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September 5, 2018

www.cumberlandtoday.com

Vol. 8, No. 9

Landfill referendum dismissed By Laura McFarland News Editor

Dukes football under new leadership in 2018, page 6

C

UMBERLAND – The same specially appointed judge who denied an injunction brought by a Cumberland County resident to stop further movement on a proposed landfill project last month also granted a motion to dismiss a referendum spearheaded by the same citizen. Retired circuit court Judge Melvin R. Hughes Jr. presided over the hearing held on Aug. 7 regarding a referendum created and championed by Bill Bruce of Cumberland. Hughes was appointed by the Virginia Supreme Court after several local judges recused themselves. Hughes had already issued a ruling on July 31 that denied Bruce an injunction he sought to stop the Cumberland Board of Supervisors from taking any further action regarding the approval of a proposed landfill pending a referendum being held. At the time, the board had a special meeting planned for Aug. 2 to finalize certain terms of a host agreement between the county and County Waste of Virginia, which will own Green Ridge Recycling and Disposal Facility. That meeting went ahead as scheduled and the final draft of the host agreement was approved in a 3-2 vote. During the hearings, Bruce, who is not a lawyer, represented himself and attorney L. Lee Byrd argued his case for a motion to dismiss the referendum on behalf of Cumberland County government. see REFERENDUM, pg. 4 

INSIDE

PHOTO BY LAURA MCFARLAND

Del. Delores McQuinn, center, is shown possible gravestones in a long forgotten African-American cemetery. The site is located on land owned by County Waste of Virginia.

Graves draw attention By Laura McFarland News Editor

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UMBERLAND – After several minutes of walking through trees, bushes, briars, and the occasional spider web, the motley group arrived at their

destination. Beneath the dead foliage blanketing the ground under the trees sat a little stone, less than a foot high, blank except for the aging of time. Nearby, a slightly larger one was easier to spot immediately and more

reminiscent of a gravestone. On a hot, humid morning on Tuesday, Aug. 28, the limelight shone on the scattered stones that may mark the graves of people who once lived and

Cumberland County schools head back to class, page 8

see GRAVES, pg. 3 

Election dates to know proposed constitutional amendments for which residents may cast their ballots. Some important upcoming dates to be aware UMBERLAND – Important dates are of include: absentee voting begins on Tuesday, approaching in the coming weeks for those Sept. 21; the last day to register to vote is Monday, interested in voting in the Nov. 6 General Election. Oct. 15; and the last day to request an absentee The election will feature three races and two see ELECTION, pg. 3  By Laura McFarland News Editor

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 OPINION: Hospitality toward parent appreciated P2 CALENDAR: Check out what is going on in the county this month P4

Library cards offer endless ways to transform school year, page 5

 COMMUNITY: Christmas Mother program needs help P5  COMMUNITY: Summit for girls aims to empower P5


FROM THE EDITOR’S DESK

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Hospitality to parent appreciated By Laura McFarland News Editor

A

pparently July 30 was Take Your Mom to Work Day. Didn’t hear about it? That’s because I made it up to suit the situation. My mom, Debra, was scheduled to come in the middle of last week to stay for a few days with me and I always planned to take three days off to spend with her. However, things worked out that she was able to come a little earlier and stay the whole week. Since I still needed to get things done before taking time off, she came early with the understanding that I was going to be working the first two days she was here. However, because Monday literally was a morning-to-night day out for me and her presence wasn’t going to hinder my coverage in any way, she asked if she could come along rather than sitting at home all day. I agreed. We started our morning at the Cumberland County Courthouse, where a specially appointed judge held a hearing on an injunction regarding the proposed landfill near the Powhatan County border. I sat on the front row so I could hear the judge and arguments from both sides. Mom sat off to the side with local Cumberland and Powhatan residents and got the chance to talk to them. I had filled her in on the background during the drive to the courthouse. Given the setting and the fact that 85 people were there to fill the courtroom, it was natural that the conversation around her would be about landfills. She intended to just sit there quietly but was immediately greeted by one of the residents and drawn into the conversation. They ended up talking about landfills, methane gas recovery plants, fault lines, and the potential damage to water sources that is weighing heavy on many residents’ minds around the site. Afterward, she said she thought the people were passionate about the issues, both pro and con, and were highly respectful of the proceedings. She added that the case was interesting to listen to, even as a complete outsider, and she thought both L. Lee Byrd, the attorney for the board of supervisors, and Bill Bruce, who applied for the injunction, argued their positions extremely well, especially since Bruce isn’t an attorney.

After the hearing was over, we headed back to Powhatan. A good part of the afternoon was a spent at Powhatan County Public Library, where I could use the internet to work and Mom could read and do some busy work. It was the first time I had taken her there and she thought it was a beautiful building. We sat in the small meeting room because it wasn’t being used and we both enjoyed the view of the patio and Fighting Creek Park beyond. Squirrels came up searching for water and it was entertaining to watch their antics. Exploring a little on her own, she said she was surprised at the size of the library, which is even bigger than some of the county libraries in Houston, and its attractiveness inside and out. She added that everyone she met was again nice and welcoming. After grabbing dinner out, we finished our day with a meeting of the Powhatan County Board of Supervisors. I once again went to my regular spot near the front and Mom sat at the back for the whole meeting. Being a municipal utility director in Texas, Mom was familiar with the procedures and said she thought the meeting was well run. Everybody seemed well prepared and knowledgeable about the variety of subjects that came before the board. She added that she was glad that even though there were some obvious differences of opinion, everyone was cordial. And once again, she was grateful how kind and welcoming people were at the meeting. “Everybody up here always receives me so warmly. I know it is partly because of you, but you can tell the difference. Unsolicited, everyone is very nice,� she told me after the meeting. I usually work in some kind of visit to my coverage areas every time my family visits because I do believe there are some great things in Powhatan and Cumberland worth sharing. Every time, these localities have risen to meet the challenge and make my family’s stay that much more enjoyable. So on behalf of my Mom, thank you Cumberland once again for the hospitality. Laura McFarland may be reached at Lmcfarland@powhatantoday.com.

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Cumberland Today

September 5, 2018

Opponents of landfill say it is not a done deal Dear Editor, DON’T GIVE UP! This is the best advice I can give to the citizens of Cumberland and surrounding counties concerning the proposed mega landfill in Cumberland County. Several people I have spoken with feel it is a dead issue since the board of supervisors approved the host agreement for the proposed landfill and the judge in two different cases presented before him ruled in favor of the board of supervisors. All is not lost – we have to regroup and move forward. There are several avenues still available to fight the landfill. For example, there is the appeals process. The person who filed these two lawsuits is already filing or seriously considering filing appeals. The person filing the suits addressed in court the right of the people to be heard under different various documents to include the Bill of Rights, the Virginia State Constitution, and the Constitution of the United States. The citizens of Cumberland County and others support this and firmly believe three people should not be able to make this big of a decision concerning our lives, our children’s lives, our environment, and our water

supply without allowing us to petition and have the matter added to the ballot in November. Some of the land owners in the affected area filed legal documentation appealing the rezoning. This was just recently done and is still pending. The other options open to those opposing this mega landfill includes letter writing. These letters should be sent to various people and organizations. For a complete list, visit LoveCentralVA.com. Please note the address is not LoveCumberlandCounty, but CentralVA as this proposed landfill’s effects will be felt from our small county to the James River, to the Chesapeake Bay and have an effect on all of Virginia. Now is not the time to sit back and say it is a “done deal� but to get on the bandwagon and fight. There is strength in unity. Betty Myers Cumberland County

Extension agents grateful for help of community Dear Editor, It is with profound gratitude that I acknowledge those in Cumberland that have gone the extra mile to support youth attending 4-H Camp! There is much in Cumberland that deserves to be celebrated. see LETTERS, pg. 5 

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Continued from pg. 1 

ballot to be mailed is on Tuesday, Oct. 30. The Cumberland County Voter Registrar’s Office is open from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday. It will have the same hours on two additional Saturdays, Oct. 27 and Nov. 3. Polling stations will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Nov. 6. Voter registrar Marlene Watson noted that people with questions about security or wanting to see what to expect on election day may come to a demonstration being held from 6 to 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 25 at the Cumberland Community Center (formerly the Luther P. Jackson Elementary School), located at

GRAVES

1874 Anderson Highway. The only local race in this year’s General Election will be a special election for the Clerk of Court, an unexpired term that ends on Dec. 31, 2023. The candidates in that race are George “Lee” Dowdy III, Mildred A. “Midge” Owens, Lundy “L. H.” Morgan III, Deidre D. Martin, Rodney A. Davenport, Eurika V. Tyree, and Susan Goodman Carden. The candidates running for the U.S. Senate are Corey A. Stewart, republican; Timothy M. Kaine, democrat; and Matt J. Waters, libertarian. The candidates in the race for the House of Representatives 5th District are Denver L. Riggleman III, republican, and Leslie C. Cockburn, democrat.

property, locals worry that its proximity would negatively impact their hopes of restoring the Continued from pg. 1  building and one day turning it into a museum. McQuinn said she agreed to visit the worked in Cumberland County was probably more attention than they have seen in as long as Cumberland sites because she wanted to be better informed about the issue and not only trust anyone can remember. Maybe longer. And the reason they are getting attention word of mouth. She didn’t advocate immedinow started with a landfill. The possible cem- ate action, saying the property will be thoretery sits on a parcel of land owned by County oughly surveyed by the Virginia Department Waste of Virginia that is slated to be part of of Environmental Quality (DEQ) during its the buffer zone of Green Ridge Recycling and permitting process. However, she did say she is interested in those Disposal Facility. findings. A group of “What I have been Cumberland and doing for the last 20 Powhatan residents years is trying to prewho are opposed to serve enslaved African the landfill say the and African- American stones mark the site of history that has been an African-American left out of the equation, cemetery and may that has been lost,” she even be a slave cemsaid. etery, according to local After visiting the oral history. These PHOTO BY LAURA MCFARLAND gravesites, McQuinn and other possible said she feels the gravesites on the large GPS is used to mark the location of a potential rural property tucked gravesite on property owned by County Waste of county, the board of Virginia. supervisors and local back in the woods need legislators need to get to be preserved, not involved and make sure the area is preserved. become the future site of a dump, they say. “That is what I am going to fight for – Their primary purpose in gathering photographic evidence and drawing attention to the that those areas where we know and are very sites is preservation of the history they repre- much aware that there are enslaved Africans or sent, said Ronald Tavernier of Cumberland, an African-Americans buried – then I think everybody needs to step up to the plate to address active opponent of the landfill project. “This is people of the country that shouldn’t it,” she said. McQuinn said she was saddened by the fact be forgotten, shouldn’t be kicked to the curb. that they don’t know the stories of the people They should be kept in memories,” he said. To that end, the group invited Del. Delores who may be buried there and that their graves, McQuinn, D-70, to visit the site to see if she if that is what they are, have been long forgotten might be a source of support or direction. In in the woods. “It is bothersome that still, in 2018, there 2017, McQuinn sponsored two bills to give equal state recognition of historic African- are limited resources to do the exploration. American cemeteries and better preserve and Now that they are aware of it and everybody tell the history of African-Americans in Virginia. is aware of it, hopefully we will not walk away Right before heading out into the woods, from it. We will begin to do the work, the due McQuinn was also taken on a brief tour of the diligence, to preserve the building and look at Pine Grove School, a Rosenwald school located what’s here.” County Waste senior vice president Jerry on Pinegrove Road. While it is not on landfill

Also on the ballot will be two proposed constitutional amendments. The first question asks: Should a county, city, or town be authorized to provide a partial tax exemption for real property that is subject to recurrent flooding, if flooding resiliency improvements have been made on the property? The second question asks: Shall the real property tax exemption for a primary residence that is currently provided to the surviving spouses of veterans who had a one hundred percent service-connected, permanent, and total disability be amended to allow the surviving spouse to move to a different primary residence and still claim the exemption? Laura McFarland may be reached at Lmcfarland@powhatantoday.com.

Cifor said his company has hired an archaeologist, Lyle Browning with Browning & Associates Ltd., to survey the site. Cifor and other County Waste employees and contractors were in the group that visited the cemetery. “We are not trying to hide anything. We have an archaeologist who we just hired and he will do a full investigation of the site. By the time he has completed it, we will know everything that we need to know,” Cifor said. If it is, as suspected, a cemetery, determining the age, race and if the people buried there were slaves would likely only be possible by exhuming them, Cifor said. If the site were found to be a historic cemetery, there are steps in place in the DEQ permitting process to make sure it is preserved, such as fencing it and putting up signs, he said.

“We can always do more than what the requirements are, and I think we would be very respectful of any gravesites that we find,” he said. Tavernier said that opponents of the landfill have been trying to pinpoint and document possible gravesites, wetlands and anything else of interest in their bid to show the land should not be turned into a landfill. Jerry Toney of Cumberland said he hunted on the property the group visited for 40 years as part of a hunt club and remembered seeing the gravestones. He recalled asking an older member of the club at one time about them and was told they were believed to be slave graves. Toney said he brought it up at the public meetings about the landfill and he felt it was initially disregarded. Laura McFarland may be reached at Lmcfarland@powhatantoday.com.

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COMMUNITY CALENDAR WEDNESDAYS  The World War II Round Table holds meetings beginning at 7 p.m. at the Father Val Hall of St. John Neumann Catholic Church located 2480 Batterson Road in Powhatan.  Cumberland County Public Library will hold Mother Goose on the Loose, a new story time option for all children from birth to age 3. It meets at 10 a.m. Wednesdays. The story hour will Incorporate songs, nursery rhymes, lap-sit activities, movement and music and integrate the latest early literacy techniques into the library program.  Cumberland County Public

Library will hold Reading with Ellie Mae at 11 a.m. on Wednesdays. Ellie Mae the Reading Dog visits the library to lend a friendly paw and ear for Preschool Story Time. Pre-school age children and their caregivers are invited to an hour of stories, nursery rhymes, songs and crafts.

THURSDAYS  The Cartersville Volunteer Rescue Squad holds a Bingo game on the third Saturday of each month. Doors open at 4:45 p.m. and games start at 6 p.m. Jackpot depends on the number of players. All proceeds benefit the rescue squad. No children under 12 allowed. For more information,

Help Feed Hungry Kids in Cumberland

call Ann at 804-314-0966.  Rotary Club of Farmville meets at noon at Charley’s at 201 B-Mill St. in Farmville.  The Woman’s Club of Cumberland, GFWC meets at 1:30 p.m. on the second Thursday of the month at Payne United Methodist Church. Visitors interested in exploring membership are cordially invited to come to any meeting.

SATURDAYS  Delma’s Pantry is open from 8:30 to 10 a.m. on the first and fourth Saturdays of every month at the Cumberland Community Cares building, 1550 Anderson Highway, behind the Cumberland County Cooperative Extension Building. This is an incomebased food pantry. Photo ID is required.

 “Christian Motorcyclists Association Powhatan” chapter Living Wheels meets at 6 p.m. on the third Saturday of each month. Members of the public are invited to join the members at Company 1 Fire Station at Old Buckingham Road and Mann Road. For more information, call 804-598-1834 or 804-357-6730 or 804-5128835.

MONDAYS  Cumberland Mobile Pantry offers food on a need base from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on third Monday of every month in the cafeteria of the Community Center Complex. Register on site.  The Cumberland chapter of the NAACP meets at 7 p.m. the first Monday of the month at Cumberland Public Library. Contact 804-909-0049.

REFERENDUM Continued from pg. 1 

“Backpacks of Love ensures that no child goes hungry. This is especially important in Cumberland County, where food access is limited. Basic needs, such as hunger, must be met before students can be expected to learn. We are thankful that Backpacks of Love assists in filling this void for our students and families.” —Dr. Amy Griffin, Superintendent, Cumberland County Schools

599094-02

Backpacks of Love is a local nonprofit dedicated to ending hunger for children in Cumberland, Va. The organization works with school staff to identify children in need and discretely places a bag of food in their backpack for the weekend.

4

Cumberland Today

September 5, 2018

At question in the hearing was deciding whether the referendum Bruce originally filed on June 15 and gathered hundreds of Cumberland resident signatures to support was legally valid. Bruce wanted the ballot in the November general election to have the question: “Should the Board of Supervisors of Cumberland County, Virginia be allowed to approve the building of a landfill within the County Limits without a Voters Referendum?” Rather than cite a specific state code to back his claim that the referendum was valid, Bruce argued that it is actually a First Amendment issue. He told the judge that although county government met the legal requirements in the meetings it held regarding the landfill, the timeline was so compressed that citizens did not have the proper time to come out and express their views on the subject. “We believe that doing the referendum petition is a First Amendment right,” he said several times. He said he wanted the referendum so the county government would have to seek the opinion of the county’s citizens on “something that can have such a devastating impact.” Byrd continued the same argument he

All women are invited to join.  A free health screening is ofBingo starts at 7 p.m. every fered from 4 to 7 p.m. on the Tuesday at the Powhatan first Monday of each month Moose Lodge. For more inforat 2294 Cartersville Road in mation, call 804-598-2809. Cartersville (the old Cartersville Medical Building). The screen Cumberland Clothes Closet is ing includes checks for blood open from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. pressure, BMI, weight, glueach Tuesday, Thursday and cose, height, and cholesterol. Friday and from 10 a.m. until 2 No appointment is necessary. p.m. on the second Saturday Contact 804-375-9850. of each month. The CCC is located in the CommuTUESDAYS nity Center Building C-7 (Old Cumberland School building)  The Powhatan Moose Lodge and has gently used clothing, will host smoke-free Bingo glassware, shoes and small with doors opening at 6 p.m. appliances for sale. and games starting at 7 p.m. every Tuesday and every third Friday. For more information, ONGOING call 804-598-2809.  Backpacks of Love, a non H.O.P.E. – Helping Others profit committed to eliminating Prepare for Eternity is a Ladies hunger in school-age children Group that meets at 7 p.m. by providing nourishing food every third Tuesday of the for their weekend, needs help. month in the Fellowship Hall In addition to the constant at Cartersville Baptist Church.

made against the injunction, that the referendum Bruce filed is not allowed under state code. According to state code, no referendum shall be placed on the ballot unless specifically authorized by the statute or charter, and Cumberland County does not have a charter that allows for the referendum, he said. That means there is no authority for the referendum, he said. Even if the county wanted to put the question on the ballot as a referendum, it couldn’t because it is not allowed by the state, he said. He cited the Dillon Rule, in which the Virginia Supreme Court said that local governments have limited authority and can pass ordinances only in areas where the General Assembly has granted clear authority. Byrd also argued against Bruce’s stance that the people had not been heard in this case. He said there were many people who attended county meetings and spoke their minds. In his questions to Bruce, Hughes asked several questions about the avenues of protest still available to citizens opposed to the landfill. He mentioned the formal appeals process to the Board of Zoning Appeals and applying to the General Assembly to pass a law supporting that a citizen referendum is needed in the case of a landfill. He also mentioned the lengthy permitting process with the

see CALENDAR, pg. 8 

Virginia Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ). He asked Bruce to cite a legal statute that would support his cause. Bruce did not have one. The judge pointed out that the legislature authorizes the court system to act in a given instance, and without those laws in place, he would assume there is no authority. “I understand your position. You believe the citizens ought to be able to vote on this because it is an important issue for the county,” Hughes told Bruce. However, “there are only certain circumstances where the court can intervene,” he said, and “it is just not appropriate at this point for the court to intervene.” Hughes then granted Byrd’s motion to dismiss. After the Aug. 7 hearing, Bruce maintained that this is a “First Amendment case all the way” and said he plans to hire a lawyer and appeal the judge’s decision. He was not upset as he acknowledged that no case like this has been won at the circuit court level because they don’t have the authority to change the law. “The judge was accurate; he has to follow the law. It is not at his level to change the law. We just had to put the fight out there,” he said. Laura McFarland may be reached at Lmcfarland@powhatantoday.com.


Library cards offer endless ways to transform school year Contributed Report

As students head back to school, there is one essential school supply that requires no shopping and doesn’t cost a penny – it’s a library card. This September, Cumberland County Public Library is joining with the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries nationwide for Library Card Sign-up Month, to encourage parents, caregivers and students to obtain a free library card that will save them money while reaping rewards in academic achievement and lifelong learning. Whether it’s providing free access to STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics) programs, educational apps, in-person and virtual homework help or technology workshops, a library card is one of the most cost effective back-to-school supplies. Resources at the Cumberland County Public Library are available to anyone with a library card. For exam-

ple, Testing and Educational Reference Center is a prime example of helping students prepare for school with practice tests for a variety of tests that they are likely to take in coming years. Libraries play an important role in the education and development of children. Studies show children who are read to in the home and who use the library perform better in school and are more likely to continue to use the library as a source of lifetime learning. “Throughout the school year, our library offers a variety of programs to stimulate an interest in reading and learning,” said Maegan Lewis, library director. “Story hours expose young children to the joy of reading and encourage school readiness, while older children have access to technology and digital tools such as Ancestry. com and Early World of Learning with the help from library staff to use those resources.”

This year, Disney’s the Incredibles are Library Card Sign-up Month honorary chairs, helping to promote the value of a library card and bring attention to the many ways libraries and librarians transform lives and communities through education. During September, the Cumberland County Public Library will host several activities, including Stop-in Fine Forgiveness Fridays, Mustache Monday’s, and Free Library Card Replacement Wednesdays! Since 1987, Library Card Sign-up Month has been held each September to mark the beginning of the school year. During the month, the ALA and libraries unite together in a national effort to ensure every child signs up for their own library card. For more information about how to sign up for a library card, visit please the Cumberland County Public Library in person or online at cumberlandcountypubliclibrary.org.

Summit aims to empower Contributed Report

Announcing the first “Gen-Z Summit” in Cumberland County! Who is Generation Z? This is the generation born after the mid-90s and into an increasingly technological age with a huge amount of information – both good and bad – at its fingertips. They are largely guided by smart phones and peers, and are bombarded by messages that condition them to believe that morality and spirituality change over time based upon societal shifts. The “Gen-Z Summit” will give young women ages 12 to 18 an opportunity to become stronger and more confident, capable of living out their beliefs in their home, school, and community. The program for the day will feature fun and relevant informational sessions.  “Say Goodbye to the Drama Llama” - be empowered in all your relationships;  “Everything You Always Wanted to Know But Were Afraid to Ask Google” - a panel discussion

with professionals in career exploration and mental health available to answer questions;  Spa and natural beauty solutions;  A clothes swap - bring an outfit you no longer want to wear; we’ll create new combinations and show them off in a special fashion show. Sponsored by Freedom House Farm Ministries, LLC, the “Gen-Z Summit” will be held from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8 at the Delma’s Pantry Building (located behind the Cumberland County Extension Office, across from the Middle School/High School Complex). The cost of the summit is $20 and includes breakfast and lunch. To register, visit Gen-Z Summit on Facebook or go directly to surveymonkey.com/r/5Z8JHPJ. Scholarships are available. If you have questions, call anyone on the planning committee: Judy Chambliss (434-390-8564); Linda Eanes (804-382-4892); Angel Chambliss (434-414-4753); Susan Carden (804-387-0083).

Christmas Mother needs help Contributed Report

The Cumberland Community Christmas Mother program is in need of items and volunteers for the 2018 distribution season. In addition to staffing, the following items are needed: New board games (Monopoly, Operation, Trouble, etc.), new socks, and clothing items. Donations of new items can be dropped off between 8:30 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. Monday to Friday at Cumberland Social Services, 71

Community Center Drive, Cumberland, Va. 23040. Financial contributions (checks) can be made payable to Cumberland Community Christmas Mother and can be sent to P.O. Box 33, Cumberland, VA 23040. Those interested in volunteering can contact Debbie Kennel at 804-980-5022 or Barbara Daniels at 804-986-5852. Volunteers are needed for setting up and resetting the shopping rooms as well as assisting shoppers with making selections.

Owned & Operated by Professional Engineers

SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NDO OWS? ? N NASTY ASTY AS TY C CRAWLSPACE? RAWL RA WLSP WL SPAC SP ACE AC E? WET E? Jesse Waltz, PE & Stella Waltz, Owners BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES,, BUGS,, RODENTS S? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACK KED BRICKS S? ? UNE N VE V N FL FLOO OORS RS? ? CRA RACK CKED CK ED D DRY R WAL ALL? L? MU UST STY Y SMEL ELLS LS S? STI TICK C IN CK I G DO DOOR ORS? S? BO OUN UN-CY FLO OO ORS? S? STTIC ICKI CKI KING NG G WIN IND NDO DOWS DOWS WS? NAS ASTY ASTY Y CRA RAWL WLSP WL SPAC SP ACE? WE WET BA BAS SEME SEME SE M NT NT? T? MOL OLD D & FU UNG N US S? TERMITTE ES, BU ES BUGS BUGS GS, RO ODE ENT NTS? S?? FO FOUN UNDA UN DA ATI T ON PRO ROBL BLE BL EMS? EM ? CR CRACKE CRAC AC CKE KED BR BRIC IC CKS KS? ? UNE NEVE EVE VEN N FL FLO OORS OO RS? ? CRACK KED D DRY DRY WA WALL LL? LL ? MUS USTY TY SME MELL LLS? LL S? ST STIC ICK IC KING DOO KING KI OOR RS? BOU RS UNC NCY Y FL FLOORS RS? ? STI TICK C IN NG WI WINN-DOWS? ? NASTY C CRAWLSPACE? RAWL RA WLSP WL S AC SP ACE? E? WE E? WETT BA B BASEMENT? SEMENT MOLD D & FU US? Crawl TERMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? NTS? Damp Space? FOUNDATION ATION PROBLEMS? PR ROBL BLEM EMS? S CR C CRACKED RAC ACKE KED B BRICKS? RICKS? U UNEVEN FL TY SMELLS? S? STICK STICKING KIN NG D DO DOORS? OOR O S? S? BO B BOUNCY OUN UNCY CY FLOORS? STICKING IN NG WIN WS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? W WET E BASEMENT? ME ENT N ? M MOLD OLLD & FU FFUNGUS? FUNG UNG NGUS US S? TTERMITES, ER RMITE MITE ES, BUGS, BUG UG GS, RODE RODENTS? EN N FO DATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED CKED Those we wish to thank I am very grateful for ALL of BRICKSS? UNE NEVE VEN FLLOO VEN VE OOR RS? CRA RS ACK C ED E DRY RY WALL?? MU MUS ST ST Ninclude: C. F Marion Trucking, the businesses, organizations, C FLOORS? CY ORS? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRA AW W Wet Basement? S? Continued from pg. 2  Inc., Marion Brothers Logging, and individuals listed above. TERMITES, BU TION PROBL OO S? O CRACKED DR STICKIIN N ING WI IN WIN NNInc., Cartersville Garden Club, Please visit them and thank them CR Increasingly acts that are praise DO OWS? NAS CRAWL SEMENT? T? ? MOLD & FUNGUS TERMITES, BUGS, S, R RODENTS? O Cartersville Ruritan Club, for their generosity and worthy and positive go FO OUN U DATION ICKS? UNEVEN UN FLOORS? C CKED DRY WALL? LL? ? MU MUST MUSTY S Y ST Cumberland Clothes Closet, commitment to the youth in unnoticed and unrecognized. SM MELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY FLOORS? ? LS LSPA SPA ACE CE? ? WE ET Cumberland Farm Bureau, Cumberland. Consider doing Because of the kindness of the Bricks? BAS SEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TERMITES, BUGS, GS, S, R RODENTS? O EN OD ENT Cracked ENTS FOUND ION PROBLEMS? S? ? CRA CRACKED ACKE www.jeswork.com business with those who are following businesses, organiza- Marion’s Bi-Rite, Mr. and Mrs. BRIC B CKS? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED DRY WALL? ALL? L?? MU MUS MUSTY STY SM ST SMEL SMELLS? ELLS LS? ? STI TICK TICKING CKIN ING G DO DOOR DOORS? ORS? S? BOU BOUNCY UNCY Ernest Marion, Cheri Raby, supportive of our youth and tions, and individuals (see FL ? STICKING WINDOWS? NASTY CRAWLSPACE? WET BASEMEN NT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TER RJohnny Asal Lumber Co., youth serving organizations. below), Cumberland 4-H was TE BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATION PROBLEMS? CRACKED ACKED BRICKS? ? UNEVEN FLOORS? CRACKED CR RACK Central Supply Inc., Cumberland Linda Eanes able to offer many youth in our DRY LL? MUSTY SMELLS? STICKING DOORS? BOUNCY NC CY FFLOORS? LOORS? ST STICKING CKING WINDOWS? N NASTY AST area the opportunity to attend Jr. Auto Service Inc., and Cumber- Cumberland 4-H Extension CRAW PACE? WET BASEMENT? MOLD & FUNGUS? TE ER RMITES, BUGS, RODENTS? FOUNDATIION land Restaurant. Agent 4-H Camp in July. PROB MS? CRACKED BRICKS? P EVEN FLOORS? OR CRACKED RA ACKE AC K D DR DRY Y WA WALL LLL? M MUSTY USTY US TY S SMELLS? MELL ME LLS? LL S? ST S STICKTI

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September 5, 2018

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Cumberland Today Sports Dukes football under new leadership in 2018 By Billy Fellin Sports Editor

Last season, Cumberland’s football coach resigned prior to the playoff game that the Dukes hosted. Jamaal Artis was an assistant on the team and assumed the role of offensive coordinator. He said he saw the chance as a “trial run” to see if he wanted to try and tackle the head coaching position. The run went well enough and Artis applied and got the job. After having head coach and assistant coaching jobs around the Richmond area, Artis is now in his first season at the helm of the Dukes. Artis and the Dukes participated in three scrimmages in the preseason before opening the year on Aug. 24 against Franklin County. The game was originally scheduled to be played against Charles City, but Charles City was one of three schools that recently cancelled its 2018 varsity football season. Charles City went so far as to completely eliminate its football program. So, the Dukes were in a bind of having to fill the date on the schedule. “We had to pick up a game and that put us behind,” he said. “It was kind of fell in our lap. A buddy of mine was coaching at Charles City and was telling me that he only had 17 kids at practice and he was thinking of dropping

6

(football). So, I started looking at public and private schools, and luckily, Franklin had an open date.” Franklin defeated Cumberland 48-12 in the opening game of the year. Senior KJ Copeland had 84 rushing yards in the season opener. Senior Ziahir Berry had 55 rushing yards in the opener against Franklin and scored the first touchdown of the game. Junior DaJuan Brown had the other score. “I would have liked the Franklin outcome to be a little bit better than it was,” Artis said. “Franklin has a real strong team. They definitely beat us up in the trenches.” Artis said that the team has had a “big turnout” by Cumberland standards and he said he has some good athletes on the team. Among the standouts is Christian Jackson, a big and tall offensive lineman who Artis said is garnering attention from some Division I college football programs. Copeland, a fullback and linebacker, is a recent convert to the offensive side of the ball, after playing strictly defense a season ago. Berry “plays a little bit of everything” for the Dukes, Artis said. Berry is a running back, wide receiver and plays quarterback in the “Wildcat” formation. Berry also is a kick returner and was an all-region safety in 2017. “We have some strong

Cumberland Today September 5, 2018

CONTRIBUTED PHOTO

Cumberland’s football team opened the 2018 season against Franklin County on Aug. 24. The game was a 48-12 final in favor of Franklin. Ziahir Berry (3) and DaJuan Brown scored the two touchdowns for the Dukes in the opener.

senior leadership,” Artis said. All told, the Dukes have 11 seniors on the roster, with Jackson, Berry and Copeland leading the way. Oscar Sustaita, Kaijhuan Trent, Ricky Clark, Caleb Johnson, Elijah Hampton, Taron Yancey, Noah Bland and Isaiah Carter complete the senior class for this year’s team. Cumberland will host Prince Edward on Sept. 7, then alternate home and away games for most of the rest of

the season. The Dukes will travel to Amelia on Sept. 14, Nottoway on Sept. 28, Buckingham on Oct. 12 and Randolph-Henry on Nov. 2. Cumberland will host Central Lunenburg on Sept. 21, Goochland on Oct. 5, Chatham on Oct. 19 and Bluestone on Oct. 26. Artis said that the team certainly has a few of these games circled as important ones this season.

“Prince Edward is always a big one because of our rivalry, the Battle of 45,” he said. “We played Chatham really close last year. Randolph-Henry, we kind of gave that game away at the end of the game last year.” While the 11 seniors on the roster provide a lot of leadership for the team, the Dukes still have a host of young players. Cumberland is not suiting up a junior varsity squad this year, so the players that would be on JV are on the varsity

team. Artis said it’s important that they get some game-speed reps as well. “We have a lot of young kids,” he said. “We have everyone dressed and are going to try and incorporate as many of the young kids as we can. We want to build toward the future of football in Cumberland County.

Sports Editor Billy Fellin can be reached at wfellin@ powhatantoday.com.


OBITUARIES

KARL BOGGS JR. Karl Hardman Boggs Jr., 81, of Cartersville, died peacefully on Thursday, July 26, 2018, after a courageous two-month fight against complications from Myasthenia Gravis Disease. He was predeceased by his parents, Louise F. Boggs and Karl H. Boggs Sr., and his youngest brother, Ralph Boggs. He is survived by his loving wife of 59 years, Betty Farley Boggs; their three daughters, Claudia Bridges (Robbie) of Maidens, Karla Otten (Eric) of Palm Desert, California, and Tammy Hands (Thom) of Boca Raton, Florida; six grandchildren, Bobby Bridges (Jerikah), Tyler Hunt (Watkins), Megan DuLong, Mathew Otten, Elle Otten, and Sam Hands; one great-granddaughter, Ellie Bridges; two brothers, John Boggs (Louise) of Manakin-Sabot, and Chuck Boggs of Virginia Beach; numerous nieces and nephews, and many friends who loved him deeply. Karl retired as an executive from Home Beneficial Life Insurance Co., where he worked for 38 years and was greatly admired and respected for his incredible work ethic and outstanding leadership. He continued working as an entrepreneur, owning and operating the Boggs Christmas Tree Farm with his wife for more than 20 years and managing investment properties (even from his hospital bed). He was a determined, self-motivated, hard-working man with great integrity and appreciation for the value of a hard-earned dollar. He served in the National Guard, and was a member of the Staunton Masonic Lodge and Shriners and the Staunton Elks. He was a great, honest, kind-hearted, fun-loving family man who was a country boy at heart. He had a competitive spirit and passion for golf and loved hunting, fishing, riding his tractor, and loving on his dogs. Most of all, he was devoted to his family, cherished his grandchildren,

and valued his friendships. We will never forget his sense of humor, that grin on his face, his silent chuckle, and a glass of wine in one hand and a cigar (not lit) in the other. Karl was one of a kind and will be deeply missed by so many. In keeping with his wishes, in lieu of flowers or any services, he would want you to have a drink and raise your glass to a life well-lived, play a round of golf, laugh at a good joke with a friend, spend time with the ones you love, pay it forward with kindness and generosity to others and he’ll meet ya where the grass is always greener – at the 19th hole in heaven.

MICHAEL GRAY Michael Angelo Gray was born on May 7, 1965, in Cumberland County to Elvin and Cora Lee Trent Gray. At an early age, he was converted, baptized, and joined Rocky Mount Baptist Church, where his membership remained. He attended Cumberland County Public Schools, graduating with the Class of 1983. Michael was loved by his devoted wife, Carol Gray and daughter, Tiffany Lazarski-Harris. Michael, known by many as "Mike", enjoyed spending time with his family and friends, hanging out playing cards, drag racing, and target shooting. Mike was "old school" and enjoyed "old school music" and a good T-bone steak. Mike lived his life at his own pace. He said and did as he wanted. In that way, he lived his life to the fullest. Michael departed this life on Monday, August 20, 2018 at St. Mary's Hospital in Richmond. Michael leaves fond memories with his wife, Carol; daughter Tiffany Harris (Darrell); father, Elvin Gray; three grandchildren, Tamilyah, Allahjah, and Legend; two sisters, Vivian Brown and Barbara Foster (Ricky); one brother, Samuel Gray; one uncle, George Trent (Molly); one brother-in-law, Charles Warren, Jr.; two

Paul E. Hatcher, 75, of Cumberland, died on Saturday, August 18, 2018. He is survived by his wife, Frankie Hatcher; sons, Anthony Hatcher and Ed Kelly; stepdaughters, Ann Summerville, Linda Dawson and Penny Morris; five grandchildren; and two special people in his life, Joseph Kelly and Peggy Woodson. No services to be held.

Gray Thomas of Cumberland, departed this life on Tuesday, July 31, 2018, at her residence in Indiana. She is survived by her devoted daughters; Patrice Mack (Emerson) and Karen Wyatt (Kenneth); two grandchildren, Morgan and Kennedy Mack; two brothers, Jeta R. Thomas Jr. (Loretha) and Robert W. Thomas Sr. (Hazel); a devoted niece, Leta Thomas; three devoted cousins, Clarence Daniels, Thomas Brodie and Evangelist Pauline Trent; other relatives and friends. A funeral service was held at 1 p.m. on Monday, August 6 at Bethel A.M.E. Church in Richmond, Indiana. On Wednesday, August 8, public viewing was held at Marian Gray Thomas Funeral Home, Cumberland, from noon to 4 p.m. Family received friends from 5 to 7 p.m., at Bethlehem Baptist Church, Cumberland. Graveside service was held at 11 .m. on Thursday, August 9 at Bethlehem Baptist Church Cemetery. The Rev. Timothy Woodson, pastor, officiated.

ED OWEN

CONNIE WILSON

sisters-in-law, Linda Carter (Mark) and Evelyn Warren; numerous nieces, nephews, cousins, and friends. Visitation was held from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Friday, August 24 at Marian Gray Thomas Funeral Home, 64 Cartersville Road, Cumberland. A funeral service was held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 25 at Rocky Mount Baptist Church, 919 Stoney Point Road, Cumberland. Interment church cemetery.

PAUL HATCHER

Connie Saunders Wilson, 61 of Farmville passed away on Wednesday, August 1, 2018. She was born in Farmville on February 17, 1957. She was married to Ricky Wilson in 1992. She love the Dallas Cowboys and watching Walker Texas Ranger. She loved her family and spending time making memories with them. She is survived by her husband, her mother Kathryn Lockner and Paul S. Lockner; her daughter, Monica Wilson (Corey Elder) of Charlotte County; a brother, Ronald Saunders of Cumberland; a sister, Joyce Pfeiffer of Farmville, and many nieces and nephews. A special thanks to her niece/friend Tammy and her sister-in-law for all their love and support. A funeral service was Mrs. Juanita Thomas Williams, 79, of held at 1 p.m. on Saturday, August 4 at Cumberland Richmond, Indiana, formerly of Cumberland, and Presbyterian Church with interment following in daughter of the late Jeta R. Thomas Sr. and Marian the church cemetery. Ed Owen, 70, of Cumberland, passed away on Friday, August 3, 2018. He is survived by two daughters, Carolyn Buckner (Greg) of West Point, Theresa Boley (Danny) of Powhatan; one son, Bobby Owen of Cumberland; and four grandchildren, Owen, Mitchell, Katlin and Savannah. The family received friends from 2 to 4 and 6 to 8 p.m. on Monday, August 6 at Bennett & Barden Funeral Home, 3215 Anderson Highway, Powhatan. Services were held at 2 p.m. on Tuesday, August 7 in the Virginia Veterans Cemetery, Amelia.

JUANITA WILLIAMS

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CALENDAR Continued from pg. 4 

need for donated individualsized food items, adults or students are needed to double bag the plastic bags the group packs in, which will help expedite the packing process. (This job can be done at home if people pick up bags at the pantry office.) The group also needs help breaking down boxes for recycling. This job should be done weekly preferably on Tuesdays, Wednesdays and/or Thursdays after packing days. These are great jobs for students looking for community hours. Contact Gloria at 804-598-2723.

UPCOMING  Are you interested in owning a safe, decent affordable home? Applications to become a Habitat for Humanity homeowner in Cumberland will be accepted from Oct. 1 to 31. You must have been a resident in the county you are applying in for at least 12 months. An information meeting and opportunity to ask questions about the program and

how the application process works will be held at 6 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 6 at Luther P. Jackson Adult Education Center located at Cumberland Middle/High School Complex, 1541 Anderson Highway, Cumberland VA 23040. Contact 434-394-3001 or info@ farmvillehabitat.org, visit www. farmvillehabitat.org, or come in person to 1417 D. South Main Street, Farmville, VA 23901.  The Cartersville Volunteer Rescue Squad, 1667 Cartersville Road, will hold a Rabies Clinic from 8 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Sept. 8. Cost is $8 per animal. Dogs must be on a leash. Cats must be in a carrier. Proof of prior vaccination required for booster shot.  Fitzgerald Memorial Baptist Church, 14 Fitzgerald Road, Cumberland, is inviting residents of Cumberland and surrounding counties to attend a free concert featuring “Smokey� Wilson at 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8.  Bear Creek Lake State Park will host Ivan Appelrouth as a part of the 2018 Routes of Rhythm Music Trail. The

performance will be held rain or shine from 3-5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 8 at Bear Creek Hall and is free. Appelrouth brings his long-time love of acoustic, fingerstyle blues and ragtime guitar to the stage for a musical event featuring the early blues traditions of the Eastern Piedmont, the Mississippi Delta and the Deep South. Bear Creek Hall is accessible to those with physical impairments and all Routes of Rhythm shows are family friendly. For more information, call the park at 804-492-4410.  Lonesome Dove Equestrian Center needs volunteers to help with sessions with veterans participating in equine therapy. Helpers are needed starting at 9 a.m. Sept. 12 and 18. Contact 804-318-6485. Visit www.ldequestrian.com.  Fitzgerald Memorial Baptist Church, 14 Fitzgerald Road, Cumberland will hold its Homecoming on Sunday, Sept. 30 during the 11 a.m. worship service with special music and a covered dish luncheon from noon to 2 p.m. All are invited to attend.

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BUSINESS & SERVICE NRA Instructor led Course for anyone wanting to learn pistol safety and fundamentals of shooting. This is your first step in getting your concealed carry permit. Held September 15th 8am-2pm. For information call Steve Dyer 804385-0410 or SteveDyer218@gmail.com

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Cumberland Today

September 5, 2018

Back to School

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CUCPS started back to school on Aug. 8. Starting enrollment this year was Cumb erland Elementary School, 549 students; Cumberla nd Middle School, 40 0 student s, and Cumberland High Sc C hool, 420 sstudents.

Cumberland Today – 09/05/2018  

Cumberland Today – 09/05/2018 © 2018 by Richmond Suburban News. All advertising and editorial matter is fully protected and may not be repro...

Cumberland Today – 09/05/2018  

Cumberland Today – 09/05/2018 © 2018 by Richmond Suburban News. All advertising and editorial matter is fully protected and may not be repro...

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