Page 1

WALK THE TALK   a psychoanalytic perspective    by Jessica Taylor How can we arrive at more meaningful  and deeper relational spaces within a group  context? When a group is given over to a  task, whether work, community or leisure  focused, the relational dynamics  underpinning the group’s function may be  operating at an unconscious level.   Culturally, it is rare to find a group giving  deliberate space to these more subtle and  abstract elements of group life. Finding  means to explore these areas can enhance  creativity and open the way for richer  experiences and more meaningful relations  within groups. Walk the Talk (WTT) aspires  to offer a way and a means to do this.  What might be occurring in this  experience that lends itself to the group and  its members creating a space of mutuality?  It could be asked, what ‘talk’ is being  ‘walked’ in WTT?  The talk seems to be of a deeper kind  than that originating from the mind that  works with the narrow cyclic movement of  the ‘this and that’ of our daily living; the  discursive mind.  Walking requires us to shift the  attention into the body, being aware of  one’s body in space when placing a foot here  and the next here and so on. The external  environment needs to be attended to.   When our awareness is grounded in our  body, we broaden the mind’s attention  opening the way for more playful and  abstract levels of consciousness to be  accessed; those proceeding from intuition  perhaps.  The green space in which the walk  occurs can facilitate this kind of awareness 

by a process of participants’ paralleling the  natural and balanced rhythms of nature  within their own beings. This ‘talk’, too is facilitated by the space  that Cultural Value holds for participants  when walking. It dissuades from any definite  purpose but to be present with the other in  reverie while being open the exploration of  insights that may come from the ensuing  external or internal musings along the way.   Participants are invited to explore  unchartered territory via this sensitive and  flexible relationship between containing and  being contained that Cultural Value  provides. This way of being with another  invokes trust that there is a different kind of  knowledge or wisdom that resides in the  human psyche, one that is not at the behest  of the reasoning mind. “Culturally, it is rare to find a  group giving deliberate space to  these more subtle and abstract  elements of group life."  If the discursive mind is solely at the  helm we may miss out on the opportunity to  make discoveries along the way; we keep  our psyches closed, in effect. Exploring in  this way we can come to know ourselves and  others more wholly and in doing so affect  transformation of self and self in relation to  other.   The use of symbols on the psycho‐ spatial maps to depict the WTT experience  provides a transitional function so that  reflecting with others on the experience can  be done in a playful way.  Images as tools for  exploration can illicit thinking from parts of  the brain that words cannot.  By free association to these images and  symbols in the workshop new discoveries  about individual and group identity can  occur.  The space created lends itself to a 


more relaxed way of reflecting on and  exploring the possibilities between, the  fantasies that individuals hold in mind about  self and others, and reality, and decrease the  possible repression of negative thoughts  and feelings.  Analysis of individual and group identity  is limited in that it gives an understanding of  existing individual and group patterns of  relatedness. Transitional or playful spaces  can go further by affecting the creation of  new ways of being; transformation of self  and self in relation to others.  “Human beings have an innate  capacity to attribute to others a  mental life similar to one’s own,  giving rise to social engagement.”

By giving ourselves over to attending to  and reflecting together on the more subtle  and symbolic levels of consciousness, we  can come to an awareness of that which  may be the same in me and you.  Human  beings have an innate capacity to attribute  to others a mental life similar to one’s own,  giving rise to social engagement.  Being attuned to how we are the same;  we all have the capacity to do harm and be  of goodwill, brings a renewed sense of  empathy. Appreciation and understanding  of others increases our relational capacity  and may also give us a better understanding  of our role in group life. WWT offers an opportunity not  commonly found to explore and deepen the  relational spaces in group life. These areas  often remain hidden and unchartered.  Fostering these forms of communication  based on mutuality may lie at the heart of  enhancing and opening the way for richer  and more creative experiences in group life.

Jessica Taylor has a background in  psychology and and works in the community  health services sector. She is currently  undertaking her Masters in Organisational  Dynamics.  This piece was written in response to an  early concept brief about Walk the Talk ‐ a  project created by Cultural Value that invites  people to walk alongside an unknown ‘other’  in a public park. A derivative of this project,  Walk the Talk@Fringe, will premiere at the  2011 Melbourne Fringe Festival.  Check out www.culturalvalue.com.au  for more information. 

Profile for peter ghin

Walk the Talk by Jessica Taylor  

A short essay in response to Cultural Value's Walk the Talk project

Walk the Talk by Jessica Taylor  

A short essay in response to Cultural Value's Walk the Talk project