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Lives & Stories of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps in the Great War

Researched and compiled by Life Lines and EMUOTC


Contents Preface 3 Acknowledgements 4 Introduction 5 What is the Officer Training Corps?

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The Life Lines Group

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About the Officer Training Corps

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A List of the Men of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps who were Awarded Honours 10 My First Experience in the Trenches

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The Stories of the Officer Training Corps during the First World War

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Full List of Officer Training Corps Members during the First World War

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Completing Further Research

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Appendix 1: Transcription of Officer Training Corps War Memorial at University of Nottingham

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Image Credits

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Preface

In the summer of 2018, a 130-strong staff and Officer Cadet cohort from East Midlands Universities Officer Training Corps embarked on a 3-day Battlefield Study on The Somme. Although I was hopeful that the opportunity afforded this contingent in the centennial year of Remembrance would be fully exploited, I had not envisaged the enormity of the impact that the experience would have on our students. It was an education for all and a chance to reflect on the true meanings of duty, selfless commitment, service and sacrifice. Without doubt it provided the catalyst for many to delve into their ancestral history and the spark for others to dig deeper into the personal experiences of our forebears 100 years earlier. When the opportunity presented itself shortly after our Somme experience to support the Life Lines Team and the OTC Project in researching the lives and service of our antecedents in the Officer Training Corps of University College Nottingham from 1909, we were understandably delighted to get involved. Although EMUOTC holds a very small archive dating back to 1913, it is limited in span and light on detail. While we were well-versed in the contributions made by Samuel Trotman in establishing the Unit and his time spent as Commanding Officer (indeed his sword is presented each year to the Platoon Commander considered the best in the intake), our awareness, appreciation and understanding of the contributions across the OTC were less clear. It is no surprise, therefore, that several of our students were extremely keen to contribute personally to the OTC Research Project. As Commanding Officer, I was overjoyed that EMUOTC Officer Cadets would be fortunate enough to be able to play a part in the research and to focus particularly on those decorated. I would like to thank the Life Lines Team, Mike Noble and the Heritage Lottery Funding for enabling this fantastic opportunity. What follows affords us a fascinating yet humbling insight into the contributions made by the University College Nottingham OTC in the First World War and provides EMUOTC specifically with a permanent record of its past – I commend it wholeheartedly and am delighted with the collection. Lieutenant Colonel Matt Ketterer AGC(ETS) Commanding Officer East Midlands Universities Officer Training Corps

Figure 1: UoN War Memorial to the OTC

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Acknowledgements This project has only been possible thanks to the generous funding of the National Lottery Heritage Funds ‘First World War – Then and Now’ fund, through which the Lifelines team have been given financial support to achieve this project. The team would like to heartily thank the staff at the National Lottery Heritage Fund who have given advice and support throughout the project. The Lifelines team would also like to thank Mike Noble, Community Liaison, Centre for Hidden Histories at the University of Nottingham for his continued support throughout the project. His initial research and continued expertise throughout the project has been vital to supporting the group to develop the main body of this research. His initial work on the 223 men whose names appear on the War Memorial in the Trent Building at the University of Nottingham is included in this research, including some stories written by Mike about individuals who started their military career with the Officer Training Corps. The Lifelines Team would like to thank the sites who have hosted workshops as part of this project, in particular University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections, Nottinghamshire Archives and Lakeside Arts for their on-going support and expertise throughout this project.

The current East Midlands University Officer Training Corps have also given considerable support to this project throughout the last twelve months. Lt Col Matt Ketterer has been incredibly supportive of the project, and the team would like to thank him for his interest and input into this work. Special mention must also go to the following individuals, who have worked diligently on researching the members of the Officer Training Corps who won decorations throughout the First World War: 2Lt Timothy Chattell OCdt Polly Appleton OCdt Owen Cairns OCdt Lawrence Miller OCdt Tom Robinson OCdt Elizabeth Scanlon The team thank them for their support, and their hard work!

Figure 2: Nottingham and Derby, the Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge

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Introduction As the centenary of the First World War approached, the Life Lines team felt that they should do something to mark this occasion; having been based at Lakeside Arts at the University of Nottingham, the obvious choice was to look into the University College Nottingham’s Officer Training Corps during the First World War. Having previously supported the University of Nottingham’s Hidden Histories team to discover more about the 223 names on the war memorial in the Trent Building at the University, this seemed like the perfect project to take further during this centenary year. Throughout the last twelve months, the Life Lines team, supported by Culture Syndicates, have delivered three workshops for the general public to engage with the project, and to further develop the skills of the Life Lines core. These sessions have been vital in developing their awareness of aspects of research, particularly related to those related to university archives, and have enabled the group to share their knowledge with others. The research compiled here has come from a variety of sources, including university archival material, county material and national information, and included in this work is information about where anyone interested in continuing this work might start to look. Throughout this research and the collection of stories that we have presented, we have done our very best to find the stories behind the men who had been part of the Officer Training Corps at Nottingham before fighting for their country. We hope that this collection will continue to preserve their stories for future generations.

Figure 3: Officers and Cadets of the OTC taken on the 24th June 1914 - four days before the outbreak of war.

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What is the Officer Training Corps? University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps was formed on 27th April 1909, following a petition signed by 27 students who were no doubt imbued with patriotic ethos which underpinned the Officer Training Corps. All male students were eligible to volunteer. They enrolled in the Officer Training Corps as cadets and undertook theoretical and practical military training alongside their college studies. The training involved instructional parades, exercises and filed operations, musketry, annual training at camp, lessons in tactics, map reading and military engineering. Students cadets who passed an examination were entitled to a commission in the Reserves, or Territorial Force. The first commanding officer, Trotman rapidly built up the numbers and by 1913 he had 106 cadets. The war broke out in the middle of the College’s summer break, but within a few days it was announced that it would provide facilities for the training of a limited number of young men in theoretical and practical subjects required by the syllabus of the Officer Training Corps examination. Applications were sought from those who intended to apply for commissions in the Special Reserve or the Territorial Force. In other words, the college would adapt to provide the training required by potential officers. In total, 104 Nottingham cadets had been gazetted to commissions by November 1914. Many of them, Trotman recalled, had enlisted ‘and in most cases obtained commissions very quickly’. By then one staff member, Captain Frederick Forster and four senior officers with attachments to the unit, Major Charles Pack-Beresford, Major William Christie, Major Nigel Lysons and Lt Col Walter Loring, had fallen. On the 24th November 1914 it was agreed to place a Roll of Honour in a prominent place for members of staff and students who had joined up. By the end of the war in 1918, 1,632 cadets had passed into the Army through the University College. They won five Distinguished Service Orders, 91 Military Crosses – fourteen with bars – and several Croix de Guerre and other decorations, besides nearly 50 mentions in dispatches. More than 500 were wounded and 229 died. Some outstanding young officers graduated through the Nottingham Officer Training Corps. Phillip Johnson ‘personally brought back six machine guns’, while his sister, Winifred left elementary school teaching in Nottingham to nurse on the Western Front. Frank Hind died aged 19 attempting to rescue a comrade under heavy fire. Eustace Cattle ‘led bombing attack under very difficult circumstances…crossing in the open to do so under close and heavy fire from enemy snipers’. William McCelland was described as ‘one of the bravest men in the line’; Harry Bedham led a bayonet charge at Cambria; Charles Vigors ‘showed great course and determination’ in repulsing an enemy attack in Salonika. The men of the Officer Training Corps served their country well, giving great reason for this research to be developed and continued in the future.

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The Life Lines Group The Life Lines team have been working together since 2014 to produce a variety of activities based on their amateur research interests. Initially, the group formed because of a shared interest in their family histories, particularly during the First World War. This led to the production of the Life Lines Collection whereby the group shared their family histories with local libraries and archives through the publication of a book. Next, the group secured funding to create three engagement boxes aimed at school students who are studying the First World War. Through collaborations with teachers and an artist, three boxes on a range of themes were produced; the boxes include scent cubes, replica artefacts and information for teachers to support the boxes contents. These boxes, funded by HLF, allow students to get hands on with history, including handling a shell from the Chilwell munitions factory! This research and publication is the result of the group’s latest efforts; with thanks to the National Heritage Lottery Fund, they have been able to carry out extensive and useful research for others to build upon in the future, and to find out more about those who served their country from Nottingham during the First World War. The Life Lines Group

Mike Noble Michael Noble is a PhD candidate at the University of Nottingham, researching the impact of the First World War on University College Nottingham, with funding from the Manuscripts and Special Collections department at the university. He has been the project manager and community liaison at the AHRC First World War Engagement Centre, The Centre for Hidden Histories, since 2014. He is the author of D-Day: Untold Stories of the Normandy Landings.

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About the Officer Training Corps It was a day many months in the planning. Crowds, drawn from the town’s rich and poor classes, thronged the streets in anticipation of the arrival of the King and Queen. The town’s less salubrious dwellings had been dutifully covered in curtains, the better to disguise their dingy walls. The local regiments, quite naturally, put in an appearance. The Yeomanry and the Robin Hood Rifles, resplendent in Lincoln green, were bound to keep the peace of the crowd. These duties were not onerous and, aside from the arrest of a single suffragette, found in possession of a number of inflammable materials, the people of Nottingham offered their warmest welcome to George and Mary. The Nottingham contingent of the Officer Training Corps were expected and had been allocated a space in Sherwood Street. The detachment was practically at full strength, its numbers bolstered by a number of old cadets, including Second Lieutenant Jesse Marson Atkin, who had returned to stand with their former unit. The officers, led by Captain Samuel Trotman, included the adjutant, Captain Forster of the Royal Fusiliers, distinctive in his busby and Lieutenant Thomas Porteous Black, who combined his Officer Training Corps duties with his position as Registrar of the College. At around 10:15am, with the Royal party not expected to arrive until midday, the unit took the opportunity to observe a short ceremony. Cadets Gould, Horlington, Peck, Shaw, and Smalley, who had recently accepted commissions, were to be presented with their ceremonial swords. The presentations had been intended to the made by the College Principal, Professor W.H. Heaton but as he was unwell and also required in the delegation in the Market Place, Captain Trotman, acted in his stead. ‘This is’, said Trotman, ‘rather an auspicious and important occasion for us…it shows that we are making bonds between the College and the world which are of an enduring nature’. In language that was unmistakably that of the pre-war age, the Captain paid tribute to the young men as the ‘first fruits of the united efforts we have been making to establish a new and officially recognised roll of honour in this College’. His words were pregnant with hope. He hoped that this roll of honour would be inscribed with ‘the names of those men who have learned, during their student days, that self-sacrifice is of some value in life, and who have heard and answered the call of patriotism’. He hoped that they would ‘make University College, Nottingham known throughout our land not just as the home of good students, but also of men who are imbued with the spirit of self-sacrificing public service which has made the greatest empire the world has yet seen’. Addressing the young commissions directly, Trotman once again spoke of hope. He hoped that they bear their swords for ‘the honour of their country’ and that they ‘never have to draw them except in peace’. However, should fate prove less fortunate, he hoped that they would ‘bear their parts as officers and gentlemen’ and that the Officer Training Corps motto, Pro Patria et Alma Matre ‘will ever be heard where the fight is fiercest and the danger is greatest’.

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With the ceremony complete, the men of Nottingham’s Officer Training Corps took their places among the townsfolk as the Royal carriage carried the King and Queen to the Market Place. Their ears rang with Trotman’s words of hope and thoughts of the future. The newly-commissioned officers had their careers to look forward to. For their more junior comrades, the Officer Training Corps Annual Camp was just a month away. It was to be held at Windmill Hill, Salisbury Plain. The date was 24th June 1914, a Wednesday. Gavrilo Princip shot Archduke Franz Ferdinand that Sunday. The Officer Training Corps Summer Camp commenced on Salisbury Plain later that summer as planned. Nottingham’s cadets were joined by fellow cadets from the Universities of Birmingham, Manchester, Leeds, Sheffield, Bristol and the Royal Agricultural College, Cirencester. Together, they formed No. 2 Battalion. The University of London formed No. 1 Battalion. The cadets were given training and treated to tactical demonstrations by Captain Forster and Major C. Christie, along with demonstrations of the supply of ammunition the treatment of casualties in battle. It was, according to one report, shaping up to be the ‘most successful camp we have ever had’. The gap between the Royal visit to Nottingham and the making of the Officer Training Corps summer camp was a mere month. It was, however, perhaps the most significant month of the twentieth century. The cadets arrived on Saturday 25th July, two days after Austria-Hungary sent its ultimatum to Serbia. Germany issued its ultimatum to Russia the following Thursday. One week into the Salisbury camp came the declaration of war by Germany on Russia, Britain ordered the mobilisation of the Royal Navy. The camp was broken up early on the 3rd August, ‘owing to the imminence of a general mobilisation of the army’. It would be the last camp attended by Nottingham’s Officer Training Corps until 1921. For the remainder of the war, Nottingham contingent Officer Training Corps had more than sufficient work to do at home.

Mike Noble

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A List of the Men of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps who were Awarded Honours J Adamson M.C A N Allen M.C and Bar J J Allen M.C C Archer M.C L S Bampton M.C A Barber M.C E D Basden M.C J R Bee - Colonels Certificate N H Beedham M.C R D Belton - Roll of Honour F E Bennett M.C L H Gibson - specially mentioned in dispatches S Blythen OBE W A Boot M.C A L Bricknell Certificates and military medal D G Brook M.C C Cammack M.C and Bar L B Chambers M.C and Bar H C Clarke M.C C Clayton M.C N W Coates M.C S Cooper M.C J Critchlow M.C and Bar W A R Dabell M.C J Denyer M.C N L Dexter M.C N L M Dickens M.C T W Dormand French Leigion of Honour J Ellse M.C H Essame M.C W E Evans M.C W Foster M.C

C L Foulds M.C L H Gibson M.C and Bar D Gillespie Croix de Guerre B C Gillitt M.C B C Gillott Croix de Guerre C E Glen M.C and Bar C A Godfrey Belgian Cross, Croix de Guerre IOrder of the Crown, MC and bar G D Gould M.C R H Graver M.C G F Hall OBE B Hallam M.C G A Hancock M.C J A Heald M.C B Hick M.C J C Hogg M.C F S Hollingworth M.C J Horlington M.C T C Howitt DSO and bar, Croix de Chevalier R B Ireland M.C and Bar R Jennison M.C R M Johnson M.C F B Ludlow OBE G W Meats M.C and Bar A Mein M.C A S Mellor M.C A Moore M.C J W Newton Mentioned in French Army Orders L G Paling M.C

G E Pearson - Special mention in dispatces E W Pendleton M.C L S Pentecost M.C S F Peshall M.C S H Piper DSO and bar, Cros de Chevalier G C Pollett M.C F Pragnell M.C E V Price M.C and Bar D Redgate Distiguished Flying Cross F HC Redington M.C J S Robinson M.C R H Rook M.C W R Rook M.C T Rose M.C A E Scothorn DSO, CMG B D Shaw MM C S Smith M.C D Smith M.C E Smith M.C E T Smith Serbian Order of the White Eagle, 3rd Class J H Smith DSO B Thooley M.C A Toon M.C A E Turpin M.C J C Urquhart M.C H A Walker M.C A Watt M.C H H Wheatley M.C M Wheatley M.C J N Wightman M.C N G Wildbore M.C R M M Wilkinson M.C E F Winser M.C H S Wolley M.C S J Worsley DSO, MC and Bars

The stories that follow include some of the men who received these honours, and how they received them.  

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My First Experience in the Trenches By Sergt. - Instructor Smith

The following extract is taken from the Rally Magazine, explaining the conditions in the trenches of France during the First World War. This extract is taken from The Rally, Vol 1, No 1, December 1917.

My Battalion was in India when war broke out, and it was not until October, 1914 that we returned to England. After a month here to re-fit, we embarked for France, and landed at Le Havre on November 15th, where we stayed for a fortnight, and after two days behind the lines, we were ordered to take reliefs in the trenches.

We were south-west of Armentieres, and “A” and “C” Companies went in first (I was in “C” Company) to relieve the Connaughts, who had suffered very heavily. We paraded at 6p.m. and, as we had been sent no guides, we got lost soon after leaving the main road and split up, the party I was in being under Company Commander. All the way up to the trenches it was all mud and slime. After wandering about for several hours we found our trenches. By this time we were wet through and very tired.

Judged by present standards, they were very rough trenches, with no shelters or firing step. Moreover, they were waist-deep in water. However, they had suffered little from German artillery. We learned that there were some enemy snipers in a house behind our lines, which did not encourage us; while the German trenches were only 25 yards away—too close to be pleasant. Looking through a loophole, one could see a series of trenches for 600 yards or so behind their front line. Just before we went in, the Connaughts had made a couple of unsuccessful attacks, and one of their officers was lying in the open, stripped naked, except for his sword. The Huns wanted our uniforms for spying and so forth.

On the second night some Engineers came to put wire in front of our trench—for we had none—and we had to provide a covering party to go 10 yards in front of them, i.e., nearly to the German trenches. The Germans soon heard sounds and began to fire, so that the Engineers had to return to the trench. They got in without loss, but one man got his legs transfixed with a bayonet in climbing in; one man was reported missing, and the Engineer officer went out to look for him without word having passed down the trench—the man came back with the covering party. I was on duty near a traverse, and saw somebody crawling over the top of it. I fired at him, but missed, and reported to the Company Commander; it turned out to be the Engineer officer. I should have hit him if my rifle had not been in the loophole; as it was I had to fire as I swung it round.

In the daytime it was fairly quiet; but on the second night we suffered our first and only casualty. A man looked out through a loophole with a cigarette in his mouth; he got hit through the head. On the second day we took some shrapnel, but no casualties, which was lucky considering our lack of shelters. On the whole, however, their guns were fairly quiet.

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Our first relief in the trenches lasted three days, when we were relieved by the East Lancs., and it rained most of the time. What with the rain and wading in slush, there was not much of us visible except mud when we came out. We were tired and exhausted through lack of sleep, and having standing up for the whole time. Half of us were asleep, I think, as we marched back, and our clothes felt like so many tons of lead, while if the mud was bad when going in, it seemed ten times as bad coming out. Naturally, we were thankful to get to billets, have a little sleep, and get some of the mud off ourselves. We were only out for one day, and the next night went to a different part of the line---in front of Neuve Chapelle---which we held in reliefs until March 7th, just before the great attack.

That was my first experience of the trenches. It was very different to what I had expected. We had expected more shelling and more casualties; we were very lucky to escape with only one. But the mud surpassed anything I had ever imagined. An Excerpt from the Rally, the monthly magazine of the U.C.N.O.T.C., December 1917.

Figure 4: Issue 1, No 1, The Rally Magazine

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The Stories of the Officer Training Corps during the First World War These are just a few of the stories that have been found so far about the individuals who passed through the Officer Training Corps at the University College Nottingham. There are far more stories to be discovered and shared than could be displayed here; many individuals went on to lead remarkable lives following the end of the war, and are still waiting to be found. The following individual’s stories are shared within this collection:

Samuel Trotman

R Jennison

John Chapman

Thomas Porteus Black

F B Ludlow

William Leslie Holt

Arthur Pelham Mason

G W Meats

John Charles Wheatley

Dr Brian Shaw

A Mein

Edward Duncan Basden

A S Mellor

Gilbert Blurton

L G Paling

Leonard Gilbert

Stephen Harvey Piper

George Hennri Wesselhoeft

Archibald John Ewart

John Arthur Meads

Frederick Claud Dennis

Jacob Hardy Smith

Samuel Towers Hartshorne

James Percival Hodgkinson

Basil Herbert Brewill

George John Darcy Schumach

R B Beeton

William Fred Fletcher

William Miles Smalley

Arnold Morely Allen

William Lisle Rockley

Arthur Newberry Choyce

William Inchley

F E Bennett

Sidney John Worsley

L H Gibson

S G Cooper

W A Boot

Robert Samuel Hallam

A L Bricknall

Leslie Andrew Tugby

C Cammack

Eric W Lane

L B Chambers

Edward Ralph Oakden

H C Clarke

Clifford Lees

S Cooper

Cecil Dunbar Hutchinson

R B Ireland

Victor Joseph Weber 13


Samuel Trotman

The Nottingham contingent’s Commanding Officer from 1909-1920 was Captain Samuel Russell Trotman, a man who approached his work with single-minded zeal. Trotman was one of those Edwardians who had been persuaded that the national enemy was Germany, with open conflict an inevitability. As the historian Robert Mellors noted, Trotman had ‘travelled in Germany, and seen the preparations, and arrived at the conclusion that war was intended; he thereupon resolved that he would do all that one man could towards saving his country, and he did it’. Among his personal preparations was an insistence that German be spoken at his home, the better to know the enemy. He was born in Frome in 1869, and was educated at Mill Hill, London University and at St. John’s College, Cambridge. He was Science Master at the Nottingham Boys High School, where he published two text books on chemistry and trained the Cadet Corps. He left teaching in 1893 to work as a Public Analyst and then in private consultancy. When the University College chose to raise a contingent of the Officer Training Corps, Trotman was the obvious choice to take command. Figure 5: Sammuel Trotman His Headmaster at the High School, the Reverend James Gow, served on the College Council and it seems likely that he personally vouched for Trotman’s abilities. The contingent was popular from the start, but had an uncertain future. It was not permitted to draw on College funds and had to raise its own money, although the College authorities provided in-kind assistance. The war would prove transformative for the Corps, and for Trotman personally. It also brought great pressure. On the outbreak of war, the corps took emergency headquarters at Trotman’s house in Lucknow Drive, Mapperley. This was then moved for a time to Bilbie Street, and each day the contingent marched out to Bulwell Common for training. Eventually Nottingham Corporation placed Bulwell Hall at its disposal, and those cadets who did not live in the vicinity were billeted there, under the personal supervision of Trotman and his wife who for some time lived in the hall and cared for their adopted family. Fortunately, Trotman’s wife appears to have been as committed to the cause as he was, and provided ‘motherly aid’ to the boys living at Bulwell Hall. In addition to running the Officer Training Corps, in December 1914 Trotman was commissioned by the College Council to devise and run a course in ‘Military Science’ for Nottingham students. The Captain prepared a curriculum consisting of three hours of lectures each week for map reading, military engineering, and practical work such as the ability to handle a company of infantry, advanced military science, as well as special courses to meet national emergencies, and courses for those unable to undertake military duties. In recognition of this work, Trotman was given the position of Honorary Director of the department and a seat on the College Senate. His course had the explicit aim of preparing candidates to ‘handle a company of infantry’, betraying its inclination towards the training of potential officers, as opposed to private soldiers. This of course reflected the traditional role of the Officer Training Corps as preparation for commission and may be considered a proper use of Colleges resources. However, the extending of the training to men not eligible for full military service was pure Trotman. Acknowledging the role of the College in teacher training, not to mention his own career as a teacher and military man, Trotman intended his new course to take those students intending to become school masters and giving them ‘such instruction in the Department as will enable them to train others’. The potential of this was such that he even suggested offering a similar course in the evenings. Indeed, for a man like Trotman, this type of training was so advantageous that to limit its scope to an instrumentalist preparation for a career would be to downplay its benefits. He advised the Council that he saw ‘no reason why military science should not be encouraged as a study for the educated classes, since it develops very highly the power of logical thinking, resource and self-reliance, the value of which is difficult to over-estimate’. Trotman had crafted his course in his own image, exercising all of his opinions and worldview, making him

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a professor in all but name and, despite his ‘honorary’ status, giving him significant influence in the College beyond anything that might have been conferred by a mere title. For the remainder of the war, the Officer Training Corps and the military science course were the children of Trotman. Captain Trotman not only personified the direction of the Officer Training Corps, he also became the focus for its institutional blending with the College, largely as a result of his astonishing work ethic. His work as city analyst occupied only a portion of his time and his private consulting practice formed the basis of his income. He continued to honour his several commitments during wartime, often rising at 4am to carry out laboratory work, leaving for the College at 7am and working on Officer Training Corps duties until 5pm, sometimes returning to the laboratory in the evening. It was a total commitment. Mrs Trotman performed clerical work for her husband’s professional practice and supported his efforts with the Officer Training Corps. This may not have been the full extent of the couple’s commitment. Trotman personally paid for some of the costs of running the operation, to a not insignificant extent. In his history of the Nottingham Officer Training Corps , G.J. Eltringham reports claims that this expenditure, combined with the fall in his consultancy income, meant that Trotman’s personal liability was ‘at least £1000’. Trotman and the College appealed for more financial assistance from the War Office, as well as more staff but also offered to expand the Nottingham Officer Training Corps. Making his case in the autumn of 1915, Trotman set out the contingent’s achievement since the start of the war; over 500 cadets had been trained with enrolment numbers never dipping below 150 at any one time and daily training had taken place ceaselessly since 25th July 1914. Despite the suspension of ordinary camps, the contingent had also ‘frequently held camps and extended operations’. This work rate would not falter until the war was over. By the time the Armistice took effect, the Nottingham Officer Training Corps had trained 1,600 cadets. 229 were killed in action and over 500 were wounded. A list of casualties was maintained personally by Trotman. His work was recognised with promotion to the rank of Major and although he stood down as Commanding Officer in 1920, (he was succeeded by Major S.H. Piper, who had been among the first cohort of cadets), he retained his association with the College. He was made Emeritus Reader in Chemistry in 1942. He died six years later at the age of 79.

Figure 6: Senior Officers of the OTC in 1930

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Thomas Porteus Black Thomas Porteus Black, (1878-1915) was educated at Robert Gordon’s College, Aberdeen, and then Queen Elizabeth’s Grammar School, Darlington. He graduated M.A. at Durham in 1901 and M.Sc. in 1903. He then continued his research at the University of Strasbourg, where, in 1905, he gained his PhD. Strasbourg was at this time part of Germany, then the leading nation for the hard sciences. The exposure to German research was good for Black’s career and it seems likely that he learned the language to a high standard. He published some of his research in German in the journal Annalen der Physik. Black arrived at Nottingham, along with his wife Agnes, as a physics lecturer. In 1911, at the age of 32 and while living in Ebers Road, Mapperley Park, he was appointed Registrar, a senior position with responsibility for all academic issues, oversight of the faculty and departmental structure and all the financial and estate matters.

Figure 7: Thomas Black

Despite this workload, Black found time to exercise his interest in the military. Having joined the Robin Hood Rifles Volunteer Corps he then took a leading part in establishing the Officers’ Training Corps at the College and worked closely with Captain Trotman in the contingent’s early years. Black was a devout Christian and was rather perturbed by the cadets’ singing jocular songs to the hymn tunes. He nonetheless remained committed to the corps. Sadly, Agnes died in February 1914 aged just 30. When the war started the new widower joined the army full time and served with the 9th battalion Sherwood Foresters Regiment. He was first commissioned as Temporary Lieutenant on 3rd October 1914 and promoted to Captain on 31st December 1914. Like other members of staff who served, Black took a leave of absence and would have intended to return to his College duties once the war was over. He was even paid an allowance by the College so that his somewhat smaller Army salary wouldn’t leave him out of pocket. An honest man, Black requested that these payments stop when he was given a promotion and better military pay. After training the battalion set sail in June 1915 and arrived at Gallipoli on 21st July. At dawn on 9th August the Sherwood Foresters received orders to advance and to link up with allied forces at Anzac Bay. Black was killed at Suvla Bay Gallipoli later that day. He has no known grave but his name is commemorated on the Helles Memorial. Speaking at his memorial service, the Reverend Dr Forbes said of him, ‘he was always one and the same fine spirit; always considerate of others, always careless of himself. I never knew a man more appreciative of any little kindness or any little service, and it is the simple truth to say his generous spirit magnified all such things till his gratitude was often embarrassing. Such was the manner of the gallant soul we knew who has flung his life away in battle with the Turk. Nay, rather let us say he has completed and crowned his life by losing it.’

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Arthur Pelham Mason Arthur Mason was the son of Richard Henry and Kate Mason of “Park View”, Dagmar Grove, Alexandra Park, Nottingham. His father was Assistant Gas Accountant at Nottingham Corporation. He was educated at the Mundella Secondary School, where he passed the London matriculation first class, subsequently taking his inter-arts and obtaining an Inter. B.A. (Honours), before proceeding to the University College, where he was in the Officer Training Corps under Captain Trotman. Later he was transferred to Officer Cadet Battalion at Worcester College, Oxford and given his commission. Second Lieutenant Arthur Pelham Mason, attached to the 1st Battalion, Somerset Light Infantry, was killed in action on 22nd August 1918, aged 19 years. He is buried in Gonnehem British Cemetery (grave ref H.15 - Commonwealth Grave No.530519). The following is Arthur Masons obituary from the Mundella Magazine, produced at Christmas 1918 (no.48).

Figure 8: Arthur Mason

‘Arthur Pelham Mason was a true soldier of Christ. For this reason it is most difficult to write about him, because when one has said that he lived and died a perfect gentleman and a gallant soldier, that is all there is to say. Mason was nothing if not sincere and single-hearted; both in and out of the army, the stream of evil passed him by and left him untouched. At the same time, no one who came into close contact with him could help being inspired by his influence, and encouraged by his example. His presence seemed to breathe a spirit of kindness and good-fellowship wherever he went. Of a quiet and retiring disposition, Mason may have been misunderstood by a few, but never by those who really knew him. Though he never pushed himself forward, yet he was intensely observant; and his naturally peaceful nature was stirred to bitter protest against the evil of the world whose paths he expected to tread when his school life should come to a close. ‘At School I knew him as a silent youth, but at the same time he took a keen interest in his surroundings and he was always ready to give a helping hand to anyone. No one ever came for help to him in vain, no matter how pressing his own work might be. He found his chief companionship in books; and the first fruits of his own pen gave good augury of greater things to come. But whatever his power of achievement, the world is the poorer for the loss of a pure and saintly character, while in the hearts of those who loved him, his death has left an aching void. But it is not for us to grudge him his happiness now that he has gone ‘over the top’ for the last time. His work on earth was done, and his Great C.O. needed him. He was untroubled at the thought of death, which he faced with a serenity that none could surpass. The last time I saw him before leaving for France, it seemed to me that a ‘waft of death went out from him to me. I tried to suppress the idea, but it still remained, and it was with deepest sorrow, not with surprise, that I heard he had found an early grave in the blood-sodden soil of France.’ (Author ‘HMS’)

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Brian Shaw Brian Duncan Shaw was born in Beeston in 1898. He was a skilled marksman and served in the Sherwood Foresters regiment during the First World War. He fought at the Somme, Cambrai and Passchendaele and was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the battle at Cambrai in 1917. He was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant on the 15th January 1922 in his role with the Sherwood Foresters Territorial Battalion. He was further promoted to Captain on the 23rd February 1929. He joined the staff of the Nottingham University College and became well known both locally and internationally for his hair raising demonstrations on explosives.

Figure 9: Brian Shaw

He commanded 1/5th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters in The Second World War and was left behind during the evacuation of Dunkirk in 1940. He was initially listed as missing but this was corrected to Prisoner of War shortly afterwards; he escaped but was recaptured. He was also listed as wounded on several occasions.

He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel whilst being held as a prisoner held at Oflag 9a) Spangenburg, Kassel. He was released on the 26th April 1945 and returned to the University. He also became Commanding Officer of the University Officer Training Corps later in life. He died in 1999 aged 101.

A.L Bricknell

Corporal A.L. Bricknell enlisted in Nottingham before the start of the war, likely straight from the Officer Training Corps. He joined the 2nd Battalion the Prince of Wales Leinster Regiment, likely taking part in the Battle of Guillemont at the Somme. At some point during his service he was awarded the Military Medal.

Figure 10: Leinster Regiment Cap Badge

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Edward Duncan Basden Edward Basden was born in Nottingham in 1889. The son of Duncan Frederick and Ada M.S Basden, his birth was registered at Basford. His grandfather was Edward W.S Basden who was 67 years old on the 1891 census and lived in Devon. He had two sisters, Margaret who was born in 1886, and Estelle who was born two years later in 1888. His father, Duncan Frederick Basden, was a Chartered Accountant and a partner of Mellor Basden in London. He enlisted in the 9th (Service) Battalion Sherwood Foresters on the 26th September 1914 as a Temporary 2nd Lieutenant. He was promoted to Temporary Lieutenant on the 29th October 1914 and further promoted to Temporary Captain on the 25th July 1915. He was transferred to the Machine Gun Corps with his rank of Temporary Captain on May 22nd 1916 and was mentioned in Figure 11: Edward Basden despatches in January 1917. He was then promoted to Temporary rd Lieutenant Colonel on the 23 May 1917. He was promoted for one day to Temporary Major on July 25th 1917 before becoming an acting Lieutenant Colonel on the same day. On December 27th 1917 his rank was reverted to Temporary Lieutenant Colonel and he continued to serve as that rank until 1st September 1921. After the war he became a Chartered Accountant and joined his father’s firm. He married Marie Bownell Rayson on the 1st December 1921 and they lived in Hampstead, London. In the Second World War he became the Director of Voluntary Organisation War Office for which he was awarded CBE on the 1st January 1946. In 1958 he was recorded to be living in Harescombe, Watford Road, Northwood, Middlesex and died aged 69, on the 27th March 1958.

W. A Boot Lieutenant W.A. Boot served with the 6th (Service) Battalion the Yorkshire Regiment until the 13th November 1916 when he was registered as a Prisoner of War. The 6th (Service) Battalion landed at Suvla Bay in Gallipoli as part of the 32nd Brigade in the 11th (Northern) Division in August 1915; the Battalion was evacuated to Egypt in January 1916 and then moved to France in July 1916 for service on the Western Front. It is likely that here is where he was captured. Lieutenant Boot was awarded the Military Cross for service to his country; ‘he carried out several daring patrol and with a small party, captured an enemy trench, beating off several bombing attacks with great determination’.

Figure 12: West Yorkshire Cap Badge

After the fighting had ended, Lieutenant Boot was repatriated in January 1919.

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Gilbert Blurton Gilbert was born in Nottingham in the summer of 1892. He was the son of Dr John F. Blurton and Phoebe Blurton, who lived on Arkwright Street, Nottingham. His father, John, was a General Practitioner of Medicine in West Bridgford. They were living on Arkwright Street at the time of the 1901 census and Gilbert had a possible twin sister, Isabel who was also aged nine, and a brother Cyril aged three. The family also had a housemaid living with them, Nellie Nethersdale. On the 1911 census Gilbert was living at Sedbergh, in the West Riding of Yorkshire, as a lodger and was described as a schoolboy. Figure 13: HMS Tipperary

He joined the Royal Navy Volunteer Reserve on the 1st June 1916. He served on HMS Tipperary. HMS Tipperary was leader for the 4th Destroyer Flotilla in support of the Grand Fleet at the Battle of Jutland. The ship was involved in several torpedo attacks against the German fleet on the 31st May and 1st June 1916. Several destroyers were sunk or badly damaged in the battle, including HMS Tipperary which was sunk on 1st June 1916 by SMS Westfalen. The ship lost 185 men out of a crew of 197. It was reported in “WW1 News on the Home Front�, the local West Bridgford paper, that Gilbert was rescued by a German ship wearing only his wristwatch and was given two curtains to wrap himself in. He refused to give any information to the Germans and it was assumed that he was an ordinary seaman. He was transferred to a Dutch torpedo boat and taken back to Holland. The paper reported that he was suffering from shrapnel wounds to his legs and back and debated whether they were from shell fragments or the exploding HMS Tipperary. He was described as recovering and eating well, despite a fever. He recovered and was returned to the UK. He was awarded the Order of St Stanislaus, Commander with Swords, by the Russian Government. He also received a Victory Medal, a British War Medal and a 1914/15 star. He died on September 7th 1931 in Basford Nottingham aged 39.

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Leonard Gilbert Leonard Gilbert was born March 1889 in Farnsfield, Nottinghamshire, to parents Benjamin Gilbert, a tailor, and his wife Maria Caunt. The 1911 Census shows Leonard was a student at Mapperley Hall Teacher Training College and then in 1912/13 he can be found as an Assistant Master at Dukes School, Alnwick, Northumberland. He enlisted at the outbreak of war with the 13th Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment, The Sherwood Foresters, and landed with them on the 26th May 1915 at Cape Helles, Gallipoli, where he was also recorded as a Temporary Major in the 1st Battalion Inniskilling Fusiliers, an Irish infantry regiment. He was taken prisoner in France on 23rd March 1917 and repatriated 18th December 1918. The 10th Sherwood Foresters War Diary notes that Acting Lieutenant Colonel Gilbert was wounded and taken prisoner at Grand Rullecourt, France.

Figure 14: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

Exact details of his internment as a Prisoner Of War are not known, but he was one of the Tunnellers of Holzminden prison camp in Germany, and was transferred to a camp at Danholm near Stralsund. Here he obtained a typewriter and became a forger, creating false papers for those who were trying to escape. He escaped from Danholm by ferry and train, but was recaptured on the Danish border and taken back to captivity. There is a reference to him being “out’ before this but there are no details of this. In the 1920’s Honour List he was awarded the Military Cross with the citation: “Gazette Issue 31759 MC awarded the Military Cross. His Majesty the King has been graciously pleased to approve the undermentioned rewards in recognition of gallant conduct and determination displayed in escaping or attempting to escape from captivity, which services have been brought to notice in accordance with the terms of army Order 193 of 1919. To date 5th May 1919.” After the War ended, Leonard returned home and was married by his brother the Rev. Thomas Gilbert, to Reniera Davison at St. Michaels Parish Church, Alnwick in January 1919. It is thought that he may have met Reniera during his time at Dukes School. He continued in the Army after the war, and his medal card information shows that by 1920 he was stationed at Napier Barracks, Siakot, India. In 1924, his wife Reniera sailed from England to Karachi to join him and they had a son John Dethick Gilbert on the 18th of December 1928 at Multan, West Bengal. Military life must have suited Leonard and his rank rose steadily, becoming Temporary Brigadier in July 1940 and was then promoted again in 1943 to Commandant of the Army Training School in Bangalore. He was made a “Companion of the Most Eminent Order of the Indian Empire” or C.I.E, before retiring from the Indian Army that year and negotiating the post of Chief of Staff to HEH the 7th Nizam’s Regular Forces with pay of 2045 Rupees per month, in addition to his pension payable from the Government of India. He also had a free, unfurnished house and payment for a motor car and battery charger.

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George Henri Wesselhoeft George Henri Wesselhoeft was born on the 21st December 1896, the son of George Vaughan Wesselhoeft and Julia Dorothea Wesselhoeft of Pelham Avenue, Nottingham, and later of ‘Westholme’, West Heath Road, Northfield, Birmingham. His parents were originally from Germany and his father was a dealer in printing materials, trading at 46 Houndsgate, Nottingham. A former Nottingham High School boy, he was a member of Nottingham University Officer Training Corps when war broke out. George was granted a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Durham Light Infantry on 22nd July 1915, despite only having served with the 15th Battalion since 12th July 1916. He served in France from 12th August 1916 and was killed in the Battle of Flers on 16th September 1916 aged 19. He is buried in the A.I.F. Burial Ground, Flers. (CWGC Commonwealth Grave No26487). Figure 15: George Wesselhoeft

The headline from The Nottingham Guardian on Monday 2nd October 1916 read: “Royal Sympathy With Nottingham Parents”. It then went on to state that George Vaughan Wesselhoeft had received a royal telegram which stated: “The King and Queen deeply regret the loss you and the Army have sustained by the death of Second Lieutenant G H Wesselhoeft in the service of his country. Their Majesties truly sympathize with you in your sorrow. Signed Keeper of the Privy Purse.” His colonel wrote of him; “Your son was killed on 16th September gallantly leading his men to the attack. I understand from those who were near him that he was killed outright. Your son was a soldier and a gentleman greatly liked by his fellow officers and men. “ On the 16th the 64th Brigade, including 15th Durham Light Infantry, temporarily attached to 41st Division from 21st, was involved in the following: Flers 1 New Zealand Brigade repelled a German advance from Ligny at 9am and was then brought forward to launch an attack of its own. 1st (Wellington) Battalion secured it’s sector of Grove Alley at 9.30am. Because 64 Brigade’s advance failed the New Zealanders consolidated just short of the Ligny Road. 1st (Canterbury) Battalion dug a trench back to Box & Cox as part of the consolidation. In these actions tank D11 helped repel the German attack but the assault advanced only 300 yards before being immobilised by shelling. 41st Division sent 64 Brigade (attached from 21st Division ) to take Gird Trench. In the lead were 9th Battalion, KOYLI and 15th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry with 10th Battalion, KOYLI and 1st Battalion, East Yorkshire Regt in support. Darkness and rain hindered the advance to the start line so that when the brigade advanced it was over 1,000 yards behind the barrage. Before passing 41st Division’s forward positions 64 Brigade had already suffered heavily from machine gun and shell fire. A few men got within 100 yards of Gird Trench before pulling back and rallying in Bull’s Road. A fresh attack was ordered in the evening, but never materialised. Tank D14 participated in this attack and advanced to Gueudecourt before being destroyed.

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John Arthur Meads John Arthur Meads was born in Sawley, Derbyshire in 1893 to a working class family. His father was a blacksmith who worked on the railways. John was a prize-winning pupil at Derby Municipal School and was awarded scholarships for further studies. He entered University College Nottingham in 1908 and earned a BSc Honours degree in Chemistry in 1912. He was pursuing postgraduate study when war broke out. In addition to being an excellent student, John was enthusiastically involved in student life. He enrolled in the Officers Training Corps and played for the College’s first XI in both football and cricket and, as a member of the football team, won the South Nottingham Cup in 1914. He was also Secretary of the Students’ Union, which is likely how he came to meet fellow student Dorothy Gladish. Dorothy, who was studying History, was also on the Union Committee and was editor of the Union magazine, The Gong. John and Dorothy became a couple. Figure 16: John Meads

John was commissioned as a Second Lieutenant in the Nottingham and Derby, Sherwood Foresters regiment in 1914 and was posted to the front line in spring 1915. He was an excellent soldier, receiving Mentions in Dispatches and, in 1916, the Military Cross. His Military Cross was awarded for his gallantry in leading his men in a bombing attack, an action which saw John receive serious wounds. He returned home for several months’ convalescence and, while back at home, married Dorothy. Owing to the injuries he had sustained, John had the option of leaving the army for civilian employment but chose to return to France in the summer of 1917. He saw intense combat again and was killed in action that October. He was 24 years old. Having already gained the rank of Captain, he received a posthumous promotion to Major, backdated to ten days before his death. Dorothy, widowed at the age of 26, went on to pursue an academic career as teacher and historian of the Tudor period. In 1930 she edited and published The Diary of Lady Margaret Hoby, 1599-1605. She also served as the Principal of Bishop Otter Teacher Training College in Chichester. She died in 1958.

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Jacob Hardy Smith Jacob was born on the 16th January 1889 to John Hardy Smith, a tanner, and Fanny Margaret of 148 Upper Walk, Leicester. He was educated at The Wyggleston Grammar School and then Clayesmore School, Pangbourne, in Berkshire. He then went on to study The Chemistry of Tanning at University College Nottingham from 1911 to 1914, where he was a member of the Officer Training Corps. He was sent to France in 1914 with the 3rd Battalion Rifle Brigade where he was awarded the Distinguished Service Order and Military Cross as well as being twice mentioned in dispatches. The citation for his Military Cross stated ‘that during a patrol between La Creche and Steenwercke he and ten Riflemen encountered a patrol of five Uhlans, killing four and taking one prisoner.’ Figure 17: Jacob Smith

For his Distinguished Service Order the official dispatch stated that ‘he led his company with great determination in two attacks and it was mainly due to his training and fine example that the company did so well after losing heavily.’ He was promoted to Captain in 1915 but on the 18th August 1916 he was seriously wounded by a shell during an attack on trenches at Guillemont and died on the 29th August 1916 in Abbeville Hospital. He is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery, France (ref: VI.A.17).

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James Percival Hodgkinson James Percival Hodgkinson was the son of James Hodgkinson, a Yarn Salesman in the cotton industry, of Riverlyn House, Fiskerton, Nottinghamshire, and the late Susan Amelia Hodgkinson. Captain James Percival Hodgkinson initially served with the Nottingham University Officer Training Corps and was reported on 24th September 1914 in the Nottingham Daily Express to have been granted a commission in the Sherwood Foresters: “James Percival Hodgkinson, of Nottingham University College Officers’ Training Corps, and son of Mr. J. Hodgkinson, of West Bridgford, has obtained a commission and been posted to the 14th Service Battalion of the Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment.” He later transferred to the 15th Battalion Sherwood Foresters and was attached to the 110th French Mortar Battery. He landed in France on 24th March 1916 and was killed in action on 2nd November 1916. He was buried in Faubourg d’Amiens Cemetery, Arras (grave ref I.H.31- Commonwealth Grave No 284436). Figure 18: Grave of James Hodgkinson An article published on 7th November 1916 in the Nottingham Daily Express read: “Nottingham Officer Killed. “Captain J. P. Hodgkinson, who before the war was well known in Nottingham athletic circles, has been killed in action.” “Mr. T. Hodgkinson, of 9, George Road, West Bridgford, whose only son he was, received a telegram yesterday [6th November 1916] stating that Captain Hodgkinson was killed while fighting in the Somme region on November 2nd. Quite recently he was home on leave after having been engaged in the Somme battles during July, August, and September, and he returned to the front only a fortnight ago”. “Captain Hodgkinson was 24 years of age. Up to the time he received his commission in September, 1914, he was in the Nottingham office of the Commercial Assurance Co., but for some years he had been a member of the University College O.T.C. He will be remembered doubtless by his fellows as a scholar of High-pavement School, and later of the University College, but more particularly as an enthusiastic member of the South Notts. Hockey Club (of which he was secretary) and at the South Notts. Harriers and the Britannia Boat Club. He received his second star in February, 1915, and was promoted captain last August.”

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George John Darcy Schumach George John Darcy Schumach was born on 23rd December 1892 at Southwell, into a family of generations of taxidermists. On the 1911 census his father and elder brother Frederick are taxidermists working from home as ‘Schumach and Son.’ At this time George was at school at the age of 18. The Nottingham Evening Post from Wednesday 14th May 1913 reports that ‘Mr H.J. Schumach, 56, of Southwell, one of the best known taxidermists in the country, suddenly dropped dead this morning. At 7.15 a.m. he walked to the station to see one of his sons off by train, and was returning home when he suddenly collapsed and expired.’ On the Nottingham Archives register of War Services of County Council Employees 1914-1918, George was registered as living in Southwell and employed in education at the Church School in Skegby as a Grade Elementary Assistant. He joined the army on 20th October 1914 and was placed in 2/8th battalion Sherwood Foresters. He commissioned on April Figure 19: Notts and Derby Cap Badge 13th 1916 and proceeded on foreign service in February 1917, being shipped to the Western Front. He was wounded in a gas attack on September 28th 1917 during the Third Battle of Ypres, otherwise known as the Battle of Passchendaele. On December 8th 1917 he was recorded with a scalp wound from an aircraft bomb. He was also noted to have a ‘strained wrist’. The dates of his held ranks are unknown but he held the positions of both Lieutenant and Quarter Master before being discharged on the 13th February 1919. Following his service, George was employed at Loughborough College for 27 years between 1926 and 1953. He was appointed as Staff Tutor in Economics in the Extra-Mural Department in 1926; Head of The Department of Continuative Education in 1938, and eventually became the Principal of the College. He remained at Loughborough until he retired. He died aged 80 in June 1973 in Christchurch, Hampshire. He is remembered on the Roll of Servicemen from Southwell who served in World War One.

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William Fred Fletcher William was born on the 6th December 1894. The 1911 Census for the Fletcher family shows them living at 69 Bath Street Ilkeston. William was the only child of Fred and Dorothy Fletcher; his father’s occupation was given as a Retail Chemist Manager. By the 8th October 1914 Fred was a Second Lieutenant and by 1st December 1914 a Lieutenant with the Leicester Regiment, 10th Battalion. On 21st December 1915 he is recorded as a Lieutenant in the British Army Machine Gun Corps and by 29th November 1916 had transferred as a Lieutenant with the Royal Flying Corps (RFC). William was a pilot in F.E. 2b of 11 Squadron with his observer Lieutenant Franklin when it was shot down near Lagnicourt. Both pilot and observer were wounded. From this mission his casualty card shows him as having been wounded in arm, foot and nose, and with a fractured humerus; he had been shot 11 times in his right arm and he was trapped under the wreckage for Figure 20: William Fletcher an hour before being dug out. His arm was amputated as a result of gangrene. He returned to the RFC in December 1917 where he remained until 1st May 1919. When William applied for his medals in 1923 his address was The Yews, Quarndon, in Derbyshire. William returned to Nottingham University College in 1919 to complete his engineering degree. In order to travel into college he purchased a motorcycle and sidecar which he modified so that the vehicle could be controlled from the sidecar. His family recall him telling the story of him giving a fellow student a lift to college. The friend would sit on the motorcycle facing backwards reading a newspaper. William claimed that they did this on at least four occasions and were never stopped by the police.

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Arnold Morley Allen Arnold Morley Allen was born on 12th November 1894 in Somerset and obtained his commission in July 1915. On 23rd July 1915 he is listed in the London Gazette as a Temporary 2nd Lieutenant. Arnold married Maud Smith in 1916 in Hyson Green, Nottingham. At this time he was listed as an Officer of His Majesties Forces, residing at the Military Camp, Rugeley, Staffordshire.

Figure 21: Arnold Allen

Arnold Allen was awarded a Military Cross on 18th July 1917 for ‘conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led the company with great skill and determination. On reaching the final objective his example and energy under heavy fire greatly assisted in the task of consolidation’. A bar was then added to his Military Cross on 16th August 1917 and was listed in both the London and Edinburgh Gazettes for ‘conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. He led his platoon to its objective with great courage and determination, by his skill repulsing continual hostile counter attacks, and, at a critical moment, defeating a violent hostile bombing attack which was seriously threatening our flank. He set a splendid example to all ranks throughout’.

The date of his promotion is not known, but he rose to Major with the Northumberland Fusiliers.

Arnold Morely Allen died on 23rd November 1948 of a heart attack at Long Eaton Grammar School, where he taught mathematics.

John Chapman John joined the Leicestershire Regiment’s 1/5th militia Battalion before 1912 he was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in the January of that year. He was subsequently promoted to the rank of Captain. The Battalion sailed to France on 26th February 1915. They travelled by train via Rouen, Abbeville and St. Omer to Arneke where they detrained for Hardifort. For the whole of April they were in trenches near Wulverghem and subjected to continual sniping by the enemy and then moved on to Zillebeke, followed by a tour in the area of Mount Kemmel. Captain Chapman was seriously wounded near Mount Kemmel. He died of wounds on 30th May 1915 at the Third London General Military Hospital, Wandsworth, Surrey, aged 26. The Melton Mowbray Times & Vale of Belvoir Gazette published an article on Friday, 4th June 1915 entitled: District War Items Loughborough Officer’s Death from Wounds: ‘much regret is felt in Figure 22: Leicester Regiment Cap Badge Loughborough at the death of Captain John Chapman, of the 1/5th Battalion, Leicestershire Regiment, who died of wounds on Sunday in hospital in London. The gallant Captain was out with a sniping party when a shot smashed his binoculars and inflicted such serious wounds that little hope was entertained of his recovery. He was a very able and popular young officer, and deep sympathy is felt for his relatives.”

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Arthur Newbery Choyce Arthur Choyce was born in 1893 in Breach Cottages, Hugglescote, near Coalville, Leicestershire. His parents were Benjamin Choyce, a Carpenter and Mary Ann Choyce (nee Newberry). He was educated at Hugglescote National School and won a scholarship to attend Market Bosworth Grammar School. In the 1911 census he is shown as a Student Teacher, living with his parents in Hugglescote.

Figure 23: Authur Choyce

Professor Jeffrey Knight’s biography indicates that he was a student teacher at Coalville’s Bridge Road School in 1910, where he worked for 20 years, only interrupted by his time fighting in World War One. He joined the Royal Fusiliers, receiving the service number 9798. The London Gazette records that as a cadet he was commissioned on 19th December 1916 as a Temporary Second Lieutenant with the Leicestershire Regiment, 9th battalion. The regiment appointed Arthur as their official war poet, and following this he was sent to the Western Front where he saw action during the Somme Offensive of 1916. On 15th June 1917 it was recorded that he was badly wounded in his left arm and spent two hours sheltering in a shell hole before being rescued.

When he had recovered from his wounds, he was sent to America on a speaking tour from April 21st 1918 to 9th February 1919. He was sent as Leicestershire’s Soldier Poet, reciting his poems to great acclaim. Arthur is recorded having passage on the ship Carpathia, arriving in New York from Liverpool in April 1918. After his tour he returned home on the steamship Caroniam, arriving back into Liverpool in February 1919. Arthur then returned to his position at Coalville’s Bridge Road school that he had occupied before the war. He later became Principal and in 1932, swapped roles with the Head Teacher of Snibston Council School, where he remained until his death. He also continued to write and publish. Arthur reportedly wrote the Epitaph sent by the Mothers of the British Empire to America’s Unknown Warrior but we have not been able to find details of the epitaph. Arthur Newbery died on 2nd February 1937. His early death is thought to be war-related though details are unknown. Arthur’s First World War poetry collections include: “Crimson Stains: poems of war and love” published in 1917 by Erskine Macdonald, London “Memory: poems of war and love” published in New York by John Lane in 1918. https://archive.org/details/ memorypoemsofwar00choy “Songs while wandering” (John Lane, New York, 1919), written in America and dedicated to England. Some poems were published in the WW1 Anthology “Soldier Poets: more songs of the fighting men” edited by Galloway Kyle and published by Erskine Macdonald in 1917

29


F.E. Bennett Lieutenant F.E. Bennett was part of the Second Battalion Sherwood Foresters, and was awarded the Military Cross for outstanding service to his country on the 18th September 1918, during an attack near Holnon, at the Battle of Epehy. Lieutenant Bennett commanded a platoon during the battle, and was reported in the London Gazette on the 8th March 1919 that he ‘organised a successful attack on a machine gun nest, thereby enabling the advance to continue and his platoon to get through the enemy wire and occupy the Douai Trench’. The Battle of Epehy involved the British Fourth Army, in preparation for the attack on the Hindenburg Line, forcing the Germans back three miles. 12,000 prisoners and 100 guns were taken by the British and Australian forces involved in this battle. Of Lieutenant Bennett, it was said in the London Gazette that ‘during the whole operation between 18th and 23rd September he showed utter disregard of Figure 24: Notts and Derby Cap Badge danger and set an example to his men’. Lieutenant Bennett was also present at the Battle of Mont Saint Quentin. The Battle of Mont Saint Quentin occurred between 31st August 1918 and 3rd September 1918, which was predominantly fought by the Australian Corps with the assistance of British troops. It is likely that Lieutenant Bennett finished the war with his battalion at Bohain, France.

L.H Gibson

Figure 25: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

L.H Gibson entered the First World War as a 2nd Lieutenant on the 24th August 1916 and worked his way to acting Major by the time his service in the war was finished. Throughout the war he was awarded the Military Cross and Bar, and the Cross de Guerre. Serving in the 11th (Service) Battalion the Sherwood Foresters, Gibson earnt his Military Cross and a Captaincy by 2nd November 1917, before being made Acting Major on the 28th September 1918, before being wounded on the 25th October 1918. He was awarded the Bar to the Military Cross shortly after for gallantry and devotion to duty in the field. The London Gazette notes that ‘while commanding two companies in a raid…he made all the initial arrangement and carried out the operation with great dash and determination,, resulting the capture of 27 prisoners and two machine guns…his fine example inspired all ranks’. He was also awarded the Cross de Guerre during the war.

30


Charles John Wheatley John did some initial officer training in Nottingham before enlisting in 1917 in the 28th (County of London) Battalion, the London Regiment, otherwise known as the Artists Rifles. This was a specialist officer training battalion responsible for providing replacements for the many junior officers killed on the Western Front. John, initially Private 766496, became a Corporal in the Artists Rifles. He then proceeded to gain his commission on 26th June 1918 and was posted as a 2nd Lieutenant to the 1/5th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment).

Figure 26: London Regiment Cap Badge

John joined the 1/5th Sherwood Foresters in July 1918. At the time the battalion was in the area of Essars and Vaudricourt, doing trench tours and working on trench improvement. For the first half of August this pattern continued, but by 19th August there were signs that the enemy was on the retreat and the battalion began to push forward, advancing around the village of Le Touret. Between 26th and 29th August the battalion occupied the outpost line in the Gorre section.

On 4th September the battalion attacked the enemy, advanced their positions to posts in the area of Richebourg St. Vaast and afterwards took over trenches in the old British front line. Between 7th and 11th September they trained in a new tactical scheme at Lapugnoy. On 11th September the battalion entrained at Calonne Ricouart for Corbie and marched to billets at Lahoussoye where further training and also sports took place. On 20th September the battalion went into the trenches at Berloucourt and were attacked by the enemy two days later. On 3rd October the battalion was back in action at Ramicourt. The area around the village of Ramicourt, north of St Quentin, was part of the Hindenburg Line system of trenches, fortified villages and gun emplacements which formed the last line of German defences on the Western Front. On the morning of 3rd October 1918 waves of allied soldiers were advancing behind an artillery barrage towards these well defended enemy positions. John, aged 19, was wounded in action and died of his wounds that day. His body was never found.

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C. Cammack C Cammack started his war early, as a 2nd Lieutenant on the 9th September 1914, being attached the 7th (Service) Battalion the Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. His Brigade was posted to the Western Front, and fought at the Battle of Loos, the Somme, Albert and Pozieres, at Messines, the Third Battle of Ypres and at Sambre in 1918. For actions during the Somme, Cammack was gazetted Captain; for his actions during the war, he was awarded the Military Cross and Bar. Captain Cammack survived the war, and remained in the Territorial Army for a number of years. He moved to Grimsby and became an Officer in the Grimsby Municipal College Contingent of the Junior Division of the Officer Training Corps. He was listed as a Captain in Grimsby Officer Training Corps in September 1937. Figure 27: North Lancs Cap Badge

L.B Chambers L.B Chambers was commissioned from the Officer Training Corps into the First World War in July 1915, joining the 3rd (Reserve) Battalion the York and Lancaster Regiment. He transferred to the newly formed Royal Flying Corps, No. 22 Squadron in 1917 as Second Lieutenant; he was reported wounded in this role on the 25th February 1917. Chambers was awarded his first Military Cross in 1917; the London Gazette recorded that ‘although wounded, he, with his Sergeant, covered the retreat of the remaineder of his part by throwing bombs so successfully that the party was able to retire with only one wounded man’. As a Temporary Lieutenant, he was mentioned in the London Gazette twice more throughout the war for his gallantry and devotion to duty. On the 14th August 1917 as a Signal Officer, ‘during and after an attack he did excellent work under very heavy shell fire…successfully keeping up communication’. The next day, in command of a company, Lieutenant Chambers then displayed ‘coolness and courage in organising and cheering his men during a heavy bombardment’. He is mentioned again two days later on the 16th August 1917 for Distinguished Service.

Figure 28: York and Lancs Cap Badge

He is last mentioned in Military Records on the 16th February 1918 when he retired from service due to injuries sustained in combat, and was made up to a full Lieutenant. During his service, he was also awarded the Bar to the Military Cross.

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H.C Clarke H.C Clarke joined the war as part of the 1st Battalion the Sherwood Foresters and was promoted to Temporary Lieutenant on 1st July 1917. He was awarded the Military Cross on the 3rd October 1918 for gallantry. The London Gazette recorded that Clarke ‘came to [his platoons] aid, and overcame the opposition, reorganised his platoon and pushed on to his objective…He accounted for several of the enemy himself and captured three prisoners and a machine gun’. It is likely that this took place during the Final Advance in Artois. Lieutenant Clarke would have completed the war with his battalion in Bermissart, West of Mons, Belgium.

Figure 29: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

S. Cooper

S Cooper was born in Nottingham on 18th July 1882 to Mary Elizabeth Copper and had one brother, George Cooper. He lived in Nottingham and was employed as a Civil Engineer from 1911. He served for the duration of the war in the 13th Battalion the Sherwood Foresters. He would have fought in Belgium and France during his service, before joining the RAF towards the end of the war. He was resident at both RAF Cranwell and Boscomb Down before being posted to Vendome in France.

Figure 30: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

Captain Cooper was awarded the Military Cross on the 21st March 1918, along with the First World War Service Medal. He died on the 9th March 1971.

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R.B Ireland R.B Ireland was born in the West Riding and worked as a Hawker in 1911. He joined the 13th Battalion the West Yorkshire. He moved onto the Royal Engineers, where he received his Military Cross for outstanding service in January 1917. He took part in the 2nd Battle of Arras later in 1917. He is again mentioned in the London Gazette in July 1918 when he ‘collected men who were withdrawing, and manned a reserve trench, holding it, although at times almost surrounded, for 36 hours, repulsing all attacks…he set a splendid example of courage and resource at a very critical time’. For his courageous behaviour, he is listed as being gazetted a Temporary Major in the News Years Honours list on 1918.

Figure 31: West Yorkshire Cap Badge

R. Jennison

R. Jennison joined the 5th Battalion (Service) Yorkshire and Lancaster Regiment in October 1914, and was made an Acting Captain on the 1st June 1916. This was the first day of the Battle of the Somme. He was awarded the Military Cross in September 1918 following actions completed during the Hundred Days Offensive. ‘He led his company forward under heavy machine gun and rifle fire, and captured groups of farms, clearing them of the enemy and capturing two machines guns…he showed great dash and ability to command’ stated the London Gazette; during this attack he sustained major shrapnel wounds to his shoulder and head. He returned home from the war in March 1919.

Figure 32: York and Lancs Cap Badge

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F.B Ludlow Ludlow joined the 2nd Battalion the Sherwood Foresters and gained his captaincy in the army on the 15th October 1915. His division took considerable casualties in July 1916 defending Ypres, and was pulled from the line before the advance on the Somme. He is mentioned in the London Gazette in September 1916, for gallantry and devotion to duty in commanding a raiding party; ‘although badly wounded during the assembly, he continued to organise and control the advance till compelled to return through loss of blood’. By 1919, he was a Temporary Major in the Sherwood Foresters, and was given an Order of the British Empire in the New Year’s Honours list of 1919 for service to his country. He remained in the army until November 1925 when he was granted a permanent commission as a Flying Offer in the RAF. In the RAF gazette, Ludlow is mentioned as being retained as Flight Lieutenant until aged 48. He was promoted to Acting Air Commodore in September 1943. Figure 33: York and Lancs Cap Badge

G.W Meats Meats joined the First World War on the 17th March 1915, commissioned into the ranks as a Second Lieutenant in the 3rd Battalion the West Yorkshires. Following his promotion to Lieutenant in 1918, he was mentioned in the London Gazette as receiving his Distinguished Service Order and Captaincy. He was awarded his Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. ‘He assembled his company on difficult ground within 100 yards of the enemy trenches that the enemy were completely surprised, and a large number of prisoners were captured…he consolidated and held the captured ground in spite of an enemy counter attack which threatened his position… he showed splendid leadership and courage’ stated the London Gazette on his actions which led to his receipt of the Military Cross. Captain Meats received his Bar to the Military Cross only 14 days later; he organised a bombing party during an enemy attack, and under intense machine gun fire bombed the enemy to the extent that they retired, allowing the position to be re-established. These actions would likely have taken place during the skirmishes before the German Spring Offensive.

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Figure 34: West Yorkshire Cap Badge


A. Mein A. Mein started his career in the First World War early, being commissioned into the 10th (Service) Battalion the Kings Own Yorkshire Light Infantry on 12th December 1914. He was wounded in July 1916, likely during the second phase of the Battle of the Somme, possible at the Battle of Delville Wood. 2nd Lieutenant Mein transferred to the 9th Battalion as an acting Captain in September 1917, being mentioned for Distinguished Service in the London Gazette in November 1917. He received his Military Cross on the 5th April 1918 when he ‘consolidated the captured position and reorganised his men after the attack under very heavy fire…his dispositions were of the greatest assistance in beating off enemy counter-attacks, and his energy and cheerfulness kept his men going in most difficult circumstances’. It was likely that this took place whilst the Battalion were at the Battle of Passchendaele. Figure 35: Yorks Light Infantry Cap Badger

A.S Mellor

A.S Mellor was a 2nd Lieutenant in the Nottingham and Derby, the Sherwood Foresters, and received a mention for Distinguished Service in June 1917. He was also awarded the Military Cross in January 1918 for courage. The London Gazette reported that ‘during a hostile attack on our trenches, he led a party along a sap under heavy fire and took the raiding part in flank, bombing them with enemy bombs… his prompt action caused the enemy many casualties, taking them by surprise and preventing the raid from effecting an entry to our main trench…he set a splendid example of promptness and courage’. Mellor was wounded in his actions at this time. Figure 36: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

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L.G Paling L.G Paling, from Hucknall, Nottinghamshire, was commisioned in the London Gazette on the 16th May 1915 as a 2nd Lieutenant. He received his Aviators Flying Certificate in December 1916, and became a pilot in the Royal Flying Corps, attached to the Sherwood Foresters, being promoted to Lieutenant in April 1916.

Figure 37: Royal Flying Corps Cap Badge

He received his Military Cross on the 21st June 1918; ‘while on contact patrol work, he engaged a hostile battalion moving the attack with bombs and machine gun fire, inflicting heavy casualties…on his return he was attacked by ten enemy scouts, all of which he succeeded in driving off after a hard fight but was forced to land on our lines’ stated the London Gazette. Following landing, he destroyed his plane, and gave information about the nearby enemy batteries. ‘His exceptional courage, dash and capacity for hard work have proved invaluable’.

Stephen Harvey Piper

Stephen Piper was part of 9th Battalion the Sherwood Foresters and entered the war as a 2nd Lieutenant in 1914. In 1916, Piper was made a Captain, which he retained for the duration of the war. He received his Distinguished Service Order in January 1919 for bravery. Following the war, Captain Piper took over command of the Nottingham University Contingent of the Officer Training Corps, upon the retirement of Captain R Trottman in September 1920. He later moved to Bristol in 1922 and took command of the Bristol University Contingent, being made up to Major in June 1925. Major Piper retired from the Officer Training Corps in 1937, having reached the age limits for the role.

Figure 38: Stephen Piper

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Archibald John Ewart Archibald was born in 1895 in Nottingham. He was the son of Archibald D and Clara Helen Ewart. He had four brothers and one sister. One brother died age 6 in 1903 and is buried in the Nottingham Rock cemetery. In 1901 the family were living at 41 Park Row, Nottingham and by 1911 they had moved to Postern Street, Nottingham. Archibald went to Nottingham High School and by the time he was 15 he was working in the family drapers and outfitting business E W D Ewart Ltd, a member of St Andrew Presbyterian Church and Nottingham University College Officer Training Corps.He was granted a commission as a second Lieutenant in the 11th Battalion of Duke of Wellingtons (West Riding Regiment) and he died aged 21 on 28 September 1916 during the Battle of the Somme. He had been attached to the 8th Battalion of the west Riding Regiment and it is likely that he died in the Battle of Theipval Ridge that occurred during the Battle of the Somme. Figure 39: West Yorkshire Cap Badge He is remembered on the family headstone in the Rock Cemetery as well as on the Officer Training Corps War Memorial, Nottingham High School War Memorial, St Andrew’ Presbyterian Church War Memorial and St Thomas’s Church war Memorial. His father died in 1961 aged 95 and until 1959 remained the managing director of the family company. Three of his sons and his daughter outlived him, two of them managing the business.

Frederick Claud Dennis Frederick was born in Nottingham in 1884 and was the son of Thomas and Sarah Jane Dennis. The family were living at 70 Bloomsgrove Street, Radford and subsequently moved to 10 Albert Grove, Lenton Sands and 70 Hartley Road. Frederick had two older brothers and their father worked as a coal miner, a general factory labourer, a blacksmiths labourer and a gardener. He died in Nottingham in 1917 aged 69.

Figure 40: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

Frederick worked as an electrical engineer for Nottingham City Council. He joined the Officer Training Corp in 1914 and was a member of Norton Street Congregational Church. He was granted a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the 17th Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters (Welbeck Rangers) in April 1915. He was sent for training in Edinburgh and Newcastle, and was sent to France May 1916. He was killed during a trench raid, leading his platoon, on the 1st August 1916, aged 31, and is buried in Gorre British and Indian Cemetery (Grave ref 11.E.17).

He is remembered on Officer Training Corps War Memorial as well as Radford St Peter War Memorial Nottingham, and the Norton Street Congregational Church and Sunday School War Memorial. His probate was granted to his mother.

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Samuel Towers Hartshorne Samuel was born in Worthington Leicestershire in 1894 son of William and Sarah Jane Hartshorne. His father was a Coal Miner and he had two younger brothers. He was baptised on 22 July 1894. In 1911 he was still living at home but was working at a school as a Bursar. He was a member of the Officer Training Corps and was granted a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the 9th (Service Battalion) of the Leicestershire Regiment in 1914. On the 29th July 1915 he was promoted to Lieutenant and Acting Captain in 1st and 2nd Battalion Leicestershire and was described as an Assistant Instructor. On the 14th December 1917 he was mentioned in despatches as deserving of special mention. He had become a Captain by the time that he was wounded on the 12th April 1918. He became an acting Lieutenant Colonel whilst commanding 1st Battalion from 14th to 21st May 1918. He was awarded the Military Cross on 13th September 1918. He was an acting Major from 12th June 1919 to 11th July 1919.

Figure 41: Leicester Cap Badge

The citation to his Military Cross states that he was in command of his company and the remnants of another, and beat off several enemy attacks. He continued to lead his men with ability until the loss of blood from a wound stopped him. He was serving as a Captain in the 8th Battalion Royal Warwick’s from 3 April 1921 and relinquished his commission in the Leicestershire Regiment on the 1st September 1921. He was promoted to Major in 8th Battalion Royal Warwick’s on 20th May 1928 and resigned his commission in Royal Warwick’s on 21st December 1932. In 1922 he was a haulage contractor in Coleorton, Leicestershire. In the Second World War, he was granted a commission as a Squadron Leader and appointed to command No 913 (County of Warwick) Squadron Auxiliary Air Force on 22 June 1939. He was promoted in the Balloon Branch to Wing Commander (temporary) on the 1st September 1941.

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Basil Herbert Brewill Basil was born on 7 December 1894 at Edwalton, Nottingham. He was the son of Arthur W. and Kate C. Brewill. He had one older brother and two older sisters. His father was an Architect and a partner of Brewill & Bailey. They designed amongst other things the Drill Hall on Derby Road Nottingham, as well as the Albert Ball memorial at Nottingham Castle. Basil went to boarding school at Oakham and was also a member of Nottingham University College Officer Training Corps.

Figure 42: Notts and Derby Cap Badge

He was granted a commission as a Lieutenant in the 7th Battalion Sherwood Foresters on the 1st June 1916. His father and brother also served for the Sherwood Foresters during the First World War. On the 18th July 1921 he was promoted to Captain and on the 1st January 1929 to Lieutenant Colonel in the Royal Artillery.

On the 1st April 1930 he was a Major in the Sherwood Foresters and shown as Member/ Secretary of the Territorial Army association and posted to The Drill Hall Derby Road Nottingham. In the same year he is also shown as a Major operating the Anti-Aircraft Unit for the Royal Engineers in conjunction with the 42nd Robin Hoods-Sherwood Foresters.

He married Beatrice Taylor in 1930 at Kensington in London. On 1 January 1942 he became Wing Major Royal regiment of Artillery (TA) and was the representative member for the County Borough of Nottingham. In 1945 he was shown as Major Royal Artillery- Territorial and Air Force Association. After the war, he became a Chartered Accountant and a was Partner in both Brewill & Kenewell ,and Clayton & Brewill, which he formed in 1945.He died in 1973.

R. D Belton R D Belton was a member of the University College Officer Training Corps. He received a commission from the Sherwood Foresters and was promoted to Temporary Lieutenant and Acting Captain in the 1st & 2nd Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters on 21st July 1917. He was further promoted to Lieutenant with the 6th Battalion on 26 July 1917. He was wounded by a gunshot to the hand on 22nd December 1917 and was entrained at Etaples in France and returned to Brighton via Calais to be treated. He was back in France by the 28th August 1918 when he was placed on the Roll of Honour for beating off a counter attack at Oppy Wood. Oppy wood was the scene of fighting in 1917 as part of the Arras Battle on the Western Front. He was wounded again on the 17th September 1918, by which time he had been promoted to Captain.

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Figure 43: Notts and Derby Cap Badge


William Miles Smalley William Smalley was born on the 18th January 1891, the son of William Arthur Smalley, a Hatter of Chapel Bar, and Anne. He was educated at Stanley Road Secondary School, Nottingham and University College Nottingham, where he was a Demonstrator in the College Theatre, and after a four year apprenticeship with Alderman Cook, he obtained the position of Lecture Assistant in the Chemical Department. He entered the Officer Training Corps at its inception and he Captain of the unit spoke of him as one of his right-hand men. Two of his brothers also served with the army as 2nd Lieutenants during te First World War. William Smalley was serving near La Gorgue and, although the section was ‘unusually quiet’ according to the battalion war diary, he was killed by a sniper whilst in a communication trench crossing an exposed part of the line. He was originally buried in a dugout close to the battalion headquarters. He is now buried in the CabaretRouge British Cemetery, Souchez, Pas de Calais (Commonwealth Figure 44: William Smalley Grave No 584026). Brigadier-General Marshall wrote of him, “We shall miss him as he possessed valuable first aid and medical knowledge rarely met with outside the profession”. A Company commander wrote “One of the best equipped and most brilliant young officers I have ever met” and his men referred to him as one of the best officers they ever had.” Second Lieutenant William Miles Smalley, 1st Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment, had written a detailed letter to his parents on 24th November 1914 describing the harsh conditions he experienced in the first winter in the trenches, dealing with snipers and exposure: “Dear Mother and Dad – We have just come out of the trenches for what is termed three days’ rest. The idea is to spend three days in them and three days behind them. We had a rotten time in them from the intense cold at night; quite a number of men have been severely frost-bitten, and some will lose toes and feet. Rifle fire is fairly all right in the trenches, but shell fire is rotten. You cannot answer it back, but simply have to get into your little hole and chance your luck. I have in some mysterious way become the chief first aid man in my company. The medical officer has provided me with a medical haversack, which I have taken into the trenches, and there I generally superintend the bandaging, of all the wounded of my own company. Have had some pretty bad cases to attend to so far, nearly all of them shell fire wounded. If you can some time, just send me along a cake or two; I’ve forgotten what one looks or tastes like. So far we have had a fairly plentiful supply of tobacco, delivered in the trenches, also some newspapers, I got some soap and tobacco per parcel post, actually delivered whilst the Germans were firing heavily. Snipers are the great trouble. One gets bullets coming in from all sides. They apparently climb trees or live in the cellars of destroyed houses, and simply pop away all through the night, having first laid the rifle by day. In the German trenches also it seems as though they have tripods or fixed rests for their rifles, and have them sighted all the time on a loophole or a tee just at the back of our trench, or any conspicuous mark along our front. One gets bullet after bullet coming through the same loophole during the night, and always hitting the same spot in the rear. Their trenches are only about 130 yards away and so far only one attempt has been made to attack us; and I am pleased to say that my platoon sergeant spotted them starting climbing over, and get ‘em hell. They didn’t try any more just there. In front of our piece of trench there are quite a number of dead Germans, which it is impossible to bury. Lucky for us that it is cold, or they would smell horribly. I must say that the Germans are very good. Shell after shell drop close together, and if our machine guns open for a moment you can bet they are shelled almost immediately. Sorry to say we have lost two officers killed and one wounded so far. Snipers in each case did the business. During the day the enemy tries hard to be funny, and if our fellows let fly at a loophole near to where earth is being thrown over they signal with a spade that the shot was a miss. Our chaps have taken to answering them in the same way. In one place in my bit of front as fast as the men build up a loophole the Germans knock it down, and there is apparently

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great rivalry as to who will eventually win. So far no men have been hit just at that spot, but many have had very narrow escapes. Personally, I find the show anything but a picnic, but am very pleased to say that I am quite fit, well, and cheerful. Am just going to enjoy the luxury of a bath, hot. A few good cigarettes would be very acceptable. And from a separate letter: Send me a refill for my lamp week by week, and also occasionally some good cigarettes. French cigarettes are vile, and one issue of cigs. consists of 10 per week – something like 5 a penny. My company have got the worst piece in the whole line occupied by the Brigade, and my own platoon has the worst part of the line held by my company. This is not just my opinion, but also that of my captain and the colonel. When I started off I had 57 men in my platoon; now I muster 27. Don’t think that all the 30 are killed or wounded, because most of them are in hospital with frost-bite in their feet. Still, I have lost more men killed than the rest put together; and, of course, a corresponding number of wounded. I am occupying an advanced kind of post in front of the main line of trenches, and we are only 50 yards, at the most, from the German trenches. The main line of trenches are from 100 to 150 yards apart. Every loophole of mine has been knocked to bits. During two hours over 1,000 bullets hit six sandbags, so you can tell how good their shooting is when necessary. The captain has mentioned my name to the colonel for work under fire and for attending to the wounded under similar conditions; and he says he hopes and expects that I shall be mentioned in despatches. Wait and see.

William Lisle Rockley William was the only son of Lisle and Margaret L Rockley, 44 Richmond Drive, Mapperley Park, Nottingham. He attended Grosvenor School, Waterloo Crescent, Nottingham and was also educated at Waverley School, Nottingham and in Paris, completing his education at the end of July 1914. Joined University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps on his return home and received his commission in the 11th Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment in December 1914. He served in Gallipoli where he was wounded and won the Military Cross. After the evacuation of Gallipoli he transferred to the Western Front. At the time of his death he was Acting Adjutant. He was killed by a shell, aged 21 on 11th October 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on Tyne Cot Memorial (Commonwealth Grave No 828039). His citation for his military cross was published in the London Gazette on 22nd January 1916 and reads: “for conspicuous gallantry and ability in the Gallipoli Peninsula.”

Figure 45: William Rockley

“He made two valuable reconnaissance’s of the enemy’s positions and working parties, and sited a work under heavy fire. The latter operation was one of great risk and difficulty, and Lieut. Rockley showed great coolness and determination.” His father laid out Rockley Memorial Park in Radcliffe on Trent in memory of his son and the men from Radcliffe on Trent who had died in the war (WMA 27271).

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William Inchley William was born on 24th November 1883 in Arnold and was the son of William Henry Francis, a Customs and Excise Officer, and Elizabeth Inchley nee Pettifor. He was educated at All Saints’ School, Nottingham, and at University College Nottingham; he became a lecturer in Engineering at the University College Nottingham. He was also a member of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps. He married Elizabeth Jane Lowson (born 1883 in the United States of America) in 1907 at Grantham. They went on to have two daughters, Joyce Lilian born 1908 and Mabel Christine born 1910, Figure 46: William Inchley both born in Nottingham. In the 1911 census showed the family living at 34 Burford Road, Nottingham. In November 1913, he received a commission in the Reserve of Officers, and at the outbreak of war was posted to the Duke of Wellington’s Regiment. Last June, Lieut. Inchley was invalided from the front, having been a victim of poisonous gases, from which, however, he had practically recovered. He died aged 33 on the 5th May 1915 of the effects of poisonous gas and is buried in Ypres Reservoir Cemetery (1.B.52 Commonwealth Grave No 99110). An article published in the Grantham Journal – 24th December, 1915: “It is with very great regret we record this week the death, in France, of Lieut. W. Inchley, 2nd Battalion Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, the sad news being received at his home, 49, Dudley Road, Grantham, this week. The gallant officer was formerly an engineering pupil at Messrs. R. Hornsby and Sons, Ltd., subsequently taking an important appointment as lecturer of engineering at the University College, Nottingham. He was the author of several technical works on Engineering and Combustion, which are recognised as standard works, and gained for him great prominence in his profession. Whilst at the University he became attached to the O.T.C., and held the rank of Colour-Sergt”.

Sidney John Worsley Sidney Worsley served with 4th North Staffordshire Regiment, and was awarded the Military Cross in 3rd June 1916. He obtained a further 2 bars for his Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry in action and devotion to duty in handling his company with great ability during a counter-attack, and in commanding the rearguard company during a retirement. He also carried out a daring reconnaissance on a motorcycle and brought back information of utmost value. Captain S. J. Worsley, D.S.O., M.C. described the fighting around Delville Wood as follows: Every semblance of a trench seemed full of dead-sodden, squelchy, swollen bodies. Fortunately the blackening faces were invisible except when Verey lights lit up the indescribable scene. Not a tree stood whole in that wood. Several, including myself, had dysentery, and that in a ghastly battered trench with no prospect of medical attention. After all, we stood and lay on putrefying bodies and the wonder was that the disease did not finish off what the shells of the enemy had started. There was hand-to-hand fighting with knives, bombs, and bayonets; cursing and brutality on both sides such as men can be responsible for when it is a question of “your life or mine”; mud and filthy stench; dysentery and unattended wounds; shortage of food and water and ammunition.

Figure 47: North Staffs Cap Badge

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Robert Samuel Hallam Robert Samuel was born on 3rd September 1898 at Radcliffe on Trent and was the son of Robert a solicitor and Emma Hallam, née Jallings of Chestnut Grove, Radcliffe on Trent.; he was baptised on 6th October 1898 at St Marys Church, Radcliffe on Trent. In the 1911 census Robert Samuel is shown as being 12 years of age, a Scholar and a Boarder at De Aston, School, Market Rasen, Lincolnshire. He joined Nottingham Officer Training Corps aged 16. After a year’s training he was posted to France. Seventeen year-old Second Lieutenant Robert Samuel Hallam, served with the 15th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment. He landed in France on 29th May 1916 and was killed in action on 20th July 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial (Commonwealth Grave No788639). The following is taken from the obituary from De Astonian, school magazine, Christmas 1916, p. 98: Figure 48: Robert Hallam

“Hallam, Robert S. Born 3 September 1898, admitted 16th September 1909, son of R. Hallam, Solicitor of Chestnut Grove, Radcliffe on Trent. Left Easter 1912. Killed July 1916. Robert Samuel Hallam, the son of a well-known Nottingham solicitor, entered De Aston in September, 1909, and remained here until Easter 1912. He possessed undoubted talents, and was useful on both cricket and football fields, and was much missed when he accompanied Mr. Elliott to Ashby-de-la-Zouch. There he distinguished himself both as a scholar and as an athlete. He was about to enter the legal profession when war broke out, and he promptly volunteered his services. As he was only 16 years of age the recruiting authorities would not accept him, so he joined the Nottingham University O.T.C., and after a year’s training was granted a commission in the special reserve, Sherwood Foresters, shortly after his 17th birthday in September 1915. He proceeded to the front with a draft in the early summer 1916 and was killed in action in July 1916.”

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Leslie Andrew Tugby Leslie was born in 1898 to Andrew and Sarah Tugby in Ashby–de-laZouch Leicestershire. He had one older brother and his father was a Cement and Plaster Manufacturer. The family attended the Wesleyan Methodist Church in Ashby and Leslie was a pupil at Ashby Grammar School. When he left school he trained to be an Engineer and went to work in Coventry, employed in aircraft manufacture. Leslie joined Nottingham University College Officer Training Corp in 1916 and accepted a commission as a Second Lieutenant in the Royal Welsh Regiment in October 1917. He was sent to serve on the Western Front and was gassed by Mustard Gas and admitted to hospital on 15th July 1918. Having recovered, he was killed in action aged 20, leading his men over the top on September 18th 1918. He is buried at Gouzeaucourt New British Cemetery, Cambrai in France. Figure 49: Royal Welsh Cap Badge

Eric W Lane

Born 8th December 1894, to Albert Lane, an Assistant Schoolteacher, and Ester Lane, he had two sisters and lived at 47 Station Street E. Kirkby, and then at Regent House East Kirkby, Nottinghamshire. He married Pattie Richardson in 1923. He served in the 8th Battalion Prince of Wales Volunteers during The First World War. After the end of the war Eric was listed as the Colliery Manager at Bilsthorpe Colliery from 1937 to 1964.Pattie died in May 1989, with Eric living to 101, passing away in Doncaster in 1995. Figure 50: South Lancs Cap Badge

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Edward Ralph Oakden Edward Ralph Oakden was born in Nottingham on the 1st June 1893, the son of Edward and Alice Oakden (nĂŠe Fairbanks) and the brother of Mary, Arthur William and George Oakden. In 1911 they lived at Trent Vale, Beeston, where Edward was listed as a farmer. Edward was educated at the Nottingham High School and afterwards became a Law Student, being articled to Mr JW Briggs, Solicitor, Nottingham. He was a member of the Officer Training Corps at school and later at the University College Nottingham. He volunteered at the outbreak of the war and obtained a commission in September 1914 in the 10th Sherwood Foresters. Three months later he was promoted and was advanced to his captaincy in July 1915. He went to France that month, and was wounded on the 21st August, and again at Reninfholst 27th-28th September 1915 in the arm by a rifle grenade; he was treated in hospital in England for these wounds.

Figure 51: Edward Oakden

Returning to the front in March 1916, he took part in the Somme offensive. In an attack at Fricourt on 2nd July 1916 he was seriously wounded, losing the sight in both eyes during a bomb explosion, his life was saved by Corporal Robinson who carried him under great difficulties to a dressing station. He recovered but lost his sight and afterwards joined the blinded officers at St Dunstan. His brother, Lieutenant Arthur William Oakden, Royal Field Artillery, was killed 29th June 1918 and is buried in Abbeville Communal Cemetery Extension. The medal roll gives his brother George’s address as 55 Herbert Street. He died suddenly on the 22nd March 1917 aged 23 in Hanover Nursing Home, London, of meningitis due to the wounds he had received nine months earlier. He is buried in Nottingham Church Cemetery

William Leslie Holt He joined the Nottingham University Officer Training Corps in June 1916, and was gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant in the York and Lancaster Regiment on the 28th March 1917. Posted to the 10th (Service) Battalion of the Regiment William joined his battalion at Beaufort as a Platoon Commander on 2nd June 1917. On 5th and 6th June the battalion moved via Croisette and Heuchin to the training area at Bomy, a village about six miles from Fruges. Here they remained for reorganisation and training until 22nd June when they began marching via Westrehen, Thiennes and Chestre to the Garden Farm Camp at Brulooze. On 28th June the battalion went into the front line trenches at Wystchaete. William was sent away on a course of instruction for at least part of July. From 2nd - 7th September the battalion was in the support area at Bois Confluent, following which they moved to the Kemmel shelters and then to the camp at Mont Kokereele in the Boeschepe training Figure 52: York and Lancs Cap Badge area until 27th September. The battalion then returned to the trenches on the right of the Ypres-Menin road near Shrewsbury Forest. December commenced with the battalion in the front line, support and reserve trenches at Hollebeke, followed by six days work for the Royal Engineers. From 13th-21st December the battalion was in reserve at De Zon Camp, Scherpenburg, before returning to the front line trenches. William, aged 19, was killed in action south east of Ypres on the 23rd December 1917. He was buried at Spoilbank Cemetery, Zillebeke, Grave II. B. 8.

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Clifford Lees Son of the Newstead Colliery Manager, Thomas Godfrey Lees and Elizabeth Lees, Clifford attended Brunts School in Mansfield from May 1907 to December 1913 with his brother Harold. After this, he joined the Nottingham Officer Training Corps, joining the 3rd Battalion Duke of Wellington’s (West Riding Regiment), and later the 15th Battalion Lancashire Fusiliers during the war. Clifford was sent to France in September 1918, and was awarded the military cross shortly after arrival. He died from his wounds on the 5th November 1918. Clifford is buried at the Premont British Cemetery, France (grave ref II.E.17). A family headstone in Nottingham General Cemetery was erected by his parents and reads: ‘In loving remembrance of Lieut. Clifford Lees, M.C. 3rd Duke of Wellington’s Regiment, who died of wounds received in action November 5th 1918, and was buried at Premont, France. Aged 22 years. ‘He gave his life for us.’

Figure 53: Clifford Lees

Victor Joseph Weber

Victor was born in Peterborough on 9th February 1899 when his parents lived at their Jeweller’s Shop in Peteborough. By the 1911 census, they had seven children and lived at 59, Narrow Street, Peterborough. His parents Emilie and Charles were both from Germany and on the census, Charles gave Niederwinden as his place of birth, and Emilie’s as Freiburg. His father, Karl, applied for Naturalization in 1896 for himself, his wife and the four children they had at the time. His father advertised his jewellery business in the Peterborough Advertiser Newspaper and placed regular advertisements for staff.

Figure 54: RAF Badge

A list of fatal accidents to British aircraft overseas during December 1918 records Victor being killed on 15.12.18 flying a Sopwith Dolphin C4071 at 1 Aeroplane Supply Depot, Marquise. The wings collapsed during a roll after take-off. Victor is remembered on the Peterborough and District War Memorial Hospital (WMR 8482). He was 19 years old when he died.

47


Cecil Dunbar Hutchinson Cecil was born on 1st April 1891 in Nottingham and was the eldest son of Arthur, a Letterpress Printer, and Mary Ann Hutchinson née Dunbar, a Milliner. In the 1911 census they are shown living at ‘Mariescot’ on Melton Road, West Bridgford, Nottingham. He had attended the Nottingham High School and then the Technical University at Nottingham before he joined his father in his printing business; his occupation is listed as Letterpress Printer in the 1911 census. He was also said to be a talented footballer. Cecil joined the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps in August 1914. He was gazetted 2nd Lieutenant on 7th December 1914 and promoted Lieutenant in August 1916; he served with the 7th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment. After a prolonged career as an Infantry Officer involving combat at Gallipoli, Egypt, the Sinai Peninsula and on the Western Front, he volunteered for the Royal Flying Corps. He trained as an observer in June 1917 and returned to France in July 1917. Figure 55: Cecil Hutchinson

On 10th August 1917 at 8.30pm his plane was shot down by Max Ritter von Müller of Jasta 28 over Ingelmunster, causing him to crash land behind German lines; he had been shot in the stomach during the aerial combat. His pilot had survived the attack and crash. A letter was received from the German Red Cross on 12th August 1917 stating that “as a consequence of his severe stomach wounds, he died of these wounds in the field hospital at Meulebeke.” He was originally buried near the military hospital where he died aged 25, but in the 1920s his body was exhumed and reburied in Harlebeke New British Cemetery in Belgium (CWGC Commonwealth Grave No486133). His Squadron commanding officer later wrote to his mother stating:- “I am very sorry to lose your son, particularly as he was a very keen and promising observer”

48


Full List of Officer Training Corps Members during the First World War This is a full list of the individuals who have so far been identified as serving during the First World War having passed through the Officer Training Corps at University College Nottingham. Further information about some of the individuals listed here can be found on the Life Lines Master Research Sheet which can be found in the Nottinghamshire County Record Office and Manuscripts and Special Collections, University of Nottingham.

Figure 56: Men of the OTC

49


50

Frank

A. H. A. N. J. J. Reginald Charles W.

John G. J. C. C. C.

Addison

Allen Allen Allen Ames Andrews

Appleby Appleyby Arch Archer

Walter William L. S.

A. Allen

Herbert

A. E. L

Bampton

Barber Barker

Barker

Barlow

Ball

Baker

Atkin

th 10 Bn West Yorkshire th 8 Bn West Yorkshire West Yorkshire -

305th Siege Bt Royal Garrison Artillery 9th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn Royal Sussex

10th Bn West Yorkshire nd 2 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 66 Bn HQ Royal Garrison Artillery 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters The Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry

Christopher 11th Bn King’s Own Ernest York Light Infantry Jesse Sherwood Foresters Marson Arthur Leslie 8th Bn West Yorkshire

J.

Adamson

Atherley

Henry

Abell

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt Sgt

-

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

Lt

Lt 2Lt 2Lt Lt

2Lt Col 2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpl

-

-

-

-

1887

1892

23.09.1891

-

1896 -

-

1884

1898

-

22.03.1918

12.09.1918

-

24.11.1915

09.10.1917

07.09.1914

17.06.1915

14.07.1916 -

13.04.1917

22.03.1916

-

12.06.1917

-

28

24

-

28

25

23

-

30 -

-

23

-

19

-

Aubigny Communal Cemetery Extension Pozieres Memorial

Houplines Communal Cemetery Extension -

Tyne Cot

Lancashire Landing Cemetery Plogsteert Memorial

Theipval Memorial -

Coxyde Military Cemetery Corbie Communal Cemetery Corbie Communal Cemetery Arras Memorial

-

52. 54.

IV. B. 17.

-

42. 46. 162. I. A. 21.

7.

A. 22.

7. 7. -

4.

I. E. 25.

I. E. 25.

I. I. 53.


51

E. R

Herbert F.

S. F.

Edward Duncan Harold

F. S. Aldred N.

William

J. H.

Barlow

Barnacle

Barnsdale

Basden

Bassett Bates

Bavin

Baxter

George N. W. N.

T. G.

W. E.

J. R.

N. H.

Arthur Colin

Edward William

Beales Beard

Beardall

Beaumont

Bee

Beedham

Bell Bell

Bell

Bass

E. K

Barlow

209th Machine Gun Corps Company

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters Artist Rifles Bn London 22nd Ammunition Park 9th Bn Sherwood Foresters 2nd Bn West Yorkshire 3rd Bn East Yorkshire 5th Bn Sherwood Foresters 1/6th Bn Sherwood Foresters 11th Bn North Lancashire 3rd Bn Northamptonshire 14th Bn Sherwood Foresters 3rd Bn Northamptonshire 1st bn Sherwood Foresters 2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters 15th Bn Sherwood Foresters Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Cpt

Lt Col

2Lt

Pte

Pte

2Lt

1887

1897

-

-

-

-

-

-

11.04.1899

1892

1894

1889

-

1898

-

-

08.12.1917

30.10.1917

-

-

-

-

-

-

29.09.1918

01.07.1916

24.04.1918

27.03.1958

-

20.10.1917

-

-

30

20

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

23

24

69

-

19

-

-

Jerusalem War Cemetery

Tyne Cot

-

-

-

-

-

Foncquevilli Military Cemetery Vis-en-Artois Memorial -

Pozieres Memorial

-

-

Tyne Cot

-

-

99. 102. 162. 162A. G. 40.

-

-

-

-

-

-

7.

I. B. 32.

31. 32.

-

-

153.

-

-


52

B. W. John E.

L.

Bird Bishop

Bisset

S.

William John

G. H.

W. A.

A.G.

Blythen

Board

Boot

Boot

Bowring

Blythe

10 Bn East Lancashire th 10 Bn King’s Own Light Infantry th 9 Bn Sherwood Foresters West Yorkshire th

2nd Bn City of London

1st Bn Sherwood Foresters rd 2 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 19 Bn City of London th 8 Bn King’s Own Light Infantry 11th Bn Sherwood Foresters

3rd Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire 130th Bde Ammunition Column Royal Field Artillery 15th Bn Sherwood Foresters 16th Bn West Yorkshire th 14 Bn Sherwood Foresters

Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve Harold C. U. 32nd Sqn Royal Flying Corps

Gilbert

William E.

Bird

Blurton

Basil William

Bird

Robert H.

J. H.

Bingham

Blatherwick

L. H. R. K.

Bibson Bilbie

Thomas O.

F. E.

Bennett

Black

R. D.

Belton

2Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Sg

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Cpt Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Mjr Pte

Lt

Cpt

-

-

-

-

1892

-

1892

-

-

-

-

1896

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

22.09.1918

-

10.02.1917

-

01.07.1916

09.08.1915

-

18.04.1916

28.04.1917

24.11.1918

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

19

-

21

-

37

-

-

25

22

-

-

-

-

S. V. I. 3.

19. -

St. Sever Cemetery Extension Boulougne Eastern Cemetery Basra Memorial -

-

-

-

II. E. 9.

Sarigol Military Cemetery

Croiselles British Cemetery -

C. 5.

Fricourt New Military Cemetery -

-

150. 152.

Helles Memorial

VII. A. 14

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-


53 Rifle Brigade

7th Bn Dorset 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 9 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 4 Bn Sherwood Foresters 7th Bn North Lancashire Royal Field Artillery

John

Basil Herbert

A.L.

G. E. O.

F. Arnold

Harold. V.

A. S.

D. G.

F. Lionel C.

F. H.

J. B. G.

C.

J. R.

C.

Edmund Powne

Brash

Brewill

Bricknell

Briggs

Bright

Bright

Bright

Brook

Brown Browne

BrunnellNugent Burnie Burrows

Buxton

Byers

Cammack

Cardell

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 14 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn Leicestershire Sherwood Foresters

Sherwood Foresters

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters nd 2 Bn Prince of Wales’s Leinster 8th Bn East Lancashire Sherwood Foresters

H. P. G.

Branston

14th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn Sherwood Foresters 1/5th Bn East Lancashire

L. S.

Brampton

MJR

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Lt Col

2Lt Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpl

Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

1893

-

-

-

-

-

1896

-

-

-

03.11.1887

-

-

-

-

-

25.03.1918

-

-

-

-

-

30.06.1917

-

-

21.09.1918

13.10.1915

-

-

-

25.08.1918

-

-

25

-

-

-

-

-

20

-

-

27

-

-

-

20

-

I. J. 3.

Sucrerie Military Cemetery -

-

I. D. 17. 7. 10.

Philosophe British Cemetery Trefcon British Cemetery Fosse No. 10 Communal Cemetery Extension Pozieres Memorial

C. 56.

-

-

-

-

-


54

Frederick H. W.

Charles Frederick

Robert James William C

Carnell

Carr

Case

J. R.

Caldwell

Francis Joseph E.

L. B.

John

R. A.

Charles

Gostwyck William Arthur Henry J.

Chadwick

Chambers

Chambers

Chapman

Charlton

Cheatle

Cheesewright Chislet

Chilton

Edwin Alver

Caunt

Cattle

Eustace B. S. James Henry Nightingale

Cattle

Catherall

E. P.

Cardell

8th Bn East Yorkshire

Royal Field Artillery Royal Field Artillery

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters rd 23 Sqn Royal Flying Corps

9th Bn South Lancashire rd 3 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 5 Bn Leicestershire

10th Bn South Yorkshire rd 3 Sherwood Foresters nd 2 Bn Bedfordshire

5th Bn Sherwood Foresters 1/5th Bn Norfolk Regiment Yorkshire and Lancashire th 4 Bn Royal Field Artillery

17th Bn Sherwood Foresters

150th Bty Royal Field Artillery th 9 Bn Prince of Wales’s Leinster

2Lt

Lt Lt

2Lt

Lt

Cpt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

-

Cpt

Lt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

1883

1887 1895

-

1889

-

-

-

1890

-

-

1894

-

-

-

18.09.1920

-

05.05.1917

-

30.05.1915

-

-

12.10.1916

-

-

01.05.1917

21.07.1916

02.11.1917

-

20.05.1917

09.05.1918

-

37

-

-

-

26

-

-

19

-

-

24

20

20

-

41

22

-

40. 14. A. 14. B. II. F. 3.

Jerusalem Memorial Thiepval Memorial

2. C. 7. 297.

Thiepval Memorial Loughborough Cemetery -

-

Kut War Cemetery

-

Arras Flying Services Memorial -

-

-

-

-

Bully-Grenary Communal Cemetery -

III. C. 9.

Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery Wimereux Communal Cemetery III. G. 4.

-

-


55

Donald James

D. H. C.

S. G. N. W.

Francis William John Roberts

Samuel W

Cyril Ramsey

Clarkson

Clarkson Clayton

Clift Coates

Cockersole

Collins

Cook

2Lt Cpt Lt Cpt 2Lt Lt

Cooper

Cooper

Cort

Coulby

Cowing

Cox

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Pte Cpt

2Lt Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Cpl

Cpt

2/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters 4th Bn Sherwood Foresters

Special Bde Royal Engineers

15 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 10 Bn Lincolnshire Royal Garrison Artillery th 10 Bn Staffordshire th

5th Bn Royal Munster Fusiliers Rifle Brigade st 1 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 1/6 Bn Sherwood Foresters

Rifle Brigade

Cooke

Coleman

Clarke Clarke

Clarke

Charles Frank Walter Sidney F. H. C.

Clarke

1897

1897

21.07.1898

18.07.1882

-

-

-

-

-

1980

-

-

11.05.1899

-

-

1895

31.03.1918

15.07.1915

1939

12.08.1918

09.03.1971

-

08.10.1916

09.06.1917

21.03.1918

26.11.1918

1965

-

-

09.08.1918

-

25.06.1916

40.07.1915

28

18

42

20

89

-

23

19

28

19

-

-

-

19

-

20

20

Bailleul Communal Cemetery Extension Moreuil Communal Cemetery Allied Extension

Thiepval Memorial

Ypres Memorial

Tourcoing (PontNeuville) Communal Cemetery Arras Memorial

-

-

Fouquires Churchyard Extension -

-

Arras Memorial

Ypres Memorial

A. 11.

I. C. 132.

-

-

-

10. C. 10. D. 11. A. -

39. 41.

7.

E. 8.

-

-

-

Iv. A. 4

-

46. 48. 50. 9.


56

Lt Cpt 2Lt

C. J.

W. A. R.

Harry

P.

Edwin Leonard Leslie

Frederick Claud

A. G.

J.

E. S. W.

N. L.

A. L. M. W. A.

Albert Light Moody

Cresswell

Critchlow

Curtis

Dabell

Daft

Davis

Dawes Dawson

Dennis

Dent

Denyer

Derbyshire Derrick

Dexter

Dickens Dickenson

Dickins

10th Bty Sherwood Foresters Royal Garrison Artillery th 10 Bn Leicestershire 7th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 11 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 1/7 Bn Sherwood Foresters

17th Bn Sherwood Foresters

7th Bn East Lancashire th 16 Bn Royal Scots 1st Bn Sherwood Foresters

Lt

Cranswick

Cpt

Cpt Lt

2Lt

Lt Sgt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

-

Cox

5th Bn west Yorkshire and Lancashire 13th Bn City of London 17th Bn City of London

Sgt

Cox

08.02.1897

-

04.01.1891

-

-

-

-

-

-

21.09.1894

-

-

-

12.04.1895

-

-

-

21.03.1918

-

1971

-

-

-

01.08.1916

02.11.1917 27.05.1918

-

13.04.1917

-

-

-

13.10.1916

18.11.1917

-

-

21

-

80

-

-

-

31

28 26

-

22

-

-

-

21

19

-

-

III. A. 36.

Roclincourt Military Cemetery -

7.

Arras Memorial

II. E. 17.

IX. B. 2. I. B. 24.

Gaza War Cemetery Jonchery-sur-Vesle British Cemetery Gorre British and Indian Cemetery -

-

-

III. B. 30.

-

-

-

Arras Flying Services Memorial Lahana Military Cemetery -


57

Ryamond I. T. W. E. C. Frederick William Sydney T.

Doncaster Dormand Downes Drew

A. T. G. M.

W. A. J. E.

F. H.

F. H. R. H.

W. A.

J.

H. V. H. O. H.

W. E.

Easom Eaton

Ecob Edminson

Edmunds

Edmunds Ellis

Ellis

Ellse

Emerson Emerson Essame

Evans

T. C. R.

J. G.

Dobson

Durose

Herbert M.

Dickinson

10th Bn Lincolnshire 11th Bn North Staffordshire Yorkshire th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Dorsetshire 16th Bn Sherwood Foresters st 1 Canadian Contingent th 5 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 8 Bn Yorkshire 8th Bn Yorkshire 3rd Bn Northamptonshire 12th Royal Welsh Fusiliers

2nd Bn Lincolnshire

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters Lancaster Fusiliers Durham Light Infantry 8th Bn Leicestershire 9th Bn East Yorkshire

22nd Sqn Royal Air Force

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt 2Lt

Cpt

Pte

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Pte Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt Cpt 2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Lt

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

08.07.1892

-

-

03.03.1899

01.05.1917

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

02.04.1917

01.07.1916 05.11.1916

-

10.07.1918

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

24

33

-

19

2. C. II. A. 19.

III. H. 8.

Thiepval Memorial Jeancourt Communal Cemetery Extension Essex Farm, Belgium

-

-

IV. E. 23.

Pont du Herm Military Cemetery, La Gorgue -


58

Arthur Noel

John S. F. Eric John Hardwood Cash J. A. W. F. Edward Lake

Donald

W.

A. M.

C. L. Frank Herbert

Frederick Donald A. H. A. A. L. Willis H.

F. H.

Charles

Eyre

Firth Firth Fletcher Fletcher

Forryan

Foster

Foulds

Foulds Fox

Fox

Franks Frisby Frith

Frith

Gascoyne

Fletcher Fletcher Flewitt

Archibald John

Ewart

13th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 2/7 Bn Sherwood Foresters

17th Bn Sherwood Foresters Royal Engineers 2nd Bn West Riding Machine Gun Corps

King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters 10th Bn South Lancashire th 7 Bn West Yorkshire 1st Bn Bedfordshire

11th Bn West Riding 10th Bn Lincolnshire 1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters

5 Bn Lincolnshire th 1/7 Bn Sherwood Foresters

th

57th Sqdn Royal Air Force

11th Bn Duke of Wellington’s

Cpt

Lt

Lt 2Lt Pte

2Lt

Cpt 2Lt

Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt Lt 2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

01.06.1881

-

-

-

1895 1898

-

-

-

-

1887

1893

-

08.05.1917

-

08.06.1917

11.05.1916

16.04.1918 23.08.1918

-

-

16.09.1916

07.01.1918

01.07.1916

26.09.1918

28.09.1916

35

-

20

20

23 20

-

-

30

19

29

25

21

-

11. C. 12. A. -

III. B. 3.

10. C. 10. D. 11. A.

-

III. A. C. 16.

Le Cateau Military Cemetery

III. E. 5.

Achiet-le-Grand Communal Cemetery Extension. Thiepval Memorial 10. C. 10. D. 11. A. 10. Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais -

-

-

Philosphe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe Thiepval Memorial

Villers-Brettonneux Military Cemetery Arras Flying Services Memorial Thiepval Memorial


59

H. S.

L. H.

L.

D.

B. C.

W. H.

Harold Mason

C. E.

C. E.

C. W.

C. A.

R. D. J. B. G. D.

Frank

R. H. William Leslie

George Harold

Walter William

Gibson

Gibson

Gilbert

Gillespie

Gillott

Gimson

Gleave

Glen

Glenn

Goddard

Godfrey

Goldborough Goodliffe Gould

Granger

Graver Gray

Greaves

Hacking

2/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters

2nd Bn West Yorkshire

8th Bn Leicestershire 4th Bn Suffolk

15th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 15 Bn York and Lancashire th 14 Bn Sherwood Foresters Loyal North Lancashire 8th Bn Yorkshire 8th Bn Leicestershire 8th Bn Durham Light Infantry th 14 Bn Manchester

3rd Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 11 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 13 Bn Sherwood Foresters Kent Fortress Royal Engineers 3rd Bn Northamptonshire Durham Fortress Royal Engineers 3rd Bn Sherwood Foresters

2Lt

2Lt

Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt 2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

Lt

Lt

Maj

-

-

-

-

-

05.10.1891

-

-

-

-

1895

-

04.1883

-

-

-

-

21.03.1918

05.03.1917

28.09.1918

15.12.1916

07.1972

-

-

-

-

06.03.1917

-

23.01.1941

-

-

-

-

22

23

20

25

78

-

-

-

-

22

-

57

-

-

-

I. H. 24 -

Hem Farm Military Cemetery -

III. C. 6. Puchevilliers British Cemetery XII. E. 18. Grevillers British Cemetery VII. E. 5. Fins New British Cemetery Sorel le Grand 7. Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais

-

-


60

G. F. Robert Samuel A. H.

B. H. A.

G. A. Albert William

Stanley James Harold Edgar

Frederick Parker

L.

W. L.

Joseph Walter

F.

Lawrence Alec

Samuel Towers

Hall Hallam

Hallam Hallam

Hancock Hanford

Harbottle

Hargreave

Hargreaves

Harker

Harris

Harrison

Hartshorn

Hartshorne

Harford

Hallam

Hall

Harwood Albert A. W. G.

Haddon

9th Bn Leicestershire

South Nottinghamshire Hussars 4th Bn Durham Light Infantry

11th Bn South Yorkshire 10th Bn East Lancashire st 1 Bn Lincolnshire

7th Bn South Yorkshire

91st Coy Machine Gun Corps 1st Bn Northumberland Fusiliers

2/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 10 Bn Army Cyclist Corps th 15 Bn Sherwood Foresters rd 3 Bn Yorkshire and Lancaster Yorkshire and Lancaster th 18 Bn Cheshire

Cpt

Lt

Trooper

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Pte

Lt

Cpt Lt

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

1894

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

26.03.1918

-

02.06.1915

-

-

20.11.1917

26.10.1918

26.10.1917

22.04.1918

-

-

20.07.1916

-

26.09.1917

-

21

-

-

-

-

21

19

24

31

-

-

17

-

30

10. C. 10. D. 11. A. II. C. 2.

Thiepval Memorial

Varennes Military Cemetery Tyne Cot

21.

Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial Flesquieres Hill British Cemetery -

-

-

IV. E. 11.

-

8.

Romeries Communal Cemetery Extension Cambrai Memorial Louveral -

154. 159. 163. A. I. E. 15.

-

-

-

IX. H. 23.

Tyne Cot


61

Frederick W

E. W.

Leslie Ewart

B. Frank G.

George H.

Arthur Edgar Field C. M.

Frank Farmer

P.

James Percival

J. C.

Heigton

Herrod

Hick Higham

Highfield

Hill

Hind

Hobson

Hodgkinson

Hogg

Hill

8th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 5 Bn Lincolnshire

-

9th Bn South Yorkshire th 15 Bn Sherwood Foresters

11th Bn West Yorkshire Botha’s Natal Horse, S. Africa th 6 Bn Leicestershire

8 Bn South Lancashire rd 3 Bn Yorkshire and Lancaster th

8th Bn York and Lancaster 5th Bn East Lancashire nd 2 Bn Royal Scots

Cyril Francis William Laurence I. John S. th J. A. 10 Bn Yorkshire and Lancaster William 11th Bn Royal Albert Henry Warwick Ralph Noel 12th Bn East Yorkshire

R. V.

Heaton

Heathcote

Heath

Hatton Hawkes Heald

Haseldine

Harvey

Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

Trooper

Cpt

2Lt

Lt Cpt

Pte

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Cpt

Cpt

Lt

-

-

-

-

-

1895

-

1894

-

-

1895

-

1894

-

1893

-

-

02.11.1916

-

16.07.1916

-

-

05.07.1915

-

23.05.1918

-

-

17.11.1916

-

-

-

-

-

24

-

19

-

-

24

-

20

-

-

30

-

-

-

V. B. 5. IX. A. 80.

Couin British Cemetery Boulogne Eastern Cemetery -

IV. H. 4.

Flatiron Copse Cemetery, Mametz Faubourg D-Amiens Cemetery, Arras -

-

-

-

I. H. 31.

-

-

L. 16.

Kemmel Chateau Military Cemetery -

-

-

-


62

F.S. William Leslie Basil Yerah

F. B.

J.

H.

Charles Morley

N.

Hollingworth Holt

Hopewell

Horlington

Hosley

Houfton

Howard

Roland Frederick

W.

William

Huyton

Inchlet

Inchley

Hund Hutchinson

Howitt Hubble

5Th Bn Sherwood Foresters Leicestershire th 4 Bn Lincolnshire

10 Bn York and Lancaster th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters rd 3 Bn Yorkshire and Lancaster th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn Sherwood Foresters th

7th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 9 Bn East Yorkshire 9th Bn South Staffordshire

2nd Bn Duke of Wellington’s 3rd Bn Duke of Wellington’s

10th Bn Royal Warwickshire

T. C. Harry Leonard F. F. 10th Bn Leicestershire Cecil Dunbar 57th Sqdn Royal Flying Corps

S. D. Ernest

Holbrook Holland

Hooley

H. B.

Holbrook

Lt

2Lt

Cpl

2Lt Lt

Lt Col 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Pte

Mjr

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Pte

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

08.06.1882

-

-

-

19.12.1915

-

25.05.1917

12.08.1917

15.04.1918

-

28.11.1915

-

-

-

28.10.1918

22.12.1917

19.07.1917

-

33

-

25

25

19

-

28

-

-

-

26

19

23

II. C. 10. II. B. 8. XXVIII. B. 31.

Dickebusch New Military Cemetery Extension, Belgium Spoilbank Cemetery Risley Churchyard Cabaret-Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez -

Ypres Reservoir cemetery

I. A. 8.

Harlbeeke New British Cemetery Hazebrouck Communal Cemetery -

I. B. 52.

-

I. E. 25.

-

Tyne Cot

-

-

-


63

R. B.

A. P.

Edward Cecil John William

H.

Charles Edward

Syndney Emlyn

Charles Edward

R.

Albert Clarence Leonard Philip Norman

Ireland

Isard

Jackson

Jackson

Jarvis

Jenkins

Jennison

Jennison

Jepson

R. M. Joseph Frank John Baker

J. B.

Johnson Jowers

Keating

Keating

Raymond albert

Johnson

Johnson

Jackson

L. B.

Ireland

5th Bn Somerset Light Infantry 15th Bn Sherwood Foresters 13th Bn Sherwood Foresters

1st Bn Sherwood Foresters

1/4th Bn York and Lancaster

5th Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire 3rd Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire

177th Machine Gun Corps

15th Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers

30th Bt Royal Air Force th 10 Bn West Yorkshire

13th Bn West Yorkshire 13th Bn West Yorkshire Kent Fortress Royal Engineers 15th Sherwood Foresters 11th Bn Sherwood Foresters

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt Lt

Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Cpt

Pte

2Lt

Lt

Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

-

-

-

-

31.03.1895

1896

-

1896

-

25.07.1890

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

20.07.1916

24.03.1918

24.04.1918

16.10.1918

12.10.1916

-

07.04.1917

04.22.1918

18.07.1917

-

17.10.1917

30.05.1916

-

-

-

-

19

20

27

23

20

-

21

23

26

-

25

21

-

-

-

87. 89. II. M. 25.

Loos Memorial Menin Road South Military Cemetery -

I. B. 15.

25. 26. 7. -

Bucqouy Road British Military Cemetery Adelaide Cemetery, Villers Bretonneux Poziers Memorial Arras Memorial -

II. B. 13.

-

-

C. 31.

II. K. 3.

II. B. I.

Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, longueval

St Nicolas British Cemetery Bouzincourt Communal Cemetery Extension Templex-leGuerard Communal Cemetery Extension -

-

-

-

-

-


64

F.T

Richard Henry J.

Edward Ivan

F. T. John Neville

I.

Eric W.

Thomas Bernard Courtenay

A. S.

Clifford

Thomas Henry

Joseph S.

Arthur Herbert

Lloyd Edward

Thomas Frederick

Keith

King

Kingsbury

Kirk Kirkby

Krako

Lane

Large Laws

Lee

Lees

Leman

Levene

Levy

Lewis

Lister

King

William Munkley

Keighley

27th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers

1/5th Bn Sherwood Foresters

13th Bn Sherwood Foresters 232nd Bde Royal Field Artillery

1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters

13th Bn Sherwood Foresters 3rd Bn Duke of Wellingtons

12th Bn King’s Royal Rifle Corps 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters 7th Bn York and Lancaster 11th Bn York and Lancaster 12th Rifle Brigade 3rd Bn York and Lancaster 14th Bn Sherwood Foresters 8th Bn West Yorkshire 7th Bn Yorkshire 3rd Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire

10th Bn West Yorkshire

2Lt

Lt

Lt

Cpt

Cpt

Lt

Cpt

2Lt Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

-

-

08.02.1887

1896

-

-

-

22.07.1894 04.02.1892

08.12.1894

-

-

24.12.1891

-

-

-

-

28.04.1917

24.09.1918

31.07.1917

-

01.07.1916

05.11.1918

-

1959 25.05.1915

12.1995

-

25.09.1916

23.08.1945

-

27.06.1917

-

01.07.1916

24

20

30

-

21

22

-

65 23

101

-

19

53

-

32

-

22

14. A. 14. B. -

Thiepval Memorial

Bedford House Cemetery -

Brandhoek New Military Cemetery Bellicourt British Cemetery Arras Memorial

2. 3.

VII. L. I.

I. E. 7.

II. E. 17. Premont British Cemetery Foncquevillers Ritish III. D. 10. Cemetery -

-

II. K. 10.

Perth Cemetery

-

-

C. 6.

Fricourt New Military Cemetery -


65

G. H.

F. B.

John

Albert

A. O. Claude

S. A. E. H.

Donald Ewan

J. E. L. Reginald F.

Arthur Pelham

S. M. F. W.

William Alan

H. M.

H. W. H. John Arthur

G. W.

A. E.

Lister

Ludlow

Macpherson

Makin

Maltby Marriott

Marriott Marsh

Marshall

Marshall Martin

Mason

Mather May

Mcclelland

McCreath

McKay Mcmillan Meads

Meats

Mee

3rd Bn West Yorkshire Robin Hood Cadet Bn

8th Bn Royal Scot Fusiliers 15th Bn Staffordshire 10th Bn Sherwood Foresters

10th Bn West Riding 7th Bn West Yorkshire 15th Bn Sherwood Foresters

East Yorkshire 1/5th Bn Sherwood Foresters 8th Bn Somerset Light Infantry

3rd Bn Manchester 9th Bn Sherwood Foresters 18th Sqn Royl Flying Corps

Royal Scots 2/4th Bn Duke of Wellington’s

13th Bn West Yorkshire 10th Bn York and Lancaster 1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters 2nd/7th Bn Duke of Wellington’s

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt Cpt

2Lt

Maj

2Lt 2Lt

2t

-

-

-

-

08.08.1889

-

1899

-

1898

2Lt 2Lt 2Lt

-

05.02.1897

-

-

-

-

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt Pte

Pte

Lt

Cpt

2Lt

-

-

10.10.1917

-

01.08.1918

-

22.08.1918

30.06.1917

07.08.1917

-

27.11.1917

22.11.1917

01.07.1916

-

-

-

-

24

-

28

-

19

19

19

-

20

-

25

-

-

10. C. 10. D. 11. A. 6. 7.

Thiepval Memorial

-

-

XV. C. 4.

-

III. F. 5.

-

H. 15.

7.

V. A. 11.

Cement House Cemetery -

Duhallow ADS Cemetery -

Gonnehen British Cemetery -

Lillers Communal Cemetery Arras Memorial

-

6. 7.

-

-

Cambrai Memorial, Louverval Cambrai Memorial, Louverval -

-

-


66

W. H.

A. S. James

H. F. Thomas Arthur Reginald A.

Mein

Mellor Mennie

Miller Mills

Charles Neil

J. W.

Geoffrey William Robert Dudley

Edward Ralph

Herbert

John J. F.

Newcombe

Newton

Norris

Oakden

Oldershaw

Oldershaw

North

Morris Morris

Morris

Herbert Harold Thomas Hodgkinson F. G. T. H.

Morrell

Moore

A.

Mein

South Yorkshire

2nd Bn Grenadier Guards

10th Bn Sherwood Foresters

2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters

13th Bn Sherwood Foresters 7th Manchester

2nd Bn York and Lancaster 9th South Yorkshire 3rd Bn York and Lancaster 7th Bn South Yorkshire

15th Bn Sherwood Foresters York and Lancashire

9th Bn Lincolnshire 1/5th Bn Sherwood Foresters

10th Bn South Yorkshire 10th Bn York and Lancaster Sherwood Foresters 7th Bn Royal Sussex

2Lt

Pte

Cpt

Lt

Lt

2Le

Lt

Lt 2Le

2Le

Cpt

Lt

2Lt Lt

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

-

-

01.06.1893

-

08.1896

-

-

19.06.1893

07.05.1897

16.07.1895

-

-

-

-

-

01.07.1916

04.09.1914

22.03.1917

03.05.1916

08.01.1969

-

27.12.1915

1974

09.08.1915

June 1991

-

26.09.1917

18.09.1918

-

-

23

-

23

31

-

-

24

80

18

95

-

21

19

-

-

K. 13. I. V. 15.

Y Farm Military Cemetery BoisGrenier La Brique Military Cemetery No. 2 Nottingham Church Cemetery Guards Grave, Villers Cotterers Forest Thiepval Memorial

11. C. 12. A.

I. 33.

D. 80.

-

-

36. 55.

Ypres (Menin Gate)

I. B. 7.

Epehy Wood Farm British Cemetery Tyne Cot -

-

-

99. 102. 162. 162. A. -

-

-


67

Edgar B.

C. B.

Ernest W.

Ernest James G. E. T. R.

Parr

Parr

Passmore

Peach

Pearson Pearson

Denis F.

Albert Leslie

Palmer

Parr

L. G.

Paling

L. G.

J. T. G. I. R. A.

Paget Paling

Palmer

R. A.

Page

C.

C. C.

Page

Palmer

Walter John Robert

Sherwood Foresters South Nottingham Hussars

Sherwood Foresters

11th Bn South Lancashire 19th Bn Hampshire

South Lancashire

9th Bn Yorkshire and Lancaster 4th Bn Sherwood Foresters Sherwood Foresters

3rd Bn Northamptonshire 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters 4th North Midlands 1/5th Bn Royal Sussex 4th Bn Sherwood Foresters 1/5th Bn Sherwood Foresters

2nd Royal Garrison Artillery

James 6th Bn East Yorkshire Thomas Herbert John 6th Bn Royal Dublin Fusiliers Dinsdale J. Royal Air Force A.

Pacey

Oubridge

Oliphant

Oldershaw

Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Pte

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Lt

2Lt Pte

Corp

2Lt

Sgt

Cdt

Lt

Lt

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1895

-

-

-

03.07.1900

29.08.1893

1895

-

01.07.1916

21.02.1919

-

21.10.1916

07.07.1916

-

-

06.03.1917

-

26.09.1917

-

-

18.07.1916

08.02.1919

04.1979

07.05.1964

-

28

20

-

24

19

-

-

19

-

22

-

-

26

18

85

69

10076

86. 88. V. C. 5. -

Nottingham Church Cemetery Risley All Saints Churchyard Tyne Cot Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery -

-

Cologne Southern Cemetery Thiepval Memorial

10. C. 10. D. 11. A. -

II. F. 2.

10. C. 10. D. 11. A. Dartmoor Cemetery, II. E. 11. Becordel-Becourt -

Thiepval Memorial

-

-

-

-

-


68

T.

Stephen Harvey John Ashley

Pilgrim

Piper

Player

William Frederick

John Basil

Pierce

Player

E.C

S.F Albert Edward

Peshall Phelan

Pickering

J.

Pepper

Pickbourne Pickerill

Roland

Pepper

Clarence Edward H C.

E.W L.S

Pendleton Pentecost

Pickard

E.

Pendleton

C.J

J.W

Pell

Phillips

L.W

Peck

18th Bn South Staffordshire th 9 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 7 Reserve Bn Sherwood Foresters

53 Squadron Royal Air Force

rd

North Midlands Brigade st 1 Bn Northumberland Fusiliers nd 2 North Division cyclists Company 8th Bn. North Staffordshire rd 3 Bn Leicestershire 8th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn Yorkshire

Special Reserve attached 2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters 14th (P.W.O) West Yorkshires 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters nd 22 Coy Machine Gun Corps

Cpt

Cpt

Maj

Lt

Lt

Lt

Cpt 2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt Cpt

2Lt

Private

Mjr Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

23.05.1896

16.07.1895

-

-

14.12.1888

-

25.10.1891

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

02.10.1918

-

-

-

20.11.1917

-

02.11.1916

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29

-

-

-

28

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Arras Flying Services Memorial -

-

-

2. 3.

Arras Memorial

-

-

-

-

-

11.

-

-

Ploegsteert Memoorial -

-

-


69

F

Neville Herbert

J.H

A.G

E.V

Richard Goodwin

Max

William. H Albert Brainerd

Benjamin Cyril Fitzwalter D

Pragnell

Pratt

Preston

Price

Price

Pyatt

Raescher

Ratcliffe Raynes

Read

Reed

Redington Redinton

J.C.W Frank Hubert Candwell Gordon Vernon

A.E

Powell

Redgate

W. G.C William Arthur

Pleming Pollet Powell

3rd West Riding 3rd/10th Bn West Riding th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters

-

Motor Machine Gun Service South Staffordshire Royal Sussex, attached 2nd Bn Royal Berkshire th 9 Bn Staffordshire

13th Bn West Yorkshire th 9 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 9 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 1/7 Bn Sherwood Foresters

2/4th Bn Yorkshire and Staffordshire 7th Reserve Bn Sherwood Foresters 10th Bn Sherwood Foresters

East Surrey th 7 attached 11th Bn Sherwood Foresters

2Lt

Flight Sub Lt 2Lt Cpt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt & Adjt Cpt

2Lt

Pte Lt 2Lt

-

-

-

06.1892

-

-

-

-

-

-

07.10.1892

-

-

-

22.03.1918

-

1929

1977

01.07.16 10.03.1915

-

13.10.1915

-

-

-

08.07.1916

-

-

05.10.1918

19

-

-

85

19 20

-

28

-

-

-

23

-

-

20

-

-

IV. B. 13

-

-

Hermes Hill British Cemetery

-

20. 21

Le Touret Memorial -

-

I.B.18

-

Vermelles British Cemetery -

-

-

II. B. 22

-

-

I.D.14

-

Communal Cemetery Extension, Mericourt-L’Abbe -

-

Prospect Hill Cemetery, Gouy -


70

George Hubbard G

Rupert A

William Henry

Thomas Stanley

Wilfred H John Henry

J.S

Reynolds

Rickett

Ritter

Roadley

Robin Robinson

Robinson

Rook Rook Rose

Rolfe

Roescher

Roe

Robson Rockley

4th Bn South Staffordshire and 8th Squadron Royal Flying Corps th 2/6 Bn South Staffordshire

8th Bn Duke of York’s Own th 8 bn East Yorkshire 11th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 10 Bn the prince of Wales’ Volunteers 4th Bn North Staffordshire 8th Bn South Lancashire th 15 Squadron royal Flying Corps

9th Bn West Yorkshire and 9th Bn east Lancashire Henry th William Lisle 10 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire Laurence 10th Service Bn William Sherwood Foresters Max Henry Motor Machine Gun Service Royal Artillery th Thomas 9 Bn East Yorkshire Wilson R.H W.R T -

E. Frank Leslie

Reeding Reynolds

Richards

Edward

Reeder

2Lt Lt Lt

Lt

Lt

Cpt

2Lt

Lt

2Lt

-

Lt

2Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Lt

-

20.09.1891

1890

1894

-

1893

14.09.1888

15.09.1899

15-11.1894

20.05.1892

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

11.10.1917

-

30.11.17

17.08.1917

02.06.1916

01.06.1916

-

09.04.1916

20.07.1916

26-09-1915

-

-

-

-

21

-

29

18

22

24

-

22

22

28 10.C 10.D 11.A 23

Thiepval Memorial

-

-

125. 128.

Tyne Cot Memorial -

-

4. 5.

Cambrai Memorial, Louverval -

XIII. C. 3

I.K.35

-

Varennes Military Cemetery Harlebeke new British Cemetery

-

-

Basra Memorial

40. 41

Loos Memorial


71

S.N

T.S

E

Arthur Theodore Frederick Ernest Claud William Henry

Rownbottom

Rowdley

Rowland

Rowley

Norman Edwin

Percy H

Clarence HT

J

E.G

Lionel E

Henry D

G.J.D Albert Edward

Rutherford

Salisbury

Sands

Saunders

Savage

Schloss

Schroder

Schumach Scothern

Ruck Rushton

Archibald W Wilfred Menadue

Rosen Roskelly

Sherwood Foresters 9th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Machine Gun Officer)

Lancashire Fusiliers

13th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 14 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 12 Bn Sherwood Foresters Machine Gun Corps (Infantry)

10th Bn Leicestershire attached 11th Bn Cheshire

7th Bn King’s Own Light Infantry

9th Bn Cheshire 1st Bn Lincolnshire

8th Bn Northamptonshire 4th Bn South Staffordshire 3rd Bn Northamptonshire 5th Bn South Staffordshire

9th Bn Leicestershire 52nd Squadron Royal Flying Corps

Sgt Lt Col

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt Cpt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt Lt

1883

-

11.01.1893

-

-

1895

-

-

22.09.1893 01.05.1897

04.12.1894

-

-

-

31.01.1893 -

-

02.12.1917

31.07.1917

-

-

-

27.08.1916

21.07.1916

25.09.1916

-

-

-

-

29.07.1917

-

27

24

-

-

-

-

21

19

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

54. 60 and 16. 3. A -

56

-

Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres Tyne Cot

-

-

-

I.D.17

I.G.20

V. A. 6.

-

-

Guards Cemetery, Lesboeufs Heilly Station Cemetery, MericourtL’Abbe Blighty Valley Cemetery, Authuille Wood -

-

-

-

-

Arras Flying Services Memorial -


72

J.R A.S

E.A

Phillip Francis

Thomas Paine Clarence Gordon Brian Duncan Fred. A

H.S

Reginald Eley

James W Arnold W.W.

Harold T.T G.T

B

Lawrence William Ewart

Seal Selby

Settle

Shackleock

Sharpe

Shaw

Sheldon

Shelly Shepard Shepheard

Shillaker Shipman Shipstone

Siddonds

Simms Sims

Shaw

Shaw

Shaw

B.H

Scott

th 10 Bn Kings’ Own Yorkshire Light Infantry th 1/4 Bn Lincolnshire 8th Bn Lincolnshire 5th Reserve Bn Leicestershire British South Africa Police th 18 Bn the King’s Own Liverpool Regiment

12th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 5 Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers th 7 Bn Sherwood Foresters

Sherwood Foresters

1/5th Bn Prince of Wales’s Own st 1 Bn Lincolnshire

4th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn Leicestershire 13th Bn Lancashire Fusiliers th 9 Bn South Wales Borderers th 2/8 bn Sherwood Foresters

Pte

Trp

L Corp 2Lt Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

Lt Colonel Lt

Lt

Pte

L Sgt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

-

-

-

-

16.07.1898

-

1895

1898

-

-

05.04.1896

-

-

-

23.04.1917

-

13.10.1915 -

-

15.04.1918

-

1950

1999

01.07.1916

07.10.1916

10.10.1917

-

-

-

27

-

22 -

-

19

-

55

101

24

23

21

-

-

-

Arras Memorial

Bay 3

-

31. 34 -

Loos Memorial -

-

-

-

VII.A.37

-

-

Bolougne Eastern Cemetery -

-

1.C

Thiepval Memorial -

13.C

-

-

XXX.B.5.

-

-

Etaples Military Cemetery Thiepval Memorial

-

-


73

J.H

Harold Samuel

William Miles

Dennis Noel E.A.V

William Miles

G.H

Charles Sydney

John Fletcher

Jacob H James S Wallace

E

G.W

C.S D E.T F.J J.H L.J

T.A

Simons

Slater

Smalley

Smalley Smalley

Smalley

Smart

Smith

Smith

Smith Smith Smith

Smith

Smith

Smith Smith Smith Smith Smith Smith

Smith

2nd Division Cyclist Company th 7 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire Dorchester rd 3 Bn rifle Brigade King’s Own Liverpool Regiment th 5 Bn Lincolnshire

Royal Flying Corps and 19th Bn Sherwood Foresters Rifle Brigade 129th Field Company Royal Engineers

5 Bn Sherwood Foresters st 1 Bn Sherwood Foresters th 15 Bn Sherwood Foresters Machine Gun Corps th

1st Bn Sherwood Foresters

7th Reserve Bn Sherwood Foresters G Special Company Royal Engineers

Lt

Cpt Cpt Cpt Cpt Cpt Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Cpt 2Lt

Lt

Maj

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt Cpt

2Lt

Pioneer

Sgt

-

-

-

-

20.01.1889 -

-

-

-

1892

1897 -

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

29.08.1916 23.11.1917

28.07.1916

28.11.1918

-

09.12.1914

-

09.12.1914

06.05.1917

-

-

-

-

-

27 23

19

28

-

23

-

23

-

-

-

-

-

VI.A.17 IV.O.7

-

Abbeville Roisel Communal Cemetery Extension -

St Paul’s 9451

3872 (C )

-

Derby Cemetery, Nottingham Road Church Cemetery, Nottingham

-

-

A. 4

-

-

Beaulencourt British Cemetery, LignyThilloy Cabaret-rouge British Cemetery, Souchez -

-


74

Cyril Levi

B

Henry. H.O

J.G.W Robert. M

Alfred. L F.N

A.B

Joseph

Ralph C

Alexander Frederick. W

A

Horace Josiah

Arthur Duncan

Claude

Soar

Speight

Stafford

Stafford Stainton

Stevens Stevenson

Stewart

Stirland

Stoddard

Straw Straw

Stretton

Sutton

Swale

Sykes

Sherwood Foresters Yorkshire and Lancashire th 10 Bn King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry th 13 Bn attached 9th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 6 bn Sherwood foresters attached 11th Bn General List attached Trench Mortar Battery and 10th Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire

10th Bn Duke of Wellington’s Regiment th 11 West Riding th 10 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire st 1 Bn Leicestershire 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 14 City of London, London Scottish nd 22 Bn Durham Light Infantry th 4 Squadron Royal Flying Corps

7th/3rd Bn South Lancashire th 7 Bn Middlesex

Lt

Lt

2Lt

Cpt

Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Lt

Pte

Lt 2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Lance Corporal 2Lt

Cpt

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

03.02.1887 1891

-

-

-

21.02.1893

02.07.1916

05.10.1918

24.11.1915

-

03.06.1918 07.11.1916

16.06.1918

24.03.1918

-

18.04.1917 -

01.07.16

04.10.1916

-

-

-

21

18

-

20 18

21

21

-

30 -

22

21

-

-

42 44 -

Loos Memorial -

150 152 III. B. 18. 4C

Doingt Communal Cemetery Extension Thiepval Memorial

-

Helles Memorial

-

-

Arras Flying Services Memorial Sissonne Thiepval Memorial

I.16 14A 14B

68 72

Pozieres Memorial

-

14.A 14.B

Thiepval Memorial

-

6.A 6.B

-

Thiepval Memorial

-

-


75

Charles. H R.S H.A C Harold. V

J.F

Vigors Wakefield Walker Wallis Walters

Warburton

Walter. A

Tunnicliffe

C.H Francis

Leslie. A

Tugby

V? Van Praet

S.R Claude Harold

Trontman Truman

J.C

Harold. P

Toon

Urquhart

B H.B C.C

Thooley Thorne Tooley

A.E

Carmont. O

Telford

Turpin

John. A

Sykes

4th Bn Sherwood Foresters

12th Bn Cheshire 3rd Bn West Riding th 6 East Lancashire Sherwood Foresters

12th Bn Cheshire Royal Field Artillery

34th Division Ammunition Column 5h Bn Lincolnshire

2nd/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters

10 Bn Leicestershire 5th Bn Somerset Light Infantry 15th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers th 11 Bn king’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry th 13 Bn Welsh

th

1st Bn 35th Sikhs Indian Army

65th Squadron Royal Air Force

2Lt

Cpt 2Lt Lt 2Lt Cpt

Cpt and Adjutant 2Lt Lt

2Lt

Pte

2Lt

Cpt Lt

2Lt

Maj 2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

Lt

-

1892

-

-

-

-

-

13.02.1891

-

-

-

-

-

18.09.1918 03.09.1916

01.10.1918

-

-

26.04.1916

18.09.1918

-

-

-

07.02.1919

16.06.1918

-

28 24

24

-

-

22

20

-

-

-

19

19

Bellicourt British Cemetery Doiran Memorial Ancre British Cemetery, Beaumont-Hamel -

-

-

VI.B.23

III.K.2

-

-

-

I.C.6

-

Gouzeaucourt New British Cemetery Long Eaton Cemetery -

-

-

Face 3

X. D. 1

-

Heath Cemetery Harbonnieres Delhi memorial, Indian Gates -


76

Maurice. S

M

John. C

H.H H.H

M

A

Wheathley

Wheatley

Wheatley Wheatly

Wheatly

White

Victor. J

Weber

Weston

L.G W. A.

Watson Watt Watts

Kingsley. V

William J

Warner

Weston

C.R

Wardle

George.H

Cyril. E

Wardle

Wesselhoeft

J.M.E

Ward

Leonard. F

C.W.D

Ward

Wells

Fred. E

Warburton

Volunteers Kuala Lumpur th 9 Bn Lincolnshire

8 Bn Leicestershire

th

Volunteers Kuala Lumpur st th 1 /5 Bn Sherwood Foresters

Sherwood Foresters

Machine Gun Corps Infantry

Durham Light Infantry

9thBn The Prince Of Wales’s Own

9th Bn south Wales Borderers th 18 Bn The Prince of Wales’s Own th 11 Bn West Riding th 9 Bn Royal Scottish Fusiliers Royal Air Force

14th Heavy Bn Royal Garrison Artillery 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters Sherwood Foresters

49th Battery royal Field Artillery

2Lt

Lt

Cpt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

2Lt Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

Lt

2Lt

2Lt

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

1899

1900

-

1896

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

31.10.1918

-

27.04.1917

10.04.1918

16.09.1916

11.10.1918

15.12.1918

-

03.05.1917

-

03.10.1918

-

-

15.10.1917

-

-

-

19

-

20

-

19

19

18

-

21

-

21

-

-

21

-

Vis-en-Artois Memorial -

-

Brebieres British Cemetery Naves Communal Cemetery Extension A.I.F Burial Ground, Flers Nottingham Church Cemetery Thiepval Memorial

-

-

-

Panel 7

10C 10D 11A -

St Paul’s 9791

II.J.6

II.A.19

BB.3

-

Bay 4

Arras Memorial -

-

A.2

-

-

VIII.H.3

Calvaire Cemetery Montbrehain -

-

Vlamertinghe New military Cemetery -


77

R.M

R.M.M A.S S

Edgar. R

John. H

Wilkinson Willaims Williams

Willis

Wilson

A.L

Wilkie

Wilkinson

N.G Robert

Wildbore Wilford

F

J.N R.M

Wightman Wiklinson

Wilkinson

B.E.F Joshua. B.C

Whylde Wigfield

Arthur William

Robert. P Tom. O

Whiteside Whitlock

Wilkinson

A.C

White

8th Bn Sherwood Foresters

14th Bn West Yorkshire th 11 Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire th 9 Bn Devonshire 12th Bn Sherwood Foresters th 8 Bn royal Sussex

11th Bn Yorkshire and Lancashire 5th Bn Attached 13th Bn Yorkshire

13th Bn Sherwood Foresters nd 22 Tyneside Scottish Bn Northumberland Fusiliers rd 3 Bn Northumbrian 74th Division Signal Company Royal Engineers th 11 Bn York Lancashire th 5 Bn Attached 13th Bn Yorkshire

2Lt

Lt

Cpt 2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt 2Lt

Lt 2Lt

2Lt Lt

2Lt 2Lt

2Lt

1884

-

-

-

-

-

-

1895

-

1897

1896

-

07.04.1917

13.07.1916

-

-

-

12.07.1917

-

23.11.1917

-

21.09.1918

24.08.1916

-

33

-

-

-

-

23

-

23

-

21

20

-

I.C.32

I.G.23

-

Peronne Road Cemetery, Maricourt Vadencourt British Cemetery

-

-

I.B.8

-

Panel 5

-

Fins New British Cemetery, Sorel-leGrand -

Cambrai memorial Louverval -

-

I.E.13

Doingt Communal Cemetery Extension -

I.K.21

-

ErquinghemLys Churchyard Extension

-


78

E.F

H.S Alan. S

John. G

William. E R.D.B

Winser

Wolley Wood

Wood

Wood Woods

3rd Bn attached 149th Company Machine gun Corps (Infantry) th 12 Bn Sherwood Foresters

7th Reserve Bn Sherwood Foresters Manchester 1st/7th Bn attached 2nd/9th Bn

2Lt

2Lt

2Lt Lt

Maj

-

15.10.1896

1896

-

-

03.10.1916

09.03.1918

-

-

19

22

-

-

Gezaincourt Communal Cemetery Extension Warlencourt British Cemetery

-

-

Sp. Mem 17.

I.H.20

-


Completing Further Research There is much more research to be completed on the men who served in the Officer Training Corps throughout the First World War – the stories here are just a sample of the information available. In order to find out more about the many men who served their King and country during the First World War, the following locations may aid you in your search: • Medal records - http://www.nationalarchives.gov.uk/help-with-your-research/research-guides/ british-army-medal-index-cards-1914-1920/ Medal records show the achievements of men during the conflicts in which they served. They may help identify where men were at any point during the First World War, tell you which battles they were involved in, and if they achieved any honourable service mentions. • Lives of the First World War - https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/ The Imperial War Museums ‘Lives of the First World War’ website can be used to search for people who have been involved in the First World War in some way, and potentially to find out further information about them. • Nottinghamshire Archives - http://nawcat.nottinghamshire.gov.uk/DServe/DServe. exe?dsqServer=AP266-0029&dsqApp=Archive&dsqCmd=Index.tcl Nottinghamshire Archives have an online catalogue of most of their archives (but not all) and there may be links to individuals within this archive. Most other regions also have a searchable local archive that you may wish to look at should you be looking further afield than Nottinghamshire. • Commonwealth War Graves Commission - https://www.cwgc.org/ For those who did not return home, the Commonwealth War Graves Commission maintains the list of where British troops are buried. This will help you locate where men where when they died, and what battles they may have been involved in.

The following websites may be useful to allow you to discover more about individuals lives: • Ancestry - https://www.ancestry.co.uk/ • Findmypast - https://www.findmypast.co.uk/ These are both paid services, but can be accessed for free in most libraries and in the National Archives, Kew.

79


Appendix 1: Transcription of Officer Training Corps War Memorial at University of Nottingham Henry Abell Frank Addison Reginal Ames Charles W Andrews John G Appleby Christopher E Atherley Jesse M Atkin Arthur L Baker Walter W Ball Allen NB Barker Herbert L Baker Herbert F Barnacle Harold Bass Alfred N Bates William Bavin George N Beales Arthur G Bell Collin Bell Edward W Bell Basil W Bird William E Bird John E Bishop Thomas P Black Robert H Blatherwick Harold CU Blythe William J Board John Brash Frank A Bright Harold V Bright Lionel C Browne Edumund P Cardell Frederick HW Carnell Charles F Carr William C Catherall Eustace BS Cattle James HN Cattle Francis J Chadwick Norman A Chambers John Chapman Charles C Cheattle Charles F Clarke Walter S Clarke Donald J Clarkson John R Coleman Samuel W Collins Cyril R Cook James G Cook Archibald B Cort Ralph H Cowing Charles F Fox George A Cranswick Leonard C Creswell Harry Daft Edwin E Daws Leonard L Dawson FC Dennis Albert LM Dickins

Herbert M Dickinson Somuel Dodd Raymond I Doncaster Frederick W Drew Sydney T Durose Archibald J Ewart Arthur N Eyre John S Firth Eric Fletcher John HC Fletcher Edward L Flewitt Donald Forryan Frank H Fox Frederick D Fox Willis H Frith Charles Gascoyne Harold M Gleave Frank Granger William L Gray George H Greaves Walter W Hacking Harwood A Haddon Robert S Hallam Albert W Handford Stanley J Harbottle Harold E Harford Frederick P Hargreave Joseph W Harris Laurence A Hartshorn Laurence I Hatton John S Hawkes Ralph N Heathcote Leslie E Herrod George H Highfield Frank F Hind James P Hodgkinson Ernest Holland William L Holt Basil T Hooley Charles M Houfton Harry L Hubble Cecil D Hutchinson Roland F Huyton William Inchley Edward C Jackson John W Jackson Charles E Jarvis Sydney E Jenkins Charles E Jennison Albert CL Jepson Phillip N Johnson Raymond A Johnson Joseph F Jowers John B Keating William M Keighley Richard H King John N Kirkby 80

Bernard C Laws Clifford Lees Thomas H Leman Arthur H Levy Lloyd E Lewis Thomas F Lister John Macpherson Albert Makin Claude Marriott Donald E Marshall Reginald F Martin Arthur P Mason William A McClelland John A Meads James Mennie Thomas AR Mills Thomas H Morris Charles N Newcombe Robert D North Edward R Oakden Herbert Oldershaw John JF Oldershaw Dinsdale JA Oubridge Walter JR Pacey Ira Paling Albert L Palmer Denis F Parr Edgard Brian Parr Ernest W Passmore Ernest J Peach Roland Pepper Albert E Phelan John B Pierce William A Powell Neville H Pratt Richard G Pyatt William H Racliffe Albert B Raynes Gordon V Reed Edward Reeder Frank L Reynolds George H Reynolds Rupert A Rickett William H Ritter Thomas S Roadley John H Robinson Henry Robson William L Rockley Wilfred M Roskelly William H Rushton Norman E Rutherford Percy H Salisbury Lionel E Schloss Hernry D Schroder Phillip F Shacklock Thomas P Sharp Clarence G Shaw


Reginald E Sheldon James W Shelly Arnold Shephard Harold Shillaker Lawrence Simms Harold S Slater William M Smalley Charles S Smith John F Smith Jacob H Smith James S Smith Wallace Smith Henry HO Stafford Robert M Stainton Alfred L Stevens Joseph Stirland Ralph C Stoddard Alexander Straw Frederick Walter Straw Horace J Sutton Arthur D Swale Claude Sykes John A Sykes Carmont O Telford Harold P Toon Leslie A Tugby Walter A Tunnicliffe Francis Van Praet Charles H Vigors Harold V Walters Fred E Warburton Cyril E Wardle William J Warner Victor J Weber Leonard F Wells George H Wesselhoeft Kingsley V Weston Maurice S Weston John C Wheatley Robert P Whiteside Tom O Whitlock Joshua BC Wigfield Robert Wilford Arthur W Wilkinson Edgard R Willis John H Wilson Alan S Wood John G Wood William E Wood Tom Wright William J Wright

Figure 57 and 58: OTC War Memorial, UoN

81


Image Credits The Life Lines Group gratefully acknowledges the permission granted to reproduce the copyright material in this book. Every effort has been made to trace copyright holders and to obtain their permission for the use of copyright material. The publisher apologises for any errors or omissions in the above list and would be grateful if notified of any corrections that should be incorporated in future reprints or editions of this book. Figure 1: University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps War Memorial, © Mary Strickson Figure 2: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 3: The Officers and Recently Commissioned Officers of the University College Officer Training Corps, 24th June 1914. © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 4: The Rally, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 5: Samuel Trotman, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 6: Commanding Officers of the University College Officer Training Corps, C. 1930, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 7: Thomas Black, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 8: Arthur Mason, © unknown, courtesy of Find a Grave.com Figure 9: Brian Shaw, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons. wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brian_Shaw_and_Henry_W_King.JPG Figure 10: Leinster Regimental Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Leinster_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 11 Edward Basden, Image Courtesy of Imperial War Museum, © IWM. Figure 12: West Yorkshire Regimental Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:West_Yorkshire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 13: HMS Tipperary, on which Gilbert Blurton sailed, © unknown, Image courtesy of Wrecksite. eu Figure 14: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 15: George Henri Wesselhoeft, © unknown, Image courtesy of Nottingham High School Figure 16: John Arthur Meads, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 17: Jacob Hardy Smith, © unknown, Image Courtesy of Imperial War Museum. Figure 18: James Percival Hodgkinson Grave Stone, © unknown, Image courtesy of Nottinghamshire Country Council Figure 19: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 20: William Fred Fletcher, © unknown, from the collection of the Fletcher family. Figure 21: Arnold Morley Allen, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 22: Leicestershire Regiment Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Leicestershire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 23: Arthur Choyce. Image Courtesy of Imperial War Museum, © IWM. Figure 24: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 25: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 26: London Rifles Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:London_Rifle_Brigade_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 27: Loyal North Lancashire Regiment Cap badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Loyal_North_Lancashire_Regiment_Cap_Badge. jpg Figure 28:York and Lancaster Regimental Cap, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:York_and_Lancaster_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 29: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 30: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 31: West Yorkshire Regimental Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:West_Yorkshire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg

82


Figure 32: York and Lancaster Regimental Cap, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:York_and_Lancaster_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 33: York and Lancaster Regimental Cap, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:York_and_Lancaster_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 34: West Yorkshire Regimental Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:West_Yorkshire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 35: Kings Own Light Infantry Cap Badge, © unknown, Image Courtesy of World Military Encyclopaedia. Figure 36: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 37: Royal Flying Corps Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https:// commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Flying_Corps_cap_badge.jpg Figure 38: Stephen Harvey Piper. © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 39: West Yorkshire Regimental Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:West_Yorkshire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 40: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 41: Leicestershire Regiment Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Leicestershire_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 42: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 43: Nottingham and Derbyshire, The Sherwood Foresters, Cap Badge Collection of Auckland Museum Tamaki Paenga Hira, 1996x2.363.144 Figure 44: Williams Miles Smalley, Image Courtesy of Imperial War Museum, © IWM. Figure 45: William Lisle Rockley, © unknown, Image courtesy of Nottinghamshire County Council. Figure 46: Willaim Inchley, © unknown, Image courtesy of Nottinghamshire County Council. Figure 47: North Staffordshire Regiment Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Cap_badge_North_Staffordshire_Regiment.jpg Figure 48: Robert Samuel Hallam, © unknown, Image courtesy of Nottinghamshire County Council. Figure 49: Royal Welsh Cap Badge, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Royal_Welsh_cap_badge.png Figure 50: South Lancashire Regiment, © Auckland Museum. Figure 51: Ralph Edward Oakden, © unknown, Image Courtesy of Nottingham Law Society. Figure 52:York and Lancaster Regimental Cap, Licensed under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:York_and_Lancaster_Regiment_Cap_Badge.jpg Figure 53: Clifford Lees, Image Courtesy of Imperial War Museum, © IWM. Figure 54: Royal Air Force Badge, Image Courtesy of United Kingdom Government. Figure 55: Cecil Dunbar Hutchinson, Image Courtesy of Imperial War Museum, © IWM. Figure 56: Cadets of the Officer Training Corps, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections. Figure 57: University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps War Memorial, © Mary Strickson. Figure 58: University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps War Memorial, © Mary Strickson. Figure 59: (Back Cover): The Officer Training Corps, © University of Nottingham Manuscripts and Special Collections.

83


The Life Lines Amateur Research Group has researched and compiled the histories of some of the men of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps to share their stories with future generations.

Although some did not return from the First World War, others did. They went on to lead fascinating and full lives, some even giving back to their Officer Training Corps. The research of the entire team has brought the Officer Training Corps to life, showing us what happened during the war, and for those that came home, what happened in the aftermath of war.

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Lives and Stories of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps in the Great War  

The Life Lines groups latest, NLHF funded project, uncovering the stories of the men from the University College Nottingham who trained with...

Lives and Stories of the University College Nottingham Officer Training Corps in the Great War  

The Life Lines groups latest, NLHF funded project, uncovering the stories of the men from the University College Nottingham who trained with...

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