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Sours And Saisons:

Not Just For Belgians Anymore by DAVID NUTTALL

If you’ve ever wandered the beer aisle at your neighbourhood liquor store or looked at the menus at better beer bars lately, you may have noticed some unusual new beer names. Not only are there some wonderfully inventive beer monikers from breweries you’ve never heard of, but you might have observed some perplexing beer styles as well! Brewmasters like to walk a fine line between producing beers for mass appeal and brewing something unique. With 150 to 200 beer styles, there is certainly no

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shortage of varieties to choose from. And these styles are not new; most have been around for hundreds of years. But they might seem new to the beer neophyte because very few of the original European beers have ever been imported into Alberta. In addition, when new craft breweries began exploring what to brew beyond what was being churned out by the “Big Breweries,” as a rule, they stayed away from these esoteric styles, fearing they might be a little too obscure for the general public.

While there are dozens of beer styles that fall in this class, it’s the European Sour Ales and Belgian Ales that seem to have literally come from nowhere. Seriously. Of all the thousands of North American breweries, only a handful have ever produced these beers… until now.

Culinaire 5:6 (November 2016)  

Alberta's freshest food & beverage magazine. Dining out, dining in, wine, beer, spirits and cocktails. Celebrating international cuisine thi...

Culinaire 5:6 (November 2016)  

Alberta's freshest food & beverage magazine. Dining out, dining in, wine, beer, spirits and cocktails. Celebrating international cuisine thi...

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