope that children will learn to share our understanding of God and His goodness. At St Mark’s children are made aware of their Christian heritage and the Governing Body has a specific responsibility to see that education is provided according to the principles and practices of the Church of England. There is, however, insufficient bias to give offence to other Christian denominations. The children attend and participate in some form of collective worship every day. The Vicar of St Mark’s Church, representatives from outside agencies and the children themselves may sometimes lead acts of worship. Regular celebrations e.g. Harvest, Christmas and Easter are held in St. Mark's Church. Each class is asked to lead an assembly and act of collective worship once a term. Parents are invited to join with us on those occasions. Parents who do not wish their children to receive Religious Education or participate in Christian Worship have the right to withdraw their children from such lessons and activities. In the event of such cases arising, arrangements will be made for those involved to be supervised. SEX AND RELATIONSHIPS EDUCATION Sex and Relationships Education (SRE), and the extent to which it should be taught, are regularly reviewed by the Governing Body. The full range of materials used by the staff is available for parents to view or borrow. Parents are free to withdraw their children from sex and relationships education unless it is part of National Curriculum Science. While various topics may be undertaken on ‘The body’ by different classes, specific teaching in this subject is usually covered in Year 6. Two members of staff are trained to deliver the Kidsafe programme to our Year 3 cohort each year. SCHOOL RULES Our Home-School Agreement draws attention to our expectations of commitment, behaviour and attitude. Children are encouraged to be polite and well mannered and to show courtesy towards and consideration for others. Our school rules and Code of Conduct reflect this and aim to encourage good behaviour and common sense.

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In addition to these guiding principles there are three specific and important rules.  Children are not permitted to have confectionery of any kind in school either for break time or lunch. Fresh fruit is encouraged in packed lunches or as a snack in the afternoon break. As part of the national government scheme children in Reception and Key Stage 1 receive a piece of fruit free each day.  The wearing of jewellery is not permitted in school.  The playing of games at the front of the school, especially at home time, is not allowed. CODE OF CONDUCT FOR BEHAVIOUR St. Mark’s is a safe and happy school where everyone has something to share, is willing to serve, appreciates what they have and is able to enjoy learning. To keep it that way we all have to play our part. Please remember to:               

Speak politely, at the right time, in the right way, ask yourself: Is it true? Is it kind? Is it necessary? Listen when someone is speaking to you, looking at them without fiddling or talking. Share with others, get involved and use the skills and abilities you have to help others Keep your hands, feet, arms and legs to yourself Leave a good space between you and other people Offer help willingly to anyone who needs it Follow instructions immediately and without arguing Take responsibility for your words and actions; be prepared to put things right Knock at closed doors and wait to be invited in Walk on the left hand side along corridors Move around school calmly and quietly, with arms by your sides Treat others, the building and school equipment with care and respect Come to school ready to learn, expecting to work hard and learn from your mistakes Try your best in everything! Celebrate other people’s successes

We ask parents to reinforce these rules, and the principles behind them, in a positive and consistent way with their children.

‘Animal Rumble Grumble’ – Reception and Key Stage 1 Summer Production 2016

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BEHAVIOUR AND DISCIPLINE We seek to maintain high standards of behaviour and conduct. Discipline is maintained by good relationships between children, staff and parents and is reinforced by a clear system of rewards and sanctions based around the Code of Conduct. We seek the co-operation of parents in resolving problems where children are involved in harming individuals, damaging property or continually breaching agreed codes of conduct. School policies on Behaviour, Discipline and Bullying are available on request PARENT / TEACHER CONFERENCES Children’s success and positive experience of school are often dependent on the quality of the relationship between home and school. Communication with parents is a high priority. We have three formal meetings between class teachers and parents: 

October / November – a meeting for introductions, discussion of initial concerns or issues and sharing of individual targets for each pupil in Reading, Writing, Maths and Personal Development  February – an opportunity to look at children’s work and discuss targets for improvement and ideas for development  July – an open evening to which all parents are invited to view and celebrate children’s work in classrooms and other shared spaces in school. During the school year meetings are arranged for parents covering aspects of the curriculum and particular topical issues.

Summer 2016 – Visit to Sizergh Castle PASTORAL CARE We are committed to ensuring that children are able to learn in a happy and safe environment. The welfare of the pupils is of paramount importance. Maintaining good relationships between home and school plays an important part in this. Meetings with individual families take place to deal with any academic or personal problems which may arise. Through the Kendal Collaborative Partnership we have access to professional counselling services and referrals can be made at any time. In the event of a pupil becoming ill or being involved in an accident it is essential that the school has on record each child's home telephone number, each parent's place of employment and telephone number, and the name, address and telephone number of another named person with whom contact can be made immediately. A form is provided for this information. We have a text-to-parents service, whereby messages are sent to all parents via text, e.g. school closure due to weather conditions. It is important that the school office is kept informed of any change in a child’s circumstances.

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If a child becomes sick or is injured at school parents will be contacted and asked to collect them. Only very exceptionally will a child be escorted home or taken to hospital or the address of another named person and then only with the parent's knowledge. Children who are ill or have genuine symptoms of illness should not be sent to school. In the event of any absence please ring or text to inform the school before 9.00 a.m. Please follow this with a letter of explanation for our records. In the interests of children's safety a known adult must collect a child from school if he or she is to attend a doctor or dentist during school time or has to leave early for some other reason. Parents are asked to inform the school office when such visits are to be made and if the collecting adult is going to be someone other than the child's parent. Please note that we will not allow a child to walk home or to another destination during school time. A note of explanation is required if a child is to miss a P.E. or swimming lesson. Members of staff are not normally expected to administer medicine. If staff are willing to administer medicine parents must complete a form giving details of the prescription medication, dose and their permission for staff to administer, this includes asthma medication. Records are kept of any medication administered in school. In rare cases, where a child needs to take prescription medicine during the school day, a parent or nominated adult may come to school to administer it or a child may take it themselves under supervision provided written permission is given (forms are available from the school office). Any prescription medication kept in school must be handed to the school office and must be clearly and officially labelled with the child’s name, the name of the medicine, the date and the dosage. Members of staff are not allowed to administer non prescription medication. Children with asthma are an exception, but the Headteacher and Class Teacher must be made aware of this need. Counselling Our local cluster of schools, the KCP (Kendal Collaborative Partnership) employs a team of trained counsellors who are able to provide sessions for children in primary schools. Referrals can be made directly from the schools initiated by parents or staff.

Residential Adventurous Activities June 2016 – Year 5 and Year 6

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SCHOOL UNIFORM: The main school colour is Royal Blue Boys Grey / black trousers (not jeans or track suits) Blue or white polo shirt. Royal blue jumper Grey / black skirt or trousers Girls Blue or white blouse or polo shirt. Royal blue jumper or cardigan Both Black outdoor shoes (not trainers, although children may change into trainers for break times). Plain black, grey or white socks Royal blue jumpers, cardigans, white or blue polo shirts and P.E./Games ‘hoodies’ embroidered with the school badge are available from school at £7.50, £8.75 and £6.75 respectively. Please call into the school office if you would like to look at a sample. P.E. KIT All children need the following kit for P.E. and Games Lessons: • Shorts • Plain T-shirts (preferably in house colours – available from school @ £3.25) • Gym shoes • Older children require football boots and shin pads for games lessons • Appropriate kit is also needed for swimming We strongly recommend that all items of clothing are clearly marked with your child’s name.

It should be noted that as a general rule neither the Local Authority, School Governing Body nor members of school staff will accept responsibility for damage to or loss of personal property, including clothing, and it is stressed that the responsibility for safeguarding personal property rests with the owner. It is for this reason that your child should only bring personal belongings to school when required and then take them home.

Year 4 visit to Westmorland County Show – September 2016 SCHOOL MEALS Meals are produced and served by Orian Catering Services on the school premises every day. There is always a choice of hot meal. More information about methods of payment for

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St Mark’s Church of England Primary School, Natland

school meals is available from the School Office. From September 2014 all children in Reception, Year 1 and Year 2 have been entitled to receive ‘universal free school meals’. If you feel that you are entitled to free school meals (FSM) for your child please ask for further advice at the school office. As the school receives extra funding based on the number of children registered for free school meals it is important to register even if you do not intend your child to take the meals or your child (in Reception Year 1 or Year 2) already receives free school meals. ‘Ever 6 FSM’ is additional funding to help children from low income families who are eligible for free school meals. This now includes any child who has been registered for free school meals in the past 6 years. If you fall into this category activities such as school trips will be met from this funding. If you are not sure if you are eligible for this funding please check at the school office. This funding can also be used to support extra- curricular activities and any school events or trips for which a voluntary contribution is requested. ‘MOSAICS’ – OUT OF SCHOOL PROVISION MOSAICS is an independent voluntarily managed organisation linked very closely to school running Breakfast and After School provision on the school premises each day of the school year. Please contact the school office for more details or to make bookings. Sessions are available Monday to Friday from 7.45 a.m. to 8.45 a.m. and 3.30 p.m. to 6.00 p.m. Bookings should be made in advance: by 9.30 a.m. for After School club and by 4.30 p.m. the day before for Breakfast Club. Half sessions are available.

Residential Adventure Week June 2016 – Year 5 and Year 6 ST. MARK’S SCHOOL PTA (Parent Teacher Association) A flourishing social and fund raising body exists to support the work of the school. A committee of parents and teachers organise events throughout the year. All staff and parents of children in school are automatically members. There is always room for more

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willing helpers and volunteers to plan and run events. More details about the PTA and its officials can be obtained from the Headteacher. ATTENDANCE AND UNAUTHORISED ABSENCE Our attendance record for the year 2015 / 2016 was high at 96.5% (3.5% authorised absence). This high attendance suggests that the children enjoy coming to school. Absence during term time can only be authorised by the Headteacher in exceptional circumstances. Requests for such absence should be made in good time on forms provided by the school office. CHARGING FOR SCHOOL ACTIVITIES The admission of your child to St Mark’s and the formal curriculum offered will not be subject to charge or your willingness as a parent to make a voluntary contribution. The Governing Body wishes to see the curriculum enriched as far as possible for the benefit of all pupils. We recognise that whatever public funds are made available they will never be sufficient to fund all desirable activities at the required level. (Pupil premium Grant money for Ever 6 FSM children can be used to fund such activities). The Governing Body reserves the right to: • • • •

• • •

Seek voluntary contributions from parents to fund activities either within or outside school hours and to provide incidentals, e.g. books and equipment. Charge parents at cost, or in kind, for materials if parents have agreed in advance to own a finished product. Request parents to voluntarily provide incidental equipment, e.g. pens, rulers. Draw to the attention of parents activities organised by a third party, thereby giving parents the opportunity to request leave of absence for their children during the school day to join these activities. In such circumstances, charges may well be levied by the third party. Reclaim from parents (or children, where appropriate, with parents’ permission) the cost of willful breakages and damage. Charge for activities offered as an optional extra wholly/mainly outside school hours. If and when any such activity is organised all parents will be advised that anyone in receipt of working family tax credit or income support is entitled to claim remission of charges for board and lodging on residential trips that are not optional extras.

INSURANCE Some parents wrongly assume that if a child is injured at school, the Local Authority and / or the Governing Body is held to be responsible regardless of the circumstances, and that their insurance will automatically apply. This is not the case. The Local Authority and / or Governing Body responsibility is strictly limited to cases where there is proven negligence by them or their staff. Accidents can happen in school, on the sports field, or during school visits, when the Local Authority and / or Governing Body is not in any way at fault and, therefore, not responsible. The provision of personal accident insurance is the responsibility of parents. We have a policy which covers the children when out of school on educational visits. This cover is acceptable, but not substantial. SECONDARY EDUCATION We maintain close links with all the secondary schools in the area. Children normally leave the school at the end of Year 6. The majority transfer to Kirkbie Kendal School in

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September. Details of other secondary schools in the area (Queen Katherine School, Queen Elizabeth School, Settlebeck, Lancaster Royal Grammar School and Dallam School) are made available during the children’s final primary school year. Parents have to submit a form detailing their three choices of schools by the October half term of their child’s final year. The Local Authority allocates places and parents are informed during the Spring term of the year of transfer. Early in the Autumn Term secondary schools hold Information Evenings for Year 6 pupils and their parents. Details of these meetings will be given through school.

July 2016 – Year 6 Leavers FORMAL COMPLAINTS PROCEDURE The Governing Body and Local Authority have a duty to ensure that Religious Education, Collective Worship and the full National Curriculum are provided and made accessible to all children. Parents have rights to complain if they feel that these duties are not being fulfilled. The Governing Body and the LA have to:      

ensure that all pupils are provided with a curriculum which is balanced and broadly based and relevant to their needs, both as young people and as future adults ensure that the requirements of the National Curriculum are met ensure that Religious Education and Collective Worship are provided in accordance with the law comply with regulations regarding the operation of policies for charging comply with regulations regarding the operation of policies for safeguarding comply with regulations regarding the information provided for parents and others

Parents concerned about particular matters should first discuss these with the Headteacher and staff at the school. In the majority of cases, this will be the most effective way of dealing with concerns. Should any matter need to progress further, the Governing Body has a formal complaints procedure, copies of which are available from the school office.

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Year 5 Canoeing – Summer 2016

DISCLAIMER The information supplied in this document is in accordance with information at present available and is believed to be correct at the date of printing November 2016, however its accuracy is not guaranteed. In particular nothing herein prejudices the right of the Headteacher or the Governing Body of the school or the Local Authority or any of their committees to make any decision relating to the school as is proper without regard to whether this will affect the accuracy of any matters contained in this publication. Further, neither the Governing Body of the school or any member of the school staff nor the Local Authority or any member of staff of the Authority can be legally held responsible for any erroneous information contained in this document.

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APPENDIX 1 SCHOOL TERM AND HOLIDAY DATES 2016/2017 2016 Autumn Term Return to School Break for half-term Return to School Break for Christmas

Monday Friday Monday Friday

5 21 31 16

September October October December

2016 2016 2016 2016

2017 Spring Term Return to School Break for half term Return to School Break for Easter

Thursday Friday Monday Friday

5 17 27 7

January February February April

2017 2017 2017 2017

2017 Summer Term Return to School May Bank Holiday Break for half term Return to School Break for Summer

Monday Monday Friday Monday Thursday

24 1 26 5 20

April May May June July

2017 2017 2017 2017 2017

SCHOOL TERM AND HOLIDAY DATES 2017/2018 2017 Autumn Term Return to School Break for half-term Return to School Break for Christmas

Monday Friday Monday Friday

4 20 30 15

September October October December

2017 2017 2017 2017

2018 Spring Term Return to School Break for half term Return to School Break for Easter

Thursday Friday Monday Thursday

4 9 19 29

January February February March

2018 2018 2018 2018

2018 Summer Term Return to School May Bank Holiday Break for half term Return to School Break for Summer

Monday Monday Friday Monday Friday

16 7 25 5 20

April May May June July

2018 2018 2018 2018 2018

Staff In-service Training Days are included in the above holiday dates

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APPENDIX 2 St Mark’s CE (VA) Primary School, Natland

Admissions Policy and Arrangements for Entry in 2017 The Governing Body of St Mark’s CE (VA) Primary School, Natland is the Admissions Authority for the school. Following consultation with the Diocesan Board of Education and the Local Authority the Governing Body has set the published admission number for the Reception Class as 30. The preferred method of applying for a school place is online via the Local Authority’s website. If you wish your application to be considered under the faith criteria you should also complete the relevant form, which is available from the school office. The document ‘Starting School in Cumbria’ is available to view or download from the website, and there is a paper copy in school if parents wish to view it. An application for entry in September 2017 must be made by the closing date which is 15 January 2017. Parents / carers are encouraged to state three preferences on the application form. Preferences are treated equally. Places are allocated according to this Admissions Policy and the Local Authority’s Co-ordinated Admissions Scheme. Parents will be notified of the outcome of their application by the Local Authority. Parents / carers of those children not offered a place will be informed of the reason and offered a place at another school by the Local Authority. All children will be admitted unless there are more applicants than places. In the event that there are more applicants than places the Governing Body will allocate places using the following criteria, listed in order of priority: 1. Children in public care or ‘looked after’ (or previously ‘looked after’). A child in ‘public care’ is defined as a child who is ‘looked after’ by the Local Authority within the meaning of section 22 of the Children’s Act 1989. Children ‘previously looked after’ extends to children who have been adopted or become “subject to a child arrangements order”.

2. Children who have physical and/or medical needs who would be disadvantaged by travelling to another school. Written evidence from an appropriate professional (e.g. a doctor or social workers) would be required for the Governing Body to consider admission in this category.

3. Children living within the catchment area having a brother or sister (including adopted siblings) attending St Mark’s at the time of their admission giving priority, if necessary, to those children with the youngest siblings. Brothers and sisters are those living at the same address, including step and foster children. 4. Children living within the catchment area who, with a parent / carer, attend at least

twice a month, a church in membership of Churches Together in Britain or the Evangelical Alliance Attendance may be at more than one church but should be for at least two years prior to the application date

5. Children living within the catchment area of St Mark’s. 6. Children living outside the catchment area having a brother or sister (including adopted siblings) attending St Mark’s at the time of their admission giving priority, if necessary, to those children with the youngest siblings. Brothers and sisters are those living at the same address including step and foster children.

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7. Children living outside the catchment area who with a parent / carer, attend at least

twice a month, a church in membership of Churches Together in Britain or the Evangelical Alliance Attendance may be at more than one church but should be for at least two years prior to the application date

8. Children living outside the catchment area.

EXCEPTION: STATEMENT OF SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS (SSEN) or EDUCATION HEALTH CARE PLAN (EHCP) The criteria outlined above will be strictly followed with one exception. If a child has a Statement of Special Educational Needs or Education Health Care Plan naming St Mark’s CE Primary School as the most appropriate school to meet those needs then, irrespective of the criteria above, the child will be admitted. In such circumstances the Governing Body has a statutory duty to admit the child concerned. TIE BREAK Where there are more applicants than places available in any category (where age is not considered) then distance between home and school will act as a determining factor. Age is only used as a tie-breaker in the sibling categories (3 and 6 above). The distance is measured from the centre of the child’s home to the main entrance door of the school. The distance is determined by the shortest walking route by road. The Governing Body will use the Local Authority School Admissions Department measuring system to ensure consistency of measurement. Children living at the closest addresses will have priority. ADDRESS OF PUPIL The address on the application form must be the current one at the time of application. Where a child lives regularly at more than one address the home address is to be the one where the child sleeps and thus wakes up for all or the majority of the school week. Where there is any doubt the Governing Body reserves the right to verify the information provided by the parents / carers, for example, through the GP or some other relevant professional or body. SUCCESSFUL APPLICATIONS For the last number of years the Governing Body of St Mark’s were able to admit all the pupils whose parents / carers made an application. WAITING LIST Parents whose children are not offered a place may ask for their children’s names to be put on a waiting list. The names will be placed on the list in the order of the admissions criteria. Late applicants will be slotted into the list according to those criteria. It is thus possible for a child recently arrived in the area to have a higher priority than a child who has been on the waiting list for sometime. Irrespective of whether an appeal has been submitted if a place becomes available it will be offered to the child at the top of the list. The waiting list will remain open for the whole of the first term in the year to which it relates. ‘IN YEAR’ ADMISSIONS ‘In Year’ admissions are those which occur outside the normal admission and transfer times. Parents / carers who wish their child to attend St Mark’s should arrange to visit the school. Parents / carers will be provided with admission details.

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St Mark’s Church of England Primary School, Natland

FRAUDULENT APPLICATIONS If the Governing Body of St Mark’s discovers that a child has been awarded a place as a result of an intentionally misleading application from a parent or carer, which effectively denies a place to a child with a stronger claim, then the Governing Body will withdraw the offer of a place. The Governing Body will reconsider the application and the right of appeal offered if a place is refused. DEFERRED ADMISSION If a child’s fifth birthday is between September and December then an admission may be deferred until the beginning of the following Spring Term. If the birthday is between January and April admission may be deferred until the beginning of the Summer Term at the latest. Parents may arrange for child(ren) to attend part time during terms before they reach statutory school age. It is recommended that any deferment is no later than the start of the Spring Term. APPEALS PROCEDURE If the Governing Body is unable to offer a child a place because of over subscription, parents / carers have a right of appeal under the School Standards and Framework Act 1998 as amended by the Education Act 2002. Parents / carers should notify the Clerk to the Governing Body within 20 school days of receiving the letter refusing a place. Parents / carers will then have an opportunity to submit their case to an independent appeals panel both in writing and in person. Parents / carers will normally receive 10 school days notice of the time and venue for the appeal hearing. An independent appeal will be organised on behalf of the Governing Body by the Legal and Democratic Services Unit in Carlisle. MULTIPLE BIRTHS The Governing Body of St Mark’s School will ensure as far as possible that twins, triplets or those children born in the same year are not separated. Such children will be given priority in any particular category. While no infant class is to contain more than 30 pupils there can be very limited exceptional circumstances. Such child(ren) are known as ‘excepted pupils’ for the time they are in an infant class or until the numbers fall back to within the size limit. An excepted child would be one whose twin or sibling from a multiple birth is admitted otherwise than as an excepted pupil. An ‘excepted pupil’ might also be a statemented or looked after child or a child of a U.K Serviceman to be admitted outside the normal admission period. The admission of a child to St Mark’s is not dependent on the ability or willingness of parents / carers to make financial contributions.

Signed Headteacher

Peter Barfoot

Signed Tim Ward Chair of Governors Date

16th November 2015

To be reviewed:

Autumn 2016

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St Mark’s CE Primary School, Natland

Whole School Behaviour Policy (abbreviated version) This policy aims to promote the overall well-being of pupils and staff and an environment in which everyone feels happy, safe and secure. The policy determines the boundaries of acceptable and unacceptable behaviour. It introduces rewards and sanctions and determines how they will be fairly and consistently applied. What pupils can expect from staff • • • • • • • • •

Arrive at school and meet pupils in the playground on time. Remain with the children until another adult assumes responsibility for them. Be enthusiastic and develop positive relationships with pupils. Be approachable and listen to pupils at all times. Eliminate or control hazards which may cause pupils harm. Use a range of non-verbal and verbal cues to encourage good behaviour and limit inappropriate behaviour. Always take seriously any complaints of bullying or inappropriate behaviour reported to them. Use rewards and sanctions consistently. Model the behaviours we wish to see. Annual review of the school Code of Conduct

What staff can expect from pupils • • • • • • • •

Comply with the agreed school Code of Conduct Use appropriate language. Tell the truth and learn from mistakes. Behave appropriately. Accept personal responsibility for their behaviour. Listen to others and work co-operatively. Use ICT in accordance with school policy. Report to an adult any bullying behaviour of others including cyber bullying.

What staff can expect from their colleagues • Treat them with respect. • Work and co-operate for the overall good of the school community. • Offer support when appropriate. • Be aware of roles, responsibilities and job remits and respect their boundaries. • Treat all pupil and staff issues with the highest standards of confidentiality. • Use ICT in accordance with school’s acceptable use policy. • Use online technology appropriately and not compromise the professional integrityof colleagues or other adults in the school community. What staff can expect from parents • Treat all staff with respect. • Treat other parents, pupils, visitors to the school with respect. • Behave responsibly whilst on school premises. • Encourage their child to have high standards of behaviour in and out of school. • Support the school’s policies, strategies and guidelines for behaviour • Try to support the 12 areas addressed in the agreed school Code of Conduct in the home environment Back to First Page 158


Support the school’s approach to e-safety which includes not uploading or posting to the internet and pictures, video or text which could upset, offend or threaten the safety of any member of the school community or bring the school into disrepute. Unacceptable Behaviour of Parents/Carers and Other Visitors to School Violence, threatening behaviour and abuse against school staff will not be tolerated. School will seek to resolve the situation through discussion and mediation though ultimately unacceptable behaviour may result in a warning, ban from school premises or the police being called. When a parent / carer or member of the public behaves in an unacceptable manner during a telephone call staff have the right to terminate the call then report the incident to the Head teacher or member of the Senior Management Team. Staff are expected to behave professionally in these difficult situations and attempt to defuse where possible and seek the involvement of other colleagues as appropriate. Unacceptable Use of Technology We expect all members of the school community to use technology responsibly. Mobile phones should not be in use by pupils during school hours or by adults when supervising pupils. Photographs or videos of children may not be taken on personal equipment without school and parental permission. School related issues or images may not be discussed or posted on-line. Rewards and Celebrating Success Verbal praise. Sharing and celebrating success. House Points for achievement, effort, conduct, improvement and participation. House points must be earned not just awarded and may not be taken away. Any adult working in school an award a house point to a child. Sanctions and Consequences Unacceptable behaviour may be dealt with in one or more of the following ways. This list is hierarchical reflecting the increasing seriousness of persistent behaviours. In the application of any sanction or consequence reference will be made to the agreed school Code of Conduct.  Explaining the behaviour and its impact.  Verbal Warnings  ‘Time Out’ - moving the child to another part of the class or school, holding anadult’s hand to walk around the playground for a short time.  Withdrawal of privileges  Sending the child to the Head teacher or in their absence the Senior teacher.  Detention The Head teacher and class teachers may put pupils in Detention. Children may miss their break in a quiet supervised environment and a record of the incident goes in the book kept by the piano.  Involving parents. The Head teacher and class teachers may involve parents. This may be verbal, written or include reporting in a Pupil Behaviour Log Book.  Fixed term exclusion or Exclusion. These actions are only considered for very serious breaches of the school’s Whole School Behaviour Policy.

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Restorative Justice / Reflection on Actions. Our school provides opportunities for both sides to explain what happened to try and come up with a solution. Children and children, children and adults or adults and adults may meet with a mediator to consider three main questions.  What happened?  Who else has been affected by this?  What can be done to prevent this happening again? Meetings are held in a neutral place with a mediator who was not involved in the incident. The mediator’s job is to keep everyone calm and civil and help those involved to move forward and restore their relationship. Pupil Support We use a wide range of strategies to support children who have on-going difficulties with their behaviour. These include:  Targets to promote success.  Increased communication between home and school.  Individual behaviour management plans.  Alternative curriculum provision.  Support from SENCo, teaching assistants and external agencies. Physical Contact with Pupils This school does not operate a ‘no touch policy’. There may be times when contact is proper and necessary. Such times may include when a pupil is being congratulated or praised, administering First Aid, comforting a distressed child, holding a hand when a child is leading a line around school etc. The Use of Reasonable Force Force is generally used either to control or restrain pupils. Control may mean either passive contact (standing between 2 pupils or blocking a pupil’s path) or active physical contact (leading a pupil by the hand or arm, ushering a pupil away by placing a hand in the centre of their back). All members of staff may use reasonable force in this way. In addition to this the majority of the teaching, teaching support team and some MDS have received accredited training in Team Teach approaches to the de-escalation of potential situations and the use of physical intervention. All incidents involving force will be recorded in the Blue Record of Physical Intervention Book and details shared in full with the Head teacher. All pupils and adults involved will be offered appropriate post incident support. Serious incidents can create upset and stress for all concerned. Force will be used only when immediately necessary and for the minimum length of time. It will never be used as a punishment. All staff have the right to defend themselves from attack providing they do not use a disproportionate degree of force to do so. Bullying Bullying is behaviour of an individual or group repeated over time that intentionally hurts another individual or group physically or emotionally. Acts of bullying may include repeated incidents of name calling, mocking, offensive comments, physical harm, taking belongings, sending offensive messages or pictures, spreading rumours, exclusion from groups. Cyber bullying is the use of information and communication technology (particularly mobile phones and the Internet) to deliberately upset someone else. Bullying may be reported to any member of staff. Staff will then inform the Head teacher. Back to First Page 160


All allegations of bullying will be investigated and school policy will be used for dealing with the behaviour, supporting the victim and the instigator. Pages 17 to 19 of the School Behaviour Policy outline the school’s specific strategies in more detail. Drug and Drug Related Incidents We do not support the misuse of tobacco, alcohol, solvents illegal drugs and medicines by members of the school community. The school has a policy of No Smoking in the building or on the school site. No alcohol is consumed during the course of a normal school day. Potentially harmful substances are stored away safely. Use of aerosol sprays are discouraged. No illegal substances may be brought to school or used on school premises. Where pupils are prescribed medicines school guidance on storage and administration of medicines must be followed. In the event of finding or suspecting the presence of a drug or illegal substance where ever possible the item should be confiscated and the Head teacher or a member of the Senior leadership Team must be informed at the earliest opportunity. Allegations of Abuse against Staff and Other Adults working in School Allegations may be true, false, misplaced or malicious. We have a duty to safeguard children and all allegations will be taken seriously and investigated fully following the school’s agreed procedure. Allegations will be dealt with fairly, consistently and quickly in a way which provides protection for the child whilst supporting the person who is the subject of the allegation. Where a member of staff has a general concern about malpractice or does not want to report an allegation directly they may make reference to the school’s Whistle Blowing Policy.

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April 2015


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Additional Courses / Experiences

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ADDITIONAL COURSES / EXPERIENCES Name: We suggest you record here any additional experience, qualifications or voluntary work you complete. This will enable you to strengthen your CV in your final year. Year 1 Date

Details-

Year 2 Date

Details-

Year 3 Date

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Year 4 Date

Details –

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SPAR Example  

Student SPAR Exemplar

SPAR Example  

Student SPAR Exemplar

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