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A6 — The Sentinel at www.cumberlink.com

Friday • January 7, 2011

Decade review 2000-2010

in

2005:

Year included a final resting place

for Jane Doe, hurricane relief, and a plan for a two-campus law school.

Community dodges BRAC attack Carlisle and South Middleton Township led a letter-writing campaign asking President George W. Bush to keep the War College at the barracks. ■■

By Joseph Cress Sentinel Reporter

jcress@cumberlink.com

So much about Carlisle marches to the cadence of a rich military heritage. The town gave its name to Carlisle Barracks, the second-oldest active military installation in the country. What began as an armed camp and training post for westward expansion would develop into a vocational school for the integration of Indian children and the current home of the U.S. Army War College. So imagine the concern in the community when Carlisle Barracks was in danger of being placed on the Base Realignment and Closure list. BRAC is a governmentsanctioned process intended to trim excess operations and programs from Department of Defense military holdings. A task force was formed years before 2005 to protect not only Carlisle Barracks but the Naval Support Activity in Hampden Township and the Defense Distribution Center in New Cumberland. This group stepped up its activities through the first half of the year in anticipation of the announcement of BRAC recommendations in May. Carlisle and South Middleton Township led a letter-writing campaign asking President George W. Bush to keep the War College at the barracks instead of moving it to Fort Leavenworth, Kan. Dickinson College professor William Bellinger compiled a study showing that Carlisle Barracks contributes about $118 million to the local economy, or about 10 percent or its total income. In the end, U.S. Sen. Rick Santorum, flanked by U.S. Rep. Todd Platts, announced a reprieve to a crowd of about 200 people gathered at the Square in Carlisle.

Two campuses As the community celebrated one victory, the battle for the future of Dickinson School of Law continued through much of 2005. In January, the board of governors voted 17-14 to work out an agreement with Penn State for a two-campus law school that effectively gave the university “unfettered” control over Dickinson Law School. The agreement would disband the board of governors and dissolve the law school’s 1997 merger with Penn State by Aug. 1. This deal hinged on Gov. Ed Rendell releasing $25 million in state funds for renovations to the Trickett Hall campus in Carlisle. While supporters touted the benefits of having facilities in Carlisle and State College, opponents argued Penn State could just close the Carlisle campus, sell off the

In Memorium A soldier and a Marine with ties to our area died in Iraq during 2005. They were: • Army PFC Kenneth E. Zeigler, 22, who lived much of his life in Mechanicsburg and Dillsburg, was killed May 12, when a roadside bomb exploded near his Humvee near Samarra, Iraq. • Marine Lance Cpl. Jason Frye, 19, of Landisburg was killed Oct. 6, when a roadside bomb exploded near his vehicle near Al Karmah, Iraq.

facilities after 10 years and walk away with a profit. Three board members would later file a lawsuit, charging that the university applied heavy pressure on the board to accept the twocampus plan and the board failed to exercise the due diligence required by state law before taking the vote. This suit was dismissed in the Cumberland County Court of Common Pleas in May. T h a t Se p te m b e r, t h e Penn State board of trustees appointed an architect to design renovations to the Carlisle campus and the new $60 million law school facility at University Park.

“Jane Doe” identified In 2005, a “Jane Doe” murder victim recovered her name and her killer was extradited to Cumberland County for trial. The story began in December 1993, when a group of hunters found her body off Whiskey Spring Road in South Middleton Township. Soon after, the young woman known only as “Jane Doe” was buried in Drytown Cemetery in Middlesex Township. For more than a decade, Cumberland County Coroner Michael Norris kept this case in the public eye, but police reported no leads year after year. This changed in July 2004, when matching DNA was uncovered by the state police crime lab in Greensburg. Within months, police arrested Theodore John Solano of Rochester, N.Y., on charges he killed Natalia Andreeva Miller, an 18-year-old Russian woman who came to the United States with dreams of a better life. In July 2005, a brief service was held to unveil a personalized granite marker for Miller to replace the “Jane Doe” marker that had served as her memorial since her burial in January 1994. As for Solano, he eventually pleaded guilty to the crime and is currently serving a sentence in state prison.

Flea market gone Not only did 2005 find closure of an unsolved mystery, it saw the end of a popular shopping venue for many across the region. That December, Donald Carter Jr.

Sentinel file photos

Florence Newhouse of Carlisle hunts though hundreds of boxes at Silver Spring Flea Market. Donald Carter Jr. closed the Silver Spring Flea Market after 31 years of business on the Carlisle Pike in December 2005. In its heyday, the flea market drew thousands of patrons every Sunday and up to 500 dealers. closed the Silver Spring Flea Market after 31 years of business on the Carlisle Pike. Alan Kreitzer — owner of the Silver Spring Speedway, a mobile home park and the Silver Spring Antique Flea Market — soon followed suit. This action came after the Silver Spring Township supervisors that October approved a land development plan for a 460,000-squarefoot shopping center anchored by a Target and a Wegmans Food Market. The plan required the demolition of the flea market, speedway, mobile home park and small businesses along the pike. In its heyday, the flea market drew thousands of patrons every Sunday and up to 500 dealers. Rising utility and insurance costs, coupled with mounting competition from stores like Walmart, made the flea market less viable. Plus it never fully recovered from being closed in 2000, when a previous developer proposed a similar shopping center.

John Connolly, head of the county task force, holds a sketch plan for an office building proposed for Carlisle Barracks if the Army College was selected for the BRAC list in April 2005. Carlisle and South Middleton Township led a letterwriting campaign asking President George W. Bush to keep the War College at the barracks instead of moving it to Fort Leavenworth, Kan.

Hurricane relief 2005 also saw Cumberland County residents lend a helping hand to survivors of Hurricane Katrina. Here are two examples: • Carlisle Mayor Kirk Wilson went to Baton Rouge, La., where the Red Cross dispatched him as a local government liaison to assess the needs of communities caught in the wake of the disaster and to make the contacts to channel the aide. • D i c k i n s o n C o l l e ge stepped in by setting up a temporary fund to help students displaced by the hurricane and to channel aide money to Dillard University and Xavier University, both historically black institutions in New Orleans with which Dickinson has an exchange program. The lacrosse team also went south to help in the recovery effort.

Heather Orr sorts donations collected prior to transporting them to hurricane victims in the Gulf Coast region in September 2005. Cumberland County residents banded together to lend a helping hand to survivors of Hurricane Katrina.

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Decade in Review: January 7, 2011