Issuu on Google+

LORI FIELD

Small Saints and Silver Linings

catalog


4107 Hillsboro Circle Nashville, TN 37215 615 297 0296

January 21st – March 4th 2017 Opening reception Saturday January 21st, 6 – 8PM

Please call for prices 615 297 0296 www.cumberlandgallery.com


“My mixed media drawings, paintings and sculptures straddle a border between reality and dream, past life and present. They evoke subliminal, mysterious worlds - planets of my own creation, demimondes peopled with anthropomorphic ‘angels with attitude’, accompanied by mutants, exhibitionists, seducers, chimeras and other intimate strangers” Lori Field


Silverpoint on gessoed paper


Process Silverpoint is an ancient drawing technique done with a metal stylus (real silver point embedded in wood) on a prepared gesso surface. The gesso is a rabbit skin glue and chalk based one that has to be heated on the stove and applied to the paper or board surface while warm. I heat gesso and apply 15 to 20 coats in order to prepare the surface to receive the marking from the silverpoint. I wait for it to dry between coats and alternate directions of the coats as they are applied. After the gesso is completely dried (at least 72 hours), I lightly sand the top surface with an extra fine jewelers sandpaper to make it as smooth as possible. I then begin the drawing. I have to work slowly and carefully because unlike pencil, silverpoint cannot be erased. After the drawing is finished it eventually will tarnish as it oxidizes due to sulfur content in the air much like silverware does in the drawer in between polishing. That is part of the unique quality of the line and the fully oxidized drawing will have a softer burnished sepia tone to it. Lori Field


Deliverance, 12” x 6”, 2012.


Ducky in Pinky Talky Town, 12” x 12”, 2012.


Dumkopf , 22” x 11”, 2012.


Fly Away Home, 14” x 12”, 2012.


Speak No Evil, 13” x 8”, 2012.


Love Will Keep Us Apart, 12” x 11”, 2012.


Milk Teeth, 13” x 8 ½”, 2012.


Poseidon, 17” x 12”, 2012.


Rain Dance, 17” x 12”, 2012.


Rescue Me, 16” x 12”, 2012.


Rumspringa, 12” x 8”, 2012.


Teenage Mutant Ninja Sea Dragon, 10 ¾” x 9 ¾”, 2012.


The Ego Wants What The Ego, 23” x 7 ½”, 2012.


The Gods Must Be Crazy, 16” x 30”, 2012.


Tulipmania, 27” x 34”, 2011.


Unicorn, 19” x 9”, 2012.


Wrapped Too Tight, 14” x 7”, 2012.


You Will Hear Thunder and Remember Me, 12” x 12”, 2012.


Voyage To The Bunny Planet, 11” x 7”, 2012.


Peaches and Herb, 12” x 12”, 2012.


Miniature Portraits Casein on wood panel

.


The artist on Miniatures Portraits Series I started using casein when I did a few commissions of hand painted furniture for some collectors, as it is a paint often used for trompe l'oeil and mural painting due to some of its inherent properties and relatively quick working time. When I decided to paint my miniature portraits, casein seemed like a good choice to achieve the jewel like narrative focus I wanted for this series. Also, painting in casein is an introductory point to get me painting again. Lori Field


Armadillo, casein on vintage wood panel, 5 1/2” x 4 ¼”, 2016.


Zebra Bunny, casein on vintage wood panel, 6” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Tigerbaby, casein on vintage wood panel, 11” x 6”, 2016.


Sonder, casein on vintage wood panel, 11” x 6”, 2016.


Clutching at Pearls, casein on vintage wood panel, 6 ½” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Pussygirl, casein on vintage wood panel, 7 ½” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Green Eye, casein on vintage wood panel, 10 ½” x 6”, 2016.


Siberian Countess, casein on vintage wood panel, 6 ½” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Polka Dot, casein on vintage wood panel, 10” x 7”, 2016.


Banana, casein on vintage wood panel, 9 ¾” x 6 ½”, 2016.


Rubatosis, casein on vintage wood panel, 6” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Onism, casein on vintage wood panel, 8 ¾” x 4 ¼”, 2016.


Huntress, casein on vintage papier mache panel, 8 ½” x 5 ¼”, 2016.


Camouflage, casein on vintage papier mache panel, 8 ½" x 5 Ÿ " , 2016.


Monkeybrain, casein on vintage wood panel, 9 Âź " x 8“, 2016.


Sharp Dressed Man, casein on vintage wood panel, 9” x 9”, 2016.


Green Turban, casein on vintage wood panel, 11” x 6”, 2016.


Nodes Tollens, casein on vintage wood panel, 17� x 7�, 2016.


Adam, casein on vintage wood panel, 14” x 7 ½”, 2016.


Madame Butterfly, casein on vintage wood panel, 8 ½” x 4 ¼”, 2016.


Voyage to the Bunny Planet, casein on vintage wood panel, 6 ½” x 5 ½”, 2016.


Chrysalism, casein on vintage wood panel, 7” x 7”, 2016.


Birdbrain, casein on vintage wood panel, 11” x 6”, 2016.


Kuebiko, casein on vintage wood panel, 9 ¼” x 5 ½”, 2016.


Blue Moth, casein on vintage wood panel, 7 ½” x 5”, 2016.


Blue Meanie, casein on vintage wood panel, 7 ½” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Nudie Two Shoes, casein on vintage wood panel, 5 ½ “ x 4 ½”, 2016.


Star, casein on vintage wood panel, 8” x 6”, 2016.


There Is No Time In The Unconscious, casein on vintage wood panel, 10” x 7 ¼”, 2016.


Red Turban, casein on vintage wood panel, 7 ½” x 4”, 2016.


Jouska, casein on vintage wood panel, 7” x 7”, 2016.


Little Bear, casein on vintage wood panel, 7” x 7”, 2016.


The Woman Card, casein on vintage wood panel, 15 ½” x 7 ½”, 2016.


Duncecap, casein on vintage wood panel, 11” x 7”, 2016.


Tiger Girl, casein on vintage wood panel, 6 ž " x 3 ž ", 2016.


Anna Bollina, casein on vintage wood panel, 7 ½” x 7 ½ ”, 2016.


Birdie, casein on vintage wood panel, 6 ¾” x 7”, 2016.


Year of the Rat, casein on vintage wood panel, 9 ¼” x 7”, 2016.


Frog Princess, casein on vintage wood panel, 4 ¼” x 6 ½”, 2016.


Oiseau, casein on vintage wood panel, 4 ¼” x 6 ½”, 2016.


Pinky in the Garden of Earthly Delights, casein on vintage wood triptych panel, 8 ½” x 10”, 2017.


I am Curious Yellow, casein on vintage wood panel, 12 ½” x 6 ¾”, 2016.


Live a Little, casein on vintage wood panel, 13 ¾” x 7 ½” , 2016.


Angel Heart, casein on vintage wood panel, 10 ¼” x 6”, 2016.


Little Agent Provocateur, casein on vintage wood panel, 6 ½” x 6 ¼”, 2016.


Tiger Contessa, casein on vintage wood panel, 7 1/2” x 6 ¾”, 2016.


Exulansis, casein on vintage wood panel, 5 ½” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Ellipsism, casein on vintage wood panel, 5 ½” x 4 ½”, 2016.


Parallel Botany, casein on vintage papier mache panel, 8 ½ " x 5 Ÿ" , 2016.


Neofeudalism

copper, white copper, bronze, fine silver, 960 silver, sterling silver


Dodohead, patinated bronze, 6” x 6” Buddha Medusa Businessman, white copper, 5” x 3 ½” Reindeer, patinated bronze, 6 ½ ” x 6 ½”


Zarafa, white copper, 7” x 2 ½” Gatorboy, patinated bronze, 6” x 3 ½” Buddha Bird, copper, 3 ¼” x 4” Tiger Mom, patinated bronze, 7 ½” x 3” Buddha Mermaid, copper, 3” x 8”


Feral Husband, sterling silver, 6” x 2” Praying Bird, fine silver, 4 ½” x 4” Krazy Kat, fine silver, 3 ½” x 2” El Kabong, copper, 4” x 2 ½” Bunny Got Her Gun, bronze and fine silver, 4 ¾” x 2 ½” Rootin Tootin Krazy Kat, white copper, 3 ½” x 3 ½”


Neptune, bronze, 8” x 2 ¾” Lionfish, bronze, 6 ½” x 2” Lionfish, sterling silver, 6” x 2” Lionbaby, copper, 3” x 1 ¼” Tiger Dancer, 960 silver, 6” x 2”


Bunny Got Her Gun, fine silver and copper, 4” x 2 ¼” Whirling Dervish (Cheetah), white copper, 4 ½ ” x 2” Leaping Tiger Buddha, fine silver, 4” x 2 ½” Leaping Tiger Buddha, white copper, 4” x 2 ½” Liongirl, sterling silver, 6” x 2 ½” Doppelgänger Moon, fine silver, 2 ½” x 2 ½” Jeanne D’Arc, copper and white copper, 6” x 2”


Atilla de Horse, white copper, 5 ¼” x 2” Nude Giraffe, white copper, 3 ¼” x 1 ¼” Gatorgirl, patinated bronze, 5” x 6 ½” Monsieur Chevalier, copper and white copper, 4” x 1 ½” Monsieur Chevalier, fine silver, 4” x 1 ½”


Straightjacket Tiger, 960 silver, 6” x 2” Tiger Mermaid in Shining Armor, fine silver, 6” x 2 ½”


Artist Statement Submitting to an obsession with obsessiveness, and exploring and visualizing the concept of ‘the other’, the work is deliberately intimate, containing fetishistic figures that are emotionally confrontational and exaggerated in their ‘otherness’. Symbolism remains far more felt than understood, more disquieting than soothing. In these primitive visual myths of their secret lives, animalistic figures provide a means for emotive personification, characterizing or exhibiting human motives and foibles, with external traits suggesting internal ones. These shape-shifting archetypes - a cast of reoccurring characters - create intuitive narratives that explore themes of loss, rebirth, identity, denial, alienation, loneliness......and vulnerability. Set in their evolving mythological context my ‘creatures’ seduce, and their peculiar environments are redolent of a flawed, human fragility. Drawing and embroidering tattoos on the bodies, as metaphor for memory, suggests an assimilation of culturally inscribed messages. By playing with my own fairy tales and folklore - by personalizing obsessive symbols and visual language - the work helps me process my own reactions to the real world and the actual events shaping it.


Biography I consider myself to be self–taught, having had less than a year’s formal training at art school (S.U.N.Y. College at Purchase). I began my artistic life as an illustrator and textile designer living and working in New York City. Ten years ago a series of lifealtering events caused me to rethink the direction my creativity was taking. I began to do work that would be the beginning of my return to fine art. I started by doing collages and then gradually doing intricate drawings on old slate chalkboards with or without gold leaf. Now I primarily do very detailed, obsessive colored pencil drawings on rice paper, which are cut out, sewn into, and then embedded into vibrantly colored encaustic paintings (pigmented wax and resin painted with the use of a heated palette). I also do intricate silverpoint drawings on gessoed paper. Both encaustic and silverpoint are very old mediums, very few people are familiar with either, although encaustic painting is enjoying a revival of sorts. I had trouble even finding any of the tools and instructions needed to begin doing silverpoint but I'm very happy that I did. I love the idea of working with tools that are uncommon and difficult to master. I have shown in many group and solo shows nationally and internationally and have my work in the collections of several museums in the US, the Montclair Art Museum, the Brodsky Center for Innovative Print and Paper, and the Newark Museum among them.


Lori Field - Small Saint and Silver Linings