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SOUND TRACKS SIOUX CITY GUIDE


PUBLISHER Alan Miller EDITORIAL DIRECTOR + DESIGN Gigie Hall ARTIST RELATIONS Leah Hobbs CONTRIBUTING WRITER David Husson MARKETING Wes Martin, Molly Kodros, Megan McCredie ADVERTISING West Coast Maria Sauer maria@WeAreCOLLiDE.com

East Coast Monique Gilbert monique@wearecollide.com COLLiDE is a North American boutique marketing agency weaving brands into the cultural fabric in meaningful ways. weareCOLLiDE.com CultureCOLLiDE.com HARD ROCK GUIDE TO SIOUX CITY is published by Collide Acency INC, 5514 Wilshire Blvd, 9th Floor, Los Angeles, CA. HARD ROCK GUIDE TO SIOUX CITY is not responsible for anything, including the return or loss of submissions, or for any damage or other injury to unsolicited manuscripts or artwork. Any submission of a manuscript or artwork should include a self addressed envelope or package of appropriate size, bearing adequate return postage. ©2017 COLLIDE AGENCY, LLC. all rights reserved 2


TABLE OF

WELCOME TO SIOUX CITY PART 1: CITY GUIDE 05. Meet Your Guides 07. Food 08. Coffee 09. Bar 10. Landmarks 11. Venue

PART 2: EXPLORE THE HOTEL 13. A Snapshot of Your Stay 14. 5 Hotel Corners to Explore 16. Live From Sioux City

An Interview with Ron Emory

24. VIP Treatment: Live Like A Rockstar 28. The Stuff of Legends: Memorabilia Tour 3


WELCOME TO

Sioux City Almost smack dab in the middle of the country, in the northwest corner of Iowa sits Sioux City, perched on the Missouri River. Once the edge of the frontier, Sioux City was a major pit stop for many an expedition making its way across the Great Plains. Its robust industrial past has now been replaced with a rich cultural present, making it one of Iowa’s biggest entertainment destinations. Popular areas include 4th street and the Pearl Street bar districts, which have both flourished in the last decade. Rising right alongside them is a burgeoning local music scene, which includes every genre from soul and rap to metal and indie. So who better to guide you than the musicians who call the city home? As you scroll through these pages, discover where to eat, drink and explore through the eyes of a local. Welcome to Sioux City.

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MEET YOUR GUIDES Emily Johnson Band

The Emily Johnson Band performs classic soul and R&B with a timeless sound and dynamic stage presence. Their deep knowledge of the old school imbues their music with confident authenticity. Already legendary in their native Sioux City, they’ve shared the stage with world-famous acts like Jefferson Starship and the Devon Allman Band. Playing vintage favorites from Aretha Franklin to James Brown, as well as modern soul compositions, EJB are sure to delight connoisseurs and causal fans alike.

Bucii

Hailing from the “Corn Coast” of Iowa, rapper Bucii got his start practicing rhymes during late-night freestyling sessions with friends. While his early experimentation helped refine his technique, it wasn’t until his brother’s death that Bucii began creating music with more drive and structure. Today, Bucii’s music is his refuge and his art. A notorious perfectionist, Bucii spits more bars in one song than many rappers do on entire albums and his lyrical complexity is matched only by his elite production quality. Don’t miss the chance to see him work his magic live!

Vibe Rations These Sioux City funk-rockers teem with a distinctive intensity, blasting away all preconceptions about the Midwestern music scene. The band’s tropical sound may seem at odds with their cornfield surroundings, but the group is full of surprises. Vocalist Jordan Clark lays down intricate lyrics, followed by hair-raising solos from the band’s guitarists. With a sound and energy like no one else, these guys are not to be overlooked.

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Meet Your Guides

Would You Kindly?

Iowan pop-punk group Would You Kindly? brings the best traditions of the genre to their home base of Sioux City. The vocals of frontman Henry Milner recall the snotty, devil-maycare attitude of their punk forebears, but are tinged with a mild desperation that conveys the singer’s depth of feeling. The band coats the rough core of their sound with melodic interludes, revealing their art rock influences. Certain tracks even veer into the territories of jazz and ska before being brought back to earth by the Milner’s heartfelt lyrics. Effectively combining the accessibility of pop and the artfulness of post-punk, the band’s future looks bright.

Mark Kochen

Sioux City-based artist Mark Kochen describes his art as “Surrealist-Pop.” He creates works of vivid color and imagination, weaving stories and characters throughout his art. Kochen’s paintings are invigorating to view; each features countless layers of complexity. Despite the whimsical nature of his art, social commentary can be detected in the scenes of rabbits chopping electrical cables and fuzzy sheep moving through factory machinery. Kochen has been creating art from a young age, and feels that he’s still developing his craft, increasing the intricacy and meaning of his work. When he’s not painting, Kochen teaches art and enjoys the outdoors.

Artificial Stars Alternative rock band Artificial Stars take inspiration from their Sioux City roots. The Midwest can be cold and dark, but it’s also ingrained with a certain distinctive charm. The band’s music reflects the navigation of this environment, of trying to find a way through the darkness. On some tracks, their sound is laden with lament and conflict. Other songs possess a cathartic vigor. The raw feelings in each song are offset with catchy guitar riffs and innovative rhythms, making the even the more somber tracks fun to listen to. Having already won several local music contests, Artificial Stars are poised for an ascent to great heights.

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city guide

Soho Kitchen & bar

Emily Johnson recommends

Bob Roe’s

Soho Kitchen & Bar

Soho Kitchen courtesy of Downtown Partners; Pizza - faungg / Flickr

“No matter what type of food you are in the mood for, they will have it on the menu. Go to order: Open face Chicken Caprese Sandwich.”

Bucii recommends

Bob Roe’s

“My favorite Sioux City restaurant has to be Bob Roe’s, I grew up in Morningside so everyone knows how big of a deal Bob Roe’s is especially on game day, when I use to play sports that was always the dinner spot! Just a lot of great memories, great pizza, and the best wings in the midwest.” also recommended by Artificial Stars

Would You Kindly? recommends

Billy Boy Drive Thru

“This place has serious nostalgia factor working for them. They opened in 1962 and have managed to hold on to that oldschool vibe. They’re a friendly, family-run operation and the food is cheap but good. Billy Boy offers no pretenses and that’s precisely what makes it so damn good. Try the chili dogs, pizza burger, and onion chips and dip.. you can’t go wrong.”

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Stone Bru

Pierce Street Coffee Works

Artificial Stars recommends

Stone Bru

“Delicious fresh brews, locally owned. Stop in and see our own bass player and barista Jesus Iniguez and he’ll make you a delicious drink of your choice! He is great at latte art as well.” also recommended by Would you Kindly? and Vibe Rations

Pierce Street Coffee Works

“Unassuming exterior with a comfortable, eclectic interior. The walls are covered with the work of local artists and it’s a great place to link up with a friend for lunch or a quick meeting. They have some strangely named food, but it’s all good stuff. Try their iced coffee.”

Emily Johnson recommends

Cup O Joy

“Locally owned, very friendly staff. Go-to order: Hazelnut Latte with Almond Milk.”

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Ston Bru courtesy of Stone Bru; Coffee - Jun Seita/Flickr

Mark Kochen recommends


city guide

The Marquee

The Diving Elk

The Marquee credit Jason Babor Photography; The Diving Elk courtesy of The Diving Elk

Mark Kochen recommends

the diving elk

“Artist turned award-winning bartender uses his drink menu as a creative outlet. These folks aren’t messing around. Extensive local and regional beer selection and the knowledge to wield it responsibly. Food menu is short, sweet, and affordable. Try the mac & cheese w/ elk sausage and an IPA.”

Would You Kindly? recommends

The Marquee

“Great shows, sound and atmoshere.” also recommended by Emily Johnson, Artificial Stars and Bucii

Vibe Rations recommends

Marty’s Tap

“Small, friendly atmosphere, and they do their own microbrews! Try the Brioux City Pretty Porter.”

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Stone State Park

Grandview Park

Bacon Creek

“Being from MorningSide I love going to Bacon Creek. They got a dog park, and a running trail. I have Day 1’s that go there every single day during the summer to run! It’s a great place to clear you mind.” also recommended by Emily Johnson

Vibe Rations recommends

Grandview Park

“A great place for community gatherings, home of Saturday in the Park annual music festival. Fantastic environs that can be enjoyed by all.” also recommended by Mark Kochen

Artificial Stars recommends

Stone state Park

“Stone State Park has beautiful trails for hiking, areas for camping, and picnics, ponds, and much more.” also recommended by Mark Kochen

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Stone State Park credit Thomas M. Loftus/Flickr; Grandview Park credit Siouxwestern

Bucii recommends


city guide

Orpheum Theatre

Hard Rock Hotel Sioux City

Mark Kochen recommends

Orpheum Theatre

The Orpheum courtesy of The Orpheum; courtesy of Hard Rock

“Going to the Orpheum is like stepping into another world that’s just dripping with opulence. Built in 1927 and restored to it’s full glory in 1999, it’s a stunning venue down to the minute detail. The Orpheum pulls in all kinds of national acts from music to theatrical performance. If you have the opportunity, this is at the top of Sioux City’s ‘must visit’ list.” also recommended by Artificial Stars

Bucii recommends

Hard Rock Hotel

“If we’re talking live music, no one compares to the Hard Rock. I don’t go to much shows but for live music it’s either at the Hard Rock or it’s at The Marquee!” also recommended by Artificial Stars

Artificial Stars recommends

Ickey nickel

“Marty’s Tap or The Ox for small intimate shows. The Ickey Nickel for outdoor shows in the summer. The Marquee always. The Hard Rock Hotel and Casino for bigger shows.”

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EXPLORE THE

HOTEL

A SNAPSHOT OF YOUR STAY 5 Hotel Corners to Explore Live From Sioux City An Interview with Ron Emory VIP treatment: Live like a rockstar The Stuff of legends: a memorabilia tour 12


A SNAPSHOT OF YOUR STAY 54 Guest Rooms and Suites Complimentaty Cocktail Upon Check In Six Restaurants Four Bars Swimming Pool + Hot Tub WAX速 Sound of Your Stay速 Body Rock速 Fitness Center Rock Shop速 850+ Slot Machines & 25+ Table Games Two Concert Venues 13


H OT E L CO R NERS TO

EXPLORE 1

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WINE BAR

With 850+ slot machines, guests have plenty of options to choose from to meet their gaming needs. Additionally, the table games pit features 25+ tables including Blackjack, Craps, Roulette, Mississippi Stud, Ultimate Texas Hold’em, Blackjack, and Open Stud and more.

American fare meats London pub at Main + Abbey. Hard Rock Pick: we recommend starting with a unique appetizer, like pretzel bites served with goose island cheddar fondue and house mustard. From there, you can’t go wrong with an 18oz ribeye, served with choice of sides and optional add-ons like lobster tail and sautéed mushrooms. Wash it all down with a glass of our Stag’s Leap Artemis, Cabernet Sauvignon, and make sure to order one of our Pastry Chef’s house-made desserts.

For all of your official fan gear needs visit the Rock Shop at Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Sioux City. Sometimes nothing does it like a tee, baseball cap or souvenir shot glass featuring our world-famous logo. Find the store near the 3rd Street entrance.

Enjoy watching the game on our big screen TVs while playing our bar top progressives. With over 100 whiskeys to choose from, sip on the finest Scotch, Rye or Bourbon at The Yards Bar, Sioux City’s Whiskey Bar.

The newest addition to the property, Wine Bar boasts a unique hangout lounge tucked away in a secluded portion of the gaming floor, offering an intimate setting for guests to enjoy their choice of 125 wine labels.


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Live from

S ioux C ity For all of your concert needs, there are two venues located on property. Anthem (850 capacity) can be found on the gaming floor and features a diverse selection of shows in an intimate space. Past performers include SLASH, Mike Posner, and Brett Young. For the bigger shows take it outside to Battery Park (6000 capacity), which hosts larger national touring acts throughout the summer such as Chris Stapleton, Journey, Kesha and more.

Theory of a Deadman at Anthem


Cheap Trick at Battery Park

If you’re looking to dig into the local music scene, check the upcoming artists booked in Anthem for events like the Tri-State Throwdown! The hotel also hosts “Acoustic All Stars,” which features local talent from a variety of bands who gather together on Anthem’s stage to create music and riff. For the solo performer, events like “Jukebox Heroes,” give the brave and the talented an opportunity to take part in a live karaoke battle with finalists performing alongside a live band and competing for cash prizes along the way. Fun Fact: Anthem also hosted the first round of the 2017 Hard Rock Rising competition, the largest battle of the bands series in the world.


A N I N TE RV I E W WI TH

RON Y R O M E By David Husson

Images by Matt Downing

Ron Emory’s career in music stretches all the way back to 1978, when he formed legendary punk band, T.S.O.L with fellow Californians Jack Grisham, Mike Roche and Todd Barnes. A highly skilled guitarist, Emory still plays with the band, in addition to side projects and solo work. Originally from Orange County, CA and later based in Los Angeles, Emory decided to leave the big city over a decade ago, choosing instead to plant his roots in the tight knit community of Sioux City. In 2010, he founded the Sioux City Conservatory of Music with his wife, a non-profit focused on musical education. The school has become an integral part of Sioux City’s arts scene, and not only brings the community together, but acts as a launching pad for some of the midwest’s most talented musicians. Below, Ron details his history in the city he now calls home and the conservatory’s origins.


What’s your history with Sioux City? I met my wife in Sioux City through a friend many years ago, and started a long-distance courtship. I lived in California, and I moved her out there, we got married, and bought our first house together. Then her mom, who was in Sioux City, was diagnosed with carcinoid cancer. We were traveling with our two little kids, back and forth, to see Grandma, knowing that she wasn’t well, and that was really the driving force of coming back [to Sioux City]. I was kind of the one pushing for it and I think it’s one of the best moves I ever made. I love this small town, everyone’s on a first-name basis. We’re able to do a lot more service work and be an asset to the community, whereas we’d just go unnoticed in Los Angeles. We started the Sioux City Conservatory of Music in 2010 or so; it’s a non-profit music school and that’s been our passion. It’s a good way to give back. I’ve been a musician since 1978 and used to live a lifestyle where there’s a lot of drug and alcohol abuse and whatnot. So it’s been really a way of giving back, being in Sioux City and trying to make a difference every day... and we’re having a heck of a lot of fun doing it. What does Sioux City offer that you haven’t seen elsewhere? The opportunity to do so much more in a small town is just incredible... it’s really given us a platform to give back. I’m not sure I could what I’m doing here if I were in a big city... I certainly wouldn’t have the funds to do it. There’s a really tight music scene, and all the musicians support each other, it’s really great that way. All the parents want their kids involved in some kind of art, whether it’s music, or dance, or theater or something else. You

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really see that in a small town, in Sioux City especially. I didn’t really notice that in Los Angeles. What are some misconceptions about the Midwest? Well, there are probably quite a few… but you get the whole gamut of people here; there are very liberal people here, and very conservative people here. But mostly, in the Midwest, they’re all really hard-working people. I always loved the music that came from the Midwest: Naked Raygun, The Effigies, The Replacements, Husker Du, all those were bands that I liked a lot. I always really liked the Midwest, and after being here for twelve years now, I really like it. I like all the seasons... I love it when we get snowed in. We light up the fireplace and don’t [have] to think about doing much, we just sit around and play and have family time… it’s cool! What’s the story behind the conservatory of music and what sparked your interest to open it? I have a friend who worked on the railway as an engineer, and he asked me, “Could you teach me how to play guitar? Cause I have a lot of down time.” I said, “Sure I’d be happy to.” Well, he was having so much fun with it, and he had twin daughters, and he asked if I’d teach them. I said, “Sure, I’d love to, that’d be great.” Started teaching them, and then their friends wanted to learn. And pretty soon, I ended up having 52 students at the house every week. And then little brothers and sisters and families, moms and dads. A good friend of mine, David Bernstein, said, “Why don’t you start a non-profit music school?”


“The opportunity to do so much more in a small town is just incredible... it’s really given us a platform to give back.”


So my wife and I opened up the school, into and we don’t make them play stuff and we ended up purchasing a building they don’t want to. We have a lot of fun, that she had looked at before as an and we really encourage songwriting. investment property, and we just moved We have all kinds of clubs that are free, in there. It’s a very artistic, very inviting where the community can come together atmosphere to create. We’ve got these and learn off each other. And of course giant glass slider windows next to the we offer private lessons, band lessons studios, so if you’re in the atrium area, — all kinds of fun stuff. you’re looking at all the different lessons going on. We bought the building next How does your own trajectory as a door because we got too crowded in musician and a member of a punk band [the first] space. That building has an influence the way you run the school? art gallery, gathering place, more lesson When I started playing music I was only studios, and in the back, it’s got an indoor interested in punk rock; that was what skatepark and live venue space, which made me want to play music. My grandpa is all-ages. So we can do live shows in saw how much passion I had for that there and we can do our recitals in there. first guitar that I worked all summer to buy, and he told me “Let’s go for a It’s really flourished, and it’s really given ride, let’s talk about that thing.” And all these kids a platform to express he told me to learn all I could about it, themselves. It’s fun, we teach very learn about every different style of guitar differently than the traditional music music, every different style of guitar, to school. We find out what the kids are take em all apart, put em back together.


I started learning to play guitar like my Grandpa suggested, learning about the different kinds of music you can make. If you’re looking at a 50s L5 jazz box Gibson guitar, you think, “Well what kind of music does this create?” So then you look up Charlie Christian, and you look up Wes Montgomery, who played an L5. All these different kinds of people that I really never would’ve known much about, I find out what their influence is on all the types of music that we listen to today. I came from Orange County, and the band the Adolescents had this really crazy great octave sound that their guitar players Rick and Frank Agnew did, and it was kind of the Orange County sound. Then I found out about Wes Montgomery, and that’s how he played back in the 40s and 50s! And it’s like “Oh, okay, I can see the connection!” So I get to share the things that I’ve learned over the years. Someone might like Taylor Swift, for instance, lots of little girls love Taylor Swift. But then you get to show them Loretta Lynn, or Roseanne Cash, and all these people they would never even know. So that’s one of the funnest things ever, to able to share influences with people. That’s definitely how I run the school. I stop students in their tracks a lot of times and go, “Hey, let’s look deeper into this, where did this band come from?” Any favorite memories or performers to come out of the conservatory? There’s a group of kids that all took lessons at the conservatory who started a band, which is something we always encourage. They submitted a tape to open up for Bon Jovi in Chicago, and they won! So they went and opened up for Bon Jovi and 35th and Taylor, and that’s a pretty proud moment for those guys. We have a lot of kids who’ve made it through many rounds on The Voice, or American Idol. I have this student who made it to the last round on The Voice and she’s a very country girl, a teenager with

really strong vocals, and I introduced her to [the Bob Dylan song] “Like a Rolling Stone.” So we did an acoustic version of that song, with this gal who sings country music, wholeheartedly, and had never heard of Bob Dylan. That’s fun, that’s good stuff. So what’s your favorite local venue? The Orpheum has always been great. The Hard Rock opening up was a huge blessing for Sioux City, cause they’ve got music 275 nights of the year, and since they opened, I’ve been to more shows there than anywhere else. Favorite local restaurant? Johnnie Mars is a family owned restaurant, a little diner. We really like it as a family restaurant. Main+Abbey is probably the nicest place in town. It’s at the Hard Rock; my friend Nick is the chef over there and he’s fantastic. Blue Café [next to the music school] is a great lunch spot, with crepes on Saturday! Anything happening at the conservatory you’d like to highlight? We’ve got the Orpheum Theater show, which is the second Saturday in November (Nov. 10). That’s our big fundraiser, that’s always a really good platform. It’s a nice, beautiful, classy, venue for the kids to get dressed up and to be able to say they performed on the Orpheum stage. We’re hoping to have Daniel Lanoi and Rocco DeLuca come play, and the kids always do a big performance, which we’re working up to. We usually pick about 5 or 6 songs and get all the kids involved on each of them. We set it up really nice, we have a stage in the lobby for some of the singer-songwriters, and then the big stage show, and then we usually bring in a headliner. We’ve had Sublime with Rome a couple times, Ukes of Hazzard, and Johnny Two Bags from Social Distortion. Fun stuff!


THE V IP TR E ATME NT

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LIVE LIKE A

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STAY & P L AY Looking to practice your swing? Book a “Stay and Play” package, which includes the choice of 9 or 18 Holes with cart, Hard Rock branded koozie and Nike golf ball, 10% Off in the Rock Shop, shuttle to and from Whispering Creek Golf Course (based on availability), Whispering Creek golf towel, 10% off in the Whispering Creek pro shop, and one appetizer at the Whispering Creek Bar N’ Grill.

Pricing for 9 holes Bring Your Own Clubs $39 | Rent Clubs $79 Pricing for 18 holes Bring Your Own Clubs $59 | Rent Clubs $99

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A M E N IT IE S One-of-a-kind photography Complimentary Wireless Internet 55” Flat Screen TVs JBL Bluetooth Radio Keurig Coffee Maker Sleep Like a Rock® Bedding and Towels Rock Spa® Bath Amenities Custom Furniture and Artwork Mini Fridge

Guests have additional options during the booking process: 1PM or 2PM checkout Two Vouchers to the World Tour Buffet Various Golf Packages Guests also have access to the 24-hour concierge service via text if they have any questions or need assistance, along with the option of turn down service, which includes slippers and robe laid out, with complimentary water set next to the bed and a Twin Bing candy bar waiting on the pillow.


THE STUF F O F LEG E N DS

A MEMORABILIA TOUR 1

B U DDY HO L LY B O OTS

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C H EA P T R I C K G U I TA R & OUTFI T

An American singer songwriter from Texas, Buddy Holly opened for Elvis in 1955 and became a central figure of the early rock’n’roll scene. On display is a pair of his custom ordered cowboy boots. Holly, along with Ritchie Valens, JP Richardson and pilot Roger Peterson, died in a plane crash near Clear Lake, Iowa. This later became known as “The Day the Music Died” as made famous by Don Mclean’s “American Pie.”

This display showcases Robin Zander’s original outfit from “Dream Police,” the band’s most commercially successful album, achieving Platinum status in 1979. The band got their name from band member Tom Peterson who said the band used “every cheap trick in the book” as part of their performance. Before their 2016 Battery Park performance, Zander gave this display’s contents to the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Sioux City.

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J O H NN Y CASH G U I TA R & S HI R T

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P RIN C E G U I TA R

On display is Johnny Cash’s vintage custom Fender acoustic guitar as well as one of Johnny’s black double-breasted cotton shirts. He claimed to wear black on behalf of the poor and hungry, on behalf of the prisoner who had long paid for his crime and on behalf of those who had been betrayed by age or drugs. The guitar and shirt were owned by Cash in the 1960’s and given to his daughter, Cindy, in 1977.

Prince was an innovator known for his eclectic work, flamboyant stage presence, extravagant dress and makeup and wide vocal range. He has sold over 100 million records making him one of the best-selling artists of all time. On display is his custom Auerswald electric guitar used in his “Alphabet St.” video. The guitar’s creator, Jerry Auerswald, crafts all of his guitars by hand from vintage woods that have unique sound properties.


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Va n halen drum set

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RO N EM O RY G U I TA R & OUTFI T

Alexander Arthur Van Halen is a Dutch-American musician best known as the drummer and co-founder of the hard rock band Van Halen. This custom-made drum set used by Alex during Van Halen’s 2007-2008 World Reunion Tour comes complete with a one-of-a-kind “kick fridge,” an additional bass drum that opens from the front to reveal a hidden, working refrigerator. In addition, the accompanied fire extinguishers were often filled with tequila and used to spray onto the audience during live events.

Ron Emory is an American rock musician and guitarist for the punk rock band T.S.O.L (True Sounds of Liberty). A native of Sioux City, Emory presented the display to the property in 2016. The Gianni Versace suit was worn in Ron’s wedding and redesigned by Tim Armstrong of Rancid. In addition, a 1957 Fender Stratocaster reissue and hand-written lyrics from the title track of his solo album “Walk the Walk” accompany the suit.

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SLAS H G U I TA R & OU TFI T

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TO MMY B O L I N G U I TA R & S UI T

Saul Hudson, better known as SLASH, is a British American musician and songwriter known for being the lead guitarist of Guns N’ Roses with whom he achieved worldwide success in the late 1980s and early 1990s. On display is SLASH’s signature top hat, a white Mickey Rat t-shirt and black leather pants.

Tommy Bolin was an American guitarist, born and raised in Sioux City, who played with Zephyr (1969-1971), James Gang (1973-1974) and Deep Purple (1975-1976), in addition to maintaining a notable solo career. On display is a suit handmade by Bolin’s longtime girlfriend, Karen Ulibarri, who created many of his outfits. The guitar, manufactured by Dean, was designed based on custom specifications of the 1974 Fender Stratocaster that Bolin used. The accompanied record award signifies the achievement of surpassing $2,000,000 in total sales throughout Australia, with Deep Purple’s studio album, “Come Taste the Band.”


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Profile for Collide

Hard Rock Sound Tracks Guide: Sioux City  

Hard Rock Sound Tracks Guide: Sioux City  

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