Page 1

FOR

FEATURING Charles Post Berkeley / Elyse Rylander Madison / Shaylen Broughton Richmond & more


GET OUT OF TOWN. (NO, REALLY...)

200 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


The adventurous spirit is wild in many ways and shapes. While the pursuit to stand on the edge is worthwhile, conquering far away peaks is just one journey of an infinite many. As the contributors in this publication show, subtler and even microscopic relationships with the world can hold as much meaning and courage as sending at the crag, or running a gnarly batch of rapids — although we have plenty of those stories too. It’s hard to ignore that even the word “adventure” is cause for a collective eye-roll. The fact that it can now be packaged, sold and promptly snapped, shared and “liked” deflates its essence like a sad balloon. But the photographers, artists, activists, ecologists, guides and mentors in these pages show that exploring is less about having the right gear or upbringing and more about looking deeper — whether at ourselves, our practices, or our local outdoor spaces. By expanding the definition of adventure — and who can come along — the essence of it is reignited. In these pages we travel to Ann Arbor, Athens, Berkeley, Charlottesville, Iowa City, Lincoln, Madison, Minneapolis, Oxford, Richmond and Tempe. Dive into the stories of people like ecologist, photographer and Berkeley graduate Charles Post as he recounts his time at university. Discover the paintings of Richmond-based artist Shaylen Broughton as she describes the beauty and intricacy of water; or learn more about how University of Wisconsin graduate Elyse Rylander is introducing queer youth to the outdoors. Plus we introduce two new Graduate Hotels: Bloomington and Seattle.

THERESA WHITE

So dive into a new adventure, find a trail, learn more about your favorite cities and most importantly, travel with purpose.

COLLIDE . 1


TABLE OF CONTENTS

CITY GUIDES Comprehensive guides to 11 of the world’s most vibrant cities as told by local artists and adventurers.

06. ANN ARBOR City Guide 18. ATHENS City Guide

30. BERKELEY City Guide Bridging the Great Divide: In Conversation with Storyteller Charles Post 48. CHARLOTTESVILLE City Guide 60. IOWA CITY City Guide

100. MINNEAPOLIS City Guide 112. OXFORD City Guide

124. RICHMOND City Guide An Artist’s Way with Water Shaylen Broughton Paints for the Earth 144. TEMPE City Guide

156. NEW PROPERTY SPOTLIGHTS Bloomington Seattle

MIKE KRIVIT/MEET MINNEAPOLIS

70. LINCOLN City Guide

82. MADISON City Guide Inclusivity and the Art of Adventure: An Interview with Elyse Rylander

2 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


W E PROPERTY ADDRESSES

A R E PUBLISHER Alan Miller

Graduate Ann Arbor 615 E Huron St, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 Graduate Athens 295 E Dougherty St, Athens, GA 30601

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Gigie Hall EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Gillian Driscoll CONTRIBUTING WRITER Mira Z. Barnum

Graduate Bloomington

INTERNS

210 E Kirkwood Avenue

Robben Barquist, Tori Adams

Bloomington, IN 47408 Graduate Berkeley 2600 Durant Ave, Berkeley, CA 94704

ART & DESIGN Sirius Being Creative MARKETING Molly Kodros, Megan McCredie, Gabrielle Costa, Leah Hobbs, Wes Martin, Shira Yevin

Graduate Charlottesville 1309 W Main St, Charlottesville, VA 22903

EAST COAST MARKETING Monique Gilbert | monique.gilbert@wearecollide.com WEST COAST MARKETING

Graduate Iowa City 210 S Dubuque St,

Maria Sauer | maria@wearecollide.com

Iowa City, IA 52240 Graduate Lincoln 141 N. 9th St, Lincoln, NE 68508 Graduate Madison 601 Langdon St, Madison, WI 53703 Graduate Minneapolis 615 Washington Ave SE,

Established in 2014, COLLiDE is a culture agency, editorial platform, travel magazine, and experiential event production company founded by industry veteran Alan Miller. Travel with Purpose is COLLiDE’s guiding principle, and the credo under which all of our editorial content falls under. It can be found in the daily wanderlust we provide at culturecollide.com, in digital magazines, and printed city guides.

Minneapolis, MN 55414 Graduate Oxford 400 N Lamar Blvd,

weareCOLLiDE.com CultureCOLLiDE.com

Oxford, MS 38655 Graduate Richmond 301 W Franklin St, Richmond, VA 23220 Graduate Seattle

TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE is published by Collide Acency INC, 5514 Wilshire Blvd, 9th Floor, Los Angeles, CA. TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE is not responsible for anything, including the return or loss of submissions, or for any damage or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Any submission of a manuscript or artwork should include a self-addressed envelope or package of appropriate size, bearing adequate return postage.

4507 Brooklyn Ave NE, Seattle, WA 98105 Graduate Tempe 225 E Apache Blvd,

STEPHEN RAHN/CCFLICKR

Tempe, AZ 85281

©2018 COLLIDE AGENCY, LLC. all rights reserved TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE is printed in the usa CULTURECOLLIDE.COM

COVER DESIGN BY BRAVE UNION BACK COVER PHOTO BY CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

COLLIDE . 3


EXPLORE, EAT, DRINK, SHOP AND TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE ANN ARBOR, MI ATHENS, GA

BERKELEY, CA

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA IOWA CITY, IA LINCOLN, NE

MADISON, WI

MINNEAPOLIS, MN OXFORD, MS

RICHMOND, VA TEMPE, AZ 4 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


COLLIDE . 5

CHRIS JOHNSON


city guide

ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN AS TOLD BY:

GRACE LUCZAK EH SHERMAN ALLENE SMITH


CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Look no further than the latter half of Ann Arbor’s name, and you’ll know that the city has a thing for trees. With 50,000 of them in the city, the dense forestation diffuses an almost enchanted feeling throughout the aptly nicknamed Tree Town. Situated on the Huron River and with a hilly terrain, the abundant green space isn’t the only feature contributing to Ann Arbor’s connection to the outdoors. “Ann Arbor has long been acknowledged as a hub for progressive social and political movements, including environmentalism and conservation,” says Ann Arbor conservationist Allene Smith. “The organization I work for was founded in 1971 in response to a growing awareness of the need to prioritize the preservation of natural spaces before they were destroyed or forever changed by development. Undeveloped land was acknowledged not as ‘empty’ but as vibrant and worth protecting. That mentality is exemplified in our many public parks, as well as our city and county-wide millage programs which specifically fund permanent preservation of natural areas and farmland.” Ann Arbor’s staunch attitude paired with a rustic charm makes this university town a magical place for creatives of any discipline, from music to food and beyond.

COLLIDE . 7


ANN ARBOR

At a Glance

Meet Your Ann Arbor Guides

FOUNDED IN: 1824

POPULATION: 119k

ALLENE SMITH

Allene Smith is a Land Steward with the Legacy Land Conservancy, an organization dedicated to maintaining the natural beauty of Southern Michigan through modern conservation strategies and watchdog programs. Allene joined the Legacy Land Conservancy after participating in stewardship programs with a number of other local conservationist organizations, demonstrating not only a passion for environmental protection work, but also a deep-rooted connection to Michigan’s various natural landscapes.

MAJOR INDUSTRIES: automotive, IT/software, healthcare, education

FUN FACT:

The Ann Arbor Film Festival is the oldest independent film festival in North America

EH SHERMAN

Ellen H. Sherman is an artist and educator based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Sherman’s paintings are comprised of evocative, abstract images inspired by nature, and captured primarily throughout the use of watercolor and acrylic paints. She also teaches art classes and exhibits her work through local galleries in Ann Arbor.

GRACE LUCZAK

Olympic Rower Grace Luczak is an Ann Arbor native who discovered her skill and passion for rowing on the Huron River during her high school years. Today, Grace is recognized as one of the best rowers in the world, with multiple world championships wins and a world record time in the Women’s 8+ boat race event.

Across the various professions of our contributors — conservationist, athlete, artist — is a unifying thread: a love for the natural world. On some level or another, it informs the structure and form of their work, whether directly or for inspirational purposes. Olympic rower Grace Luczak describes the feeling of training outside as freeing: “I can truly let go and have a moment of ‘awe’ in nature. The seasons in Michigan make it different every time you go outside.” Of course, her sport of choice most often requires a natural body of water, of which Ann Arbor has no shortage. Artist EH Sherman works to reveal the subtler sides of nature and Ann Arbor was the perfect place to do so: “I want to highlight its beauty and its fragility through colors and movement,” she says, “To draw attention to small moments before they are lost; a maple leaf gliding down a stream, a shadow cast in snow. So much of my work is rooted in natural landscapes and the colors of the wild, it was imperative to move to a city that was equal parts concrete and conifer.” But these spaces would be nothing without the dedication and care of stewards like Allene Smith. She explains, “The ecological systems on which our species depends and, which add so much beauty and richness to this planet, cannot advocate for themselves; it is up to us to realize, communicate and safeguard their value… each acre of land conserved and each individual inspired to help advance the mission contributes to what, hopefully, someday, will become a critical mass. The tides can turn; it’ll just take time.” 8 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

GRACE LUCZAK PHOTO BY ERIK DRESSER

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE


COLLIDE . 9

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


ANN ARBOR

ZINGERMAN'S DELI

ZINGERMAN'S DELI

10 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


FOOD AND DRINK Ann Arbor’s academic, cultural and tech cultures, along with its civic engagement, lends itself to a creative culinary scene with an emphasis on sustainability. Chefs take pride in utilizing local ingredients while residents love to take a load off at one of the many biergartens in town. Guide EH Sherman recommends Homes Brewery: “The atmosphere is just perfect for winding down after a day of adventures. My most treasured spot is right by the fire pits with a glass of their Same Same Different IPA.” Whether you need to fuel up before or after a day of exploring, Kosmo has you covered with their fresh, hearty offerings. “It’s all-around legit food,” says Allene Smith. “I get their vegetarian bibimbap with sauteed and fermented veggies, and load it up with their gochujang sauce.“ If you’re searching for a caffeine kick, head over to Mighty Good Coffee. “The beans are ethically sourced, roasted locally and turned into art through a wide selection of brew methods. Their decaf is Swiss Water processed, which is a good, clean choice if you’re looking for a little less oomph, and they can froth non-dairy milk like no other,” says Smith. A trip to Ann Arbor isn’t complete without a stop at Zingerman’s Deli, a local institution since 1982 with an international reputation. People line up for their towering sandwiches and specialty items. As Grace Luczak says, “It’s so good, they have mail ordering.”

[AT HOMES BREWERY] THE ATMOSPHERE IS JUST PERFECT FOR WINDING DOWN AFTER A DAY OF ADVENTURES. MY MOST TREASURED SPOT IS RIGHT BY THE FIRE PITS WITH A GLASS OF THEIR SAME SAME DIFFERENT IPA. — EH SHERMAN

MIGHTY GOOD COFFEE

COLLIDE . 11


ANN ARBOR

NICKELS ARCADE

WHERE TO EXPLORE Ann Arbor provides the best of both worlds: it’s enriched by academic amenities, tech enterprises and cultural resources right alongside abundant parks, natural sanctuaries, gardens, trails and more. The ease and accessibility means never having to sacrifice one for the other. Our guides are especially fond of the Nichols Arboretum (the Arb) and the abundance of trails and flora to enjoy. “You get a little bit of everything,” says Grace Luczak. “The Peony Garden in May; through the wooded trails down the hill to the Huron River to watch canoers ‘handle’ the rapids; and a final lap through the meadows with some white-tailed deer.” Other favorite spots include the Argo Cascades, which EH Sherman recommends for a calming meditation session, and Legacy’s Sharon Hills Preserve with its open fields, woodlands and natural wetlands for hiking of the ‘choose your own adventure’ variety. Ann Arbor’s largest park, Bird Hills Nature Area, lures in locals for its lush greenery, river views and of course, bird watching. “There’s a valley with a bench in a planted pine forest at Bird Hills Nature Area… it is a pretty magical place. Sitting there you’d never guess there’s a highway a few hills over,” says Allene Smith.

12 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

AN ELEMENT THAT CAN’T BE IGNORED IS THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE CITY AND THE LANDS AND WATERS THAT SURROUND IT. NO URBAN AREA IS AN ISLAND, AND PART OF OUR MISSION AT LEGACY IS TO GET FOLKS OUT AND BUILDING RELATIONSHIPS WITH THE LANDSCAPES AND WATERWAYS THAT SUPPORT THE PLACE THEY CALL HOME. — ALLENE SMITH


NICHOLS ARBORETUM

ARGO CASCADES

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14 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSEANN ARBOR graduate


COLLIDE . 15

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


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city guide

ATHENS GEORGIA AS TOLD BY:

MARSHALL MOSHER KATHERINE EDISON PATRICK JANDA


Like most southern cities in summer, the air in Athens is filled with a hot buzz where even the humidity seems to have a ring to it. Maybe it’s the sound of the Oconee River running right through town or the wind weaving its way among the oaks. Whatever the reason, everyone including the most rugged of outdoors people and city folk alike can agree that Athens has it all. While the heat can reach stifling temperatures during the summer, overall the year-round climate allows residents to enjoy both the picturesque spaces within its limits and the more wild places that north Georgia has to offer. As wildlife photographer Katherine Edison explains, “Living in Athens, you are only a couple of hours away from the Appalachian Mountains and a day trip from the ocean or Okefenokee Swamp or the pine sandhills of South Georgia. We have a little of everything!” With all these offerings, the community takes note. Bike culture is big in this Georgia city (despite the hills), and on any given weekend, you’ll find UGA students floating down the Broad River or wandering the many green spaces and trails that Athens has to offer.

COLLIDE . 19


ATHENS

At a Glance

Meet Your Athens Guides

FOUNDED IN: 1806

METRO POPULATION: 122k

MARSHALL MOSHER

Marshall Mosher is an entrepreneur, outdoors enthusiast and the co-founder of Vestigo. After working as a trip leader for the University of Georgia’s Outdoor Recreation program, Mosher combined his passion for adventure sports and team building to form the successful startup and online platform, Vestigo. The Athens-based company provides custom-tailored adventures to companies in Georgia and beyond, the goal being to foster positive office relationships and encourage growth of teamwork skills through memorable experiences in the outdoors.

MAJOR INDUSTRIES: healthcare, education, food processing

FUN FACT:

The UGA Chapel features the largest framed oil painting in the world

KATHERINE EDISON

Katherine Edison is an Athens-based nature photographer who specializes in capturing nature’s smaller details like wildflowers and insects. She has worked and volunteered as an environmental educator for many years and often uses her photography as a teaching tool. A passionate environmentalist, her goal is to use her photos to share her love of the natural world with others, and perhaps spread a little information and understanding along the way.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT PATRICK JANDA

Patrick Janda is a leader within the University of Georgia’s UGA Outdoor Adventure Club. The student-run group focuses on gathering students for low-expense outdoors experiences in an inclusive setting. Designed for both novice and seasoned adventurers, the club organizes monthly activities in addition to their yearly trips to Sugar Mountain for skiing, Pisgah National Forest for rafting and Tybee Island for beach camping.

As our Athens contributors show, there are a myriad of ways to dive into nature. You can notice the smaller details like flora and fauna or start a business, taking team-building to wild new heights. As a student you can lead the University’s outdoor club, helping to inspire another generation of adventure-seekers. For photographer Katherine Edison, flowers are her gateway to everything: “I want people to look at my photos and see nature in a new way. Perhaps to notice something small that they might have otherwise overlooked or see beauty in something ordinary or even ugly. I want them to see that there is beauty everywhere.” For Vestigo founder and CEO, Marshall Mosher, it’s about inspiring the courage in others to step outside their comfort zones: “Challenging outdoor experiences create opportunities for people to speak and listen on a deeper level. Tackling a difficult challenge as a team and accomplishing it in a beautiful outdoor setting is one of the best ways to bond.” As president of UGA’s Outdoor Club, Patrick Janda knows the benefits getting outside can have for stressful student life: “Being outdoors has a very calming effect, which I’m sure a lot of people find helpful. College can get pretty stressful, so having a day or two to spend out among trees with a few people instead of reading and studying.”

20 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

STEVE HARDY/CCFLICKR

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE


NORTH GEORGIA

COLLIDE . 21


ATHENS

1000 FACES COFFEE

1000 FACES COFFEE

CREATURE COMFORTS

BIG CITY BREAD CAFE

AFTER FOUR YEARS OF WORKING AS A TRIP LEADER FOR THE UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA’S OUTDOOR RECREATION PROGRAM, I REALIZED THAT HELPING PEOPLE TO ACHIEVE THIS LIFESTYLE IS EASY. IT OFTEN SIMPLY TAKES ACCESS TO AN EXPERIENCED FRIEND WHO CAN GUIDE THEM THROUGH AN EXHILARATING NEW EXPERIENCE AND INTO THE MENTALITY OF POSSIBILITY AND EMPOWERMENT. — MARSHALL MOSHER 22 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


FOOD AND DRINK Fueling up is essential for any outing and Athens’ blossoming food scene has no shortage of options. For that cup of joe, Katherine Edison recommends Big City Bread Cafe: “Great biscuits! It’s fun to eat out on the patio under the trees with the dogs and little kids

drawing with sidewalk chalk.” Marshall Mosher says, “1000 Faces for delicious caffeine infusions,” and Patrick Janda suggests Zombie Doughnuts in downtown Athens. But

when the caffeine wears off, and the hunger kicks in, it’s time for a good ol’ fashioned meal, and maybe even a drink after. Both Edison and Mosher recommend BBQ at Pulaski Heights, while Mosher opts for a craft brew afterwards at Creature Comforts.

BIG CITY BREAD CAFE

COLLIDE . 23


GRADUATE ATHENS 24 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


COLLIDE . 25

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


ATHENS

WATSON MILL BRIDGE

WHERE TO EXPLORE Athens has an abundance of options when it comes to getting outside. For something within the city limits, Katherine Edison recommends the Oconee Forest Park on the UGA campus, Watson Mill Bridges State Park (about 30 minutes out) and Sandy Creek Nature Center. “[It] is an urban oasis with a huge variety of ecosystems — miles of trails through the woods, rivers and creeks, a pond and even restored Piedmont prairie.” If you’re looking for a nature hike, Katherine leads them herself! Marshall Mosher recommends heading to Trail Creek Park, the only designated mountain bike trail right in the city, where everyone from beginners to advanced riders can enjoy the various loops. If a day trip is in order, hikers, backpackers and climbers can take the hours-long drive to the North Georgia Mountains, a must according to Patrick Janda. There you’ll find a range of terrains including Yonah Mountain, Cloudland Canyon and Raven Cliff Falls.

26 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


STEPHEN RAHN/CCFLICKR

ATHENS FARMERS MARKET

ATHENS IS GREAT IN THE SENSE THAT GOOD TRAILS ARE ONLY AN HOUR AWAY. YOU HAVE SEVERAL CHOICES OF TRAILS IN BLUE RIDGE TO THE NORTH AND STATE PARKS TO THE SOUTH. EVEN IN ATHENS, THERE ARE HIKING AND KAYAKING OPTIONS ONLY 15 MINUTES AWAY. IT’S EASY TO JUST DECIDE TO GO HIKING IF YOU HAVE AN EMPTY DAY. — PATRICK JANDA

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THROUGHOUT ALL I DO, I SEEK TO INSPIRE COURAGE, AND POSSIBILITY IN LIFE THROUGH PURSUIT OF ADVENTURE AND THE COURAGE TO CONSTANTLY CHALLENGE OUR PERCEIVED LIMITS. I HOPE THAT VESTIGO CAN BE THE VEHICLE FOR ME TO BEST PURSUE THIS GOAL THROUGH CHALLENGING THOUSANDS OF INDIVIDUALS AND TEAMS TO STEP OUTSIDE THEIR COMFORT ZONE AND ACCOMPLISH THEIR IMPOSSIBLE. — MARSHALL MOSHER

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BERKELEY CALIFORNIA AS TOLD BY:

CHARLES POST JENNY MULHOLLAND-BEAHRS JOSH PRENOT

30 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


JOHN MORGAN/CCFLICKR

Located in the hills on the east side of the San Francisco bay, Berkeley has a front row to seat to some of California’s most majestic waterways and mountains. Looking out across the bay near the university’s iconic Campanile, the possibilities feel endless, as you just make out the Pacific Ocean beyond the orange tint of the Golden Gate bridge. Campus alone offers many a hidden corner, whether along the creek that runs through it, or amongst the trees in the redwood grove. But beyond school grounds lies a network of trails, hills and water to be explored, paddled and hiked. Even trekking along Telegraph can feel like quite the adventure as you make your way through the vendors, students en masse and wanderers from all corners of the globe. As contributor Jenny MulhollandBeahrs says, “Berkeley is very urban, but also has so many incredible natural gems. Some of them are obvious (the Bay, Tilden Regional Park) and others are much more hidden (many hidden paths, some incredible pocket parks). I love exploring the city and discovering new places to connect with the natural world.”

COLLIDE . 31


BERKELEY

At a Glance FOUNDED IN:

Meet Your Berkeley Guides

1878

POPULATION: 120k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES: CHARLES POST

Charles Post is an ecologist and multifaceted storyteller. Using a variety of mediums like film, social media and print, Post works to protect ecosystems and species at risk. After receiving both his undergrad and graduate degrees at UC Berkeley, Post went on to produce a slew of influential conservation documentaries and projects such as Sky Migrations and Island Earth. He continues to explore the American west from his current home base of Montana. His work can regularly be found in National Geographic, Outside Magazine and more.

JOSH PRENOT

Josh Prenot is an Olympic swimmer who specializes in the breaststroke. The Berkeley graduate and Santa Maria native majored in physics and can often be found hiking, rock climbing and mountaineering. Prenot won a silver medal in the 200 meter breaststroke at the Rio Olympics in 2016.

JENNY MULHOLLAND-BEAHRS

As director of the California Outdoor Engagement Coalition, Jenny Mulholland-Beahrs has combined her passions for social and environmental justice. The coalition’s mission is to provide and advocate for equitable access to the outdoors. By focusing on inclusion, equity and diversity, the coalition has expanded the definition of the outdoors and introduced thousands of underrepresented Californians to the state’s many wild and green spaces.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE Diving into a new locale or connecting with a familiar space requires a healthy dose of curiosity and enough time to scratch the surface — which these days can be hard to come by. For some, like Olympic swimmer and Berkeley graduate Josh Prenot, it’s about being active. “Growing up on the central coast of California, I spent almost all of my free time outdoors, whether I was playing with my friends in the park or sitting in my backyard tree reading a book. With time, that love of the outdoors only grew as I began to enjoy hiking, cycling and mountaineering.” Others get involved in the community. As director of the California Outdoor Engagement Coalition, Jenny Mulholland-Beahrs works to expand equitable access to the outdoors. “We do this through advocating for policy changes that will impact all Californians; promoting equity, diversity and inclusion in the outdoors ​through various trainings, convenings and partnerships and collective impact initiatives.” Ecologist and photographer, Charles Post connects with the world through storytelling. “I realized that I didn’t actually want to be a scientist with a PhD but I wanted to tell stories about science and about the people who were inspiring me...the department gave me a master’s degree after three years and everybody said go do it. We need people in the world illuminating what we’re doing and celebrating our progress and finding ways to build bridges between academia and the general public.” Whether by winning an Olympic medal or helping others get outside, our Berkeley contributors work daily to inspire others to never stop exploring. 32 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

education, health

FUN FACT:

The Berkeley Lab has discovered 16 chemical elements, more than any other university in the world.


COLLIDE . 33

D COETZEE/CCFLICKR


BERKELEY

FOOD AND DRINK

Berkeley is a smorgasbord of options but everyone has a strong opinion about their favorites. Blondies fans will rip apart a Fat Slice devotee faster than you can order a top dog. But let’s skip the food wars and go straight to the most important meal of the day: coffee. Josh Prenot’s go-to? Artis Coffee on 4th street: “The absolute best coffee in the Bay Area. I always bring my thermos so I can keep enjoying my caffeine after I’ve hit the trail.” He also recommends grabbing a few slices from Gioia Pizzeria on Hopkins, or a burrito from Guacamole 61. For a healthy snack, Jenny Mulholland-Beahrs praises Brazilian Bread on Solano: “Amazing açai bowls, gluten-free cheese breads, sandwiches and salads.” Charles Post opted for Berkeley classics during his time at Cal: “The Cheese Board was fun to sit on the median and eat pizza. But I like Taste of Himalayas because it transported you out of college. I used to eat at I [International] house a lot, too.” If you happen to make your way across the bay and are in need of some fine artisanal products, Josh Prenot has the spot: “If I’ve been hiking around Point Reyes National Seashore, my favorite place to refuel is Tomales Bay Foods in Point Reyes Station. They have the best chicken I have ever tasted.”

BRAZILIAN BREAD

CHEESE BOARD

34 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

TOMALES BAY FOODS


COLLIDE . 35


BERKELEY

INDIAN ROCK 36 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

ROBERT JOHNSON

THE BAY AREA HAS SUCH A DIVERSE OFFERING OF OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES! THERE’S AWESOME BOULDERING RIGHT BY WHERE I LIVE IN THE BERKELEY HILLS. THERE’S GREAT SURFING AT OCEAN BEACH AND PACIFICA. THERE ARE BEAUTIFUL HIKING TRAILS ALL AROUND THE RIDGE LINES SURROUNDING THE BAY. MARIN IS THE BIRTHPLACE OF MOUNTAIN BIKING AND WORLDCLASS SKIING IS JUST A SHORT DRIVE AWAY. IT’S IMPOSSIBLE TO GET BORED HERE. — JOSH PRENOT


WHERE TO EXPLORE There are many reasons why people flock to the Bay Area and, in particular,

Berkeley: school, acceptance, delicious food, and as we covered, the outdoors. With so much to do, where does someone start? Josh Prenot recommends INGRID TAYLOR/CCFLICKR

The Dipsea Trail: “You get panoramic views of Stinson Beach, beautiful

shady wooded sections of trail and quite a good workout! The adjacent

Steep Ravine Trail is a good alternative — make sure to get a picture on the famous wood ladder.” For the climbers out there he suggests the well-known

Indian Rock or alternatively Cragmont Park: “There are fewer crowds, tons of good boulder and top rope routes, as well as a basketball court and a

Bay view.” For Berkeley staff member Jenny Mulholland-Beahrs, it’s all about

the views: “I love the loop trail in Tilden. It’s about three miles, has a good amount of elevation and takes you through a variety of scenery, including a

stream, meadow and vistas of the bay.” If you’re looking to stay on campus, she suggests the redwood grove just off Oxford and Center Streets. “It’s right next to downtown Berkeley, and offers an incredible and immediate

connection to the awe and beauty of nature. It’s the perfect respite when someone needs a quiet moment outdoors.” Berkeley alum Charles Post

turned to the network of trails behind campus during his college years. “I used to run up Strawberry Canyon all the time. Above Lawrence Livermore

there’s a great series of trails, and I spent a lot of time just poking around

JOHN MORGAN/CCFLICKR

Strawberry Creek eating lunch or to go on little walks.”

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graduate BERKELeY 38 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


COLLIDE . 39

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


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Berkeley has many hidden gems. You › just have to know where to look. With campus smack in the middle of town, it’s an obvious starting point. Josh Prenot recommends grabbing a coffee inside South Hall, heading to the PhysicsAstronomy Library in LeConte Hall and¨ § ¦ seeing the dinosaur bones inside the ¬ « Valley Life Sciences Building. Next up take a trek to the UC Botanical Garden near the California Memorial Stadium. For a meal Sunday morning, head to the craftsman-lined streets and find Thai Temple. According to Prenot, it’s “an absolute must-do if you’re in Berkeley on a Sunday. Eat delicious Thai food in the courtyard of a Thai place of worship.” For ¬ « some fun by the water Jenny MulhollandBeahrs suggests Cesar Chavez Park at ALAMEDA the Berkeley Marina: “Great for walking, running or wheeling (and kite flying!); you can also rent boats nearby!” █ n █ n

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BRIDGING THE GREAT DIVIDE: In Conversation with Storyteller

CHARLES POST By Gigie Hall

Divide cuts deep into the American psyche, despite the constant messaging our differences make us stronger. But really our differences can only make us stronger if we reach across the gaps — if we see the “other” as one of us. But in the current political climate, this task feels daunting. As the outdoors gains more exposure (because Planet Earth has really amped up its PR game), polarizing views on conservation make their way into public spheres that were once inhabited by only a knowledgeable and dedicated few. So how do we best reach across the proverbial aisle when the quick spread of disinformation has replaced face-to-face dialogue? The answer lies in storytelling. More specifically, good storytelling that builds upon a mixture of empathy and wisdom, so that we not only understand the motivations of someone we may disagree with, but we also learn about the larger context that generated those motivations. If there’s anyone who does this with both eloquence and insight, it’s ecologist and photographer Charles Post. Known for his large social following and beautifully written posts, Charles has worked diligently to inform the masses about both the little known and more popular ecosystems at risk. The Berkeley alum was once on track to be a PHD scientist, a path defined by making small, yet important impacts behind the closed doors of labs and in remote locations. Instead, Post took a leap of faith and pursued a different road. When I chatted with Charles, we discussed his journey, the impact Berkeley had on him as an ecologist and how he builds bridges today from his home in Montana. (Warning: as a Berkeley graduate myself, some reminiscing was in order.)

42 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


COLLIDE . 43


44 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


I know you grew up in Northern California. What is your history with Berkeley other than going to school there? I grew up in Marin county, just west of Berkeley. My mom was born and raised in

Marin, my grandparents moved there after the war, and their house looked straight

across at Berkeley. My grandfather is a sailor, and there’s always a pair of binoculars on the window sill. He always pointed out the Campanile and that’s where he went to college. He went there on the GI Bill, after the war. We were always around that

culture and there was definitely a legacy of Berkeley that is prominent in our family. Also growing up in Marin, we were exposed to music and arts and the Greek Theater

was a place we went to quite a bit as a kid. My first concert was a Beck concert. I don’t even know if that guy is still famous. Yeah, he is (laughs).

It didn’t really dawn on me that I was watching his music on a really special campus, but I guess in time it became more relevant as I grew up. My brother was going to

Berkeley and I remember just thinking how proud I was that he had gotten in and

how proud my family was that he was continuing the legacy that my grandfather had started. So I started taking summer school courses and was literally just walking into

labs on campus and knocking on doors until a professor or someone would open. I’d shake their hand and introduce myself and say, “Hey, I’m applying to transfer, I’m

It was kind of a weird feeling, because you get into a school like Berkeley and you kind

of beat the odds right? You’re constantly exposed to stress and expectations and the

difference between being an undergrad and being a graduate student, in my opinion, is that as an undergraduate you’re paying to be there. But as a graduate student,

you’re part of the institution. So there are all these variables that I think really puts

your life under a microscope and forces you to really think hard about why you’re doing what you’re doing and what’s the end goal, and every time I did that I realized

that I didn’t actually want to be a scientist, but I wanted to tell stories about science and about the people I was working with and the people who were inspiring me. As

that feeling sprouted over time, I reached out to my advisors and told them what

I was feeling and the feedback was amazing. They said, “Go do it! We need people out in the world helping us communicate our science. We need people in the world

illuminating what we’re doing and celebrating our progress and finding ways to build bridges between academia and the general public.” I was really nervous that I was

going to let people down. I was wading into the world, trying to create a job that didn’t exist, trying to do things that I hadn’t really found anybody else doing. It was

hard to find mentorship and find advice and obviously there are a million ways to

tell stories so you have to do a lot of soul searching through trial and error. I would definitely not be where I am today without Berkeley, and I would definitely not be where I am without the community that makes Berkeley what it is.

Do you feel that Cal has a unique perspective on ecology and conservation and

interested in ecology.” I only applied to Berkeley and I had this singular mission to

has that been integrated into what you do?

a creek in our backyard, fishing and hunting and really was intrigued by this idea of

that was focused on natural resources, grazing and forestry. I think a lot of people

get in and study ecology. For some reason or another they accepted me, and my first day of class, first course I took, was a fish ecology class. I had grown up in Marin with

I think Cal is really unique because it is a land grant institution. Cal started as a school

a young person. It just so happens that I take this course and the associate professor

just go a little north or a little east or even a little west, California gets pretty rural,

being a scientist and studying those places and species that I had fallen in love with as

was really young, energetic and it blew me away. She was just so relatable and so effective in the way she taught and she showed us this slideshow of her graduate students, and her as a graduate student doing field work in Alaska. She explained

to us that with a small stipend and salary, you can go travel the world as a field scientist, studying whatever organism sparks your interest. It was in that moment that I realized not only was science and the department at Berkeley inspiring me academically and intellectually, but there’s also this really exciting lifestyle that came with this.

I think the Berkeley community, professors and graduate students were just so

integral in supporting this curiosity. It was that first week that Stephanie hired me

as a field research assistant and I was getting paid 15 bucks an hour to work in her lab after school. It was that first taste of what being a scientist could be like and it felt empowering to be doing something that I loved and to be doing something that

I had consciously chosen to pursue. Berkeley was, from a personal perspective, such a great nursery for creativity and collaboration, and one of the things I really loved most about the community was the diversity of people.

who aren’t from California or don’t know how diverse the state is don’t realize if you

pretty quickly. I live in Montana now and I think people are quick to say, “You’re a

Berkeley ecologist, you’re pretty left, you’re probably pretty hippie,” or whatever the

prejudices are. But I would argue California, and Berkeley in particular, has a really unique blend of perspectives because the forefathers of Berkeley conservation set the stage for a lot of the questions and research that’s informing us today. So there

is a really famous legacy of people who shaped the way our country is managed and

understood from an ecology perspective. Not to mention we have some of the best professors on Earth studying and teaching there. But I think it’s unique. I taught as a

graduate student with Christopher Dow, who is a forester, and the only real cowboy

in the department. Where else can you have somebody, like Chris from farming and cattle country and me, a Marin kid who was probably the only kid in my high school

who grew up hunting and fishing? I think conservation is so often polarized today with

conversations around land use or wildlife hunting and fishing. They’ve historically been quite divided topics. Berkeley really taught me to not focus on the divide, but find those atypical bridges where you might have an unexpected partnership or a unique perspective through which you might better understand a situation.

You live in Montana now and in a way there have been two outdoors communities

I was boarding at Casa Zimbabwe, so I ate my meals there and in return for the

that have often been pitted against each other. How has living in a new place

house, and I had flowers for the house. And I spent so much time after school when I

I don’t think my perspective has changed at all. I think, if anything, I just see more

Looking back on it, I’m not sure if there’s a time that could come close to that, where

grizzly bears, wolves, Yellowstone, crazy winters and huge cattle ranches. People talk

meals and a small semester payment, I managed the rooftop garden. I had bees and

shifted your view of that polarization?

wasn’t in the lab, up on this rooftop garden and I got to meet people from all over the

clearly that there needs to be more effort made to strike a middle ground, because

I had probably eight or nine planter boxes with ripe fruits and vegetables for the

world studying everything from abstract algebra to Roman literature to linguistics. you’re exposed to so many different types of people. In our house we had great mathematicians, gay poetry majors, people from Norway, people from Asia, graduate

students, undergrads, and we’d all sit down at dinner and you could literally just pick your person and know that you’re going to learn about something that was so far removed from the things that you were familiar with or the life experiences you had.

our reality in Montana is so different than somebody’s reality in Chico. We have about wildlife management and you can’t even come close to comparing California with Montana. There’s more people in San Francisco than the entire state of Montana. So while Berkeley people might have preconceived opinions about people in Montana

and vice-a-versa, I think what people need to realize is that we’re all American but

our life experiences are so different. When we talk about conservation or talk about COLLIDE . 45


the way land should be used, people really need to think about space and time.

a positive thing, but I also think at the end of the day, there’s probably not that many

conversation now. But I think in a roundabout way, my education and life experience

It’s hard because it’s a passionate social issue that requires a hard science

Where are we talking about? And how is that place today? Because Yellowstone has changed dramatically since wolves were reintroduced, and that’s a whole different

— maybe a dozen — that have formal training.

has really aided me in being committed to finding that middle ground and help people

backing. You cannot separate the two. I think social media might spark

It’s been really rewarding because I’m working with companies in Montana who are

that responsibility fall on consumers or does it fall on brands?

But historically, there’s been so much finger-pointing and so many assumptions made

My biggest grudge is toward brands and peers who I know are talented, smart and

realize that we have a lot more in common. So I think Montana hasn’t changed me at

someone’s interest, but we can’t control the next step. An image might inspire

all. If anything, it’s just helped me be louder or more confident in the way I see things.

someone to go outside but it might not inspire them to learn or go deeper. Does

can engage with people around mutual respect, then people can have conversations.

I think it falls on the shoulders of thoughtful individuals who see what’s happening.

member is probably really similar to someone from Bozeman who’s an REI member.

adventure story, what does that do for the world? What does that do for public lands?

very open and excited about sharing content that’s more middle of the road. If you that are just unfair and propagate the divide. Somebody from Berkeley who’s an REI

Do you think that is your greatest challenge as a storyteller, especially one that has a large social following? Do you think that your challenge is to get across that middle ground? A lot of the topics that I think historically propagate divide like bears, wolves or wild

horses, I’m drawn to, because I feel like those are areas where there’s room for the most progress. But it’s hard taking on topics that you know when you do, people will

hate you. So I haven’t really dove head first into any of those topics as far as some

people have. It adds another element to storytelling because you’re not just worried about “Am I doing a good job of being a reporter or doing a good job at making a film?”

I certainly spend quite a bit of time talking about light things, but I think Berkeley taught me to do thorough research and that’s one of the greatest things an institution

have the platform and voice. I look at them and say, “No offense, you’re telling an What does that do for conservation?” Time and again, we see society rewarding

people for hiking something quickly or skiing some bad-ass line and I look at them and think if we change the currency of storytelling and if we’re celebrating somebody

who almost kills themselves while dragging pounds of gear for sixty days across the ice, then we’re missing an opportunity to instead tell society, “Hey, look at the person who did that, but they’re collecting ice samples to inform climate change.”

You don’t need a PhD to collect some ice. I think it’s really the brands and the people of influence who are missing the mark because we’re propagating this moment in

time where people are being praised for a photo of somebody jumping into a lake. A million people following you and that’s what you’re going to put out in the world?

We’re obsessed with the Alex Honnolds of the world, not that he doesn’t do work in his own right. People are obsessed with physical feats in places that

like Berkeley does for people. It teaches us how to think and how to really get out

look as magical as Yosemite without looking at how overcrowded Yosemite is

do that research and put in dozens of hours into those posts or stories and still there

Yosemite is a great point! Yosemite is dead from an ecology perspective. There are

Do you think that people who interact with the outdoors in a variety of ways

there’s too many people and the people scare away the mountain lions and bears that

there and do our homework and that’s really what my work, my films and my social

or what that brings to Yosemite when we show these pictures. It’s complicated.

are going to be thousands of uniformed people saying things that are completely off

four million dead trees in the park, there’s a loss of oak tree recruitment, which is the

media leans on — an extensive amount of research. I feel confident in that. So when I the mark, it can be a little disheartening. It gives you a little bit of anxiety.

— whether as an enthusiast, as part of a brand or an athlete — should have a baseline knowledge of ecology and science so that they can more effectively interact with the outdoors? I often feel like most people on social media love the outdoors but they may not have a knowledge or deeper understanding of what’s going on.

main food for a lot of animals, because there’s too many deer in the valley, because

prey on the deer. One of my friends who’s a park ranger, said it so perfectly: “Yosemite is the sacrificial land of public lands.” We’ve literally loved Yosemite to death and maybe it’s doing a good job of getting people outside, but that place is so far from wild. Before long there won’t even be waterfalls there because there’s no perennial snowpack.

Is that sacrifice worth it? That is probably my biggest grudge against the outdoor community. That is my

north star every day. The number of people who think because they hiked the PCT

If we sacrifice Yosemite, maybe we can save these huge swaths of wild landscapes.

a hunter, it just comes with the license. Hiking the PCT and being an ambassador

Yosemite as the vehicle to at least start the conversation and use social media and

(Pacific Crest Trail), they understand ecology, conservation or even hunting! This doesn’t mean you’re not making a conscious choice to support conservation if you’re or having 80,000 followers doesn’t make you informed and it doesn’t make you an authority on the topic. There’s a difference between just yelling to be heard and yelling something that has tangible action associated with it and facts supporting it. I think

it takes power away from people who are experts. It muddies the waters because you have this phenomenon on social media where there’s an issue and everybody is

just regurgitating the same thing. Public land is inherently dynamic. A piece of public

land in Nevada is totally different than a piece of public land in Minnesota. There’s different social, political, environmental, climate issues affecting that space. Different threats, different constituents, different history.

For society to continue forward, we need half the planet dedicated as wilderness area, marine and terrestrial, so I think it’s a step in the right direction. We can use use storytelling and use content to push the needle a little further. I have a lot of optimism in that sense. Like you said, there are people on social media who have a

million followers who post a picture of Yosemite and there are dead trees in the photo and they say, “Look at the autumn colors.” How do we get that person to realize that they’re photographing a dying forest? Because it changes the message from “That’s beautiful” to “This place we love so much is literally dying before our eyes and we don’t even see it.” So that’s the million dollar question.

It is. How do we make our storytelling more nuanced as a collective?

It’s confusing because the first step to being informed is being aware and I think

I think there’s always a voice to use. When I make a post, who am I catering to?

become informed stewards one day. So I can’t help but look at this surge of interest as

think more? Or is it something where I just make a post and say something really

there’s a lot of people that would lead you to believe that they’re taking that first step by engaging with the topic. We need people to get outside if we hope that they’ll 46 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

Am I catering to somebody who wants to read all the nerdy stuff and bolster their

knowledge and prime my stories for criticism which is great because it helps me


simplified? It’s that give-and-take with your audience. Sometimes I ask myself, do

or California or Iowa, every fall and spring millions of birds are flying overhead. It’s

because I enjoy writing it and I enjoy the few people who engage with it. But we’re

to look or how to look because our society is moving away from that. But I probably

people even read anymore? Instagram allows 4,000 words for the copy. I’ll bet you

one percent of my audience reads everything that I write, which is fine. I write it

turning into such a world satiated by ten seconds of content and then we move on. It’s a hard thing.

So how do people who are living in an urban environment, commuting to work, have a 9 to 5 — how do we encourage people in that kind of space to acquire a more nuanced view of their environment? I hope that my social media and the things that I put up there are an invitation to

learn more. There’s a ton of information out there that I think is intimidating. People

just one of those things where if you know where to look and how to look, you’ll start seeing those elements of wildness. I think increasingly we don’t know where

get between 10 and 15 emails or messages a week from people — young biologists,

undergraduates, graduate students, adults who are like, “I’m a biology student and I

want to get a job in this. Or I’m trying to figure out how to do this in ecology. Or I’m

trying to build a portfolio in bird photography.” There’s a huge group of people who are stoked on that way of life and thinking, so it’s definitely rewarding to know that it’s out there.

Yeah I think what you do is, about building bridges without losing nuance. It’s about making something accessible without losing its wildness. Its both things

don’t know where to look or what’s real or true. I think putting a brand behind

all the time.

threads of wildness all around us. If you live in New York City, Dallas or San Francisco

Charles Post recently released Sky Migrations, a project documenting birds of

hills where they closed the roads. You could live in one of the most urban places in

about wild horses. Keep up with Charles at charlespost.com and on instagram

reporting, like I’ve done on social media, is one way to make that whole process more

comfortable and familiar. I also think people should remember that there’s these there’s Peregrine Falcons that live in the skyscrapers that hunt pigeons. People just

prey in the American west. It was an official selection at the 5 Point Adventure

the country and watch 2,000 salamanders crawling out of the forest to go migrate

@charles_post.

don’t think to look up. In Berkeley, there’s a salamander migration in the Berkeley

Film Festival, among others. He is currently working on a documentary film

to breed in winter. This last film we made, Sky Migrations, is all about birds of prey

migrating through our cities and across our country. So whether you live in Texas

COLLIDE . 47


city guide

CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA AS TOLD BY:

LARA GASTINGER SYDNEY HALLEMAN HIGH TOR GEAR RIVANNA RIVER COMPANY


CHARLOTTESVILLE TOURISM BOARD

Tucked in the verdant Virginian countryside lies the college town of Charlottesville. Some argue whether it’s a big town or a small city, but they can’t deny that it’s a special place: it regularly ranks in the top five places to live in the U.S. Natural beauty abounds with the Rivanna River flowing through town and the Blue Ridge Mountains overlooking the region. Gazing at the spectacular scenery, it’s easy to see why more than one Founding Father chose to call Charlottesville home. The historic architecture of the University of Virginia and brick-laden streets of downtown are steeped in American heritage. But make no mistake: C’Ville is undeniably contemporary, too. With a recent influx of musicians and artists, the city keeps a pulse on all things cool but with laid-back vibes. Charlottesville is also on the forefront of the region’s culinary vanguard, fusing and updating southern classics. There is no shortage of activities with the Shenandoah National Park as the city’s backyard. With a solid music scene, burgeoning breweries and vineyards, and the outdoors calling, wouldn’t you want to live here, too?

COLLIDE . 49


CHARLOTTESVILLE

At a Glance

Meet Your Charlottesville Guides

FOUNDED IN: 1762

HIGH TOR GEAR (ERIN AND SETH)

In early 2018, this power couple brought a baby and a brand new company into the world. High Tor Gear Exchange is geared (pun intended) towards getting people to go outside for less than the usual cost. The company highlights the wonder of a circular economy by obtaining used gear and re-selling it for a reasonable price. The system helps to reduce waste by highlighting the beauty of consignment and conscious consumption. The couple donates one percent of their sales to Piedmont Environmental Council, a group that is working on urban greenways-connecting cities with outdoor avenues.

POPULATION: 43k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES: healthcare, education

LARA GASTINGER

Lara Gastinger is an artist and botanical illustrator based in Charlottesville, Virginia. Her art focuses on creating hyper-realistic images of flora, inspired by the processes and cycles of growth, decay and rebirth found in the natural world. She has most recently been working as the Chief Illustrator at the Flora of Virginia Project.

RIVANNA RIVER COMPANY

Husband and wife team Gabe and Sonya founded the Rivanna River Company in 2015 as Charlottesville’s first paddlesports outfitting service. They started the company to share their love of playing in the outdoors and to help connect Charlottesville with its beautiful river. They are dedicated to making adventures on the water inviting and accessible to people from all backgrounds. With many years of experience as outdoor educators and a lifetime of enthusiasm for playing on the water, they provide friendly advice, skills instruction and educational programs.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT SYDNEY HALLEMAN

Sydney Halleman is an assistant guide at Greenstone Adventures, a guide for University of Virginia’s Outdoor Recreation group, and the Gear Master of the UVA Outdoors Club. With these organizations, Halleman shares her love of the outdoors with local youth and curious students. She helps people find passion for the outdoors through team building exercises centered around climbing, backpacking, mountain biking and hiking. In addition to her outdoors expertise, she is a pre-law student at the University of Virginia.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE Our Charlottesville guides all share an affinity for nature from a young age. Lara Gastinger grew up near the Chesapeake Bay and remembers “exploring in the water and looking at crabs, snails and plants. Those early memories of exploring nature were the basis for my love and curiosity of nature today. Growing up surrounded by the rivers, mountains, coast and four beautiful seasons we experience in Virginia, I guess it’s natural to begin a life-long love affair with the natural world.” For Sydney Halleman, early memories of the outdoors are connected to her family. “My dad would take me mountain biking, hiking and surfing every day,” she says, “Being surrounded by the grand beauty of the Pacific from an early age definitely ingrained that awesome respect for the outdoors into me.” Natives Gabe and Sonya Silver of Rivanna River Co. say their love of nature compelled them to not only become protectors, but business owners, too. “[We] believe that direct experience in nature cultivates a desire to protect the places in which you play. In my work in watershed conservation outreach, I’d noticed that local outfitters, when run by folks with a heart for conservation, served as an important part of developing a wide-spread constituency for saving rivers. We decided that entrepreneurship was the most effective (and exciting) way for us to engage, and took the leap into starting the company in 2015.” Living in Charlottesville has helped our contributors sustain that love for nature. “There are so many things to do outdoors that are just within arm’s reach here,” says High Tor Gear. With trails connecting the city to state parks, wineries and wild rivers, maybe the ease of access to the magnificent outdoors helps fuel Charlottesville’s spirit of adventure. As outdoor guide Sydney Halleman puts it, “I want to see all that nature has to offer and experience that raw power and force that simply being in awesome nature allows us. Why not ride that insane downhill mountain biking route? Why not hike that magnificent waterfall loop or summit that mountain? Why not climb that multipitch route in West Virginia, just to catch the sunset at the top?”

50 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

FUN FACT:

University of Virginia (founded by Thomas Jefferson) is the only world heritage site university.


COLLIDE . 51

SANJAY SUCHAK


CHARLOTTESVILLE

I’D SAY WE’VE COME TO UNDERSTAND ‘ADVENTURE’ AS A WAY OF LIFE THAT HAPPENS ANYWHERE, ANYTIME. THE ADVENTUROUS LIFE, JUST LIKE ANY SPECIFIC OUTDOOR ADVENTURE, INVOLVES SOME KEY COMMITMENTS; IT’S ABOUT TAKING RISKS, BEING TRUE TO WHAT YOU BELIEVE, MAINTAINING A SENSE OF HUMOR IN CHALLENGING CIRCUMSTANCES AND CULTIVATING AN OPENNESS TO BEING SURPRISED BY BEAUTY AND THE WILD, WHEREVER YOU FIND YOURSELF. — RIVANNA RIVER COMPANY

VU NOODLES AT THE SPOT

52 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


STARCITY SKYCAMS

FOOD AND DRINK

BLUE MOUNTAIN BREWERY

After a day of outdoor activities, you’re bound to grow an appetite and Charlottesville’s culinary scene does not disappoint. If you’re making your way back from Shenandoah, make a pit stop at Blue Mountain Brewery or Pro-Renata for a beer and a picture-perfect view of the mountains, says Lara Gastinger. High Tor Gear has recommendations for joints closer to town. Lean back and chow down on local fare at neighborhood hang, Beer Run or grab a quick fresh bite at Barbie’s Burrito Barn. Sonya and Gabe’s favorite tavern Firefly offers up delicious grub and arcade games. Guide Sydney Halleman tipped us off to Charlottesville’s well-kept secret The Spot. “It’s literally one booth, but the owners are so kind and the Vietnamese food that they serve is incredible. Most of their food is vegan too!” For a caffeine jolt, Sydney Halleman and High Tor Gear agree that Milli Joe near the downtown mall will get you going. “If you really want to start the day out right,” High Tor Gear suggests trying “a Morning Muffin from Paradox Pastry!”

ADVENTURE IS THE APPRECIATION OF LIFE. — SYDNEY HALLEMAN

PARADOX PASTRY

COLLIDE . 53


GRADUATE CHARLOTTESVILLE's gameroom 54 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


COLLIDE . 55

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


WHERE TO EXPLORE

THERESA WHITE

When it comes to outdoor activities, Charlottesville is a choose-yourown-adventure of options. But with biking, hiking, canoeing and climbing, where to begin? Our guide Lara Gastinger recommends starting with a hike at Big Meadows in Shenandoah National Park. Another option closer to town that Sonya, Gabe and Lara all love: the Rivanna Trail. “[It] meanders around the city and has some really lovely and quiet trails that can make you feel removed from traffic and the busy days,” Lara says. For a dose of architecture, history and nature, head to Thomas Jefferson’s historic home, Monticello. Road and mountain bikers, put O-Hill on your list. Conveniently situated in town, it features a mix of climbs and tracks and it’s a go-to for beginners and experts, alike. For “rolling hills, friendly cows, gorgeous scenery and a winery or two” cycle out to the neighboring areas of Batesville, Free Union, Earlysville and Dyke, says High Tor Gear. Charlottesville is also a renowned rock climbing destination. According to Sydney Halleman, “Love Gap is small but offers stunning views of the Blue Ridge Mountains at the top of most of its routes and Goshen Pass offers some cool potential overhanging routes. Both are great for all levels provided that someone experienced comes along with you!” Indoor climbers can project fresh boulder problems at Rocky Top.

IT HAS BEEN REALLY EXCITING AND REWARDING TO WATCH THINGS THAT ONE PERSON NO LONGER NEEDS BECOME JUST WHAT SOMEONE ELSE IS LOOKING FOR. THERE ARE KAYAKS, BIKES, JACKETS, HIKING BOOTS, TENTS, SLEEPING BAGS, YOU NAME IT, LIVING IN PEOPLE’S CLOSETS AND HOUSES RIGHT NOW, NOT BEING USED, AND PEOPLE SEEM GENUINELY EXCITED TO EITHER GIVE THEIR ITEMS A NEW HOME, OR TO BE THE NEW HOME FOR THOSE ITEMS. WE ARE SO EXCITED TO BE PROVIDING THIS OPPORTUNITY IN OUR COMMUNITY. — ERIN, HIGH TOR GEAR

56 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


BRENT MCGUIRT

SANJAY SUCHAK

NATURE IS MY CONSTANT MUSE AND WHENEVER I AM IN A CREATIVE OR EMOTIONAL RUT, A WALK IN NATURE PROVIDES THE INSPIRATION AND SOMETIMES EVEN A BOTANICAL SPECIMEN TO GET BACK ON TRACK. NATURE CHANGES EACH MOMENT AND NEVER CEASES TO INSPIRE AND MOTIVATE ME. — LARA GASTINGER

HUMPBACK ROCK

COLLIDE . 57


BERKELEY ATHENS

MONTICELLO

TUNING INTO OUR SURROUNDINGS CAN REALLY QUIET THE CONSTANT MIND CHATTER. JUST BEING OUTSIDE FOR A LITTLE BIT HAS A REALLY SOOTHING AND QUIETING EFFECT ON THE MIND AND THE BODY. KHALIL GIBRAN IMPLORES US TO ‘FORGET NOT THAT THE EARTH DELIGHTS TO FEEL YOUR BARE FEET AND WINDS LONG TO PLAY WITH YOUR HAIR,’ AND I FEEL LIKE HIS WORDS ARE A REMINDER OF THE JOY THAT OUR COMMUNING WITH NATURE CAN BRING US. — HIGH TOR GEAR

JLOONEY

LANDMARK TOUR


Walk back through American history from the University of Virginia, designed in part by Thomas Jefferson and honored as a World Heritage Site, to the architect’s very own home, Monticello. Take in the view at Carter’s Mountain, “[it] paints the picture of two geographic regions in Virginia. Look east for the Piedmont Plain, west for the Blue Ridge”, says Gabe and Sonya. Heritage meets modernity on the bricklined streets of Downtown Mall where you’ll find vogue boutiques and craft beers. Lighten the mood by snapping a selfie with the “Love Butt” statue at Ix Art Park.


city guide

IOWA CITY IOWA

AS TOLD BY:

BRIAN MILDENSTEIN DAVID CONRADS TAMRA ELLIOTT ELLEN CARMAN


TONY WEBSTER

At first glance, Iowa City may not have the most eclectic exterior, but the college town has an abundance of both outdoor and intellectual offerings up its sleeve. While images of unending corn fields might come to mind, there’s more to this Midwest picture than meets the eye. As student Ellen Carman notes, “Outdoor adventurers in Iowa don’t take any natural space for granted.” For those willing to look harder, the rewards range from river adventures to a step back in time, almost 375 million years. At the Devonian Fossil Gorge, visitors can marvel at the fossilized ocean floor that was revealed after massive flooding in the early ‘90s. Peel back even more layers, and you’ll notice an abundance of wildlife that thrive at the many parks and reserves that surround the city. On a more academic note, Iowa City may best be known as a literary paradise. Home to the famed Iowa Writers’ Workshop, the city was designated a UNESCO City of Literature back in 2008, the only city of its kind in North America. Plus it’s probably one of the only places where students can live in a converted Carnegie library. It’s clear that within the state, Iowa City is the cultural capital, rivaling bigger Midwest cities with its nightly lineup of concerts, lectures and delicious culinary options. From aspiring writers to burgeoning explorers, this Midwest gem is a creative spirit’s dream.

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IOWA CITY

Meet Your Iowa City Guides DAVID CONRADS

David Conrads fell in love with the Midwestern natural landscape as an undergrad, and he’s been following that passion ever since. Specializing in the biology of birds of prey, Conrads first came to the University in 1990 to oversee the Iowa Raptor Project. Today, Conrads is focused on sharing his love of nature and inspiring responsible recreation as the Associate Director of Outdoor Education and Recreation at UI. Those in his programs enjoy easy access to some of the most beautiful land in the Midwest at the Macbride Nature Recreation Area. It is a true wildlife haven free from development or crowding. As Conrads says, “The back fields and land have been called ‘Narnia’ by some locals…due to its sense of being in another world because of the minimal usage by others.”

TAMRA ELLIOTT

Born and raised in Iowa City, Tamra Elliott has been interested in conservation since an early age. During her childhood, Elliott visited the Macbride Nature Recreation Area (MNRA) every summer, and now as an adult, manages the land. A unique ecosystem, the MNRA requires special care of its trails, infrastructures, rare plant species and natural resources. Elliott expertly balances both the needs of the land and human recreation, specifically by tackling the issue of non-native invasive plants. By using natural processes like fire and removal by hand, the MNRA and the prairie areas within it are seeing huge improvement. Elliott also works with the University of Iowa research projects, the Wildlife Camps, School of the Wild and the Iowa Raptor Project.

At a Glance FOUNDED IN: 1839

POPULATION: 74k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES:

renewable energy, education, manufacturing

BRIAN MILDENSTEIN

In 1968, Roger and Linda Mildenstein opened up Fin & Feather with just four employees in a small shop in town. In the 50 years since its opening, the store has grown, as did their son right alongside it. Working in the store since he was a kid, Brian Mildenstein thanks his parents for introducing him to the outdoors and says they were “instrumental in teaching me about communing with nature. I loved to fish and hunt with my dad. My mom was great at getting me on a bike and inspiring me to ride where I needed to go. They both furthered other interests, like backpacking and canoeing.” In the late ‘90s he became a full-time employee and in 2013 spearheaded the opening of Fin’s sister business Fin & Feather H2O. Enjoying a wide range of outdoor pursuits, Brian continues to explore all that Iowa has to offer.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT ELLEN CARMAN

Born and raised in Iowa City, Ellen Carman is a staple of the University of Iowa outdoor community. As an avid climber, backpacker, and all around outdoorswoman, Ellen’s sense for adventure has found her leading University of Iowa expeditions to parks across the country, founding inaugural women’s climbing clinics, and counseling young students as they discover the outdoors in the University of Iowa Wildlife Camps. Whether going for a short day trip, or an extended adventure, Ellen knows the ins and outs of the Iowa outdoors.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE

One of the biggest lessons one can glean from the world of conservation is that people have to better understand something to care for it. Once someone sees a place and interacts with it, they’re more likely to fight for its protection. This process is something all of our contributors can relate to. As the Associate Director of Outdoor Recreation & Education at the University of Iowa, David Conrads knows from experience what education can do. “Even in so-called ‘flyover country,’ we have some pretty amazing and diverse wildlife and wild areas. When an undergraduate professor opened my eyes to this, it turned my whole career path towards the wild,” he says. “In my role at the University of Iowa, I try to encourage those same experiences with our students and community — to open their eyes to the wild as well.” Tamra Elliott had a similar experience, but at a younger age. “My parents sent me to the University of Iowa Wildlife Camps at Macbride Nature Recreation Area every summer as a kid,” she says. “Through the camps, I learned about the natural world and that it was okay to step off the beaten path. It was an easy decision for me even at an early age that I would do something with conservation as a career...I know the importance of the experiences I had at the camps as a child and now I get to be a part of that all while doing what I love.” For Brian Mildenstein, growing up in an outdoor gear shop allowed him to “live vicariously through the adventures of customers.” Now as a full time employee, Brian works to keep the family business running, always with a core mission in mind. “It all comes back to the outdoors,” he says. “Our mission is to help our customers solve problems and find the right products that enhance their experiences. We exemplify this in the community in multiple ways — mostly by providing a place for the outdoor community to come together and by giving back, not only to outdoor organizations, but also to community organizations and local schools.” As a leader at the university’s Wildlife Camps, recent grad Ellen Carman discovered that learning is a two way street. “Kids have a way of noticing things that adults don’t. I am amazed by what my campers know. From bird calls to bugs, I am always learning something new! They notice the smallest things and ask the biggest questions. Exploring with my campers helped me grow my own knowledge and passion for the outdoors.” Whether as educators, or those gearing up future leaders in the outdoors, it’s clear our contributors work tirelessly to pass on the knowledge and passion that sparked a lifelong love of nature and adventure.

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FUN FACT:

The University of Iowa became the first public university to admit men and women on an equal basis


TONY WEBSTER

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IOWA CITY

FOOD AND DRINK Fueled by the demand from University students (and their parents) as well as notable politicians who make their way to the state for the Iowa Caucuses, Iowa City has a notable food scene. From farm-totable newbies to old school Midwestern fare, the city — and especially downtown — has a bar or restaurant on every block. But you can’t talk food in Iowa City and not mention Hamburg Inn No. 2, one of the oldest and most beloved Iowan restaurants. Serving up classic diner comfort food, the place has counted numerous presidents among its customers, including Barack Obama, Bill Clinton and Ronald Reagan. If you want to start your day off right, then Brian Mildenstein recommends Cortado: “It not only has a great vibe and view of the Pentacrest, but also great coffee.” For a downtown option, Tamra Elliott suggests heading to Prairie Lights Books & Cafe, while Ellen Carman goes for High Ground Café. David Conrads prefers Capanna Coffee and for a hearty meal, he recommends SugaPeach Chicken & Fish Fry or Red’s Alehouse. Ellen Carman chooses Short’s Burgers & Shine and for Tamra Elliott, it has to be Big Grove Brewery: “There’s always something cool going on there and they have a nice patio which you can sit around a fire and relax at.” Brian Mildenstein shares his two favorites best enjoyed after a long day on the water. “Go to George’s for a beer and a cheeseburger (or two) and Pagliai’s for the best pizza in town. Both are Iowa CIty institutions and are consistently delicious.”

RED'S ALEHOUSE

THE OPPORTUNITIES YOU HAVE AROUND IOWA CITY ARE GREAT BECAUSE THERE ARE SO MANY NATURAL AREAS. NO MATTER WHAT YOUR COMFORT LEVEL IS, I FEEL LIKE YOU CAN FIND SOMETHING TO MATCH.

— TAMRA ELLIOTT

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HAMBURG INN NO. 2

SUGAPEACH CHICKEN & FISH FRY

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IOWA CITY

PEOPLE ARE ALWAYS SURPRISED BY ALL OF THE OUTDOOR OFFERINGS IN IOWA. THE RURAL IOWA ROADS ARE GREAT FOR GRAVEL BIKE RIDES. STAND UP PADDLEBOARD YOGA IS MEDITATIVE AGAINST THE BACKDROP OF AN IOWA SUNSET. RUNNING ON ROLLING IOWA HILLS IS A GREAT WORKOUT AND IOWA CLIMBERS DON’T LET LESS THAN PERFECT CONDITIONS STOP THEM FROM GETTING OUT ON OUR LIMESTONE CLIFFS. — ELLEN CARMAN

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WE HAVE GREAT RIVERS FOR CANOEING AND KAYAKING, GREAT CLIMBING SPOTS AN HOUR AWAY AND NUMEROUS LANDS FOR HIKING, BIRDING, MOUNTAIN BIKING, AND JUST ABOUT ANY OUTDOOR PURSUIT YOU CAN IMAGINE. — DAVID CONRADS

WHERE TO EXPLORE Located along the Iowa River, Iowa City’s outdoor options are defined by the water that runs through it, wooded preserves and stunning geological features. David Conrads, Tamra Elliott and Ellen Carman recommend the Macbride Nature Recreation Area. “There is a large variety of trails to hike, the wildlife is abundant and the area is quiet,” says Elliott. “I love the big oaks that we have and there are many places along the way to stop and enjoy the views of the lake. There’s water at the shelters throughout the park for refilling your water bottle and you can visit the birds of prey at the Iowa Raptor Project as a reward after a long hike.” She also recommends the Macbride Spillway for its waterfalls and streams as well as Palisades Kepler State Park: “The views of the bluffs over the Cedar River are amazing.” Brian Mildenstein notes that, “the thing about the outdoors in the Midwest and Iowa in particular, is that the beauty is more subtle. We don’t have mountains, oceans or other obvious outdoor draws, but that doesn’t define us.” If you’re in town and don’t have much time he suggests Ryerson Woods or Hickory Hill. Or if you need to get on the water, he says, “head to Fin & Feather H2O for paddling. I like all of these places because they’re in the city limits of Iowa City and extremely accessible.” For more water adventure Ellen Carman recommends paddle boarding on Sand Lake at Terry Trueblood Recreation Area: “You don’t need your own board, you can rent one there! This lake is also a great place to go ice skating on cold winter days.”

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RICHMOND

LANDMARK TOUR

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The University is undoubtedly the city’s hub, and makes for the perfect base from which to explore both on foot and bike. First stop would be the University’s Museum of Natural History where you’ll be greeted by Rusty the Giant Sloth! If you’re up for a quick workout, check out the climbing wall at the Campus Recreation and Wellness Center. Next head south on foot and you’ll hit the Pedestrian Mall which features painted benches, outdoor pianos, great shopping and restaurants. Next up is the haunted Oakland Cemetery where you can visit the Black Angel, a nine foot tall monument whose change in color has been the source of many legends. Counter to this rather spooky landmark is another statue that’s more a hilarious roadside attraction. At 20 feet tall, the Sitting Man is a 110 ton limestone sculpture of a massive man sitting on a bench. Overlooking the Iowan countryside, the walk out to the sculpture makes for a lovely stroll. Drive 30 minutes north and you’ll drive across the Sutliff Bridge. Built in the late 1800s, it’s a large historic truss bridge that spans the Cedar River. Pro tip from our contributor Tamra Elliott: “Bring some cash and you can get food at the tavern. [It] has an awesome porch to eat on or there are picnic tables on the bridge.” Last but not least are the Amana Colonies, 40 minutes west. A national historic landmark, the colonies are one of America’s longestlived communal societies. A group of seven villages, they were founded by a group of German immigrants escaping religious persecution. Today it’s a thriving community, plucked from another era. COLLIDE . 69


city guide

LINCOLN NEBRASKA AS TOLD BY:

GRIFFIN MIMS GAGE MRUZ JORDAN MESSERER


CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Sprawling out in the midst of lightly rolling prairie and rustling green cornfields is Nebraska’s capital city, Lincoln. “People imagine Nebraska from what they see driving through on I-80: corn and agriculture,” but Jordan Messerer counters, “If you leave the I-80 you would discover the beauty of Nebraska and the Great Plains.” As Griffin Mims’ words illustrate, “The cornfields themselves are a beauty to behold, especially in the fall when the corn is swaying underneath the soft breeze, and the sun is setting magnificently across the entire sky.” It’s not hard to imagine the covered wagons and pioneers traversing the wild salt marshes or the fierce Plains Indians hunting the buffalo herds that once roamed the valley. Or even before that, the raptors, tyrannosaurs and mammoths who prowled here. Today’s residents are decidedly more modern and surprisingly global. In this refugee-friendly city, over 50 languages can be heard in the streets and cuisine from Vietnam, Burma and Sudan can be found. Arts and culture flourishes, with a roster of solid music venues, theatres and art galleries. Nebraskans have dubbed their capital the “Second City”, but in our opinion, it’s first-rate.

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LINCOLN

At a Glance FOUNDED IN:

Meet Your Lincoln Guides

1867

POPULATION: 280k

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT GRIFFIN MIMS

Griffin Mims was raised with a love for the outdoors and is a Park Ambassador for the Kearney Parks and Recreation group. He spends his free time kayaking local bodies of water and climbing at the Outdoor Adventure Center on the University of Nebraska campus, where he studies Communications.

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT GAGE MRUZ

Gage Mruz serves as a Sustainability Specialist at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Office of Sustainability. He is currently pursuing an Environmental Studies degree and plans to launch an environmental and leadership consulting business to guide companies toward increasing their overall sustainability.

JORDAN MESSERER

Jordan Messerer is the Assistant Director of the Outdoor Adventures group at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. Messerer studied business at UNL in the 1990s. After several unfulfilling years at a traditional 9-to-5, he returned to UNL and began leading outdoor excursions with the Outdoor Adventures station. Messerer loves everything about the outdoors, but is most passionate about kayaking and biking.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE Lincoln’s defining natural element just may be its flatness. But don’t mistake flat for boring. This feature makes the region a biking paradise. As Jordan Messerer says, “It is hard to beat the 131 miles of bike trails within the city of Lincoln. These trails provide access to some of the great eateries, breweries and parks within Lincoln… you could ride to Kansas and Omaha (minus 10 miles of the Mopac this side of the Platte River)”. For Gage Mruz, the geography has altered his perspective: “Lincoln’s landscapes allow you to really appreciate the little things. You are much more likely to stop and fully admire a patch of flowers, a family of ducks or maybe even an unusual tree during your travels in Lincoln compared to the sometimes cluttered mountain ranges out west or the tropical forests in the southern hemisphere.” And then there are the sunsets. According to Griffin Mims, “The great thing about living in a flat state is that there is nothing that interferes with the setting of the sun.” Gage Mruz adds that “[it] stretches for miles and consumes your field of vision in its entirety.”

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MAJOR INDUSTRIES:

locomotives, insurance, flour and feed milling, grain storage, diversified manufacturing.

FUN FACT:

Originally called Lancaster, the city was renamed Lincoln in memory of Abraham Lincoln following his assassination.


CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

I BEST PRACTICE ADVENTURE BY CONSCIOUSLY RECOGNIZING THE UNIQUENESS OF SITUATIONS AS WELL AS FINDING OUT WHAT I DON’T KNOW, AND EXPLORING IT. — GAGE MRUZ

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LINCOLN

FOOD AND DRINK

I WAS FORTUNATE TO BE RAISED AS A “FREE-RANGE” CHILD IN RURAL AMERICA WHERE THERE WERE FOREST AND LAKES. I HAD TWO MODES OF TRANSPORTATION THAT STILL PLAY A MAJOR ROLE IN MY LIFE TODAY. ONE, I HAD A BIKE THAT ALLOWED ME TO TRAVEL THE LOCAL RIVERS AND LAKES TO FISH. I WAS ALSO FORTUNATE THAT MY OLDER BROTHERS BUILT SOME WOOD-FRAMED/CLOTH COVERED KAYAKS FROM PLANS OUT OF POPULAR MECHANIC’S IN THE EARLY ’70S. THESE KAYAKS PROVIDED HOURS OF ENTERTAINMENT WITH FRIENDS AND ACCESS TO THE RIVERS AND LAKES. – JORDAN MESSERER 74 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

THE MILL COFFEE & TEA

CLINTON COLLINS

All our guides direct coffee drinkers to The Mill Coffee & Tea. Let their savvy baristas whip you up a latte to savor while you answer some emails and people-watch. They'll even help you select a bag of beans to take home. If your stomach is growling, Jordan Messerer recommends the tacos at Mexican hole-in-the-wall Taqueria El Rey and for another coffee option, Cultiva. “I enjoy the artistry of the fresh roasted coffee bean and espresso shot at Cultiva Lab's for my bike ride into work each morning,” says Messerer. Gage Mruz tipped us to local favorite Yia Yia’s Pizza and Beer. Hunker down with a slice or two while you peruse Lincoln’s largest beer selection (rotating tap beer selection and over 400 bottled beers!). Griffin Mims’ go-to is LeadBelly. “It was the first restaurant where I ate when I came to Lincoln for college, and it has been one of my favorites ever since. They have incredible burgers with recipes that you would have never thought would work for a burger but end up knocking the socks off of your taste buds.” We’re intrigued by their Raspberry Beret burger, which features — yup, you guessed it — raspberry jam.


CULTIVA

CULTIVA

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LINCOLN

I THINK OF ADVENTURE AS AN OPPORTUNITY TO GROW AND CULTIVATE PASSION. THE ONLY WAY THAT WE CAN TRULY BETTER OURSELVES AS INDIVIDUALS IS BY MAKING OURSELVES UNCOMFORTABLE, AND IT IS THROUGH UNCOMFORTABILITY THAT WE UNCOVER OUR DEEPEST PASSIONS. ADVENTURE IS NOT THE BEAUTIFUL VIEW THAT WE CAPTURE ON OUR PHONES FOR OUR SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS. IT’S THE MANY FALLS TAKEN, MANY MILES HIKED AND MANY HOURS SPENT PUSHING YOURSELF OUTSIDE OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE TO REACH THAT BREATHTAKING VIEW. IT’S IN THE MOMENT WHEN YOUR HEART IS BEATING SO FAST THAT YOU WANT TO JUST SIT DOWN AND DANGLE YOUR TOES OVER THE EDGE OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE RATHER THAN TAKING THE JUMP INTO THE UNKNOWN. AND IT’S IN THAT FOLLOWING MOMENT WHEN YOU CLOSE YOUR EYES, TAKE A DEEP BREATH, AND ASK YOURSELF WHAT WOULD HAPPEN IF YOU DIDN’T JUMP THAT YOU FEEL FULFILLED WITH A SENSE OF ADVENTURE. — GRIFFIN MIMS

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SHELDON ART GALLERY


PIONEERS PARK

ANTELOPE VALLEY

INTERNATIONAL QUILT STUDY MUSEUM

WHERE TO EXPLORE

Take it from resident Griffin Mims: “Lincoln has incredible parks and lakes that create a special connection with those who visit them.” Lincoln is conveniently situated within biking (or driving) distance from lakes like the Pawnee Lake State Recreation Area and the Branched Oak State Recreation, where you’d be hard-pressed not to find motor boats and kayaks skimming the surfaces in summer months. This is one of Jordan Messerer’s ideal ways to appreciate Nebraska. As he puts it, “I believe [Lincoln’s] beauty is best seen from the seat of a paddle craft or a bike where you can slow down and recognize what is around you.” For those seeking to immerse themselves in what the region has to offer without crossing city limits, Gage Mruz recommends Pioneers Park. “[It] has tons of open space to bike, hike, interact with wildlife and enjoy time with family and friends.” The park boasts eight miles of trails, several streams and ample opportunities to spot raptors, bison, elk and white-tailed deer. Griffin Mims also encourages visitors to check out Sunken Gardens, near the heart of Lincoln. Every year, the gardens highlight a new theme, with the aid of over 30,000 individual annual plants. For bikers, rural roads throughout the region provide endless options for rides. “There are super rad running and biking trails all around Lincoln that stretch all the way to Omaha.” If you need direction, Griffin Mims’ favorite “is a little trail that loops around Pioneers Park here in Lincoln. It’s a beautiful area that is close enough to bike and is a great three-mile trail.” Get up and go.


GRADUATE lincoln


CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


LANDMARK TOUR No visit to Lincoln is complete without a trip to the Capitol building. In fact, a stop at the Art Deco building and tower should be the first order of business. Scale up the top where you’ll get an incomparable view, as far as the eye can see. From there, make your way over to the University of NebraskaLincoln to see Memorial Stadium, home of the Huskers. While on campus, take a moment to center yourself at the Sculpture Garden by the Sheldon Museum. It’s one of Gage Mruz’s favorite spots. “The art coupled with the unique trees and landscape architecture never cease to extract my inner creativity when I’m working on homework or just creating music or art.” Wind down with a walk around the restaurants, bars and shops of the Haymarket. 80 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


NEBRASKA TOURISM COMMISSION

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city guide

MADISON WISCONSIN AS TOLD BY:

AMANDA KESSEL ELYSE RYLANDER DARREN BUSH


CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

Madison’s citizens exemplify the hardcore spirit one can only find in the Midwest. Drastic weather patterns coupled with industrious roots make for a group of people who know how to take advantage of a nice day. Well, even the bad ones — you’ll find Madisonites biking in full blown blizzards. Due to its unique geography, Madison is like a playground for anyone who enjoys the outdoors. Sandwiched between Lake Mendota and Lake Monona means that at every turn, there’s a trail or a body of water to play in. But this hard-working and robust energy for life can be found in all of the city’s cultural offerings. The food scene is hearty, the musical history is legendary and the people really give a damn. They invest in their community, and it shows.

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MADISON

Meet Your Madison Guides

At a Glance FOUNDED IN:

AMANDA KESSEL

Amanda Kessel’s name may ring a bell — with the help of her teammates, the forward won a gold medal at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics in Hockey. The Olympian and Madison native attended University of Minnesota, before beginning her professional hockey career with the Metropolitan Riveters. In addition to playing in the NWHL, she is a member of the United States national team and won Silver in 2012, Gold in 2013 and Gold in 2017 at the IIHF women’s World Championships. Kessel won silver at the Olympics in 2014, but returned in 2018 to win gold in a historic battle against the team’s number one rival, Canada.

ELYSE RYLANDER

Elyse Rylander is an activist, outdoor educator and the founder/ executive director at Out There Adventures (OTA). After receiving her BA in Communications and Gender Studies from the University of Wisconsin, along with her Masters in Adventure Education at Prescott College, she moved to Seattle to start OTA. The organization provides queer youth with the opportunity to connect with the natural world while using its platform to promote diversity and inclusivity across the outdoor industry.

DARREN BUSH

Darren Bush is the owner of Rutabaga Paddlesports, an independent canoeing and kayaking store in Madison. Not only does Rutabaga provide hands on customer service and great gear, they play an integral role in fostering Madison’s outdoor community by leading excursions, hosting events and teaching underprivileged youth. Darren attended the University of Wisconsin for his undergrad and has lived in the area for almost 30 years.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE If there’s a thread that runs throughout the lives of the individuals who contributed — athlete, activist and business owner — it’s that their formative years spent outside led them to where they are today (alongside years of hard work and determination). Olympic gold medalist hockey player Amanda Kessel notes that the surrounding lakes “offer great options for summer and winter activities. I grew up skating on Lake Mendota in front of my grandma’s house.” She recommends heading to Trek Bikes to gear up for a ride around town. “They provide Madison with miles of trails as well as bikes that are located around the city that you can rent and use to explore.” For Darren Bush, owner at Rutabaga, going to college in the Wisconsin capital sparked his love for paddling. Now a part of the community, he uses the sport to give back. “We have a bunch of kids who don’t know how to swim. So for us, it’s great to provide a way for them to learn how to be water safe. It’s the fun part — that’s why we do what we do. We work with different camps, community centers, boys and girls clubs and usually underprivileged areas.” Out There Adventures founder Elyse Rylander explains that it was this community that helped her through the more difficult times, and was absolutely integral to the creation of OTA. “I really give credit to my time at Rutabaga Paddle Sports for helping me dodge some of the depression, anxiety, feelings of isolation and lack of community that a queer teenager usually experiences. I was going into Madison every day for six summers in a row and I was able to cultivate my skills as this outdoorsy badass person. But also, at Rutabaga, there’s a lot of women who work for that company.”

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1846

METRO POPULATION: 578k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES:

agriculture, health, education

FUN FACT:

Just one of two U.S. cities built on an isthmus


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CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


MADISON

FOOD AND DRINK Madison’s food scene is the meeting of low and highbrow. We’re talking cheese curds meets James Beard Award-winning chefs, to which Darren Bush says: “We have lots of them.” It’s a booming scene, according to Amanda Kessel. “Madison has recently had so many new restaurants pop up. The best eats are located up on ‘the square’ surrounding the Capitol. They have great places like Eno Vino Wine Bar & Bistro which sits high in a hotel. It hosts one of the most beautiful views of the Capitol, especially if you go at night. I also really enjoy Tipsy Cow, Lucille and Tornado, a classic hole-in-the-wall supper club that serves amazing steak.” Staying in classic Madison fare territory, Elyse Rylander recommends The Plaza Tavern. “[It’s] always really fun because my folks went there a lot when they were in college and some of my closer friends and I would go there because their burgers are really cheap and the Plaza sauce is amazing.” She also recommends standards like Ian’s Pizza and The Old Fashioned. For something a little outside the usual midwestern palate, Darren Bush prefers Japanese-Chinese fusion restaurant Umami. For coffee, Darren and Amanda both go with Colectivo Coffee. The local chain has big roll-up doors and on a nice day, Darren says, “They roll them up and it’s really pleasant. It’s like being outside and inside at the same time.”

ENO VINO

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IAN'S PIZZA

UMAMI

COLECTIVO COFFEE

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WHERE TO EXPLORE

SARAH LERNER

There are quite literally thousands of lakes and spaces to explore, so where to begin? Amanda Kessel’s go-to spot is Devil’s Lake State Park. “It’s not in Madison but it’s one of the closest hiking spots,” she says. “Located in Baraboo (about 45 minutes to an hour away), it has beautiful bluffs that you can hike that overlook a lake and acres of hills and greenery.” For somewhere right in the middle of the city, Darren Bush heads to Lake Wringa: “It’s surrounded by the university Arboretum. So if you close your eyes and look towards the zoo (which is the only part that is really developed) you could be in the middle of any lake in Wisconsin. It’s a beautiful, beautiful lake and I can be there in five minutes.” To get the best views of the city Elyse Rylander suggests Picnic Point, an almost mile-long peninsula along Lake Mendota’s south shore, great for boating and hiking.

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

MADISON

THERE ARE FANTASTIC WAYS TO GET OUTSIDE NO MATTER WHAT YOUR INTERESTS ARE. I TELL EVERYONE YOU CAN DO LITERALLY EVERYTHING IN WISCONSIN, INCLUDING SURFING, BUT YOU JUST CAN’T DO IT TO THE MOST GNARLY DEGREE. EVERYTHING IS ON LIGHT, WHICH IS GREAT, BECAUSE THEN THE ENTRY POINT CAN BE LOWER FOR FOLKS SO YOU CAN GET GOOD EXPOSURE. THEN IF YOU WANT, YOU CAN TAKE YOUR SKILLS UP A NOTCH. — ELYSE RYLANDER

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CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY 90 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE GRADUATE madison


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LANDMARK TOUR Being the Wisconsin capital, Madison has no shortage of historic landmarks. Darren Bush’s favorite is the Arboretum, and he provides a bit of backstory. “It was started by Aldo Leopold, and some of his professor friends to try and create all the different environments and biomes on this continent, in this one 1400-acre, old farm that this guy donated to them. It’s got probably one of the best restored prairies in the country. It’s beautiful.” Amanda Kessel suggests visiting the Capitol building, the Camp Randall football stadium and Memorial Union Terrace, a Madison and UW staple.

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JOEY REUTEMANN

I THINK THAT THE WEATHER IRONICALLY MAKES IT MORE OF A ROBUST COMMUNITY. LIKE TODAY IS 65 AND PERFECT RIGHT? SO EVERYBODY IS OUTSIDE TODAY. LITERALLY EVERYBODY. THE BIKE PATHS ARE FULL. WE TAKE ADVANTAGE OF EVERYTHING WE CAN. — DARREN BUSH

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INCLUSIVITY AND THE ART OF ADVENTURE: AN INTERVIEW WITH ELYSE RYLANDER By Gigie Hall

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he outdoors as an industry and as a space has received more attention than ever before. Thanks, Internet! This means more trending #vanlife posts, hip outdoor retailers catering to a younger crowd, glamping retreats and the list goes on. The outdoors is finally hitting the mainstream, with climbing gyms replacing bars as meeting places and Teva making its way into acceptable footwear territory. Cheekiness aside, the industry is expanding, and with that comes some growing pains, the most glaring of which is the issue of representation. In today’s woke world, it isn’t enough for an industry to pander to the most privileged sectors of society. For too long, the outdoors has been seen as a space reserved for men who claimed dirtbag status, without paying attention to their middle class safety nets. But the industry is waking up, and like most social change, it’s happening because a dedicated minority is leading the way. One of those pioneers is Elyse Rylander.

T

As executive director of Out There Adventures (OTA), Rylander works to help queer kids get outside and in doing so, she disrupts the narrative that claims the natural world is inherently dangerous for queer people. Many may view the outdoors as a space open and free to anyone with a pair of hiking shoes, but it’s not that simple. There is a spectrum of barriers that make it hard for certain people to get outside, from cost and time, to fear of discrimination and lack of programming. Out There Adventures addresses all of these issues by providing affordable trips and outings across the nation specifically for queer youth (and now adults). By providing space and mentorship, queer youth can begin to see the natural world as a means to building confidence, rather than a place defined by isolation and intolerance. Speaking to the Wisconsin native and UW alum, Elyse Rylander, I learned more about OTA and her formative years spent in Madison.

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What’s your history with the outdoors and did you feel like there were some barriers to break through to get outside? I feel really fortunate in a lot ways. I grew up just North of Madison in a small town called Poynette, near Lake Wisconsin, and my family didn’t necessarily have a ton of discretionary income when I was growing up. But we had enough to fuel our family camping/canoeing trips in summer and ski trips in winter. So I was really lucky in that we had the ability to do that and that my parents felt it also very important to expose my sister and I to all sorts of outdoorsy things. In that way, I didn’t necessarily experience some of the barriers that other folks have in terms of urbanization and lack of access because of geography or income.

I think the complexity in my personal narrative comes in as I got older and came to realize that I was not like my peers in terms of my sexuality and my preferred gender expression. So that’s where the nature component comes in and I really give credit to my time at Rutabaga Paddle Sports, to helping me dodge some of the depression and anxiety and feelings of isolation and lack of community that a queer teenager usually experiences. I was able to cultivate my skills as this outdoorsy badass person because I was leading canoeing, kayaking and stand up paddle boarding trips all summer long. But also there’s a lot of women that work for that company, and in particular while I was there, there seemed to be a lot of openly queer women. So as a 16, 17, 18-year-old, it was a mind-blowing experience for me to see these women doing this very powerful thing and be so confident in their identities. When I came out at 18, those relationships with a few of those women in particular really helped provide me with some sense of community and a support network.

I think the conversation is just starting to shift a little bit. But a lot of the response has been from people who are just perplexed. How do you break down the nuance of this issue to people who are like ‘anyone can just go outside!’ Outside of my work at OTA, I’m an independent contractor with a consulting firm that’s focused on creating more equitable spaces in the outdoor industry across all of its facets. I was talking to one of the founders of the firm and we were like if we only had a dollar for every time someone said, “Well the mountains don’t care, the trees don’t care who you sleep with or what color you are,” and we’re like, yes, exactly. Yes, there’s the fear of the unknown, but those fears can more easily be mitigated. It’s the fear of the other folks you might come across when you’re out in these remote spaces that I think is the overwhelming anxiety that gets created for queer folks or folks of color, for women. It’s quaint and nice to say the mountains don’t care but I’m willing to bet the person who utters that phrase does actually care a lot. As evidenced by the fact that they are saying that, they are indicating through that vocalization that they don’t understand the nuance and complexity of the situation. That’s the bigger issue. You talk about historical trauma for communities of color and for queer folks and for women, the things that we have been told for generations about what could happen to you when you go into the woods. Those things are very real and even though we aren’t, as an overall society, necessarily committing those hate crimes against those various communities, those stories are still very real for us and that fear is very real. It’s not the mountains, it’s the people that you could potentially meet out there that we’re scared of.

“MADISON IS ABSOLUTELY LINKED TO THE WHOLE FORMATION OF OTA GIVEN MY TIME THERE, GROWING UP IN CLOSE PROXIMITY AND THEN GOING TO SCHOOL THERE. IT’S SUCH A FASCINATING LITTLE TOWN IN THE MIDWEST, IN THAT THERE ARE A LOT OF FOLKS WHO ARE REALLY DRAWN TO THE OUTDOORS THAT END UP IN MADISON FOR VARIOUS REASONS.” 96 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


I think queer people are told that their only place to thrive is in a city or if you’re going to find community you have to find the gay bar in town. Do you see this image changing for queer youth? Do you think they find possibility in more rural or wild places? That’s a great question and everything you just mentioned are things that I have been articulating for the past few years. We’re headed into our fourth programming season and as of January of this year we have added in adult programs, which wasn’t my original intention for the focus of the organization. What I’ve realized over the past few years, in essentially banging my head against the wall trying to get more queer kids outside, is that we really needed to start about ten steps backward. That cultural narrative of what it means to be a queer person is so strong and is so closely linked to people being in an urban space. Maybe you’re involved in some sort of musical or art activity, and the other place you gather as a community is at pride events, which often incorporate drinking. We’re coming up against so many barriers that we knew we would experience and also these very pervasive and profound cultural narratives about what it means to be a queer person and it just doesn’t mean going outside yet. I was joking with a friend of mine, who runs this group for queer teens and they openly talk about how they hate anything that resembles physical activity and they would much rather be playing their video games or talking about anime or listening to music. I see that over and over and over again. I think for queer teens the place that they find community has often been through the internet and through situations in which they aren’t going out there and exposing themselves to the view of lots of different folks. They want to hang out with their group of people in a space where they know they’re going to be safe. Which totally makes sense, it’s just a bummer. It is. I feel that so strongly and I think it’s really interesting that you bring in adults, because I think queer youth not only need to see themselves, but see people older than them getting out there so they can see a future. What programming do you have that brings together queer youth and queer adults?

That intergenerational connection is something that I have wanted to bridge for the last few years. This year we’re piloting a mentorship program that we’re calling “The Summit Mentorship Program.” The program is being piloted in Seattle and San Francisco where we have five queer adults in each of those cities and we’re going to match them with five queer youths. But as we have experienced in the past, we’re having a lot of difficulty getting the kids signed up for that program. The goal for that program is to do exactly what you just articulated, in connecting queer youth to adults that are out doing these different activities. So we pair them up and run them through a version of our day program that we call queer mountain school. They do a couple hour-long hikes, they go to a climbing gym, they rent kayaks for a few hours, and then it all culminates with an overnight camping trip, local

to San Francisco and Seattle. The goal is to connect those kids to adults and provide them with opportunities and exposure — to see an adult like them, doing these things. Hopefully they get stoked on it and they connect to that adult and that will help support them in pursuing these activities outside of that program.

I think people crave mentorship and it’s hard to find when your community is based online. That’s how I got where I am. There’s a woman who works in Madison at the University of Wisconsin now, but she was my boss when I was working at Rutabaga. I still remember the day when she walked into staff training when I was 18 and I had just been hired as an instructor there. She has been such an amazing support for me. So at 18, I was exposed to all the possibilities that were open to me as a queer woman through my relationship with her. Then I had the added benefit that she was this badass canoe guide and had done all these things that I wanted to do. That relationship completely changed the course of my life, so I can speak firsthand of its impacts, which is part of the reason why we’re trying to offer it. Totally. The other thing I wanted to speak to is how the LGBT community is lumped together under this umbrella when in actuality there’s such a variety of needs and experiences among gay youth and trans youth. How do you address these differences?

It’s been interesting in that a lot of our participants identify as members of the trans community, or non-binary so we don’t really get your run of the mill cis white gay teenager. I think that’s partly indicative of where we’re located. I think if I had tried to launch the organization back in Madison, the story would be a little bit different, but I think here, pulling kids from Seattle and San Francisco, they’re pretty wellsupported and they can find their niche and their place far more easily. So we don’t necessarily have that conversation a lot because we aren’t really getting that intermingling of identities. I’ve worked in outdoor education since 2006 and I worked with pretty much the most full spectrum that you could, from super rich folks from Beijing, all the way down to kids with disabilities who have experienced homelessness, and everything in between. Queer kids as an overall demographic are the most amazing at building trust and rapport with one another. I find myself very rarely having to engage in those typical behavior redirection patterns that you do when you’re working with teens because they just have this innate wisdom that I have not seen replicated in any other demographic. Even though we have kids coming from different lived experiences, they treat each other with such respect and such compassion that we’ve just never really had an issue around that. They engage in these beautiful conversations organically, so it hasn’t been a problem, it’s rather been a really fantastic opportunity for them to talk about their lives and their differences.

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“QUEER KIDS AS AN OVERALL DEMOGRAPHIC ARE THE MOST AMAZING AT BUILDING TRUST AND RAPPORT WITH ONE ANOTHER.” We talked about how media is such an important thing for queer youth, and it’s slowly starting to change. Do you find that brands and other media are reaching out to you more or are they still slow on the uptake? We’re seeing an increase in desire to want to work with us over the last six months to a year. It’s been really fascinating to see the awareness of our work increase after we put on a conference in October and were at the winter outdoor retailer show in Denver. Folks are always like, what are the brands that are doing this work well in the industry and really the only huge name that I can think of that’s actively taken a step towards representing queer folks is The North Face, which is not surprising. They have wound up being a huge fantastic supporter of ours. It’s been interesting to see their support not necessarily equate to support from other brands like REI or Patagonia. Those conversations are just now starting to shift, but because of how political queer identities are, lots of folks have wanted to show support by showing up at pride events but not necessarily wanting to take a step further. They don’t see the value in the queer community, so they don’t want to invest yet. Once they do, then overnight we’ll see a radical shift, but it’s very frustrating for me to be standing at the vantage point that I have right now because it’s bullshit in my opinion. I wanted to talk a little more about Madison and your experience there. Was there anything about your experience in Madison that helped when you were forming Out There Adventures and was there something that you took from your time there that you wanted to focus on? Madison is absolutely linked to the whole formation of OTA given my time there, growing up in close proximity and then going to school there. It’s such a fascinating little town in the Midwest, in that there are a lot of folks who are really drawn to the outdoors that end

up in Madison for various reasons. They hosted the Association for Experiential Education International Conference right after I graduated college, which brought in a thousand outdoor educators from across the world. I think through the University of Wisconsin, there’s a pretty large community of college students that love to get outside and do all sorts of different things, rock climbing, biking skiing, snowboarding and snowshoeing. So it was a really fun community for me to be a part of — to be able to continue to fuel my interests in the outdoors and find different folks to do all of that stuff with. I think that’s surprising for people because it’s not Denver, it’s not Seattle, it’s not Salt Lake City, it’s not Moab, but it is a really active city and people are drawn to it for a lot of reasons. There are fantastic ways to get outside no matter what your interests are. I tell everyone you can do literally everything in Wisconsin, including surfing, but you just can’t do it to the most gnarly degree. Everything is on light, which is great, because then the entry point can be lower for folks so you can get good exposure and if you want you can take your skills up a notch by going to the Rockies. My OTA light bulb moment happened for me in a queer theory class my junior year at Wisconsin. The story I always tell is that I had this class where they brought grad students in to talk about a queer writing group that they had started and someone asked the question, “Why did you start this group” and they said, “Well there wasn’t one and we thought there should be, so we just started it.” I was like, that’s exactly what I need to do because I want to work with my community outside and there’s no place to do that. I ran to my mentor’s office, skipped my next class and was like, I have this idea. She offered support and connected me to people so that’s how the ball got rolling for OTA. My initial support network around how to become a non-profit definitely came from my connections in Madison and at the University of Wisconsin. So Madison played a huge role in where I am personally and where the organization is.

OTA is currently in its fourth year, providing a range of programs throughout the year including Queer Mountain School, a variety of expeditions, mentorship programs and more. Be sure to stay up to date with everything Elyse and OTA is up to at outthereadventures.org.

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city guide

MINNEAPOLIS MINNESOTA AS TOLD BY:

RICHARD RUSKELL JEFF GROTTE KELSEY OSEID

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KRIVIT PHOTOGRAPHY

One half of the Twin Cities, Minneapolis manages to play host to strands of both mainstream and underground cool. Like neighboring St. Paul, it’s split by the Mississippi River, as the iconic landmark curves its way between the two cities. As illustrator Kelsey Oseid puts it, “The Mississippi is the lifeblood of the Midwest and you can’t be near it without feeling its power. I like to stand on the Lake Street/Marshall Ave bridge and look down and think about the massive amounts of water moving beneath me and all the other people in the city. It connects us to the rest of the country, and to the entire world.” But the river is just a slice of the area’s attraction. Known as the City of Lakes, Minneapolis features 197 parks, — that’s one every six blocks — 13 lakes and three major sports stadiums. Culturally speaking, the city has a lot to brag about, with multiple art museums, an incipient startup and tech industry and many outstanding restaurants from which to pick. Not to mention the music scene. For a modest city in the Midwest, Minneapolis’ music history is remarkable, considering both Prince and Bob Dylan hail from this Minnesota town. Adventures of both the cultural and outdoor variety await anyone willing to explore Mill City.

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MINNEAPOLIS

At a Glance

Meet Your Minneapolis Guides

FOUNDED IN: 1867

METRO POPULATION: 413k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES:

RICHARD RUSKELL

Pastry chef Richard Ruskell has travelled around the country baking delicious and unique treats for those who seek them. After an illustrious career in multiple states, he is now based in LA and serves as Executive Pastry Chef for UCLA. His many television appearances and his respected stature in cake culture has garnered national attention and personal pastry requests from the likes of Oprah, Beyonce and the Kardashians. In his free time, the award-winning chef teaches aspiring chefs.

JEFF GROTTE

Jeff Grotte is a freelance nature photographer living in Minneapolis with his partner, her three daughters, roughly one hundred chickens, six cats, a couple of parakeets, two ducks and one cockatoo. If his love for animals and wildlife isn’t already obvious, his work makes it crystal clear. He combines his love of the wilderness with his passion for photography. Grotte has struggled with a genetic congenital heart defect and diabetes, and finds that getting out in nature helps him put things in perspective.

KELSEY OSEID

Kelsey Oseid is an illustrator obsessed with natural history who lives and works in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Her painted illustrations of animals and plants celebrate the natural world and the ways humans relate to it. Her forthcoming book, Whales: An Illustrated Celebration, which she authored and illustrated, explores the most interesting and illuminating facts about these marine mammals (slated for release in August 2018). She runs the art and paper goods brand Kelzuki alongside her husband, Nick.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE Sub-zero temperatures don’t stop Minnesotans from embracing the outdoors. From ice fishing and polar plunges to ice climbing and cross-country skiing, locals have adapted. For pastry chef Richard Ruskell that extends as far as seasonally adjusting his menu. For Jeff Grotte, the area provides stellar photographic opportunities. “I want people to know what kinds of things you can see if you just go out to see them,” he says. “All of my photos aren’t the most impressive but I like to think that they are more impressive than what you see if you sit at home or at the bar all day.” As a wildlife illustrator, Kelsey Oseid taps into our collective love of the natural world in a way that is inclusive and accessible: “I love natural history, and just want to share some of the passion it makes me feel. I think there is a kind of shared nostalgia a lot of people have about animal encyclopedias, zoos, and museums from our childhoods, but issues around nature and science are so politicized and fraught these days. So it’s nice to have a sacred space where nature can just be cool and beautiful and we can just sort of worship it for what it is. Of course, I also hope that my work can stoke appreciation for the natural world and hopefully educate people a bit on how we can best protect it.”

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medicine, sports, manufacturing, education, research

FUN FACT:

The Minneapolis Skyway, spanning 69 blocks, is the longest continuous skyway in the world.


KRIVIT PHOTOGRAPHY

I’M FROM SOUTHERN MINNESOTA AND WE ALWAYS HAD SWEET CORN, STRAWBERRIES, APPLES. I REMEMBER GROWING UP AND WONDERING WHAT ALL THE SOYBEANS AND CORN I SAW GROWING EVERYWHERE WAS FOR. MY MOTHER ALWAYS SAID, ‘NOT FOR US.’ — RICHARD RUSKELL

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BIRCHWOOD CAFE

FOOD AND DRINK When it’s time to fuel up, look no further than The Birchwood Cafe. “It’s a Twin Cities must,” says Kelsey Oseid. The locally sourced, sustainable, organic ingredients leave you feeling great. Those wanting to indulge should stop by Matt’s Bar for their famous Juicy Lucy burger. “No others compare,” says Jeff Grotte. If you still have room for dessert, pop into Patisserie 46. Richard Ruskell raves, “Fellow pastry chef John Kraus has created a dessert lovers oasis. The pastries are every bit as good as they look, the breads are hearty, the coffee hot, and the atmosphere neighborly. What more could you want. Uff-da, you betcha!” Ruskell recommends ordering a pastry to go and savoring it at the Minneapolis Sculpture Garden outside the Walker Art Center, or Loring Park.

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KEELIE RITTER

MINNEAPOLIS


ALBERT LEUNG KEELIE RITTER

JUICY LUCY BURGER AT MATT'S BAR

BIRCHWOOD CAFE

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MINNEAPOLIS

MINNEHAHA FALLS

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MEET MINNEAPOLIS

OUTDOOR SPACE IS SO ACCESSIBLE IN THE TWIN CITIES. I GREW UP LIVING CLOSE TO THE CHAIN OF LAKES, SO BIKE RIDES AND RUNS AND WALKS WERE SO EASY TO TAKE. THERE’S SUCH GREAT WILDLIFE TOO — WOOD DUCKS AND MALLARDS, TONS OF BALD EAGLES AND OTHER BIRDS OF PREY AND THERE ARE ALWAYS TONS OF SPECIES OF MIGRATORY BIRDS ON THE LAKES IN SPRINGTIME. — KELSEY OSEID


WHERE TO EXPLORE

KRIVIT PHOTOGRAPHY

Fort Snelling State Park is a favorite for local residents and local wildlife, too. “With the Minnesota and Mississippi Rivers coming together there,” Jeff Grotte describes, “there is a big variety of animals that you can see in one place,” and a killer view that’s perfect for picnicking. Another Minneapolis must is the Minnehaha Regional Park, home to Minnehaha Falls, the Mississippi River’s only waterfall. “When you emerge from the wooded creek to this big open view of the river, it always seems like going through the portal to Narnia or something” says Kelsey Oseid. “I love that it’s full of people whether it’s the height of summer or the dead of winter...it draws you to it.” Stone Arch Bridge is Minneapolis’s oldest bridge and the only arched stone bridge on the entire Mississippi River. Today it is enjoyed by pedestrians and cyclists, and offers unforgettable views of the city skyline.

JEFF GROTTE

[A SNOWY OWL] WAS WINTERING IN MY NEIGHBORHOOD AND AFTER GETTING SOME FRESH POWDER I THOUGHT I WOULD GO FIND AND PHOTOGRAPH IT...I SNAPPED SOME SHOTS AS IT JUMPED FROM ONE PEAK ACROSS TO ANOTHER AND I KNEW INSTANTLY THAT IT WOULD BE MY FAVORITE. I WON THE NATIONAL PARKS ORGANIZATION WILDLIFE PHOTO CONTEST A FEW YEARS AGO WITH IT AND ACTUALLY HAD IT TATTOOED ON MY ARM. — JEFF GROTTE BOREAL OWL

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Calhoun When taking in all there is to see and Beach do in Minneapolis, culture ranks high on the list. Thanks to free festivals (like Grand Old Day and Twin Cities Jazz Festival), sculpture gardens, public art installations and music is easily accessible for the community to enjoy. Get lost among the 89,000 works of art at The Minneapolis Museum of Art, which also offers free admission. Stimulate your olfactory senses at The Marjorie McNeely Conservatory ¥ at Como Park as you walk among the palms, orchids, bonsai, Japanese gardens, butterfly gardens and more, in a historic Victorian style glass dome. For a meditative day, pay a visit to The Lyndale Park Peace Garden by Lake Harriet. The newly erected U.S. Bank Stadium is a site to behold in and of itself. With a capacity of over 66,000 people, and a translucent roof, it offers stunning views of downtown and has been compared to the Crystal Cathedral in southern California.  ―

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110 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE GRADUATE MINNEAPOLIS


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CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


city guide

OXFORD MISSISSIPPI AS TOLD BY:

SAM KENDRICKS CARLYLE WOLFE

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY

STEPHEN KIRKPATRICK


Legend has it that the city’s founders named Oxford after the British university town to bait the state’s institution of higher learning. It was a successful strategy — Oxford is home to “Ole Miss” or the University of Mississippi for those of us out of the know. This leafy Southern college town has also beckoned literary luminaries, blues musicians, innovative chefs and artists of all kinds. Sam Kendricks assures us, “Oxford is a special place… there is something for everybody.” With its small town charm and rich creative lore, Oxford draws people in and casts a spell. As our guide Carlyle Wolfe so eloquently says, “it isn’t best viewed from a distance like a postcard vista. I think of it more like an invitation — to be aware and to enjoy what is right there.”

COLLIDE . 113


OXFORD

At a Glance

Meet Your Oxford Guides

FOUNDED IN: 1837

POPULATION: 19k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES: SAM KENDRICKS

Sam Kendricks is a track and field athlete and Olympic pole vaulter who competed in the Rio Olympics. From 2014 to 2016, he held his title as the U.S. indoor National Champion in his sport. A native of Oxford and alum of the University of Mississippi, he is also a 1LT in the United States Army Reserve.

education

FUN FACT:

The oldest book in the U.S. is an ancient Biblical manuscript, located at the University of Mississippi.

CARLYLE WOLFE

Carlyle Wolfe makes oil paintings on panel and watercolors on paper, based on drawings from observation of plants and landscape color studies. Wolfe grew up in Canton, Mississippi, earning a BFA in painting from the University of Mississippi and an MFA in painting and drawing from Louisiana State University. Her work has been exhibited throughout the South, and was recently selected for the Art in Embassies Program at the U.S. Embassy in Maputo, Mozambique. She lives in Oxford, works in her studio beside her home, and until recently taught part time at the University of Mississippi.

STEPHEN KIRKPATRICK

Wildlife photographer Stephen Kirkpatrick has published more than 3,500 photographs in books and magazines worldwide and also published 11 solo pictorial coffee table books. His work has earned international acclaim: in addition to his many other honors and accolades, he has twice been named a winner in the prestigious International Wildlife Photographer of the Year. His latest book, Sanctuary: Mississippi’s Coastal Plain, is a tribute to the rare and endangered species and habitats of the Mississippi Coastal Plain.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE For our Oxford guides, nature is an integral part of their lives and their careers. Something

clicked for artist Carlyle Wolfe when she was in second grade. “The assignment was to mark a square foot of average earth and then record the life within it – creatures and plants. I was

thrilled to realize that such an inconspicuous spot was so alive.” To this day, nature acts as her

muse. “One of the reasons plants make great subjects is that they stay in one position for a relatively long time, but they also describe something bigger – a constant forward motion of seasonal change.” For Stephen Kirkpatrick: “My fascination with nature became a full-time

career when my father gave me my first camera in 1981.” Since then, he’s photographed the Amazon, Alaskan tundra, deserts of the Middle East and depths of the Pacific Ocean. And yet,

“I consider all of Mississippi, including Oxford, my ‘backyard,’ and that backyard is where I’ve had some of my most exciting outdoor adventures and captured some of my best photographs.”

and sweaty clothes were just a part of my day to day. I think one whole summer I never changed clothes, they just got washed in the pond and got dirty at the farm.” While the world may

recognize him as an indoor Olympic runner, he assures us, “I’m a boy of the sun. I love to get the wind in my face and the sun on my back. It keeps me going much longer.”

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VISIT OXFORD

Pole vault world champion Sam Kendricks and self-proclaimed country boy says, “Tan skin


COLLIDE . 115


OXFORD

FOOD AND DRINK Oxford owes its culinary cult status in part to restaurateur John Currence. The James Beard Award-winning chef has five establishments (and counting). For that first meal of the day, Stephen Kirkpatrick reps Currence’s Big Bad Breakfast. “The name says it all.” While primarily known for City Grocery, Currence’s Snackbar serves up oysters, cocktails and Southern dishes with a touch of French flavor. His other bistro, Boure overlooks the Square, and Stephen Kirkpatrick recommends their balcony for prime people watching. Well loved by locals, no-frills Handy Andy grills up the best burgers, “followed by the best nap in the summer”, warns Sam Kendricks. When you need to wake from the food coma, “go to Lyndsey’s Chevron just off the Square. The police get their coffee there and you can get much-needed intel on what’s going on in Oxford that day.”

BIG BAD BREAKFAST

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CITY GROCERY

CITY GROCERY

SNACKBAR

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OXFORD

SQUARE BOOKS

118 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


WHERE TO EXPLORE

Get acquainted with Oxford outdoors. Sam Kendricks believes the best way to discover the town is on the back of a bicycle. Start at the heart of the town at the Square, preferably on a Sunday before 9am, “before everyone goes to church,” he says. Stephen Kirkpatrick recommends Rowan Oak, William Faulkner’s historic home. From there, retread Faulkner’s route with a hike through Bailey’s Woods to the University Museum, a much-loved route of Carlyle Wolfe, too. Hikers, bikers and runners can wander through 26 wild miles of Whirlpool Trails, at the edge of campus, says Sam Kendricks. Just east of town is Carlyle Wolfe’s pick, Holly Springs National Forest. These beautiful trails wind through pine forest, small glittering lakes and bottomlands. If you get the chance, she also urges boating on Lake Sardis at sunset.

THE LYCEUM

COLLIDE . 119


LANDMARK TOUR THE NATURAL WORLD IS A RICH SUBJECT. FOR SEVENTEEN YEARS I HAVE BEEN MAKING LINE DRAWINGS OF PLANTS. THE PRACTICE IS A WAY OF MARKING TIME AND BECOMING PROGRESSIVELY, CYCLICALLY MORE PRESENT TO NATURAL BEAUTY AND MYSTERY.

— CARLYLE WOLFE

120 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


PAUL GANDY

The Lyceum’s columned facade is an Ole Miss icon. When the university integrated in the early 1960s, it became a focal point in the Civil Rights Movement. Learn more about this charged episode in history, and more, at the beloved Square Books. Their offshoot, aptly named Off Square Books, hosts Thacker Mountain Radio Hour, a radio show featuring the South’s best readings, lectures and musical performances. It’s free and open to the public, but check their schedule. Now that you’re on a literary roll, buy a bottle of your favorite whiskey and take a shot at Faulkner’s grave. Make sure to pour one out for him too.

COLLIDE . 121


122 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE GRADUATE OXFORD’S rooftop BAR, THE COOP


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CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


city guide

RICHMOND VIRGINIA AS TOLD BY:

CHRIS JOHNSON COLLEEN HALL MARY RAFFERTY


LUKAS SCHLAGENHAUF

Coursing through the city, the James River is like Richmond’s moving foundation — the pumping heart of the city. It acts as a lifeline that connects residents to a more wild place, without ever having to step outside the city. Truly — it is the only place in the country where you can paddle class III (sometimes even class IV) whitewater rapids within sight of skyscrapers. As photographer Chris Johnson says, “Whether you want to hike along the banks, go swimming, kayaking, tubing, fishing or paddleboarding, you can do it all while still within the city limits.” If there was ever a true merging of urban and rural, Richmond would be at the center of it. But that feeling seems to permeate everything in the River City, drawing people to its mix of small town charm and big town opportunity. Offering one of the richest historical profiles in the country, coupled with a thriving cultural (and physical) landscape, Richmond is not to be missed.

COLLIDE . 125


RICHMOND

At a Glance FOUNDED IN:

Meet Your Richmond Guides

1737

POPULATION: 220k

MAJOR INDUSTRIES:

MARY RAFFERTY

Mary Rafferty is the Executive Director of the Virginia Conservation Network (VCN), and facilitates Virginia’s various conservation efforts in partnership with other organizations. Before her time at VCN, Mary worked with Environment America, organizing grassroots efforts to protect untouched landscapes in America. She is also on the board of Green Corps, a field school for environmental organizing. Mary’s passion for the environment extends beyond her career, with much of her time spent in Richmond’s beautiful natural landscape.

COLLEEN HALL

Colleen Hall is a painter and environmental advocate who uses her platform to raise awareness for endangered species and spaces. By engaging her viewers creatively, she hopes to promote an awareness that translates to action. Originally from New York, Colleen settled in Virginia after earning her degree in business at the University of Richmond. Much of her work can be found locally, including her living sculpture, “Turtle Island” at the Lewis Ginter Botanical Garden. See more of Colleen Hall's work at colleenhall.com.

CHRIS JOHNSON

Born and raised in Virginia, Chris Johnson is a photographer, musician, physician and father. His photography explores the awe-inspiring beauty of places wild and untouched. Covering a wide range of ground from landscapes to up-close shots of flora and fauna, Johnson’s work captures the essence of Virginia’s magic and breathtaking scenery.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE It’s clear that the James River is Richmond’s most signature feature, but for photographer Chris Johnson, he hopes to inspire more people to take advantage of all it has to offer: “I have met many people who grew up here who were unaware just how accessible and beautiful the James River is. It’s easy to take it for granted since it’s something that is just part of the region. I am hopeful that my photos inspire others to go out and explore this amazing resource that’s literally in our backyard.” But it takes work to preserve something so tied to the city and that’s where Mary Rafferty comes in: “As the director of a network of local, state, and regional conservation organizations, I believe the best approach to conservation is working together as a community to find unique approaches to protect our parks, reduce climate pollution, increase public transportation and keep our rivers clean.” At the root of it all, it’s about maintaining a certain level of active appreciation and awareness. Artist Colleen Hall describes what it takes for more people to care about their surroundings: “We can’t protect something unless we know about it, care about it, and are called to act. Being a child of educators, I always have woven education into my artwork. I hope that families that see my work will want to see the environments I have depicted and perhaps try to learn more about them.”

126 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

finance, medical, advertising, manufacturing and transportation

FUN FACT:

Patrick Henry's famous 'Give me liberty or give me death' speech was made in Richmond's St. John's Church.


CHRIS JOHNSON

COLLIDE . 127


RICHMOND

I WAS FORTUNATE TO HAVE BEEN GRANTED ACCESS TO THE OLD BEER CAVES OF THE JAMES RIVER STEAM BREWERY AT ROCKETTS LANDING. THESE WERE THE CELLARS WHERE BEER WAS LAGERED AND STORED PRIOR TO TRANSPORT ON THE RAILROAD THAT RAN RIGHT ALONG THE BASEMENT ENTRANCE (WHICH IS NOW PART OF THE VIRGINIA CAPITAL TRAIL). THE BREWERY WAS OPENED IN 1866 BY DAVID G. YUENGLING, JR. NOW THE FLOORS ARE COVERED IN THICK MUD THAT IS BETWEEN ONE TO TWO FEET DEEP. GETTING AROUND INSIDE WAS A BIG CHALLENGE BUT WORTH THE EFFORT TO SEE ALL OF THE DIFFERENT ROOMS INSIDE. — CHRIS JOHNSON

HERITAGE

128 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


FOOD AND DRINK Richmond’s culinary scene is a collaborative affair, with industry veterans and up-and-coming restaurateurs supporting each other in hopes of creating a more unique spin on traditional southern food. But you’ll find almost every cuisine in this Virginian city. After a sunrise shoot on the river, Chris Johnson suggests Ellwood Thompson’s. He also recommends Richmond staple Heritage and Triple Crossing for delicious wood-fired pizza. For a low-key meal, Mary Rafferty’s go-to is “a cheeseburger, sweet potato fries, and a beer on the patio of Citizen Burger in Carytown.” Colleen Hall enjoys the range of options from international fare to traditional diner food: “I am a huge fan of Foo Dog, which serves up yummy Asian street food and craft beers at really reasonable prices. I also love the amazing amounts of options now available in Scott’s Addition [Historic District] including several breweries like Ardent Ales, the new Blue Bee Cidery and the Dairy Bar that dates back to 1946 for their amazing milkshakes.” For coffee she recommends Perk, Crossroads Coffee and Ice Cream, and Lamplighter Coffee Roasters.

CITIZEN BURGER

EACH WEEK DURING THE SUMMER MONTHS, THERE IS A FREE OUTDOOR YOGA CLASS AT DOGWOOD DELL. THIS IS WITHIN WALKING DISTANCE OF MY HOME, WHICH MAKES IT EVEN MORE CONVENIENT. — MARY

RAFFERTY

ARDENT ALES

COLLIDE . 129


THERE IS A STRETCH OF TRAIL BETWEEN THE PUMPHOUSE AND TEXAS BEACH THAT HAS ALWAYS BEEN FUN TO EXPLORE. I’M SURE PLENTY OF PEOPLE KNOW ABOUT IT, BUT I NEVER REALLY SEE THAT MANY OTHER FOLKS ON THE TRAIL. THERE IS SOME GREAT HISTORY WITH THE RUINS OF THE FOUSHEE MILL, BEAUTIFUL VIEWS OF THE JAMES, AND PLENTY OF SPOTS TO HOP OUT ON ROCKS THAT PUT YOU RIGHT IN THE MIDDLE OF THE RIVER. —CHRIS JOHNSON

130 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

PONY PASTURE

CHRIS JOHNSON

RICHMOND


VIRGINIA STATE PARKS/CCFLICKR

JAMES RIVER

WHERE TO EXPLORE While there’s no denying that the James River is the spot to be, just exactly where to visit the 348-mile long river can be a mystery. Chris Johnson suggests hiking along the Northbank and Buttermilk trails. For the perfect sunrise, he recommends heading to Pony Pasture. “Especially in summer when sunrise is so early that it’s usually not crowded. You can scramble a good ways out in the river on the massive boulders. As the sun comes up you’ll hear the rushing water, see fish jumping, and often if you look up you’ll see bald eagles, great blue herons and ospreys flying overhead.” Mary Rafferty loves hiking in Forest Hill Park: “This park sits right along the James River and is filled with miles of trails that you can hike for hours. It also hosts the best Farmers Market in the city every Saturday morning!” One of the most stunning places to explore has to be Maymont Park. According to Colleen Hall, it’s considered the “Central Park” of Richmond. With 100 acres, a museum, arboretum, Japanese gardens, exhibits and more, it would be easy to get lost in there for a day.

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graduate richmond

132 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


COLLIDE . 133

CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


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QUADRANGLE LOCATIO


AN ARTIST’S WAY WITH WATER

SHAYLEN BROUGHTON PAINTS FOR THE EARTH

136 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

BY MIRA Z. BARNUM SARAH SCHULTZ TAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY


COLLIDE . 137


Water — it is the defining property of any urban place, whether in scarcity or abundance. For some cities, it is fundamental to the place’s character. This is certainly the case for Richmond, and the same holds true for its native daughter, artist Shaylen Broughton. The region’s most recognized feature, the James River, “is what gives Richmond its unique vibe and character,” she says. When the painter seeks artistic inspiration, she returns to the river, seeking solace and inspiration. “[It’s] where I go to quiet my mind and connect with nature. I gather water for my projects, sit and paint with watercolors, or simply sit with my feet in the water and breathe deeply.” 138 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


“IT’S THE FEELING THAT I GET WHEN I REALLY TAKE IT IN. WHEN I LOOK UP AT THE MOON OR FEEL MY BARE FEET ON THE EARTH. WHEN I JUST BREATHE AND FEEL GRATEFUL FOR EVERY SINGLE BREATH. WHEN I CLOSE MY EYES AND FEEL THE SUN ON MY FACE. WHEN I START TO NOTICE HOW EVERYTHING IS CONNECTED, THE MAGNIFICENT BEAUTY OF THE CHAOTIC AND WILD YET INTRICATE DESIGN OF LIFE ITSELF. THE WAY THE WATER SPARKLES IN THE SUNLIGHT AND WAVES EBB AND FLOW ON THE SHORE. WATER ESPECIALLY HELPS ME FEEL THIS CONNECTION.”

Born and raised in Richmond, Broughton came by her love of the river honestly. “Oh the 1990s, before computers and smartphones took over the world, my sister and I spent more time outside than in.” She remembers, “When we weren’t digging in the dirt, pretending to be archeologists or climbing trees, building forts, and chasing fireflies around the yard, we were visiting Maymont, the VMFA, or the Science Museum, and spending countless summer days at the river or Virginia Beach and camping in the Blue Ridge Mountains with our parents.” At the same time, her grandmother Grace, a professional portrait artist, was teaching her to paint and she credits her for nurturing her “creative and adventurous spirit.”

After earning her BFA from the Savannah College of Art and Design, Broughton eventually returned to Richmond, and continues to appreciate the many things that make her hometown special. “In my experience, the fact that we are able to walk across a bridge and feel almost completely immersed in nature is a rare thing to find in a city.” She continues, “There is never a shortage of outdoor activities in Richmond when the weather is nice. You can do anything from mountain biking or regular biking (we have a new trail that connects us to Jamestown), kayaking, whitewater rafting and stand-up paddleboarding, hiking, rock climbing, to outdoor festivals, concerts, rooftop bars and patios.” She rarely passes up an opportunity be outside and you’ll regularly find her at Richmond’s outdoor yoga classes (her favorite is the one at the VMFA put on by Project Yoga Richmond) or biking from Willow Lawn down to the river and back. COLLIDE . 139


140 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


“THERE IS NEVER A SHORTAGE OF OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES IN RICHMOND WHEN THE WEATHER IS NICE. YOU CAN DO ANYTHING FROM MOUNTAIN BIKING OR REGULAR BIKING (WE HAVE A NEW TRAIL THAT CONNECTS US TO JAMESTOWN), KAYAKING, WHITEWATER RAFTING AND STANDUP PADDLEBOARDING, HIKING, ROCK CLIMBING, TO OUTDOOR FESTIVALS, CONCERTS, ROOFTOP BARS AND PATIOS.”

COLLIDE . 141


It’s clear that the natural world is a formidable presence in Broughton’s life, so it will come as no surprise that it drives her creative expression. “My inspiration to create comes from the feeling of peace that I get when I feel truly connected to nature,” she describes, “It’s the feeling that I get when I really take it in — the way the water sparkles in the sunlight and waves ebb and flow on the shore. Water especially helps me feel this connection.” For Broughton, “When I create, I am able to harness this energy, I am able to take this feeling and make it into something tangible and visible.” Looking at her art provokes a sense of awe for the natural world. Her paintings, while abstract, recall a sense of organic material. Some of her pieces conjure up aerial panoramas. Others capture the beauty of flora on a molecular level, and some even resemble the electric branches of a lightning bolt. Whether framed incredibly close or vastly distant, these perspectives defy our basic human sight. Her abstract perspective delivers us to a plateau of peace, calm and connection — removed from the noise of modern existence.

Artists are uniquely positioned in society to give back in ways that drive both attention and appreciation towards a cause. Broughton uses her voice and skill to do just that by leading neighborhood art projects such as large-scale interior murals and after-school art programs. At the root of her work is a desire to conserve the precious resource our world depends upon. “I believe artists have a unique ability to connect with people on a deeper, more emotional level. I think using this ability to promote something we care about, such as conservation, is one of the most important things we can do with our voice.” Of course, water conservation ranks high for Broughton. “It is the life force of this planet, we cannot survive without it. I often get incredibly emotional thinking about the damage we have done to the earth, our oceans and our rivers. I wish I could save the world, but I am only one person. So this is what I can do to help. It is the least I can do.”

142 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


Shaylen’s Food and Drink Picks Even when dining, Broughton opts to eat alfresco. One of

her most visited spots is Tex-

Mex cantina En Su Boca. “The food and drinks are great, the vibe is chill and the servers

are always friendly. I love that when I sit out on the patio, I

totally get that vacation vibe, surrounded by giant tropical plants.” Her other favorites

include Mellow Mushroom,

Bottoms Up, Goatacado, The Mill, Sine’s Irish Pub, LuLu’s, Mekong, The Daily, Don’t Look Back, Sabai, Pasture, Fat Dragon, Lunch and Supper, Comfort and Gwar

Bar. For coffee, it depends on

where she is in the city. Some

favorites include Black Hand Coffee, Lamplighter, and

Urban Farmhouse, among others.

COLLIDE . 143


city guide

TEMPE ARIZONA AS TOLD BY:

ZANE BICKHAM JOE CZERWINSKI DANA ARBEL


BOB WICK/CCFLICKR

The sun is an almost permanent presence in Tempe, Arizona. Though within spitting distance of Phoenix, it is its own dynamic destination. This friendly desert city in the heart of the Valley of the Sun is home to Arizona State University, the largest public university in the U.S. The major student presence means education, science and the arts are at the city’s forefront. But Tempe knows all work and no play is no fun. From Oktoberfest to the Festival of the Arts to the football games at Sun Devil Stadium, there’s always something going on. As Dana Arbel puts it, “The city fully embraces the outdoors from fall to spring. Concerts, festivals and markets fill up our weekends. You can stumble upon a unique cultural experience by simply walking in your neighborhood park.” But if the mercury climbs a little too high for comfort, there are plenty of indoor attractions to cool you down. Look no further than ASU. Check out the school’s state of the art science centers where visitors can learn about Mars exploration, art museums with ancient and modern exhibits and the Frank Lloyd Wrightdesigned Gammage Theatre where you can catch Broadway plays. The fun continues over at Mill Avenue where you can enjoy fine dining, refreshing cocktails and entertainment late into the night.

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TEMPE

At a Glance

Meet Your Tempe Guides

FOUNDED IN: 1871

POPULATION: 122k

STUDENT SPOTLIGHT ZANE BICKHAM

Zane Bickham is a Junior at ASU studying Engineering Management with a focus in sustainable and environmentally benign industry. He is originally from Pullman, WA where he came to enjoy rock climbing, snowboarding, mountain biking and mountain climbing.

JOE CZERWINSKI

Joe Czerwinski has been ranked in the top 20 in every national level adult rock climbing event he has competed. His success comes from his speed and his sheer determination. He has routeset for international events like the Asian X-Games and Junior X-Games and worked for ESPN, ESPNStar, NBC, Disney and OLN. Joe has been coaching for 12 years, producing some of the top athletes in the world. He is also a state-certified guide for Hueco Tanks State Historical Park.

DANA ARBEL

After years of struggling with identity, body image and mental health, Dana Arbel found the tools to cultivate peace within through yoga. She trained at Urban Yoga in 2011, under the tutelage of Dave and Cheryl Oliver. With a Bachelor’s Degree in Media Arts, her teaching emphasizes individual expression through movement. A first-generation American with a multiethnic identity, Dana grew up searching for her place of belonging. Creating a space that is inclusive and welcoming to all is built into the blueprint of DiRTYOGA. Establishing a strong sense of self while cultivating community drives Dana.

FOR THE LOVE OF NATURE Love of nature has driven our Tempe resident contributors to join clubs, run for student office and launch their own businesses. In his freshman year, ASU student Zane Bickham signed up for the Arizona Outdoors Club. “I had been looking for a group of like-minded, outdoor-oriented people. After the first meeting I knew I would fit right in.” Fast forward three years and many meetings later, and he’s now the Club President. “I wanted to give back and ensure people could make the same great memories and friends that I had through the club.” Nature also forms a pillar of DiRTYOGA’s philosophy. Dana Arbel, one of its founders says, “Yoga and nature bring people outside of their own chaos, and allow us to gain perspective. They ground us!” The outdoors has a similar effect on Joe Czerwinski, “Being outside (since most of us work and live inside) helps reconnect us to our roots.” We can’t help but agree with his argument: “When people go on vacation, all their pictures [are] of them doing stuff outside. Go outside, it’s good for you.” 146 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE

MAJOR INDUSTRIES: tech, agriculture, education

FUN FACT:

The university was founded 27 years before Arizona actually became a state.


VISIT TEMPE

COLLIDE . 147


TEMPE

FOOD AND DRINK Tempe’s range of cafes will give your day a bright start. Zane scores his caffeine kick at Cartel Coffee Lab. It doubles as a hip spot to “hang out and get homework done.” When he needs to get going, Joe Czerwinski turns to Seattle Espresso, while Dana Arbel alternates between vegetarian eatery, The Coronado and Ollie Vaughn’s. “The Coronado has a great selection of teas and vegetarian breakfast options. Ollie Vaughn’s has the best selection of baked goods, from quiche to pie, love it all.” After a day of outdoor climbing, Zane Bickham’s guilty pleasure is Culver’s concrete mixer (a chocolate and vanilla frozen custard-based shake). Pro-tip: “ASU students get 2-for-1 with student ID!” according to Zane. At the top of Dana’s list is Gallo Blanco for Mexican, and Glai Baan for Thai. For Joe Czerwinski, it’s the classics, “Pizza/burgers, and beer is what works for me — Boulders on Broadway is the place.” ’Nuff said.

CARTEL COFFEE LAB

148 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


CARTEL COFFEE LAB

GALLO BLANCO

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150 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE GRADUATE TEMPE


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CHRISTIAN HORAN PHOTOGRAPHY


RYAN CADBY/CCFLICKR

GROWING UP IN A DESERT CLIMATE GAVE ME A DEEP APPRECIATION FOR WATER AND LIFE. I LEARNED WHAT PLANTS AND SPECIES ARE ABLE TO SURVIVE THE DRY HEAT THROUGH PROTECTION AND WATER CONSERVATION. RAINFALL IN THE DESERT IS A SPIRITUAL EXPERIENCE! IT IS A RARITY THAT IS GREATLY HONORED AND CAPTURES MY FULL ATTENTION. NO UMBRELLAS FOR ME, I RUN OUTSIDE TO DANCE IN THE RAIN! — DANA ARBEL

TIM TRUMBLE

TEMPE

152 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


VISIT TEMPE

I WENT CAMPING A LOT AS A KID, SO I ALWAYS ENJOYED BEING OUTSIDE VERSUS INSIDE. I LEARNED THE BASICS OF OUTDOOR ETHICS AND RESPECT FOR MOTHER NATURE… AND WHAT MY DAD’S COORS LIGHT TASTED LIKE. — JOE CZERWINSKI

WHERE TO EXPLORE

Whether hiking or mountain biking, the trails at Dana Arbel’s recommended spot, Papago Park do not disappoint. Once you’ve worked up a sweat, beat the heat with a kayak or paddleboard on Tempe Town Lake. Zane Bickham points adventure seekers toward The Jug at Salome Canyon for an unparalleled canyoneering hike. Due to its technical difficulty, trekking with a guide is highly advised. “You’re constantly in the water so you’re not getting too hot. There’s also a lot of fun rappelling and the canyon is beautiful.” If you’re willing to venture farther afield, Tempe is within driving distance of some of the country’s most beautiful natural wonders. Joe Czerwinski highlights Tonto Natural Bridge (1.5 hour drive), Walnut Canyon National Monument (2.5 hours), Grand Canyon (4 hour drive) and Antelope Canyon (5 hours). But staying in town has its perks, too. Both Zane and Dana are fans of the Desert Botanical Gardens. Locals love the butterfly enclosure. “I love walking to my neighborhood park, Steele Indian School Park. We walk around the park, sometimes stop by the dog park, and then usually find a grassy spot to sit and relax. I end up practicing some form of creative expression, often journaling or yoga,” says Dana Arbel.

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RICHMOND

BOB WICK/CCFLICKR

LANDMARK TOUR

154 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


BOB WICK/CCFLICKR

Though Tempe is not much older than a century, it has its fair share of history. Retrace Teddy Roosevelt’s steps to the Old Main, perhaps the most famous building on the ASU campus, built in Victorian and Queen Anne style of its time. For more arts and culture, make your way to ASU’s Harry Wood Gallery and contemplate the MFA students latest works. Wind down on Mill Avenue with a beer or something more potent. Pick your poison.

COLLIDE . 155


TIFFANY VON ARNIM/CCFLICKR

WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST PROPERTIES

SEATTLE

156 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


With two brand new properties opening up this year in Seattle and Bloomington, we thought we’d give you just a quick overview of the latest cities you can explore from the Graduate Hotel. Ranging from the Pacific Northwest to the very middle of the country, these places offer a vast array of landscapes and activity. So take a quick dive, and plan ahead for your next great adventure.

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spotlight city

POREN CHIANG/CCFLICKR

BLOOMINGTON

158 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


Although Indianapolis may be home to the Indy 500, Bloomington (just 50 miles southwest) hosts the Little 500. Branded as “The World’s Greatest College Weekend,” this bicycle race has grown to include a whole week of activities. Indiana University students can be found cheering at Hoosier basketball games, slaking their thirst at Kilroy’s bar or playing a game of “Sink the Biz” at Nick’s English Hut. Aside from its robust college vibes, Bloomington also boasts a healthy outdoors scene. The area features coves to wade in, cliffs to jump off and bike paths to cruise on. So take advantage of the dynamic seasonal weather and explore all that the Indiana town has to offer. COLLIDE . 159


spotlight city

TIFFANY VON ARNIM/CCFLICKR

SEATTLE

160 . TRAVEL WITH PURPOSE


In the very northwest corner of the country, Seattle sits among a web of waterways and islands, welcoming the gloom the adjacent Pacific Ocean provides. While the Emerald City may be well-known for its rainy weather, the city shines for its cultural, social and economic contributions — Starbucks, Amazon and Microsoft were all founded here. But the rain certainly seems to have factored into its music scene. For a time, particularly in the ‘90s, Seattle was synonymous with its grunge exports which include Nirvana, Soundgarden and Pearl Jam. Regularly ranked as one of America’s most literate cities, Seattle is a hub for creative, intellectual and entrepreneurial spirits who crave a beautiful and rugged landscape. Whether you want to bike under a light drizzle, cozy up with a cup of joe, or catch some live music, Seattle is the place to be. COLLIDE . 161


COLLiDE Travel With Purpose for Graduate Hotels Fall/Winter 2018  
COLLiDE Travel With Purpose for Graduate Hotels Fall/Winter 2018