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Discover the history and stories behind the images used on our fall 2019 cover.

A KEY TO THE COVER

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TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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Eugene: Willamette River Bike Trail In a small town with temperate weather and beautiful scenery, a healthy bike culture only makes sense. Such is the case in Eugene, which has 153 miles of paths, bike lanes and bike routes as well as well developed city bicycle education programs, including the Eye-to-Eye traffic safety campaign and the Safe Routes to Schools program. No wonder it ranks in the top ten most bikeable cities each year.

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Annapolis: Maryland State Dome Built in 1772, the Maryland State House in Annapolis is the oldest US state capitol in continuous legislative use. It houses the Maryland General Assembly and the offices of the Governor and Lieutenant Governor. The capitol building also has the distinction of being topped by the largest wooden dome in the United States constructed without nails.

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Fayetteville: Old Main, University of Arkansas Old Main is the oldest building on the University of Arkansas campus and one of its most recognizable symbols. Constructed between 1873 and 1875, the building has gone through numerous restorations. Fun Fact: the arboretum (the large lawn area in front of Old Main) is home to one of every type of tree in Arkansas. Additionally, during Senior Walk each year, graduates have their names carved into the sidewalk that encircles and cuts through campus. The walk begins directly in front of Old Main with the first graduating class of 1876. Columbia: Loblolly Pine Loblolly Pines, or Pinus taeda, are the tallest trees east of the Mississippi. The grandest of them all, standing 167-feet high, is located just 20 miles outside Columbia in Congaree National Park. It looks down on one of the highest temperate forest canopies in the world and towers more than 100 feet above the surrounding American holly and pawpaw trees.

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State College: Penn State University Pennsylvania State University, or Penn State as most refer to it, was founded in 1855 as the Farmers’ High School of Pennsylvania and was later known as the University of State College. The surrounding town of State College evolved from a village to a town in order to serve the needs of the school. One of the leading research institutions in the world, Penn State is known for its high academic rankings, spirited athletic programs and student-run philanthropy.

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Columbus: Arch City In 1888, wooden arches were first installed in Columbus along High Street in what is now the Short North Arts District. They were erected during the Civil War to provide lighting and safety for soldiers and were never intended to remain permanently. But the arches stayed and were later replaced with metal ones to provide support for street cars. Today the 22 arches feature color-changing, fiber optic lighting that illuminates the crowds that gather in the Short North Arts District for the monthly Gallery Hop.

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New Haven: The Green One of the oldest and most well-known town greens in the nation, the New Haven Green dates back to 1638 and comprises the central square of the nine-square settlement plan of the original Puritan colonists. Today, the Green hosts numerous public events like the International Festival of Arts and Ideas and New Haven Jazz Festival. In 1970, the New Haven Green Historic District was designated a National Historic Landmark District for the architectural significance of the three 19th century churches located there.

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Christian Horan

WHEN SUMMER WINDS DOWN AND THE TEMPERATURE BEGINS TO DROP, A NEW ENERGY FILLS THE AIR, MARKED BY THE TIDE OF STUDENTS RETURNING TO CAMPUS — IT’S BACK TO SCHOOL SEASON.

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Some may dread the inevitable return, but we believe it’s the most exciting time of year. With new classes and faces, it’s a chance to hit the refresh button, set bigger goals and reinvigorate the mind. So we decided to pay homage to the start of the school year by reaching out to faculty, alum and students at seven schools across the country. From historians and product designers, to opera singers and artists, we learned about seven of the most exciting college towns through the eyes of those making an impact in their fields. Guides to Annapolis, MD; Columbia, SC; Columbus, OH; Eugene, OR; Fayetteville, AR; New Haven, CT and State College, PA provide both an exciting peek into some of the nation’s brightest minds and practical information on the cities’ best food, sites and more. So as we welcome you back to school, we encourage you to step outside of your comfort zone, gain a new skill and be open to the unseen possibility that new beginnings offer. But most importantly, travel with purpose.

Brown University

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CONTENTS

10. EUGENE 12. Oregon’s Only Product Design Program with Kiersten Muenchinger 14. Eat like a Eugeneian: A Farm-to-Table Culinary Adventure 16. Product Design Student Héctor Escobar Shares his Campus Pride 18. View the First-Ever Nike Moon Shoes at Graduate Eugene 20. ANNAPOLIS 22. Sailor Ian Burman Shows Some Hometown Love 24. A Craving for Crab Cakes 26. A Midshipman Shares his Annapolis Favorites 28. Look to the Light for a Famous Naval Academy Tradition 30. FAYETTEVILLE 32. Fayetteville History with Charlie Alison 34. Food Truck Flavor 36. A Recent University of Arkansas Grad Reminisces 38. Hidden Gems of Graduate Fayetteville 40. COLUMBIA 42. Opera Singer Rachel Calloway Sings Columbia’s Praises 44. Dig into the Ultimate Food Marriage: Pimento Cheeseburgers 46. Meet the Student Body Vice President 48. Art and UofSC Tradition Merge at Graduate Columbia Hotel 50. STATE COLLEGE 52. Designer Emily Burns on State College’s Burgeoning Art Scene 54. Nosh Away with our State College Brunch Guide 56. An Interview with the Director of the Largest Student-Run Philanthropy in the World 58. Famous PSU Alum Portrait Hangs in Graduate State College 60. COLUMBUS 62. Dr. Melanie Corn Shares Why Columbus is a Designer’s City 64. Calling all Chronic Sweet Tooths! 66. Ohio State Pride with the Student Body President 68. Take a Seat with Famous Ohio Astronaut John Glenn

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70. NEW HAVEN 72. Urban Planner Elizabeth Bickley Delves into New Haven’s Layered Past 74. Walking Tour: Eat Your Way through New Haven’s Italian Heritage 76. A Yale A Cappella Singer Merges Creativity and Tech 78. Discover the Origins of New England’s Love for Blue and White 80. WILDCARDS 80. Wylie House Museum | Bloomington 80. University of Iowa Museum of Natural History | Iowa City 80. New Dominion Bookshop Rose Garden | Charlottesville 82. Hatch Show Print | Nashville 82. 40 Watt Club | Athens 82. Rowan Oak | Oxford 82. James River Park Pipeline Walkway | Richmond 84. Gondola Ride | Providence 84. Sather Tower | Berkeley 84. Air Apparent | Tempe 84. Underground Tour | Seattle 86. International Quilt Museum | Lincoln 86. Underground Butcher | Madison 86. Guthrie Theater | Minneapolis 86. Crazy Wisdom Bookstore & Tearoom | Ann Arbor


WE ARE

Publisher Alan Miller

Editorial Director Gigie Hall

Senior Editor Frances Welch

Design Ernesto Gonzalez

Marketing Molly Kodros, Jack Federman, Carla Contreras, William Bearden, Todd Apmann, Ross Campbell

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE is published by COLLiDE Agency INC, 5514 Wilshire Blvd, 9th Floor, Los Angeles, CA. TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE is not responsible for anything, including the return or loss of submissions or for any damage or injury to unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Any submission of a manuscript or artwork should include self addressed envelope or package of appropriate size, bearing adequate return postage.

FEATURED HOTEL ADDRESSES Graduate Annapolis 126 West Street Annapolis, MD 21401

Graduate Columbia 1619 Pendleton Street Columbia, SC 29201

Graduate Columbus 750 N. High Street Columbus, OH 43215

Graduate Eugene 66 E. 6th Avenue Eugene, OR 97401

Custom Publishing

Graduate Fayetteville

Monique Gilbert monique.gilbert@wearecollide.com

70 N. East Avenue Fayetteville, AR 72701

Graduate New Haven 1151 Chapel Street New Haven, CT 06511

Graduate State College 125 S. Atherton Street State College, PA 16801

Established in 2014, COLLiDE is a culture agency, editorial platform, travel magazine and experiential event production company founded by industry veteran Alan Miller. Travel with Purpose is COLLiDE’s guiding principle, and the credo which all of our editorial content falls under. It can be found in the daily wanderlust we provide at culturecollide.com, in digital magazines and printed city guides.

Š2019 COLLIDE AGENCY, LLC. All rights reserved TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE is printed in the USA. CULTURECOLLIDE. COM

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Cover design by Zeka Design 7


CITY

EUGENE

S TA T E

OR

F E AT U R I N g

At the South end of the Willamette Valley, nestled between two small mountain buttes, sits Eugene, Oregon. If its geographical positioning doesn’t hint at its beautiful natural offerings, then look to the community of people who have embedded their love of the outdoors into every corner of Eugene, from its sustainable farm-to-table food scene to the city’s spectacular open-air amphitheaters. Eugene, known to many as “TrackTown USA,” is the birthplace of Nike. And while the shoe giant has certainly made its mark on the community and university, Eugene stands out on its own for being an energetic, verdant paradise, where a love for the arts, good food and the natural world converge to create one of the West Coast’s most beloved cities. So throw on some running shoes, hit the trails and grab a bite for a true Eugene experience.

Taylor Higgins

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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OREGON

An aspiring aerospace designer and Eugene’s thriving farm-to-table food scene.


Eugene Cascades

OR

City Stats

Melanie Griffin

Eugene FOUNDED

1846

NICKNAME

TrackTown USA

POPULATION

196k

FUN FACT

The Donald Duck mascot for the University of Oregon is the only sports mascot by Disney.

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O R E G O N

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT OR

Kiersten Muenchinger is the Pioneer Behind Oregon's Only Product Design Program

Kiersten Muenchinger is an associate professor and the head of the department of product design at the University of Oregon. Kiersten researches and teaches the intersection of materials, manufacturing and design with an emphasis on sustainability. She develops more sustainable product businesses with the Green Product Design Network and the Eugene RAIN accelerator at UO. Her work applying experimental materials in outdoor furniture has most recently been exhibited in ShowPDX, Portland and Salão Design, Brazil. Kiersten was the Industrial Designers Society of America’s (IDSA) Young Educator of the Year in 2011, and one of the DesignIntelligence 30 Most Admired Educators for 2015.

Ricardo Llamas

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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Learn about what made Kiersten fall in love with the city she’s called home for over a decade.

First Friday Art Walk

Eugene NAME

KIERSTEN MUENCHINGER

AFFILIATED SCHOOL

University of Oregon

TITLE

Associate Professor and the Head of the Department of Product Design

SPECIALTY

Product Design

How did you get your start in product design? I started out in mechanical engineering and over time, I worked as a design engineer at firms like IDEO in Chicago and Sottsass Associatti in Italy. One of the things that was totally fascinating, and the reason that I moved to Eugene, was to start the product design program here because my experience was that we didn’t have product design where I went to school. I thought it would be really wonderful for other kids to have that as an option when they go to college.

Does the location of Eugene have an impact on the program? The thing that I like best about Eugene is that our whole faculty is very international, and we’ve all had very international professional backgrounds. Being in Eugene, in a very small town, it very much focuses in on itself. Being inward and having that interplay between how you fulfill people’s needs and desire for beauty that touches someone on both a local level and an international level is the best of all worlds. It makes our students think really wholey about problems, especially when they are focusing on something that they know is going to solve a local need. And if they are able to get international accolades for it, then it’s like “Oh! Other places have these needs and desires also, and what I am doing as just a student can fulfill that.” It is a very Eugene-focused community here and that combination with our international faculty is brilliant.


Jonathan B. Smith

Shopping Guide: UO Faculty Transform Everyday Products

Twin Carafe by Studio Germ from UO Product Design faculty John Arndt and Wonhee Jeong Arnd This coffee and tea brewer consists of a double-walled carafe and silicone lid.

The Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art

The carafe keeps your beverage hot while the outer surface remains cool to the touch. The center of the lid acts as a pourover set while the ridged edge can be used to filter looseleaf tea.

“It is a very Eugene-focused community here and that combination with our international faculty is brilliant.” Are there examples of the program’s work around the community? At the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art, they carry a lot of works that have been done through our programs. The museum is a total steal, by the way. Oregon has this art thing that I can’t describe in an extremely well-informed way. But basically, if you are a private collector of art but you show your work some place in Oregon, you don’t have to pay as much tax on your art. So we get some amazing pieces that come through the Schnitzer that you just wouldn’t see in a town of this size.

Aside from the Schnizter, what’s the art scene like in Eugene? The First Friday Art Walk is a fabulous thing. A lot of cities have these, but the thing that I really like about Eugene’s is that you have no idea what you’re going to see at Art Walk. Sometimes it’s amazing and sometimes it’s like, huh. It’s just really fun and local, and it’s beloved here.

Cone Pen by Selek Design from UO P.D. faculty Erdem Selek and Hale Selek The Cone pen by Selek Design for Rubberband is a rollerball pen designed to be a picturesque yet simple pen that does not visually dominate surrounding objects.

Wrist Ruler Bracelet by Product Design Professor Avik Maitra, purchasable in the Jordan Schnitzer Museum Wrist Ruler is a leather wristband with engraved inch and centimeter measurements. If you always find yourself needing to measure things on the go, this is the accessory for you.

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F L AVO

Travel With Purpose

Eat like a Eugeneian: A Farm-to-Table Culinary Adventure Within a 100-mile radius of Eugene is a landscape that provides some of the most abundant and fresh ingredients in the state — from lush agriculture provided by the Willamette Valley and foraging and fishing in the Cascade Mountains to the freshest seafood caught in the Pacific Ocean. Having this kind of accessibility across the food pyramid cuts out the middleman between farmers and the restaurants and markets they sell to. You’ll find that the establishments listed below support local farmers by primarily sourcing ingredients within 100 miles. On this farm-to-table culinary adventure, you’re not only learning about where ingredients come from but also about the leading agricultural producers in the area too.

Cornucopia Restaurant This friendly neighborhood favorite is known for its burgers made out of all-natural, grass-fed Oregon beef as well as its expansive wine and beer selection and famous happy hour. Lunch, dinner and housemade desserts are offered daily, and both locations now serve breakfast featuring naturally nested eggs, thick bacon, house-baked bread and organic coffee.

Dish of the Day: You can never go wrong with a good turkey burger, so gobble down the Gobbler. It comes with peppers, roasted red pepper aioli, smoked gouda and gourmet greens.

Falling Sky Brewpub This brewery and gastropub pulls inspiration from Munich beer halls and combines it with the coziness of an English pub. They have a massive handcrafted beer and custom soda selection. If you can’t make it to the brewpub, check out their delicatessen and pizzeria. Every location is pull of fantastic bites and drinks. Dish of the Day: Their famous poutine and salmon tacos with a craft brew are a must.

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5th Street Public Market This historic marketplace located in the heart of downtown is home to some of Eugene’s best cafes, restaurants and gift shops. Highlights include Marche & Le Bar, Provisions Market Hall, Northwest Burgers, Cafe Glendi Greek Eatery, Sushi Pure, Sweet Cheeks on 5th, Thai Spice and more.

Dish of the Day: Enjoy oysters on the half shell with a cheese and salumi plate at Blackboard.

Rye Inspired by European village taverns, Rye has long been committed to local, fresh and seasonal ingredients. The bar offers both pre- and post-prohibition cocktails along with excellent service and an extensive wine menu. Drawing from French, Italian, Spanish and Greek cuisine, the restaurant’s cozy and comfortable ambiance, paired with a sizable patio, provides the perfect backdrop to enjoy the city’s eclectic food scene. Dish of the Day: Don’t miss the steamed mussels cooked in garlic, shallot, fennel and white wine. Finish it off with one of the restaurant’s popular whiskey and chocolate pairings.

Steven Weeks

Each week, Grit Kitchen offers a new menu based exclusively on available locally grown sources. There is a prix fixe four-course dinner for $35 per person, in addition to a selection of a la carte starters, entrees and desserts. Dining in the historic Shamrock House in the Whiteaker neighborhood is the perfect place to take in Eugene’s charm.

Steven Weeks

Grit Kitchen and Wine

Dish of the Day: Their specialty is the Fixed Four: a fixed-price, four-course meal that changes monthly to highlight the best produce and meats from local farms.


state

Quintin Soloviev

OR

May 2020

graduation date

Product Design and Art

major

University of Oregon

college

Héctor Escobar

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

Héctor Escobar is a double major in product design and art. Minoring in business administration, he’s learned the skills needed to help his father start a business where the two currently work. Their start-up machine shop, Arrow Tech Machine Works, manufactures airplane and helicopter tooling in Eugene for the aerospace industry.

CAMPUS CORNERS

Héctor was raised in Eugene but was born in Guadalajara, Jalisco, Mexico. He hopes to pursue a career in both aerospace design and acting. “Acting is my other self-expressive side job that I never saw myself doing but have picked up as it helps keep my mental health vibrant and healthy.”

Your college clubs: Oregon cheerleading School tradition: Singing “Shout!” at every game! Sporting event: Football because the Oregon Duck makes me laugh! I only go to watch the Duck. A class to remember: Product design: Objects and Impacts really taught me a lot about the processes of creating complex products we see on the market today. It’s almost like a “How It’s Made” episode every class. This class really showed how old manufacturing techniques have evolved into the ones we use today.

Ray Terrill

Campus study spot: The balcony on the third floor inside of the Lillis Business Complex. Eugene love: I really love how accessible all the hiking and nature trails are to us. We can go to the beach and go skiing all in one day. The one thing to do in your college town: I love floating the Willamette River on super hot days. Favorite food near campus: Burrito Boy

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Christian Horan

Advice you would give to incoming freshmen: Find hobbies that you look forward to outside of school. Try to stay off your social media as much as you can and go off grid. You are not missing out on anything by being off your phone. Your ultimate care package: A puppy, an electric blanket and lots of Dutch Bros gift cards.

Visitor7 CC BY-SA 3.0

Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: Treat everything you learn as if it was the most interesting thing to you. It makes learning boring subjects a bit more exciting.

Lillis Business Complex

QUICK FACTS Founded: 1876 Enrollment: 23.6k Sports Team: Oregon Ducks

O F U N I V E R S I T Y Christian Horan

Christian Horan

Did you know: In 1996, Nike CEO Phil Knight began a uniform partnership with the Ducks. The designs became flashier and changed often. As of December 2012, a physics professor calculated that Oregon Football had 9,984 different uniform combos.

O R E G O N

Academic Highlight: Interested in sports marketing? The University of Oregon has the number one program in the country.


I N S P I R E D D E S I G

View the First-Ever Nike Moon Shoes at Graduate Eugene

N

Nike Moon Shoes were one of the very first waffle-soled running shoe designs created by Nike co-founders, Phil Knight and Bill

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Christian Horan

Bowerman.


Christian Horan

In 1972, Knight and Bowerman wanted to create something different for their new company and capitalize on the US Olympic track and field trials being held at the University of Oregon’s Hayward Field. After some experimentation, Bowerman created the waffle sole pattern after pouring rubber into a mold inspired by his wife’s waffle iron. They only produced 12 pairs of these innovative shoes, giving them away to Olympic-hopefuls, including David Russell, one of 102 runners to qualify for the marathon at the 1972 Olympic Trials. Nearly five decades later, Russell’s rare pair has returned to its original home of Eugene, Oregon. Come by Graduate Eugene and see the original Moon Shoes for yourself.

T R A V E L W I T H P U R P O S E

Christian Horan

With a Nike love that runs deep, Graduate CEO Ben Weprin personally scoured eBay for months, hand-picking 43 pairs of vintage Nikes to display at the front desk of Graduate Eugene. The shoes span the years between Nike’s founding and 1980 and include waffle racers, Blazer mid-tops and a pair of ‘72 Cortezes. The collection also includes vintage Nike hiking boots, soccer cleats, track spikes, bowling shoes and a pair of official Nike roller skates.


CITY

ANNAPOLIS

S TA T E

MD

F E AT U R I N g

One hundred and forty years older than nearby Washington DC, Annapolis is a living, breathing US history book filled with cobblestone streets, 18th century architecture and beautiful views of Chesapeake Bay. A city steeped in maritime culture, Annapolis is a prime destination for anyone looking to connect with the sea and its delicious cuisine. For a quintessential Annapolis experience, head to Ego Alley and enjoy some of the country’s best-ranked seafood as you watch boat captains show off their piloting skills. Aside from its harbor-front dining and spectacular collection of yachts, Annapolis is a culturally and architecturally rich city, with layers upon layers of history to dig into.

Nick Lipton

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

MARYLAND

A midshipman’s favorite Naval Academy tradition and the best crab cakes in Naptown.

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Visit Annapolis

Annapolis

MD

Visit Annapolis

City Stats

FOUNDED

1649

NICKNAME

Naptown

POPULATION

39k

FUN FACT

Annapolis is the oldest state capitol in continuous legislative use. It was also where the Continental Congress met when Annapolis was the capital of the United States in 1783 and 1784.

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M A R Y L A N D

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

Annapolis NAME AFFILIATED SCHOOL

MD

Lifelong Sailor Ian Burman Shows Some Hometown Love

IAN BURMAN

US Naval Academy

TITLE

Head Coach

SPECIALTY

Sailing

An Annapolis native, Ian Burman has been involved with sailing for most of his life, both as an accomplished athlete and coach. After a successful junior sailing career, which included representing the USA in the Optimist South American Championship, Optimist European Championship and 420 World Championship, Burman went on to sail at Georgetown University.

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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Nick Lipton

After graduation, he coached teams at numerous organizations and schools on both coasts, and is now in his 12th year at the helm of the Navy intercollegiate sailing team. With too many accolades and championships to list, Ian Burman is no doubt one of the most distinguished members of Annapolis’ sailing community.

What makes sailing such a special sport and what lessons have you seen it impart to others? I’ve been involved with sailing for as long as I can remember. It’s unique in that it’s outside. You’re reliant on the forces of nature to make the sport happen. You learn a lot about what you can control and what you can’t control. That’s the biggest lesson it imparts — being able to accept that there are some things that are out of your control and having the will to control what you can.

How would you characterize the sailing community in Annapolis? I would say that there are a lot of sailors in Annapolis and a lot of people that love the water and to get out on the bay. People do it in a lot of different ways. There are cruisers, fishermen, people that like to just get out for a day’s sail and people that sail all different kinds of boats. The one thing that everyone has in common is a love for the outdoors, a love for the water and a love for nature.


Nick Lipton

Ian Burman’s Sailing Picks Do you have any annual sailing events that you participate in? The one thing I always enjoy doing is the Olivia Constants Team Race Regatta at SSA. I’ve been involved with that for a number of years. Also the fall sailing season is always special. Probably my favorite thing is team racing and college sailing in the spring.

“The one thing that everyone has in common is a love for the outdoors, a love for the water and a love for nature.” What makes Annapolis a special place to call home? The bay is the draw and then the culture. The people around here are relaxed but get things done at the same time.

Are there any quintessential Annapolis landmarks or places people should visit? If you get a chance to take a boat out to Thomas Point Lighthouse, that’s somewhere everyone should check out. It’s also one of my favorite spots to go fishing. Obviously the Naval Academy is a must see as is Eastport. The village of Eastport is a neat spot, lots of great places to eat there.

If someone wants to try out sailing or to get on the water, how do you recommend people do that if they’re visiting? Watermark does a lot of different adventures on the water, from the Harbor Queen to the Woodwind Schooners. There are a lot of boats that go out and take people out for a quick sail. There are also a number establishments that will help you get out on the water, like paddleboarding, sailing or whatever you want to do. There are a lot of opportunities to get out in Annapolis.

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F L AVO

Travel With Purpose

A Craving for Crab Cakes Picking the best seafood restaurant in Annapolis is like picking the best coffee in Seattle or the best pastrami in New York. In other words, it’s nearly impossible. So we limited our picks to a single dish: the crab cake. Still just as hard to narrow down considering the state is known for its world famous blue crab, which Marylanders have found thousands of ways to prepare. But we’ll stick to the cake, a delicious mound of crabmeat that can be sautéed, baked, grilled, deep-fried — you name it.

For this delicious entrée, we picked both Annapolis old school favorites and some new kids on the block, so enjoy!

Boatyard Bar & Grill

Dish of the Day: If “World’s Best Crab Cake Dinner” doesn’t spell it out for you, I don’t know what does. It comes with two broiled Maryland jumbo lump crab cakes served with house-made tartar sauce, fresh vegetables and smashed red skin potatoes.

John Bildahl

Located in Annapolis’ historic Eastport neighborhood, this family friendly restaurant tops almost every crab cake list there is. Not only did it win Baltimore Sun’s 2019 Critic’s Pick for best crab cake, it’s also been said that upon finishing her meal, Michelle Obama declared them as the best crab cakes she’s ever eaten. With a fun nautical interior, you’ll find sailors, boaters, fishermen and families enjoying the Boatyard’s ambiance and mouth-watering food.

Hole in the wall, greasy spoon, throwback diner — whatever you want to call it, this place is an Annapolis institution. With an unassuming exterior, Annapolis locals know this is the place for a crab cake meal. Packed with plenty of charm and tradition, the Pledge of Allegiance is recited every morning at 8:30 sharp, and the menu includes several “Colossal Challenges” including a sixpound milkshake. If you’re not in a crab cake mood, their famous breakfast is served all day.

Larry Hoffman

Chick & Ruth’s Delly

Dish of the Day: Start off slow and order #471, which comes with a half pound jumbo lump cake, two sides and a dinner roll.

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Iron Rooster This spot in historic Annapolis takes country comfort and adds a bit of hipster chic to the mix. They do serve lunch and supper, but like any good Southern restaurant, they’re especially known for their brunch. Served all day, the menu offers creative twists on classics like homemade pop tarts and breakfast ravioli. With vintage ephemera lining the walls and a waterfront view, this modern joint is the place to be. Dish of the Day: We couldn’t ignore the Cakes on Cakes dish on the supper menu. It comes with house made crab cakes, cornmeal pancakes, fried green tomatoes, chipotle hollandaise, asparagus, corn salsa and Maryland’s favorite seasoning, Old Bay.

The Point Crab House This one takes the cake, so to speak, for best waterfront dining. While not technically in Annapolis, it’s just a short 15-minute car ride away and well worth the drive. Situated on Mill Creek, the restaurant can be accessed by boat or car. During warm weather, three sides of the restaurant open up garage doorstyle for one of the best open air dining experiences in the area.

Dish of the Day: Get the Crab Cake Sandwich, which comes with a Jumbo Lump crab cake, potato roll, tomato, bibb lettuce and house-made remoulade.

Reynolds Tavern Perfectly capturing Annapolis’ historical flair, Reynolds Tavern is not only the oldest tavern in the city, but one of the oldest taverns in the United States. Located in a beautifully preserved 18th century building, it is one of the finest examples of Georgian architecture. Famous for its afternoon tea, Reynolds Tavern is the perfect place for a special occasion. Dish of the Day: To sip on some of the tavern’s traditional English afternoon tea, stop over for lunch and try the Chesapeake Crab Cake Sandwich.

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state

MD

May 2020

graduation date

Chemistry

major

US Naval Academy

college

Christian Hoffman

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

Originally from Sandy Hook, Connecticut,

Christian Hoffman grew up playing lacrosse, establishing a love for athletics and small team competition.

CAMPUS CORNERS

At seven, Christian visited the Naval Academy and immediately fell in love with the school. After graduating high school, he attended the University of Connecticut and joined the club sailing team. A year later, he transferred to the Naval Academy. As a member of the Varsity Offshore Sailing Team, Christian says, “The sailing team has been incredibly beneficial to my development as a person and a naval officer. It has been an absolute privilege to serve as the Varsity Offshore Sailing team captain since February 2019.”

Your college clubs: Navy Varsity Offshore Sailing Team and Chem Club School tradition: Army Week is my favorite tradition. It’s great to see the ingenious pranks the plebes (freshmen) think of and pull off. The entire brigade is in a great mood with the semester winding down and the Army-Navy football game at the end of the week. Sporting event: Army-Navy football. The atmosphere is incredible and the game evokes a lot of emotion from both the players and fans. Being inside the stadium on game-day, jumping and chanting with the brigade is the experience of a lifetime. A class to remember: [I took] an independent chemistry research class. It has been extremely rewarding to delve deeply into a specific discipline of chemistry. Through this class I have had the opportunity to operate specialized equipment and continuously hone my ability to think critically and communicate effectively. Campus study spot: My favorite study spot is Nimitz Library. Finding a spot on the second or third floors overlooking Annapolis or the Severn River is the best way for me to focus on doing work. The coffee helps, of course.

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Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: Always try your best. Whether it is your passion or not, if you try your best, it will be reflected. Even in challenging situations, you will be rewarded. Your ultimate care package: Clif Bars, Pretzel M&Ms and Sour Patch Kids.

Enrollment: 4.5k Sports Team: The Navy Midshipmen Academic Highlight: #2 Top Public Schools for National Liberal Arts Colleges Did you know: Admission to the US Naval Academy is based upon a five-year military service, so all graduates go straight into employment with the US Navy or Marine Corps.

A C A D E M Y

Favorite food near campus: I am a huge fan of Galway Bay. It is an Irish pub with a fantastic atmosphere. I love heading there in the winter with friends for great food and conversation.

Founded: 1845

N A V A L

The one thing to do in your college town: Crabbing on Chesapeake Bay

QUICK FACTS

U S

Annapolis love: I love the history of Annapolis. Walking around the Statehouse and the brick streets is beautiful, especially in the middle of fall or late spring. There are always plenty of new places to explore, both on the water and downtown.

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I

Look to the Light for a Famous Naval Academy Tradition

N S P I R E D D E

Turn on the bedside lamp at Graduate

S I

Annapolis and you’ll notice a fitting

G

tribute to a 60-year ceremony

Nate Smith

N

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Nate Smith

The Herndon Monument is a 21-foot-tall granite obelisk, located on the grounds of the US Naval Academy. As tradition goes, all plebes (freshmen students) work together to climb the greased monument at the end of their first year. The goal is to replace a plebe sailor cap on top with a service cap as fast as possible. The guest room bedside lamps are replicas of the Herndon Monument, with the lampshades representing the service cap. Another tribute to Maryland can be found in the wallpaper. The colors — flame red, blue gray, green and white — are inspired by Chesapeake Bay’s famous blue crab.

T R A V E L W I T H

In 1959, the academy began recording times for the “plebes-no-more” ceremony. A decade later the record was set when Midshipman Larry Fanning made the climb in one minute and 30 seconds. It must be noted the monument was not greased. To put that in perspective, the class of 2022 completed the climb in one hour, five minutes and five seconds.

P U R P O S E


CITY

S TA T E

FAYETTEVILLE F E AT U R I N g

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ARKANSAS

A Fayetteville historian and the town’s eclectic Food Truck courts.

Anyone that lives in Fayetteville, Arkansas can attest to the town’s singularity. The city’s location deep in the Ozarks and its motley population of students, creatives and long-time locals has made it one of US News’ top-five places to live in the US several years in a row. “Active” may be the most apt description for the people of Fayetteville: politics, entertainment, food, the outdoors — you name it and the town’s residents are not only involved, but they are putting Fayetteville on the map. And while there’s a lot going on in this Northwest Arkansas hot spot, Fayetteville also knows how to do what the South does best: slow and easy living. If cultural bustle, relaxation and a healthy side of hospitality are priorities, then you’ve come to the right place.

AR


Fayetteville FOUNDED

1828

NICKNAME

The Ville

POPULATION

85k

FUN FACT

Fayetteville is known as the Track Capital of the World and for good reason. The University of Arkansas' track and field program has won 45 national championships.

AR

City Stats

31


A R K A N S A S

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT AR

Fayetteville History with Town Expert Charlie Alison

If there was ever a position open for Official Fayetteville Historian, then Charlie Alison would be the town’s top candidate. As the executive editor for the University of Arkansas, he oversees editing of the university’s alumni magazine, its catalogs of study and the daily news email sent to the campus community.

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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Arkansas Parks Tourism

He’s also lived in Fayetteville for most of his life and has authored and co-authored two books about Fayetteville’s history. Currently, Charlie is working on a history of the University of Arkansas for the U of A Press. Keep reading to learn more about Fayetteville through the eyes of a historian.

Fayetteville NAME

CHARLIE ALISON

AFFILIATED SCHOOL

University of Arkansas

TITLE

Executive Editor

SPECIALTY

History

What makes Fayetteville a particularly special place to live in? Part of what makes Fayetteville special to me is the nostalgia from a life lived here. On the Square, I remember being in the homecoming parade during high school. I bought my first bicycle at High Roller Cyclery. Beyond memories though, I think the social participation and civic spirit that Fayetteville people have for this community are remarkable. From the theatre to dance to music to the arts, from serving on city and school district committees, from simply spending time on the Square on a cool autumn Saturday during Farmer’s Market, the people of Fayetteville really do lots of things.

What are some significant historical landmarks and events that took place here? Perhaps the most significant events in Fayetteville were related to civil rights. Silas Herbert Hunt successfully sought admission to the University of Arkansas School of Law in 1948, becoming the first African American student to enroll in a white Southern university and starting the desegregation of higher education across the South. Six years later, in 1954, the Fayetteville School District voted immediately after the Brown v. Board of Education decision to begin integration of its schools, becoming the first school district in the South — along with Charleston, Arkansas — to desegregate. Both of those events happened without lawsuit, major


protest or violence, so they don’t show up on the radar very often; but they show what is possible. We’re not a perfect community, but I hope we keep asking questions and taking actions that make us a more perfect place.

Do you have a favorite local historical figure? Gosh, so many. Sophia Sawyer, a missionary educator to the Cherokee Nation, is one of the most fascinating. She came west with the Cherokees when they were forced out of North Carolina, Tennessee and Georgia, moving to Fayetteville with the Ridge family after civil strife occurred among the Cherokees, resulting in the killings of Major Ridge, John Ridge and Elias Boudinot. Sawyer and Sarah Ridge started the Fayetteville Female Seminary in Fayetteville in 1839, and it continued into the Civil War, drawing students from across the Southwest as well as from the Native American nations just to the west.

Where does the University of Arkansas fit into the city’s history? Fayetteville was widely known across the state as a leader in education before the Civil War

and the establishment of the state’s first public university in 1871 was opened to all communities in Arkansas. The university has proven to be one of the prime economic engines of both Fayetteville and the region. It’s the largest employer in Fayetteville and as a result has provided a buffer during economically unstable periods outside the region. The university’s consistent draw of professors from across the nation, new students every year from across the state, and a healthy population of international students also dramatically affects the flavor of Fayetteville.

FAYETTEVILLE HISTORY • The Arkansas Air and Military Museum • The Clinton House Museum • Headquarters House • Genealogical section of the Fayetteville Public Library • Special Collections at the University of Arkansas Libraries

CITY FAVORITES • Shop the farmer’s market • Bike the Razorback Greenway • See a TheatreSquared Performance • Hike Kessler Mountain

Arkansas Parks Tourism

Arkansas Parks Tourism

“I think the social participation and civic spirit that Fayetteville people have for this community are remarkable.”

Charlie Alison’s Historic Picks

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F L AVO

Travel With Purpose

Food Truck Flavor

Smash together gourmet and grunge and you get quintessential food truck cuisine: unique flavor combos, a tad greasy and perfect for a late night food run. These restaurants on wheels are perfect for a city like Fayetteville that prides itself on good food and eccentric taste. If you’re exploring this tucked-away college town, then a stop at one of its many food truck courts is a must.

We dish on some of Fayetteville’s best grub and where to get it.

Yacht Club Located in the NoMa district (between North and Maple streets), food truck court the Yacht Club offers up everything from Southern comfort food to Asian fusion. Home to trucks like Dot’s Nashville Hot Chicken, Funktown BBQ, Homestyle Cravings and more, this food truck congregation is perfect for a midday lunch al fresco. Dish of the Day: For a splash of Tennessee in Arkansas, Dot’s is the place. Their hot chicken is to die for and you can pretty much get it any which way you want: hot chicken tenders, hot chicken sammie, hot chicken on a salad. But our pick is their Mac n Beer Cheese. Enough said.

Shulertown

Arkansas Parks Tourism

No visit to Fayetteville is complete without a stroll down Dickson Street. Considered the heart of the city, it is home to Fayetteville’s entertainment district, which includes a lively nightlife scene with plenty of bars, restaurants and venues. When you’re done catching a live show and it’s past midnight, Shulertown is the place to be. The food truck court includes Wicked Wood Fired Pizza, Blazin’ Asian Munchies and Burton’s Creamery.

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Dish of the Day: For the most authentic wood fired pizza with interesting topping combinations, stop at Wicked Wood Fired Pizza. Sample the Abby Special which comes with BBQ sauce, Alfredo, smoked gouda, portobello mushrooms, sweet peppers, red onions and pineapple.


Crossover If you find yourself on the east side of town, then head to Crossover and Mission where you’ll find authentic Indian food like Punjabi Kitchen and T-Boy’s BBQ, which serves up ribs, pulled pork sandwiches and more, straight out of an airstream.

Experience Fayetteville

Dish of the Day: Punjabi Kitchen cooks up mouthwatering classics like chicken tikka masala and samosas, but their specialty is Malai Kofta, which includes veggies and paneer balls in creamy curry topped with raisins and nuts.

North Street Parked directly across from the Columbus House Brewery is one of Fayetteville’s most well reviewed food trucks, Kiko Rice and Noodle. And you guessed it — they serve up savory rice and noodle dishes with all your favorite toppings. From their signature Chinese sausage to salmon and fresh veggies, order yourself up a bowl along with a spring roll or two, and you won’t be disappointed.

Dish of the Day: While traditional is always a safe bet, we opt for something with a kick: spicy Crawfish Fried Rice with pineapple.

If you’re headed to the SoFay District (South Fayetteville), and craving a tasty meal in a rustic and adorable setting, then Quick Town food court is well worth a visit. Located on S. Government off of MLK Blvd., this collective includes food, crafts and clothes. Vendors include Harvest Moon Pies, Zuppa Zuppa and Mo’ Tacos & Churros. Dish of the Day: You had us at churro. These fried doughy delights are delicious and Mo’ Tacos & Churros has perfected the art of the churro. Our pick? Try the churro sundae with horchata ice cream and a caramel drizzle.

Experience Fayetteville

Quick Town


state

AR

May 2019

graduation date

Journalism

major

University of Arkansas

college

Caroline Minor

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

A fifth generation Arkansan, Caroline Minor’s family history runs deep with the Razorbacks. She practically grew up in the bleachers of Bud Walton arena and the Razorback Stadium, so when it came time to pick a college, Arkansas was the clear winner.

CAMPUS CORNERS

Caroline recently graduated from the University of Arkansas with a BA in Journalism. She says, “[I] was devastated to leave Fayetteville. The people, food, culture and life truly make it one of the best places to visit, live and work. Every opportunity I’ve had has come from the network and knowledge I gained in my four years there.” Caroline currently works and lives in Little Rock and in her free time she enjoys exploring Arkansas, trying to cook new recipes, reading the latest celebrity memoir and spending time with friends and family.

School tradition: The hog call, of course! It’s a rallying cry to Razorbacks everywhere! Sporting event: Basketball season is always exciting! The stadium is smaller and it’s indoors, so it’s fun to get a group together for a game. A class to remember: Videography with Dale Carpenter my sophomore year. That class was equal parts lecture and field work. The School of Journalism at the U of A is wonderful at pushing students out of the classroom to find stories that matter to them and then giving them the tools to be top-notch multimedia storytellers. Campus study spot: Arsaga’s at the Law Library (which was lovingly nicknamed “Law-saga’s”). The big windows and comfy seats are SO nice.

Arkansas Parks Tourism

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Your college clubs: Delta Delta Delta, The College Diabetes Network, Main Hill Media, Ad Club, PRSSA

Fayetteville love: No matter how far you drive from campus, there’s still this palpable feeling of excitement and eagerness. People are open minded, curious and constantly seeking connection with their community.

Old Main


Favorite food near campus: There are so many! Taste of Thai, Ghiraldi’s, Little Bread Co., Prelude, Emelia’s, Meez and Kini… the list could go on forever. And there’s always a new one to try! Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: You get out of college what you put into it, so you should go in knowing what you want. Before I started my freshman year, someone recommended that I sit down and come up with a vision for my four years of college. So I did, and I decided that my overarching goal was to be a leader. That gave me a good solid goal to achieve — I joined a sorority and was a leader there, I started a student group to raise awareness and support for a topic I was passionate about and I jumped into my major with both feet.

Founded: 1871 Enrollment: 28k Sports Team: Arkansas Razorbacks Academic Highlight: #78 Top Public Schools in the Nation Did you know: Bill and Hillary Clinton began their careers by teaching law at the University of Arkansas. Before she was a US senator or the nation’s secretary of state, Hillary founded the university’s legal clinic.

U N I V E R S I T Y

Arkansas Parks Tourism

O F

Your ultimate care package: Is anything on the table here? If I’m going all out, I’d say VIP tickets to Hamilton, a private jet and a lifetime supply of Arsaga’s cathead blend coffee. But, if I’m being reasonable, I’d settle for one bag of Arsaga’s CatHead blend.

QUICK FACTS

A R K A N S A S

The one thing to do in your college town: Visitors in town for a football game or one of Fayetteville’s other fall events must take a walk around campus, when the leaves are at their most vibrant fall colors.

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I N S P I R E D D E

hidden gems of

Graduate Fayetteville

S I G N

The University of Arkansas’ most iconic structure has been standing since the late 19th century and was the inspiration for two design pieces

Beth Hall

in Graduate Fayetteville.

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Beth Hall Beth Hall

Old Main, as it is lovingly referred to, was the first permanent building to be erected on Arkansas’ campus. Its exterior was finished in 1875, just three years after the university opened for classes. The oldest building on campus, it was built in the architectural style known as Second Empire, and is recognized for the clock and bell towers that stand on either side. Fun fact: during the early years of the university, male and female students were not allowed to mingle. In those days, students sometimes left love notes tucked into cracks of a limestone rock that was dropped during the construction of Old Main. That rock became known as site for marriage proposals.

T R A V E L W I T H P U R P O S E

If you look closely, you’ll notice that both the headboard and bedside lamps in Graduate Fayetteville’s guest rooms replicate Old Main’s architecture.

Beth Hall

Spoofer’s Stone and continues to be a popular


CITY

S TA T E

SC

F E AT U R I N g

An opera singer’s love for Soda City, and a Columbia classic: the pimento cheeseburger.

At the heart of South Carolina lies its capital, the charming Southern city of Columbia. Located on the Congaree River, you’ll find residents floating its waters on a hot summer day as much as you’ll find them enjoying the city’s abundant offerings: the symphony, two professional ballet companies, several theaters and a number of museums are just a few of the things that keep people busy. Steeped in history, the merging of old and new makes the city particularly appealing for entrepreneurs, creatives and award-winning chefs who are looking for an affordable place to set down roots. Small enough to avoid the pitfalls of big-city life, but large enough to feel like a metropolitan center, Columbia is truly the best of both worlds.

Nick Lipton

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SOUTH CAROLINA

COLUMBIA


Nick Lipton Nick Lipton

Columbia

SC

City Stats

FOUNDED

1786

NICKNAME

Soda City

POPULATION

130k

FUN FACT

The world's first textile mill run completely by electricity opened in Columbia in 1894. The enormous red brick building that housed the mill is now home to the South Carolina State Museum.

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S . C A R O L I N A

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

Columbia NAME AFFILIATED SCHOOL

SC

Opera Singer Rachel Calloway Sings Columbia's Praises

Rachel Calloway is an opera and concert singer and serves as a voice instructor at the University of South Carolina. She is also the Associate Director of Spark, Carolina’s Music Leadership Laboratory, which offers coursework, project support, guest residencies and other initiatives for UofSC students. There isn’t enough room on the page to list Rachel’s many accomplishments, but the prolific artist has performed at venues all around the world, including Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center and the Opera de Lille.

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

James Naruke

Learn more about Soda City’s musical offerings from UofSC faculty member and mezzo-soprano, Rachel Calloway.

42 Ohio State Fair

RACHEL CALLOWAY The University of South Carolina

TITLE

Instructor of Voice and Associate Director of Spark

SPECIALTY

Classical Voice

How did you come to work at UofSC and what makes the music department there special? I was eager to leave New York City, my home of 16 years, for a smaller, more livable city. My husband, Ari Streisfeld, also serves on the faculty at UofSC as assistant professor of violin and violin pedagogy. We are happy raising our two young children here. Our faculty is extraordinary, for its talent, collaborative spirit and love for our students.

What kind of initiatives does UofSC have to connect students with the Columbia music community? We have multiple initiatives to bridge the gap between academia and our community. Through Spark and other areas, we engage with those beyond the walls of the university. Students perform at the Richland Public Library in a collaboration called Plink, Rattle, Toot. Our Creativity in Music Awards instigate communitydriven programming, all planned by our students with faculty and staff support. We host a Pop Up Music Studio downtown in the spring and much more. Many of our students perform recitals in assisted living facilities each year, and this year we’re excited to host Intermission Sessions, a yoga-violin duo who will work with our students and faculty on wellness and effective performance techniques.


Kim Truett

Graduate Picks: Columbia Venues by Genre from Rock Heads to Jazz Hands

Rock ‘n’ Roll All Night Located in Columbia’s downtown Vista district, The Senate (formerly known as Music Farm) is a spacious 1200 capacity venue that hosts both local and big-name acts. Check the calendar and enjoy one of the best rock clubs in the region.

All that Jazz If you’re looking for an intimate space and some of the best live jazz and blues in the country, then head to the heart of the River District in West Columbia for a night at Chayz Lounge. Enjoy small bites and signature cocktails in this smooth jazz hotspot.

Koger Center for the Arts

“I find the musical culture at UofSC to be second to none.” Fifth Print

This is Country Music

How would you describe Columbia’s music scene and what makes it a great home for musicians? I am a lover of classical music, and I find the musical culture at UofSC to be second to none. We have extraordinary classical and jazz programming alongside fantastic ensembles like the symphony, choirs and marching band. I know there is great bluegrass, country and jazz outside of the University as well.

Classical Compositions

What are your favorite local events? I love the State Fair! This was a completely new event for me, and I can’t express enough how much I enjoy it. Also the farm-to-table dinners at City Roots are simply fantastic. City Roots

What is the best venue to see a classical performance? The University of South Carolina recital hall has magnificent acoustics and a warm and intimate atmosphere which enables one to directly connect with audiences.

South Carolina is well known for its country and bluegrass music, and there’s no better place to sample some honky tonk tunes than at Tin Roof. Originally from Nashville, this venue chain has established itself as one of Columbia’s goto live music joints. Attached to The Senate, Tin Roof also offers Southern inspired bar food and drinks.

As Columbia’s premier performing arts center, the Koger Center for the Arts draws crowds from all over the state to its diverse and impressive programming. Located on the University of South Carolina campus, the center hosts the Columbia City Ballet, The South Carolina Philharmonic, and performances by both the UofSC Dance Department and the School of Music.

Up and Coming Indie New Brookland Tavern is one of, if not the, oldest continuous running music venues in the Columbia area. Opened in the early 90s, it is well known for presenting live music 365 days a year and featuring some of Columbia’s best up-and-coming acts.


Dig into the Ultimate Food Marriage: Pimento Cheeseburgers It’s safe to say that South Carolina’s culinary legacy goes unmatched, and many of the most beloved Southern dishes come straight out of the state’s lowcountry cuisine, including she-crab soup, Frogmore Stew and shrimp and grits. But specific to Columbia is the heavenly pimento cheeseburger. For the uninitiated, pimento cheese, or “Carolina Caviar,” consists of sharp cheddar cheese, mayonnaise and pimentos blended together. Fun add-ons include horseradish, cayenne pepper, jalapenos and dill pickles. The pimento cheeseburger dates back to the early 1960s, when J.C. Reynolds, owner of The Dairy Bar in Columbia, had his very own “aha” moment and decided to put the Southern spread on a hamburger. Today, Columbia remains the epicenter for this delicious combo. Thank you Mr. Reynolds!

Rockaway Athletic Club You won’t find any signage outside this establishment, and yet this local institution is known far and wide for its famous pimento cheeseburger. Even visited by George W. Bush, the restaurant also offers excellent seafood. Located in UofSC’s old athletic club, the nondescript red brick building is easy to miss, so keep an eye out and enjoy this secluded gem.

Forrest Clonts

F L AVO

Travel With Purpose

Dish of the Day: The Rockaway Pimento Cheeseburger comes with the works: lettuce, tomato, mayo, raw or grilled onions and pickles on the side.

Rosewood Dairy Bar If you’re looking for an old-school authentic dairy bar experience, then this Rosewood neighborhood spot is the place. With crinkle fries and milkshakes named after great Carolina baseball players, this Columbia hole in the wall is a classic no-frills burger joint. Dish of the Day: Served in a paper tray lined with red and white checkered paper, this pimento burger is cheap, gooey and perfect after a walk in the neighborhood.

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Pawleys Front Porch Located in the popular Five Points area of Columbia, Pawleys claim to fame is a feature on Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives. All of the restaurant’s offerings are named after South Carolina cities and themes, like The Fripp Island burger, which comes with Southern salsa, Boursin cheese and a fried green tomato.

Dish of the Day: The Isle of Palms burger is a spicy take on a classic. It comes with pimento cheese, lettuce, tomato, red onion and the kicker — jalapeño bacon.

1801 Grille Tucked behind the Darla Moore School of Business at UofSC, this rustic and charming establishment offers a “tavern-inspired” menu with playful twists on tried and true dishes. With a cozy interior that includes exposed brick walls and large mahogany tables, the restaurant was established to directly serve the college community. Hence the 1801 name, which references the year the university opened.

Dish of the Day: The Pimento Cheeseburger comes with lettuce, tomato, garlic aioli, melted pimento cheese and bacon lardons.

Although this trendy Cottontown spot doesn’t technically have a pimento burger, we had to include it for ambiance alone. Housed in a renovated auto body shop, War Mouth’s specialty is its cocktails, which include concoctions like Backsliding Southern Baptist, Snake Juice and Little Merman. Both presentation and flavor are top notch, so be sure to stop over at this up-andcoming eatery. Dish of the Day: Not a meat eater? Opt for the pimento grilled cheese. As one reviewer noted, “The pimento cheese itself ranks as one of the best I’ve ever had.”

Kick Stand Studio

The War Mouth


state

SC

Kim Truett

May 2020

graduation date

Finance

major

The University of South Carolina

college

Sophie Davish

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

Senior Sophie Davish is a finance major in the Honors College with a minor in political science.

CAMPUS CORNERS

She is originally from Chester Springs, PA. Sophie currently serves as Student Body Vice President and has been in student government for three years serving as a freshman council member, a business school student senator and chief of staff to the 18’-19’ student body vice president. Sophie also worked as an intern for Governor McMaster and serves on a variety of boards for the university, including the Board of Visitors and Russell House Advisory Board.

Your college clubs: Zeta Tau Alpha, Student Government, Omicron Delta Kappa Honor Society School tradition: There is nothing like “Sandstorm” playing at the beginning of a football game. I swear the crowd goes absolutely electric. It’s those moments when I look around at all the passion and I know I made the right decision to come to school here. Sporting event: We are so lucky at UofSC to have amazing attendance and spirit at all our sporting events! Soccer games are my personal favorite, but I also rode horses all my life so I love making the trip out to our equestrian facility. A class to remember: I got the opportunity to take an honors course as an “intro to law school” class actually in our UofSC Law school. It was that class that taught me about the art of crafting arguments and advocating for others. I credit a large portion of that class as the reason I am pursuing law school after graduation.

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Crush Rush

Campus study spot: The Horseshoe! We are so lucky to have such gorgeous weather practically all year. There is nothing more refreshing than meeting up with some friends and getting in a quick study session on our beautiful green space.


Kim Truett

The one thing to do in your college town: Soda City Market on Main Street! This is a huge farmer’s market that pops up every Saturday. Highly recommend checking out the donut truck.

QUICK FACTS Founded: 1801 Enrollment: 35k Sports Team: South Carolina Gamecocks

Favorite food near campus: Publico is typically my friends and my go-to spot when we need to unwind and grab some delicious food after a long day of class.

Academic Highlight: #1 Undergraduate International Business Major

Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: I had someone tell me once to never minimize your fire to let others shine. College is a unique experience where you are typically thrown into rooms of the smartest, funniest, most talented people you’ve ever experienced. Don’t let that intimidate you. You have every right to be there just as much as everyone else.

Did you know: South Carolina’s sports teams are referred to as the Gamecocks in honor of Revolutionary War hero Thomas Sumter. The brigadier general and future South Carolina senator was called the “Carolina Gamecock” for his fierce fighting style.

T H E

Crush Rush

U N I V E R S I T Y

O F

S O U T H

Your ultimate care package: Face masks (for unwinding!), coffee gift card and Gamecock gear (you really can never have enough).

C A R O L I N A

Shell Suber

Columbia love: Columbia is unique in that it’s a city that never feels overwhelming, yet there’s always something to do. On any given Saturday (that’s not a gameday) you can find me shopping the Five Points boutiques, enjoying a Gourmet Shop brunch or even floating down the river with friends.

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I

Art and UofSC Tradition Merge at Graduate Columbia

N S P I R E D D E S I G N

Working with husband and wife team Genna and Signe Grushovenko, Graduate Columbia commissioned three custom pieces from the South Carolina-based

Ron Blunt

artists.

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Ron Blunt

The duo works collaboratively on all of their paintings, which are inspired by vintage photographs and ephemera. After Genna creates abstract backgrounds, Signe comes in and applies an opaque oil painting, depicting figures and scenes of the past. Together, they created three pieces that can be found in the guest rooms. The first is based on the musical theme from “2001: A Space Odyssey,” which The second is a tribute to UofSC baseball superfan, Bill “Oot Oot” Golding, who was known for his garnet and black overalls, sticker-decorated helmet and

Nick Lipton

the UofSC football team uses while they take the field.

catch phrase, “Oot! Oot!” The third is a portrait of UofSC alum Darius Rucker, best known as the lead singer for band Hootie & The Blowfish.

T R A V E L W I T H

The founding members of Hootie & the Blowfish, Darius Rucker and Mark Bryan, met while attending the University of South Carolina in the mid 80s. The story goes that Bryan, a guitar player, heard Rucker singing in the showers of the dorm they shared and was impressed by his vocal ability — the rest is history.

P U R P O S E


STATE COLLEGE

S TA T E

PA

F E AT U R I N g

The ultimate State College brunch guide and the director of the largest student-run philanthropy in the world.

At the very center of Pennsylvania sits the small but mighty town of State College. Two hours from Pittsburgh, three hours from Philadelphia and five hours from New York City, it offers wide open spaces with close proximity to denser metropolitan areas. But its main draw is all in the name. Considering there’s no separation between city and university, almost all of State College’s residents are somehow connected to Penn State. The town itself was built around the campus after the Civil War, but that doesn’t mean its only attractions are collegiate. Yes, football games are notoriously popular. It’s even said that on gamedays, Beaver Stadium (with a capacity of over 106,000) becomes Pennsylvania’s fourthlargest “city” by population. But State College’s shop-lined streets, annual festivals and weekly farmer’s markets are worth a visit too.

Nick Lipton

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

50

P E N N SY LVA N I A

CITY


State College Downtown Nick Lipton

State College FOUNDED

1896

NICKNAME

Happy Valley

POPULATION

42k

FUN FACT

State College's Berkey Creamery is the largest campus creamery in the United States.

PA

City Stats

51


PA

Designer Emily Burns on State College's Burgeoning Art Scene

State College

Daniel Collins

P E N N S Y L V A N I A

FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

Emily Burns is an artist, designer and curator based in State College, PA. She holds a BFA in drawing and painting and an MFA in graphic design from Penn State. An accomplished painter, her work has been exhibited both internationally and throughout the United States. She is both the founding editor and curator of the contemporary art publication Maake and is also the founder and director of Maake Projects, a new exhibition space in Central PA. In addition to working with a variety of clients on branding, identity and print design, Emily is also an assistant professor of graphic design at Penn State. Discover the best galleries, arts events and more as you explore State College’s creative side through the eyes of a local.

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

Woksob Family Gallery

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NAME

EMILY BURNS

AFFILIATED SCHOOL

Pennsylvania State University

TITLE

Assistant Professor of Graphic Design

SPECIALTY

Design

What brought you to State College and what made you stay? I am a third generation Penn State grad and grew up visiting State College as a kid and always loved the campus. I studied painting here as an undergrad and moved to NYC after graduating to work for artists and explore the many art scenes there. I returned to State College to start a studio practice and pursue my master’s degree. I appreciate this area because of the small-town vibe, beautiful landscape and wide-open spaces. I still spend a lot of time in New York City, and love coming back to Central PA for a breath of fresh air, the ability to have lots of studio space and to interact with the outdoors. I am very interested in what the future holds for arts communities outside of metropolitan areas, as places like NYC become increasingly cost-prohibitive for emerging artists.

What’s unique about the visual arts programs at Penn State? The faculty and students are really fantastic. The arts programs here are top-notch and bring a full roster of artists and speakers to campus for lectures and workshops. Penn State students have access to a wide range of disciplines in the arts in addition to courses in other areas—I have a BFA in drawing and painting with a minor in equine science. In college, I would split my time between the art studios and the horse barns, and I loved that unlikely combination. Students can also combine their studies with entrepreneurship and business via the Arts and Entrepreneurship minor.


Emily Burns’ State College Picks

Local Gallery: The Woskob Family Gallery & HUB Gallery

Woksob Family Gallery

“I appreciate this area because of the small-town vibe, beautiful landscape and wide-open spaces.”

Public Art: Campus Arts Initiative

Is there anywhere in particular around State College that has inspired your work?

A new large-scale project is the Campus Arts Initiative launched by Penn State faculty. It will include public art pieces across the Penn State main campus and branch campuses. Woksob Family Gallery

Nick Lipton

My current paintings incorporate floral motifs, and the Penn State Arboretum has been a vast source of visual inspiration. The team there has built an incredible space with so many unique plants and flowers.

It’s really exciting to see the beginnings of a contemporary art scene in the area with a range of engaging programming like artist and curator talks, openings, hands-on interactive projects, live music and lots more. I also just started a new project space, called Maake Projects, and I’m excited to see what lies ahead!

Event: Central PA Festival of the Arts The annual Central PA Festival of the Arts is a long tradition here in State College that highlights visual arts, crafts and live music in mid-July.

Museum: The Palmer Museum

Palmer Museum of Art

Emily Burns Serendipity Prize, 2017 Acrylic on canvas over panel 7 x 5 inches

The Palmer Museum on campus is a great place to stop by for their permanent collection as well as current exhibitions.

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Nosh Away with our State College Brunch Guide

Travel With Purpose

Brunch in a college town is the most holy of traditions, as any college student will tell you. There is nothing better than dragging your friends out of bed and sleepily jaunting over to the local diner or café for a fresh cup of coffee and a warm, filling brunch. But perfecting this inbetween meal is an art: you want enough options to keep things interesting, but the staples must be solid or else everything else crumbles. Waffles, pancakes, eggs benedict, coffee — these are the things that get students through four years of late night studying, the big football game and campus soirees. We’ve rounded up some of State College’s finest brunch spots so you can savor the best meal of the day.

Sowers Harvest Café Serving food made with only the finest and freshest local ingredients, Sowers certainly lives up to its slogan: “Naturally healthy cuisine served with a hearty welcome.” With a rustic interior, Sowers offers easy breakfast and lunch options, from smoothies and sandwiches to their Grillatillas. But perhaps their most beloved menu item is their homemade pretzel which comes in plain, garlic parmesan, cinnamon sugar or sour cream and onion. Dish of the Day: We have to go with the pesto-port egg sandwich and a chai latte.

Naked Egg Café Although this place is considered out in the country, it’s only a 10-minute drive from downtown State College, near Rothrock State Forest. As the name suggests, this brunch spot specializes in eggs, especially eggs benedict. With a Southern flair, Naked Egg’s menu includes mouth-watering delights like candied bacon cornbread and a chicken oyster which, for the uninitiated, is an egg wrapped in sausage, breaded and deep fried. Holy biscuits and gravy does that sound good.

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Dish of the Day: The Hot Mess is a must-try and comes with eggs to order, cheesy grits, grilled shrimp, gravy and a side of toast.


Original Waffle Shop The Original Waffle Shop is a State College institution and a brunch jewel among breakfast spots. Most every PSU student has frequented the OG Waffle Shop at least once during their four years in State College, hence the usual line out the door. But the wait is worth it. Hefty portions, reasonable prices and a classic diner setting make the Original Waffle Shop a brunch lover’s heaven.

Café Lemont Located in a converted house in the Lemont neighborhood, this cozy café is known for its loose-leaf tea, craft coffee, pastries and healthy breakfast and lunch options. Welcoming and quaint, Café Lemont uses locally sourced ingredients and products whenever possible. With homemade appeal and fresh cooking, Café Lemont makes for the perfect Sunday morning brunch date.

Barrel 21 Distillery Is there anything better than brunch and buffet in the same sentence? We think not. That’s why Barrel 21’s Sunday brunch was voted the best brunch in State College. For $20, you can relish any and all of Barrel 21’s many gourmet options, including an omelet station, assorted pastries, French toast, breakfast stir-fry and anything else your brunch-loving heart desires. If you’re 21 and over, enjoy the extensive Bloody Mary bar.

Dish of the Day: While enjoying the rotating menu, we recommend saving room for the dessert bar.

Kate Kenealy

Dish of the Day: The Banana Nut Waffle is especially good.

Dish of the Day: The quiche of the day with a side of loose-leaf tea is a local favorite.


state

PA

May 2019

graduation date

Accounting and Finance

major

Penn State University

college

Regina Duesler

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

Regina Duesler is a fifth year student in the

Patrick Mansell

CAMPUS CORNERS

Coming from a high school with 88 people in her class, Regina says, “Penn State was a huge transition, but I’ve loved every minute of exploring this large campus. My favorite flavor of Creamery ice cream is Coconut Chip and my secret talent is chubby bunny.” Regina is also the executive director of THON, Penn State’s dance marathon and the largest student-run philanthropy in the world.

Patrick Mansell

Masters of Accounting Program majoring in accounting and finance and minoring in Spanish. From Huntingdon Valley, PA, she is the first member of her family to go to Penn State.

Your college clubs: Currently, I’m the executive director at THON, but throughout my time at Penn State I have been involved in Lion Scouts, Mortar Board, Smeal Student Mentors and the DUS Leadership Council. School tradition: My favorite tradition is the Blue and White game! Sporting event: Besides football, my favorite sporting event is hockey. The atmosphere is so much fun in Pegula, especially in the student section. A class to remember: My favorite class was COMM 118, Intro to Media Effects. It was just an elective I chose on a whim. It was in 110 Sparks (my favorite classroom on campus) and every day we learned about how the media changes how we think, which was fascinating. Campus study spot: Harry Potter Room of the Library State College love: I love the feeling in the air on Friday afternoons the weekend of a home football game. Walking out of class and going downtown, the town is electric with alumni coming back to State College. The sense of community and pride is contagious.

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Nick Lipton Patrick Mansell The Obelisk

Favorite food near campus: Fiddlehead Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: Take advantage of every opportunity you can! It’s always great to discover what you are interested in and passionate about, but it’s just as beneficial to discover what you are not interested in and then begin to pursue a different path. No opportunity is a waste of time, so put yourself out there. I tried classes in almost every field until I discovered the MAcc (Master of Accounting) program.

Founded: 1855 Enrollment: 97k Sports Team: Nittany Lions Academic Highlight: For international students and study abroad, ranks #1 in Pennsylvania and #14 in the US. Did you know: Penn State was the first to offer a baccalaureate degree in agriculture.

THON

Patrick Mansell

P E N N

S T A T E

Your ultimate care package: Target gift card, K-cups and homemade baked goods!

QUICK FACTS

U N I V E R S I T Y

The one thing to see in your college town: For a landmark, the obelisk outside Willard is one of the oldest on campus. It was built in the 1800s and has stones from across the state dating back to Jurassic times. It’s a great reminder of the history and origins of Penn State. As for activities, a perfect day in State College would be to attend a football game at noon, head to the Creamery for some ice cream, attend a volleyball game at night (you get discounted tickets with your football tickets!) and then take a late night photo at the Lion Shrine.

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I N

“Casablanca” Writers on Display at Graduate State College

S P I R E D D E S I G

Steve Friehon

N

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Steve Friehon

After Philip’s death, Julius continued to write and received two more Oscar nominations. He maintained close ties with Penn State throughout his life, returning often to guest lecture at the film school. At his request, he was buried in a Penn State polo shirt.

It’s a little known fact that the writers behind one of the most famous films of all time attended Penn State. Identical twin brothers, Philip and Julius Epstein both graduated from the university in 1931 and were champion boxers during their time there. After graduation, Philip took up acting while Julius began his short-lived professional boxing career.

After finding work as a radio publicist and writing a few one-act plays, Julius moved to Los Angeles where his brother later joined him. The pair would go on to be one of Hollywood’s most successful screenwriting duos, churning out 10 screenplays together before Philip’s death in 1952. Their most famous writing credit is of course for the 1942 classic “Casablanca,” T R A V E L

which went on to win the Academy Award for Best Picture.

P U R P O S E

Steve Friehon

W I T H


CITY

S TA T E

COLUMBUS

OH

F E AT U R I N g

Columbus’s flourishing art scene and the city’s most sought-after desserts.

Home to the fifth largest college in the country (The Ohio State University), Columbus’ population is predominately comprised of a great number of students, the professors who teach them and the businesses that serve them all. From the artsy Short North district and historic German Village to the revitalized Downtown area, Columbus offers a veritable smorgasbord of history, art and food. No wonder many are leaving the more saturated big cities for this fast growing culture hub. If you’re looking to skip the heavyweights and try out one of the Midwest’s most prospering cities, then Columbus should be at the top of your vacation hit list.

Nick Lipton

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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OHIO

South of the Great Lakes in the very middle of Ohio resides its most populous city and capital, Columbus. Considered by some to be the Midwest’s hidden gem, this powerhouse city is like the smaller, more affordable cousin to Chicago.


Nick Lipton

Columbus

OH

Nick Lipton

City Stats

FOUNDED

1828

NICKNAME

The Arch City

POPULATION

880k

FUN FACT

The Indianola Junior High School in Columbus was the very first junior high in the country. It opened in 1909 and still operates today as the Graham Expeditionary School.

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FACULTY SPOTLIGHT

Columbus

O H I O

Brand Columbus

OH

Dr. Melanie Corn Tells Us Why Columbus is a Designer's City

Dr. Melanie Corn made history in 2016 when she became the first female president of the Columbus College of Art & Design (CCAD). Before joining CCAD, Dr. Corn received a bachelor’s degree in art history from Stanford University and a master’s degree in art history from University of California Santa Barbara. Her academic work focused on contemporary visual culture and theories of gender and sexuality. In addition to her art history degrees, Dr. Corn also received a doctorate in higher education management from the University of Pennsylvania.

Ty Wright for Columbus College of Art and Design

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Using her impressive background in academia and education, Dr. Corn works to not only set the vision of CCAD but also bridge the gap between the college and the Columbus community. Read on as Dr. Corn guides us through the Ohio capital’s dynamic art scene.

CCAD Art Sign

NAME

MELANIE CORN

AFFILIATED SCHOOL

Columbus College of Art and Design

TITLE SPECIALTY

President Art History

How does the community at CCAD differ from other major art schools? Our students come from all around the world, but at heart, we’re a Columbus institution. That means our community at CCAD is smart and open — just like Columbus. We have a Midwestern friendliness here that has helped us build a community focused on creative excellence, collaboration and healthy creativity.

How does CCAD facilitate the relationship between students and the Columbus community at large? The Columbus Way is all about collaboration. Our Career Services team frequently works with regional and national employers on career fairs and internships. And, in the classroom, we often partner with businesses and nonprofits so our students can gain practical experience by working with real-world clients. We also believe that it’s important for every student to engage with Columbus’ creative community regardless of their major. So we encourage students to get involved with our many art and design spaces and events, whether that’s joining an artist collaborative or maker space or attending festivals and events like Cartoon Crossroads Columbus (CXC) or GDEX, the Midwest’s premier gaming expo.


Dr. Corn’s Columbus Picks Local gallery: ROY G BIV I’ve been really excited to see great institutions like ROY G BIV relocating to Franklinton and Wild Goose Creative adding a second location in that growing creative neighborhood.

Brand Columbus

And, of course, I’m thrilled to be collaborating with both of those galleries (and many others) for our CCAD Grads in the Galleries series, which features works at art spaces around Columbus from September through December as we celebrate the college’s 140th anniversary.

“The thing that has impressed me about Columbus’ art scene is that it encompasses so many different kinds of venues...”

Public art: CCAD Art Sign The CCAD Art Sign, of course. It has become an iconic image that’s part of the skyline of Columbus. Plus, I get to see it from my office every day.

How would you describe the art scene in Columbus and what makes it a great place for an artist or art lover to live in? The thing that has impressed me about Columbus’ art scene is that it encompasses so many different kinds of venues, from major internationally known spaces like the Wexner Center and the Columbus Museum of Art to a strong commercial gallery scene and emerging arts spaces.

Museum: Columbus Museum of Art

Brand Columbus

You can do a lot more here than you might be able to do in other cities. For an artist, this is an especially great place because you can afford to be experimental and entrepreneurial here. You can take risks here because you can afford to take risks here, and it’s an open collaborative place where people will help you take those risks and succeed.

Three ways to support local artists: 1. Buy artwork You can find fantastic pieces created by emerging artists and designers at places like the semiannual CCAD Art Fair (coming up on Dec. 7, 2019, and April 11, 2020).

2. Support arts organizations At CCAD, the majority of our philanthropic dollars go to support student scholarships to help students graduate and be successful.

3. Hire artists and designers They’re incredibly creative thinkers, collaborators and problem solvers who work in all sorts of careers and fields.

Our next-door neighbor, the Columbus Museum of Art. They do a great job of bringing in work by worldrenowned artists while also connecting with our local creative community. And it’s right next door to CCAD, so our students get a view the amazing contemporary art on view in their beautiful new wing.

Event: Chroma: Best of CCAD I may be biased, but Chroma: Best of CCAD is one of my favorite events. It’s a chance for the community to see the best work created by emerging artists and designers. And it’s a really fun street party that’s free and open to the public. Come join us on Thursday, May 7, 2020, or learn more at ccad.edu/ chroma.

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Calling All Chronic Sweet Tooths!

Travel With Purpose Travel With Purpose

Whether it’s the European influence or just a random congregation of tart-loving aficionados, Columbus is chock full of dessert places. French boulangeries, chocolate shops, gluten-free bakeries, ice cream parlors — every imaginable sugary construction is available in the Ohio capital. There’s even a van-based All Dessert Food Tour that will take you to Columbus’ best spots. But if you’re looking to do it on your own, we’ve assembled the perfect list for the dessert-obsessed traveler.

Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream A beloved Columbus institution and one of the city’s most famous exports, Jeni’s Splendid Ice Cream is world famous for its creative flavors and high quality, ethically sourced ingredients. Founded in 2002 by OSU alum Jeni Britton Bauer, the shop spearheaded the artisan ice cream movement and is now nationally distributed with 34 storefronts across the country. A stop at one of Columbus’s 10 locations is a must. Dish of the Day: Say “Brambleberry” 10 times fast because that’s exactly what you and all your friends should be sampling. The popular flavor is made up of oven-toasted oat streusel and a blackberry and blackcurrant jam layered throughout vanilla ice cream.

Buckeye Donuts Everyone knows that feeling when an insatiable craving for the perfect doughnut takes over. It has to be crisp yet soft and sweet with a touch of salt. Any trace of sanity is gone until one of these is in hand with a side of cheap coffee. Just me? If you’re looking for the classic doughnut spot in Columbus with all of the aforementioned qualities, then Buckeye Donuts is the place. This old-school joint has been serving up handcut fried delights to OSU students since 1969.

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Dish of the Day: I think we drooled when stumbling upon Buckeye’s namesake donut, which is chocolate iced with a dollop of peanut butter in the center. The shop gets bonus points for being open 24 hours a day.


Pistacia Vera From hole-in-the-wall to pinkies up, finely crafted delicacies, we give you: Pistacia Vera. With two locations in German Village and Downtown’s North Market, the cafe offers classic French pastries made to perfection. We’re talking macarons, croissants, tarts, tortes, cookies and more. Oh la la! Dish of the Day: The foodie world has long praised Pistacia Vera’s Parisian macarons and for good reason. They have absolutely perfected the art of these meringue cookie sandwiches, and they’re not afraid to get adventurous. The Honey Lavender is a stand out.

Mozart’s For over 20 years, Mozart’s has brought the “taste of Austria” to Columbus, serving up the centuries old cuisine with fine-dining panache. Founded by husband and wife Anand and Doris Saha, the Vienna inspired restaurant serves their signature Schnitzel to the sounds of live classical music every night. Professionally trained as a pastry chef in Switzerland, Doris’s baking expertise can be sampled in the form of Europeanstyle tortes, cakes, pastries and cookies.

Dish of the Day: For an Austrian classic, the Sacher Torte is our pick. The world famous confection is named for the Sacher Hotel in Vienna and is made from a rich chocolate cake, layered with European apricot preserves and “enrobed in chocolate fondant.”

Bake Me Happy “Gluten-free” may inspire eye rolling for some, but the treats at Bake Me Happy would entice even the most wheat-loving patrons. That’s because they have mastered the mix of flavor and texture to give people treats they never thought they’d be able to taste again. So why would a gluten fiend head to Bake My Happy? Because as the founders put it, “Each and every one of our gourmet goodies has a surprising twist — a special ingredient, a superior texture, an extra-creamy filling.” Need we say more?

Dish of the Day: Try their signature item, the Oatmeal Cream Cloud, made with two soft molasses oatmeal cookies and a marshmallow creme filling.


state

OH

May 2020

graduation date

European History and German

major

The Ohio State University

college

Kate Greer

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

CAMPUS CORNERS

From Cleveland, OH, Kate Greer is currently the student body president at The Ohio State University. She previously served in USG (Undergraduate Student Government) as Director of Academic Affairs and as Chair of the Undergraduate Caucus in University Senate. She says, “I chose — then subsequently fell in love with — Ohio State for its endless opportunities, excellent academic programs and connection to the city of Columbus and state of Ohio. Someday, I hope to become a full faculty member in either History or German, after I’ve earned a PhD in one of the fields.” Outside of USG, Kate participates in a number of clubs and does undergraduate research with the German Department.

Your college clubs: Undergraduate Student Government, BuckeyeThon, German Club, International Affairs Scholars School tradition: I love our amazing marching band and our athletic legacy at Ohio State, but my favorite school tradition has to be the Taste of OSU. This is an event that showcases the amazing multicultural and international communities at Ohio State through an evening of dance, music, food and fellowship at our union. Sporting event: I always love Beat Michigan Week leading up to the football game against That School Up North. The campus environment is absolutely electric. A class to remember: The History of Afghanistan with Dr. Scott Levi because the instructor was incredible, and I learned so much about a new, complex and beautiful part of the world. Campus study spot: The Grand Reading Room in Thompson Library Columbus love: Columbus is the biggest small town in the United States. It’s a friendly and affordable hub in the Midwest with all of the entertainment, artistry, adventure and opportunity of a big city!

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The one thing to do in your college town: Definitely the Book Loft in German Village. I’m a nerd, so I’m a little biased toward this answer, but it’s 32 rooms of books in the prettiest district in Columbus.

Enrollment: 66k Sports Team: Ohio State Buckeyes Academic Highlight: Top 12 public research university and No. 3 nationally in industrysponsored research. Did you know: In 1926 the Ohio State student body elected a cow, Maudine Ornsby, to be its Homecoming Queen.

U N I V E R S I T Y

Your ultimate care package: Fair-trade coffee, Pilot G2-07 pens and Sensodyne toothpaste. College students have to think practically.

Founded: 1870

S T A T E

Advice you would give to incoming freshmen: Go to class. Prepare, show up and learn all that you can. If you don’t go to class, you’re a) wasting money and b) throwing away your best chance to study for the exams.

QUICK FACTS

O H I O

Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: Get involved in clubs and activities on campus. If you want to truly find your home at a college or university, be engaged with the amazing community of clubs and extracurriculars.

T H E

Favorite food near campus: Heirloom Cafe at the Wexner Center for the Arts

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I N S P I R E D D E S I G N

Take a Seat with Famous Ohio Astronaut John Glenn Ohio native John Glenn was a United States Marine Corps aviator, engineer, astronaut, businessman and politician.

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Brett Bulthuis

John Glenn is best known for being the first American to orbit the Earth, circling it three times in 1962. Following his retirement from NASA, he served from 1974 to 1999 as a Democratic United States Senator for Ohio. In 1998 at age 77, Glenn flew into space again.

That same year, he helped found the John Glenn Institute for Public Service and Public Policy at The Ohio State University to encourage public service. The institute merged with OSU’s School of Public Policy and Management to become the John Glenn School of Public Affairs, where he held an adjunct professorship. T R A V E L W I T H

Each guest room includes a bedside chair featuring John Glenn’s NASA portrait.

P U R P O S E


CITY

S TA T E

NEW HAVEN

CT

F E AT U R I N g

As the nation’s first planned city, New Haven is an archetypical New England city through and through, with its stunning fall foliage and neoGothic towers. Walking through the city’s historic streets, you’ll find both foodie-filled eateries and gritty dive bars, aged Victorian homes and modernist architectural masterpieces. Known as the “cultural capital of Connecticut,” New Haven is where colonial meets contemporary and long-timers rub shoulders with Ivy leaguers. Speaking of, much of the city’s economy is driven by the presence of Yale, one of the world’s most prestigious universities. Drawing the most innovative thinkers and doers to its cathedral-like campus, the college has undoubtedly made New Haven a hotbed of intellectual and artistic pursuit.

Full Send Productions

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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CONNECTICUT

New Haven’s architectural history and a walking Italian heritage food tour.


New Haven

CT

Full Send Productions

Full Send Productions

City Stats

FOUNDED

1638

NICKNAME

The Elm City

POPULATION

130k

FUN FACT

Yale students in the 1940s recycled Frisbie pie tins from the Frisbie Pie Company, to create flying toys which would later become the Wham-O Frisbee.

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CT

Urban Planner Elizabeth Bickley Delves into New Haven's Layered Past

New Haven

Nick Lipton

C O N N E C T I C U T

ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT

Elizabeth Bickley is an active resident of New Haven, and New Haven is an active influence on her. The smell of local pizza greets her every time she enters and exits her apartment, which is nested above an Italian restaurant. During the work week, she walks the streets of the original city grid and assesses the vitality of downtown New Haven’s public realm. She plans and manages improvement projects to help build a more equitable, well-loved downtown from its sidewalks and bridges to green spaces and plazas.

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

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Off the clock, she enjoys exploring the city’s natural and cultural treasures: its rivers, harbor, art galleries and architecture. On what drew her to New Haven in the first place, she says, “A Yale graduate program allowed me to study the spiritual and social dimension of architecture and urban design beckoned me to New Haven. The opportunity to care for downtown public spaces and authentic friendships persuaded me to stay.”

NAME

ELIZABETH BICKLEY

AFFILIATED SCHOOL

Yale University

TITLE

Special Projects Manager at Town Green District

SPECIALTY

Spiritual Architecture

What specific programs or initiatives are you currently working on to improve New Haven? Currently, I am managing multiple public art projects to enliven downtown: murals, art installations in vacant storefronts, ornamental architecture on pedestrian bridges and decorative lighting and plantings in alleys. On the side, I help upkeep historic churches and collect litter dumped in the rivers that pour into the Sound.

What’s unique about New Haven’s visual and architectural history? For better or for worse, we are a city shaped by ambitious, idealistic city planners from various eras. During the colonial age, New Haven was the first planned city. This original city grid of nine squares was designed to literally mimic Puritan eschatological beliefs and ideals. In the heyday of Urban Renewal, New Haven received the most federal funding of any American city in order to realize the highway and transportation theories popularized by city planner Robert Moses. In fact, New Haven was nicknamed “Model City.” Similarly, much of Yale University’s architecture is a material enactment of liberal arts idealism. As proof, step inside Sterling Memorial Library and see the cathedral dedicated to wisdom. A grand, entrepreneurial, sometimes overzealous spirit is behind much of the architectural and city layout decisions that form New Haven.


Nick Lipton

Elizabeth Bickley’s New Haven Picks

Favorite New Haven public spaces, structures and historical sites:

“My studies underscored to me the importance of community-based design and historic preservation and commemoration that honors the layers, the intensity, the dynamism of people inhabiting a place.”

• East Rock Park • Whitney Lake Dam • Temple Plaza and its Varini anamorphic mural • Beinecke Library • Quinnipiac River Park • Food Truck Paradise at Long Wharf • Town Bridge next to Eli Whitney Museum • Trinity Church on the Green • Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge • City Point • Wooster Square during Cherry blossom season • New Haven Green when the elm trees’ leaves have turned yellow

Nick Lipton

I see this contentious, exciting landscape and now navigate it as a practitioner. We can’t take for granted the way a place exists. There is always a backstory, probably with tale-telling scars, evidence of how the earth and the vulnerable populations were overlooked, and then strokes of genius intertwined. I bear this in mind as I participate in city planning and development projects.

Nick Lipton

How did your studies at Yale shape the way you see and move through the world?

If someone wanted to explore New Haven on foot, where should they absolutely visit? Wooster Street where the Wooster Square Arch stretches over the street. Here, Italian family-owned pizzerias and bakeries line the sidewalk. You must stop in Libby’s Italian Pastry Shop for a cannoli!

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Walking Tour: Eat Your Way Through New Haven’s Italian Heritage During the late 1800s, a large wave of Italian immigrants made their way to New Haven and at one point, the city had the highest percentage of Italians of any city in the country. Today, their influence on the area is best sampled

Travel With Purpose

with a fork and knife in the Wooster Square neighborhood, also known as Little Italy. Home to some of the best Italian cuisine outside the homeland, Wooster Street is lined with both fine dining establishments and one of the country’s oldest and best known pizzerias. We had the unfortunate job of narrowing down our favorites to just a few standouts, but rest assured — there’s a New Haven Italian eatery to satisfy even the most diehard pizza and pasta lovers.

Olives and Oil Though Wooster Street is the heart of New Haven’s Italian roots, the whole city provides ample opportunity to try some delizioso cibo Italiano. Thus, we’re starting off our tour on Crown Street near the New Haven Green at Olives and Oil. The hip gastro describes itself as an “Italian restaurant with an electric twist… where old world meets new world.” With graffitied exposed brick walls, industrial design and a mounted vespa above the entrance, the ambiance and adventurous menu make it one of Elm City’s most exciting dining options. Dish of the Day: Though this place is a popular cocktail and dinner spot, the brunch menu is equally interesting. We suggest sharing the Bagel and Lox pizza which comes with house beet cured salmon, everything bagel spice, poached egg, pickled shallots and capers.

Skappo Merkato From Olives and Oil, walk five minutes west on Crown Street and you’ll hit Skappo Merkato, the perfect spot for a quick lunch or to grab some artisan imported goods. Stocked with fine cheeses, fresh bread, cured meats and more, this familyowned market is attached to its sister restaurant, Skappo Italian Wine Bar.

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Dish of the Day: Known for its hearty sandwiches, the Parma is a popular choice. It includes prosciutto, goat cheese, Skappo’s Classic Fig Spread, balsamic glaze and baby mixed greens on a roll of fresh baked ciabatta bread. Pair that with one of their homemade Italian sodas and you have the perfect lunch.


City Seed Farmer’s Market

Lea Rosemary Studios

Dish of the Day: Pick up the award-winning feta pesto dip from Sankow’s Beaver Brook Farm and some fresh bread, and you won’t be disappointed.

Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana Walk around the corner toward Wooster Street, and you’ll hit one of the country’s most infamous pizzerias, Frank Pepe Pizzeria Napoletana or simply Pepe’s as the locals call it. Founded in 1925 by Italian immigrant Frank Pepe, the pizzeria originated the New Haven-style thin-crust apizza, pronounced “ah-beets.” This place is an institution along with its rival Sally’s, which was opened by Pepe’s nephew Sal Consiglio in 1938. While New Haven residents are divided on who serves the better pie, we had to stick with the original apizza creators.

Dish of the Day: One of Pepe’s original inventions, the “white clam pie” is a must-try. It comes with the signature apizza crust, olive oil, oregano, grated cheese, chopped garlic and fresh littleneck clams.

Libby’s Italian Pastry Shop What better way to end an Italian food tour than with cannoli and cappuccino in hand? After a meal at Pepe’s, it’s tradition to head next door to Libby’s,founded in 1922. This old school pastry shop offers some of New Haven’s best Italian desserts like tiramisu, sfogliatelle, pasticciotti, gelato and more.

Nick Lipton

Lea Rosemary Studios

We thought it’d be apropos to include a stop at a farmer’s market. After all, you’ll want only the freshest basil for that pesto recipe you’ve been wanting to try. Continue west toward Wooster Square on a Saturday morning, and you’ll hit the City Seed Farmer’s Market. Located at Russo Park, the alfresco market includes over 30 vendors with a variety of locally grown products including fresh fruits and vegetables, meats, seafood, artisan breads, homemade pies and specialty food items.

Dish of the Day: Since we’re ending on a traditional note, we recommend picking a classic. The Cannoli Neapolitan is baked in a flaky dough (instead of fried) and filled with chocolate or vanilla ricotta cream.


CT

Nick Lipton

May 2021

graduation date

Computer Science and Psychology

major

Yale University

college

Aaron Wade

name

A Guide to the College Life

meet your campus guide

Nick Lipton

CAMPUS CORNERS

Aaron Wade grew up just north of Cincinnati, OH. Double majoring in computer science and psychology, he plans on entering a career in tech and interned at Google this past summer. He’s also passionate about the arts and was the musical director of vocal group, Shades of Yale.

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Nick Lipton

state

He says, “I think an ideal career for me would be one where I get to engage my technical and creative skills simultaneously.” But what makes his college experience especially unique is that he shares it with his three brothers: “We’re quadruplets, and all members of the class of 2021. Although our academic and professional interests vary widely, it’s cool to see them all excelling in the things they enjoy.” During his free time, Aaron enjoys playing music, drawing, cooking, yoga and hanging out with friends.

Your college clubs: Shades of Yale (Vocal Group), Yale Black Men’s Union, Yale Club Gymnastics School tradition: Midnight breakfast during finals week — they always have tasty iced donuts. Sporting event: The Harvard-Yale football game. [It’s] always a fun weekend filled with festivities and (mostly) friendly competition. A class to remember: Psychology and the Good Life taught me that happiness is a choice and that there are lots of small things we can do to make this seemingly ephemeral ideal attainable. Campus study spot: Law School Lower Level, School of Management


Nick Lipton

QUICK FACTS Founded: 1701 Enrollment: 13k

Favorite food near campus: Yorkside Pizza Best piece of advice you’ve received about college: Enjoy your time at college — it goes by quick!

Academic Highlight: #3 Top Schools in the nation and ranked sixth in the world for arts and humanities. Did you know: The world’s most mysterious manuscript, the Voynich Manuscript, is held within the vaults of Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Yale. It dates back to 15th century Italy, and no code breaker, cryptographer or linguist has been able to crack it.

Nick Lipton

Nick Lipton

Y A L E

Your ultimate care package: Snacks, laundry detergent and essential oils

Sports Team: Yale Bulldogs

U N I V E R S I T Y

The one thing to do in your college town: [Visit] East Rock.

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I N S P I R E D D E S I G N

discover the origins of

New England’s Love for Blue and White When you think of classic New England design, China might not immediately come to mind. But antique Chinese porcelain can probably be found more readily in New England than anywhere else in the country.

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While many associate blue and white motifs with France, the style is part of the Chinoiserie aesthetic — a European interpretation of Chinese design, most popularly the porcelain made famous during the Ming dynasty.

But let’s travel across the Atlantic, to when the Treaty of Paris was signed in 1783, allowing ships from Salem, Boston, Portsmouth and New Haven to conduct global trade, including with China. Known as the “China Trade,” ships in massive numbers sailed the seas to meet the demand for goods from the Far East; by the start of the Civil War, most homes of middle and upper-class coastal New Englanders featured items brought there by the China Trade.

T R A V E L

To stay true to Graduate New Haven’s historic roots (the building opened as the Hotel Duncan in 1894), fabrics were pulled from the Kravet archives. From the curtains to the headboard and pillowcases, each textile is historically accurate to the late 1800s.

W I T H P U R P O S E


Travel With Purpose CA

Wildcards A day’s stopover never provides enough time to fully take in a city. But if you only have 24 hours to sightsee or you’re looking for that one special thing to cross off your bucket list, then our recommendations make up the perfect

IA

itinerary for the traveler on the go. Avoid the most

VA

trafficked part of town and enjoy offbeat attractions,

TN

art installations, architecture and more with our

GA

wildcard picks. All are just a short drive, walk or bike ride

MS RI

away from Graduate Hotels, so find your city and start exploring.

AZ WA NE

MN MI

Bloomington

WI

Wylie House Museum

Built in 1835, the Wylie House was home to Indiana

University’s first president, Andrew Wylie. It is one of Bloomington’s oldest homes and is open to the public for free guided tours. Furnished as it might have looked back in the 1840s, collections include family artifacts, photographs and archival materials. There is also a number of programs and educational opportunities that take place in the museum’s heirloom gardens.

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Where:

307 E. 2nd St. Hours:

Tue - Sat 10AM - 2PM Cost:

Free

Distance from Graduate: :

The museum is a 7 minute walk, directly south from Graduate Bloomington on North Lincoln St.


Jessica Smith

Jessica Smith

Iowa City

University of Iowa Museum of Natural History

Founded in 1858, the University of Iowa Natural

History Museum is the second oldest university museum west of the Mississippi. It houses over 115,000 specimens and artifacts, including a handful that was once on display at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair. Be sure to schedule a tour and snap a picture with the museum’s beloved mascot, Rusty the Giant Sloth.

Where:

17 N. Clinton St. Hours:

Tue - Sat 10AM - 5PM; Sun 1PM-5PM Cost:

Free

Distance from Graduate: :

Just a six-minute walk from Graduate Iowa City.

Photography Champloo

Photography Champloo

Charlottesville

New Dominion Bookshop Rose Garden

Where:

404 E. Main St. Hours:

Mon - Sat 9:30AM - 8PM; Sun 12 - 5PM Cost:

Free

Distance from Graduate: :

Just under two miles, the bookshop is less than a 10-minute drive from Graduate Charlottesville.

Founded in 1924, the New Dominion Bookshop is the oldest bookstore in Virginia. Located in the middle of Charlottesville’s Historic Downtown Mall, it includes a secret rose garden that blooms every spring. To find this gem, access the alleyway off of 4th Street and you’ll be treated to a slice of the English countryside.

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Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum

Nashville

Hatch Show Print

Where:

224 5th Ave S. Hours:

Mon - Sun 9:30AM - 6PM Cost:

The tour is $18 for adults, $15 for youth Distance from Graduate: :

Just under two miles from Graduate Nashville, the Hatch Show Print is located in the lobby of the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, and is less than a 10 minute car ride away.

Athens

40 Watt Club

If there’s one thing Athens is known for, it’s a legendary music scene that produced acts like R.E.M and the B-52s. Music continues to thrive in the Georgia city and can be best enjoyed at the many iconic venues that call Athens home, like the Georgia Theatre and The Foundry. But nothing beats the notoriety of local institution the 40 Watt Club, a venue instrumental in launching the punk and new wave movements of the 80s. 82

At 140 years old, the Hatch Show Print shop is the premier destination for Southern entertainment’s graphic arts needs. Specializing in letterpress printing, posters for some of America’s biggest country and jazz stars have been crafted by the Hatch family, including Hank Williams and Duke Ellington. The studio offers classes as well as tours seven days a week, where you can catch a glimpse of the shop’s iconic prints getting pressed on the spot.

Where:

285 W Washington St. Hours:

Check show calendar Distance from Graduate: :

A little over half a mile from Graduate Athens, 40 Watt Club is a quick 15 minute walk.


Visit Oxford

Oxford

Rowan Oak

Built in the 1840s by Colonel Robert Sheegog,

this two-story home is where William Faulkner wrote many of his most famous works. The Faulkners lived in the home until the author’s death in 1962, and his daughter sold the home to the University of Mississippi in 1972. Today, visitors can tour the unchanged house and grounds.

Where:

917 Old Taylor Rd. Hours:

Sat 10AM - 6PM; Sunday 1PM - 6PM Cost:

$5 cash only Distance from Graduate: :

Exactly one mile from Graduate Oxford, a fiveminute car ride can get you “write” to where Faulkner lived.

Visit Richmond

Richmond

James River Park Pipeline Walkway

Where:

1101 Haxall Point Hours:

Open 24 hours Cost:

Free

Distance from Graduate: :

A five-minute drive from Graduate Richmond, you can reach the pipeline on the river side of the floodwall, just west of 14th St.

Located in downtown Richmond, Pipeline Park can be accessed by a small ramp atop a pipeline that cuts across a section of the James River. The walkway is just above water level and overlooks a section of Class III whitewater and a large Great Blue Heron rookery. It is one of the more unique ways to experience the James River.

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N. Millard

Providence

Where:

La Gondola, 1 Citizens Plz. Hours:

Mon - Fri 1PM - 9PM; Sat & Sun 10AM - 9PM. Please check the La Gondola website for details. Cost:

$89 - $139 Distance from Graduate: :

Located in the heart of downtown, it’s a sevenminute walk to the Gondola landing.

Gondola Ride

One of the most beloved traditions in this “Renaissance City” is WaterFire, and there’s no better way to enjoy this spectacular display than from the seat of a gondola. Glide along Providence River in a true Venetian vessel as you take in the installation made up of a series of pyres built into the river. Be sure to book a gondola ride well in advance as they are especially popular during WaterFire. Or enjoy a ride another day, and be serenaded by the talented and hospitable gondoliers.

Visit Berkeley

John Morgan

Berkeley

Sather Tower

Sather Tower, more commonly known as the

Campanile, is one of Berkeley’s most iconic symbols. As the third tallest bell and clock tower in the world, it’s visible from almost any vantage point in the Bay. Standing directly at the center of UC Berkeley’s campus, the sounds of the carillon are ubiquitous with campus life. Visit the top of the tower to treat yourself to 360-degree views of the Bay Area, including the Golden Gate Bridge. 84

Where:

UC Berkeley Campus Hours:

Mon - Fri 10AM - 3:45PM; Sat 10AM - 4:45PM; Sun 10AM - 1:30PM and 3 - 4:45PM Cost:

$4

Distance from Graduate: :

An eight-minute walk to campus and you can’t miss it.


Tempe

Air Apparent

One of Tempe’s lesser-known gems, James

Turrell’s Skyspace exhibit, Air Apparent, is a must-see for any art or architecture lover. Known for his experimental light and space installations, Turrell has created a modernist steel structure with an open ceiling, framed by a ring of LED light that changes throughout the day. Surrounded by a lush desert landscape, it is best viewed during sunrise and sunset.

Where:

ASU campus, intersection of Rural and Terrace roads Hours:

Open to the public 24 hours Cost:

Free

Distance from Graduate:

Less than a mile away from the Graduate, it’s a 15-minute walk through campus to get to the installation.

Seattle

Where:

614 1st Ave. Hours:

Apr - Sep 9AM - 7PM; Oct - Mar 10AM 6PM, tours start on the hour every day. Cost:

$20 adult, $10 youth. Please visit undergroundtour. com for full price list. Distance from Graduate: :

Drive South 15 minutes through Seattle’s Central District to arrive at Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour.

Underground Tour

In a city filled with unusual attractions, Bill Speidel’s Underground Tour may be right at the top of the list. In 1889, the Great Fire swept the city, destroying the entire central business district. Today, you can stroll through the remnants of storefronts and sidewalks that were entombed after the city was rebuilt. The 75-minute guided walking tour begins beneath Doc Maynard’s Public House and continues on to historic Pioneer Square before heading underground for a subterranean view of the buried city. 85


Lincoln

Where:

1523 N. 33rd St. Hours:

Tue - Sat 10AM - 4PM; Sun 1PM - 4PM Cost:

$8 adults. Visit internationalquiltmuseum.org for a full price list. Distance from Graduate: :

Heads toward East Campus for 10 minutes by car to arrive at the museum.

Home to the largest known public collection of quilts in the world, the International Quilt Museum includes state-of-the-art research facilities and educational displays. The quilts range from early examples of American and European quilts to contemporary studio quilts that resemble abstract modernist masterpieces. The collection now numbers more than 6,000 quilts from 50 countries, dating from the 17th century to the present.

Madison

Underground Butcher

Wisconsin is world famous for its dairy products, but Madison’s food scene consists of more than just a good cheddar cheese. With a spirited farm-to-table movement taking the city by storm, newer restaurants are popping up that serve locally sourced and sustainable delicacies. So rent a bike from Graduate Madison (residents’ favorite mode of transportation) and head to the Underground Butcher for lunch. As part of the Underground Food Collective, this deli specializes in pasture-raised meat from local farms and other finely curated items like cheese, wine and sandwiches. 86

International Quilt Museum

Where:

811 Williamson St. Hours:

Fri 10AM - 7PM; Sat 9AM - 7PM; Sun 9AM - 6PM Distance from Graduate: :

Bike through the streets of Madison for 10 minutes and reward yourself with some artisanal cheese.


Krivit Photography

Minneapolis

Guthrie Theater

Located in the historic Mill District of Downtown

Minneapolis, the Guthrie Theater is well worth a visit, even if you can’t catch a show. Featuring a 178-foot cantilever bridge that overlooks the Mississippi River, the theater has some of the most stunning views of Minneapolis and the Stone Arch Bridge. Head to the ninth floor for 360-degree views from the Amber Box, a yellow-tinted glass room suspended off the building’s side. The whole place is a photographer’s dream, not to mention the city’s premiere venue for classic and contemporary plays.

Where:

818 S. 2nd St. Hours:

Tue - Sun 8AM - 11 PM (Performance days); 8AM 8PM (non-performance days); Mon 8AM - 8PM Cost:

The theater offers tours (backstage, architectural and costume) that range from $12-$17 Distance from Graduate: :

Just a 10-minute drive across the Mississippi River, and you’ll see this standout building in Downtown East.

Ann Arbor

Where:

114 S. Main St. Hours:

Sun 12 - 8PM; Mon - Thurs 11AM - 9PM; Fri 11AM - 11PM; Sat 10AM - 11PM Distance from Graduate: :

Head straight west on Huron St. for seven minutes by foot and you’ll hit this one of a kind bookstore.

Crazy Wisdom Bookstore & Tearoom

The Michigan town of Ann Arbor is known for its liberal tendencies, from freedom rallies in the 60s to its progressive politics of today. So it’s no surprise that a bookstore like Crazy Wisdom would call Ann Arbor home. This unique shop carries over 200 categories of books that range from the esoteric to Zen and acupuncture. It also carries jewelry, art, incense and anything else your yogi heart desires. On the second floor, the tearoom carries over 100 types of tea and coffee, along with an array of treats to be enjoyed over a good book and a scented candle. 87


Profile for Collide

COLLiDE Travel with Purpose for Graduate Hotels Fall/Winter 2019  

COLLiDE Travel with Purpose for Graduate Hotels Fall/Winter 2019