Issuu on Google+

City Master Plan 2011–2040


Our vision A vibrant lifestyle opportunity that celebrates innovation and excellence – your place, your home, your future. Strategic Plan 2011–2015


Message from the Mayor The vitality and viability of our city over the next 30 years are key focuses of our City Master Plan 2011–2040. This plan reflects the vision and goals from our create20forty consultation in 2010, when we invited our community and stakeholders to help us shape our city. Our Elected Members and staff will continue to work closely with the community and all tiers of government to deliver this plan.

Miriam Smith Mayor City of Tea Tree Gully

City of Tea Tree Gully Elected Members (2010–2014) and Chief Executive Officer

Acknowledgements The City of Tea Tree Gully thanks the many people and stakeholders who participated in the community engagement processes for the City Master Plan 2011–2040 and who assisted in its production. GHD Services Pty Ltd produced the maps contained in the City Master Plan using data from the City of Tea Tree Gully/GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), Department of Environment and Natural Resources (2005) and Geoscience Australia (2006). This plan was also developed in consultation with our Elected Members, staff and community.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040


Contents Introduction.......................................................................................................1

The Strategic Plan 2011-2015....................................................................2

City Master Plan.........................................................................................2

How the City Master Plan will be used?...................................................2

Our planning framework..........................................................................3

Delivering, monitoring and reporting on the plan..................................3

Our history.................................................................................................4

Snapshot of our city..................................................................................4

Snapshot of our population......................................................................4

Community facilities..................................................................................5

Housing......................................................................................................5

Buildings, infrastructure and transport networks....................................5

City Master Plan 2011–2040..............................................................................6

Sites of high environmental value............................................................8

Sites of key economic activity................................................................10

Urban renewal.........................................................................................12

Areas of cultural interest.........................................................................14

Key Council community hubs................................................................16

Key multi-use community and recreation centres.................................18

Local and regional connections..............................................................20

Key open space areas.............................................................................22

Glossary...........................................................................................................24 References and Consultation..........................................................................26 Disclaimer........................................................................................................27

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040


Introduction Developing the Strategic Plan and City Master Plan In 2009 Council started the process of developing a Strategic Plan and City Master Plan to shape our city for the long term. Called create20forty, the process started with Elected Members developing a vision and key strategic objectives for the City. This was followed in mid-2010 by four weeks of engagement with our community and key stakeholders to obtain their feedback on the best way for our city to develop. The vision for the City incorporates nine themes that capture the shared priorities of our community. Each theme reflects the City’s responsibilities to its community, as well as challenges that must be met jointly by our community and all stakeholders, including the business sector, non-government agencies, local, state and federal governments and the Council, if the vision is to be fulfilled. The themes are: • Our buildings and infrastructure • Our local economy

members of parliament, young people, the Indigenous community and Council staff • inviting the community to give feedback via notices in the local newspaper • inviting the Tea Tree Gully Community Panel to comment • inviting key government agencies to comment • dedicating a section on Council’s website for community feedback. This feedback has contributed to the shaping of the Strategic Plan and the City Master Plan. Other influences on create20forty include the following State Government documents: • South Australia’s Strategic Plan • The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide We then developed the draft City Master Plan 2011–2040 and presented it to the community and other stakeholders between 13 April and 13 May 2011 for feedback. We disseminated the draft at the Civic Centre, the library and other community facilities. The community was invited to attend workshops.

• Our population

The document and feedback form were made available on Council’s website and Council’s Community Panel and the community members who had participated in create20forty were invited to comment on the draft.

• Our leadership

For each map we specifically asked:

• Our community

• What do you like?

• Our leisure, play and arts.

• Why do you think this?

Council consulted with the community on these themes in a variety of ways including:

• What don’t you like?

• Our housing and living • Our environment • Our transport networks

• distributing information brochures and feedback forms to stakeholders and at community facilities • holding workshops with representatives from community groups, the business sector, local

• Why do you think this? Feedback from the create20forty engagement process and our consultation on the draft City Master Plan is collated on Council’s website: <www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au/goto/ create20forty>.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

1


The Strategic Plan 2011–2015 This plan is the key strategic planning document that sets out Council’s vision and objectives. It also identifies the strategic directions for the next five to 30 years and outcomes for the next one to five years. The key strategic objectives are: • Physical infrastructure that supports the future needs of our community • Sound business and employment opportunity through innovative economic development • Diversity in housing • A sustainable living environment • Our community linked through effective transport systems • A diverse population • Leadership excellence • Foster family and community development • Participation in entertainment, recreation, leisure and the arts. These objectives align with the maps in the City Master Plan.

City Master Plan This plan is the physical expression of Council’s vision and objectives for our city during the next 30 years. The City Master Plan consists of eight maps with associated commentary to describe the main physical features of our city as envisaged for 2040. The maps identify opportunities for growth and revitalisation of the City and capitalise on our existing strengths. The maps and commentary show: • Sites of high environmental value • Sites of economic activity • Urban renewal • Areas of cultural interest • Key Council community hubs • Key multi-use community/recreation centres

How will the City Master Plan be used? The City Master Plan is a key document to guide Council in: • forming partnerships with stakeholders, including the community, state and federal governments, other local governments, non-government service providers and businesses • planning for sustainable growth and regeneration • planning for Council infrastructure, facilities and services • identifying key areas for development • social planning • budget preparation

• Local and regional connections

• setting policies, such as for land use

• Key open space areas.

• identifying priorities for capital works

These maps reflect high-level planning and Council will continue to work collaboratively with the community and stakeholders to develop more detailed precinct maps for specific localities. In addition, Council will continue to develop more detailed maps to denote educational facilities, health delivery services, community and public bus routes and tourism opportunities.

• allocating funding. The delivery of specific outcomes will be managed and delivered through the Strategic Plan 2011–2015. Its objectives will also inform our Development Plan, which sets out how the City will grow and change. The City Master Plan will also give some certainty on the City’s direction for our community and stakeholders. This will attract investment and increase collaboration opportunities. In some instances, Council will take a leading role, while at other times we will work to strengthen existing relationships, build new partnerships, or collaborate with other organisations.

2

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040


The City Master Plan 2011–2040 is a high-level strategic document which forms part of Council’s strategic planning framework (Figure 1) and suite of strategic management plans.

Our planning framework The Strategic Plan is underpinned by a hierarchy of Council strategies and policies, including the City Master Plan 2011–2040. These are delivered through action plans, department business plans, and internal work plans (Figure 1). The City Master Plan is a physical expression of Council’s 30-year vision and objectives for our city. In a series of maps with associated commentary the plan identifies opportunities for growth and revitalisation. Section 122 of the Local Government Act 1999 requires Council to identify the documents that make up its strategic management plans. These documents are available on Council’s website: <www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au>. Together they identify the measures and deliverables that indicate how the Council is performing.

Delivering, monitoring and reporting Our city’s corporate reporting framework will enable Council to track its performance in delivering its strategic management plans and measure this against Council’s social, environmental, economic and governance priorities. The frequency and method of reporting vary; however, reports to the community occur through the annual report and annual business plan as a minimum. We will track our performance in achieving the objectives and directions in the Strategic Plan and City Master Plan in our Annual Report and Annual Business Plan: both are public documents available on our website: <www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au >.

Strategy

Strategic Plan

Strategies, policies and initiatives, incl. City Master Plan 2011-2040

Delivery

Action plans

Department business plans

Internal work plans Figure 1: Council strategic planning framework

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

3


Our history

Snapshot of our city

Tea Tree Gully was named as a literal description of its natural environment: a steep gully dotted with native tea trees, which was originally inhabited by the Kaurna people.

The City of Tea Tree Gully lies at the foot of the Mount Lofty Ranges and northeast of the Adelaide central business district, which is a short drive away or 20 minutes via the O-Bahn.

European settlement dates from the late 1830s, when the land was used mainly for fruit-growing, cropping, livestock and vineyards. Over time several small townships grew up, including Tea Tree Gully, Hope Valley and Modbury.

We are a predominantly residential area covering about 95 square kilometres. Our slogan ‘Naturally Better’ reflects the rich natural heritage that runs through the City, from nature reserves to its treelined suburban streets.

The area did not significantly develop until the 1950s. Residential development exploded during the 1960s, and in February 1968, the District of Tea Tree Gully was officially proclaimed as the City of Tea Tree Gully.

Our local government area is bounded by the City of Playford to the north, the Adelaide Hills Council to the east, the Campbelltown City Council to the south and the cities of Port Adelaide Enfield and Salisbury in the west.

The southern half of the City was established by the late 1970s and the northern during the 1980s and 1990s, with the creation of the Golden Grove Development Area, including the suburbs of Golden Grove, Greenwith and part of Wynn Vale.

We include the suburbs of Banksia Park, Dernancourt, Fairview Park, Gilles Plains (part), Golden Grove, Gould Creek (part), Greenwith, Highbury, Holden Hill (part), Hope Valley, Modbury, Modbury Heights, Modbury North, Para Hills (part), Redwood Park, Ridgehaven, Salisbury Heights (part), St Agnes, Surrey Downs, Tea Tree Gully, Upper Hermitage (part), Valley View (part), Paracombe (part), Vista, Wynn Vale and Yatala Vale.

Today, our city is an established area. In 1991 the population was 84,000; now in 2011 the population has risen to 100,806.

Retail, construction, light manufacturing, professional and commercial services, and home-based businesses are our main economic sectors.

4

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

Snapshot of our population Our population is forecast to increase to 105,368 in 2031. Along with most of the world’s Western societies, we face the challenges of an ageing population: our 55–84 age group is projected to grow faster than any other age group. This phenomenon, along with changing lifestyles, has altered the make-up of households, with one and two-person households increasing at the expense of more traditional households. Our population of young people (12–25-year-olds) is the highest in the North Eastern Adelaide region and, despite a predicted marginal decrease during the next 30 years, young people will remain a significant proportion of our total population. As a Council, we need to be able to meet the health, recreation, and employment needs of the population, now and in the future.


Community facilities Our residents want a City with features that are appealing. These features include community facilities and services, particularly to suit the changing make-up of the population and its increasing diversity. To achieve this with limited resources will require an innovative approach to the nature and delivery of services. Council recognises that access to services in health, recreation, the arts and culture is vital for wellbeing and reduces health-care costs in the long term. We will continue to encourage and support the community’s engagement in these activities, in collaboration with relevant stakeholders. This is important not only for the economy, but also for the strength and sustainability of our community.

Housing Available housing in a range of sizes, prices and styles is important for existing and new residents; however, after several decades of strong housing growth, our supply of undeveloped land is nearly exhausted. There is increasing demand for more housing choice, which the existing housing stock cannot meet. The demand is coming from all sectors of the population and across a variety of age groups. Rental and affordable housing is in high demand but in low supply. Identifying areas where urban renewal and regeneration can occur in close proximity to services is vital to enable the City to provide greater housing choice.

Buildings, infrastructure and transport networks Council develops, operates, manages and maintains, many infrastructure assets including roads, open spaces, buildings, streetscapes, footpaths and bikeways, as well as water and sewerage systems. These assets affect all of us and contribute significantly to our quality of life. Infrastructure demand and supply is affected by population growth, demographic change, vehicle ownership levels, community preferences and expectations, economic factors and environmental considerations, as well as legislation changes. State and federal governments also play an important role in infrastructure planning and provision. Developing infrastructure helps to bring our community together, providing meeting places, fostering social ties, and shaping the City’s character and sense of place. Our neighbourhoods are connected by a network of roads, bikeways, walking trails and footpaths, as well as bus routes, including the O-Bahn busway. A sustainable transport network that is integrated, coordinated, affordable, efficient and safe is vital to connect our city’s residents and visitors with other regions. As an outer suburb, we are highly dependent on cars. Better access to alternative means of transport is needed. This involves liaising with relevant government departments to improve public transport networks as well as providing more footpaths, walking and cycling trails and ensuring accessibility of public transport for people with disabilities.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

5


Create 2040 Master Plan

City Master Plan 2011–2040 Legend & Notes

Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY TWO WELLS

GAWLER

VIRGINIA

Council Boundary

LYNDOCH

CITY OF PLAYFORD

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully

Golden Suburb Grove

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

BIRDWOOD

Hills Face Zone

GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

ADELAIDE

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

State Park / Reserve

MOUNT BARKER

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

Major Road

MACCLESFIELD

O-Bahn Track

MCLAREN VALE STRATHALBYN

ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre Council Depot

Ro a

d

Reservoir

H i ll

Environmentally Valuable Sites

T re e On e

ov

e

Ro

ad

Environmentally Valuable Open Space

ad

Aqueduct Land

d

Ro

Gr

Core Habitat

oa

ll

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

C ro uc h R o ad

ay

Golden Grove

Wetlands

n

W

Creekline or River in public ownership

Upper Hermitage

Th

Go

ld e

Sites of Key Economic Activity Activity Centres

e

Th

e Gr

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

G ld Go

Extractive Industry

N

d

en

oa

oa d H ai ne s R

In t yre Ro ad

Kel ly Ro ad

d

Urban Renewal Modbury Regional Centre

Yatala Vale

Development along major transit corridors Building height is low rise, maximum 3 storeys

Upper Hermitage

Banksia Park

ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

St Agnes

o ad To ll ey R

Lo

Va ll ey Ro ad

Aw oo n ga R oa d

B al m o ra

Dernancourt

we

r

r No

th

Ea

Ro st

h Ea st

R oa

Tea Tree Gully Township - Economic and Cultural

d

Community and Recreation Hubs

Tea Tree Gully

Vista

Local and Regional Connections Anstey Hill Recreation Park

O-Bahn potential mass transit corridor to northern suburbs

Houghton

To Adelaide Hills

Lo

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

w

er

No

rt

h Ea s t

To Barossa

R oad

To CBD & Eastern Region Alliance (ERA) To Port Adelaide To Salisbury, Playford & Northern Region

Highbury

Bikeways Key Open Space Areas

ad

Other Key Open Space Areas

Paracombe

l R o ad

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

Areas of Cultural Interest

Significant Outdoor Destinations

Angove Conservation Park

Holden Hill

Urban Renewal Areas Building height is low rise, maximum 3 storeys - 400 metres radius from activity centre boundary

State and Local Heritage Site

No rt

Modbury ad Re s er vo ir Ro

o ad Va li an t R Ly o n s R o ad

oa

Areas of Cultural Interest

Sm ar t Ro ad

Gilles Plains

an

R

Ridgehaven

Ro ad Mo n t ag ue

Hope Valley

Modbury Regional Growth Area

Mi ln e Ro ad

Modbury North

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

Commercial / Industry

ad

R

ad Ha n co ck Ro

Mc

Redwood Park

Valley View

m

ad Gr e nf el l R o

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Wr i gh t Ro ad

or

Fairview Park

Surrey Downs

Modbury Heights

d

o e R

en

W

N

Mi ln e Ro ad

oa

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

e

Wynn Vale

Para Hills

a

R

ng

re

e

ad

ov

W y n n Va l e D r i v

Se

vi

ew

Ra

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map9_CTTG_Create2040_MasterPlan_Composite_NoLR_6June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB © 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


The City Master Plan The City Master Plan provides a map for us to follow as we journey forward.

community engagement — finally producing this City Master Plan.

hubs that will support social and

Over the next 30 years the city will undergo significant change as it embraces exciting new opportunities to support the community, while adapting to new technologies, an ageing population, ageing infrastructure and diminishing opportunities for broadacre development.

This plan:

with non-government organisations

The plan was formed with the participation and engagement of the community, other stakeholders and Elected Members, through the create20forty consultation project. This was followed by the development of the Strategic Plan 2011-2015 and the Draft City Master Plan, resulting in further

• identifies locations for urban renewal to cater for housing diversity while still reflecting the natural character and amenity of the City • identifies activity centres which cluster compatible land uses, including housing, retail, employment and other local services, to provide for accessible, productive and efficient use of infrastructure

community programs and partnerships • identifies major environmental sites that should be protected and enhanced for their biodiversity value • envisages a transit-orientated development with supporting peripheral land uses to create a vibrant Modbury Regional Centre capitalising on the Modbury Interchange that is truly the heart of the City.

• envisages key focus areas for sporting activity through provision of hubs for sporting, recreation and leisure

The City Master Plan map is a composite

• identifies locations for key community

map.

of eight themed maps that bring all elements of the City together onto one

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

7


Sites of high environmental value Locality Map ROSEWORTHY TWO WELLS

CITY OF PLAYFORD

GAWLER

TANUNDA

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE

VIRGINIA

WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

ADELAIDE

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH MOUNT BARKER

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA

Little Para

STRATHALBYN

MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes Council Boundary Roa H i ll

28

W

ay

T re e

Golden Grove

n ld e

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre Council Depot

e

e

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

G ld

Yatala Vale

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Creekline or River in public ownership

Upper Hermitage

1

X

ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

Go

yre Ro ad Kel ly Ro ad

17

Sm ar t Ro ad o ad To ll ey R

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

14

4

6. Mumford Reserve

7

No rt

h Ea st

7. Pine Park Reserve R oa

8. Player Reserve

d

9. Shannon Reserve

11. Riverside Reserve

Vista

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

E

ad

12. Stevens Reserve

Houghton

13. Abercrombie Reserve

6

14. Gifford Reserve

13 Lo

w

er

N

th E a s t R oad or

15. Turramurra Reserve 16. Sandalwood Reserve 17. St Agnes Recreation Park

Va ll ey Ro ad

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

B al m o ra

r N

th or

o tR as

10. Sherwood Reserve

16

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

3. Callitris Reserve

5. Kaplan Reserve

3

5

2. Gunda Reserve

4. Doxiadis Reserve

21 Tea Tree Gully

St Agnes

Environmentally Valuable Sites 1. Taworri Reserve

18

R oa d

e Low

Aqueduct Land

19

Modbury

Hope Valley

R

Environmentally Valuable Open Space

2

oa d H ai ne s R

Banksia Park

Mi ln e Ro ad

12

33

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

an

d

Wetlands

Angove Conservation Park

Valley View

m or

oa

N

d

en

oa

10

Ridgehaven

Wr i gh t Ro ad

Core Habitat

ad

R

In t

Mi ln e Ro ad

9 ad Ha n co ck Ro

Mc

11

Reservoir

o e R

en

W

w

d

ng

re

e

ad

ov

Redwood Park

Modbury Heights

18. Brightlands Reserve 19. Tea Tree Gully - Hills Reserve

Highbury

20. Dry Creek Reserve 21. Milne Reserve

15 24 23

22. Lyons / Willowbrook Creekline

Paracombe

23. River Torrens Linear Park 24. Aqueduct Land

l R o ad

Dernancourt

ie

oa

Fairview Park 8

22

av

R

Ra

Gr

Se

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Mo n t ag ue

O-Bahn Track Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

Surrey Downs

31

Ly o n s R o ad

Upper Hermitage

N

20

Wynn Vale

Holden Hill

Major Road

r i ve

Modbury North

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

Go

Th

30

Gilles Plains

ad

Th

29

Para Hills

Ro

C ro uc h R o ad

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

32

e

d

ad

26

W yn n Va l e D

ov

Hills Face Zone

oa

Ro

R

ll

Gr

an

CITY OF SALISBURY

Hi

en

ch

et

ld

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

On e

Go

Greenwith

ra

27

rg

St

Salisbury Heights Ta

Golden Grove Suburb

d

25

25. Para Valley Reserve / Lot 101 26. Cobbler Creek East and West 27. Immanuel Reserve 28. Marengo Reserve 0

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL Black Hill Conservation Park

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

29. McIntosh Reserve 30. Verdant Reserve

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54

31. Horama Reserve

Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map1_Environment_A3_revA Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011

32. Para Hills Reserve 33. Dalaston Reserve


Sites of high environmental value Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Key strategic objective 2040:

Our environment A sustainable living environment

The community recognises and highly values our city’s natural heritage. Sites selected for their high environmental value contain remnant communities of local native plants or they are natural in character and have potential for improvement. The community is continuously involved in revegetation programs and vegetation management at several of the sites.

• Eucalyptus porosa (Mallee Box), occurs in Salisbury Heights, Wynn Vale and Golden Grove

Each site has ecological and natural attributes that support its listing as a reserve requiring conservation, protection and specialised management. Those attributes may include:

• Callitris sp. (Southern Cypress Pine), occurs in Callitris Reserve.

• a last remaining patch of bushland that resembles the landscape prior to development

• Eucalyptus camaldulensis (River Red Gum), occurs in Dry Creek Reserve, Cobbler Creek Recreation Park and the River Torrens Linear Park • Eucalyptus leucoxylon (South Australian Blue Gum), occurs in Surrey Downs, St Agnes and Highbury

Natural features that may be associated with each vegetation type include: • significant trees • uncommon native grasses, native orchids, chenopods and ferns

• uncommon local native plants

• native fauna.

• habitat for native wildlife

• wetlands.

Core habitat areas are conservation parks or recreation parks under the protection of the National Parks and Wildlife Act 1972 (SA). They are identified as a primary source of fauna and flora that may expand into the neighbouring urban areas if their open spaces present the appropriate habitat.

Such reserves would not need irrigation, which encourages grass to cover over native vegetation.

The creeklines that run through the City act as the remaining connection between rural and urbanised areas.

The native plants endemic to our city include:

The Aqueduct Land is under the protection of the River Torrens Linear

• significant trees • corridors that allow for wildlife movement • watercourses

Park Act 2006 and is a key ecological site in the southern part of our city. Wetlands store stormwater and improve water quality by treating it through natural physical and biological processes, such as gross pollutant removal, sedimentation, nutrient removal by plants, filtration of fine sediments and disinfection by sunlight. As well as improving the aesthetics of an area, wetlands provide habitat for wildlife and can be a focus for recreation with additions such as walking paths. The City’s wetlands typically fall into three main categories: • wetland/storage for stormwater harvesting and managed aquifer recharge (MAR) • flood detention/mitigation • recreational/aesthetic. In recent years Council has actively developed wetlands and these will become a common feature in the suburban landscape in the future. As well as these significant sites, Council recognises the value of street trees and reserve trees for their ecological contribution to sites of environmental value and will continue to support the planning and development of streetscapes.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

9


Sites of key economic activity Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll ay

W

T re e

Major Road

n ld e e

e

G

Ro

h

ve ro

it

Go

Reservoir

m or

13

an

R

oa

N

d

en

oa

N

Fairview Park

d

Modbury Regional Growth Area Light and Service Industry

Yatala Vale

1. Holden Hill

Upper Hermitage

ad Gr e nf el l R o

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Council Depot

ad

R

G

w

ay

ld

R

o e R

en

W

a

w

ng

re

e

ad

ov

Se

e vi

d oa

Ra

Gr

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

24

2. Modbury North 3. Greenwith Road

In t

oa d H ai ne s R

Mc

ad Ha n co ck Ro

Banksia Park ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

yre Ro ad

7. Hancock Road, Golden Grove

Kel ly Ro ad

2

17

Ridgehaven 18

Modbury North

5

Mo n t ag ue

8

6

B al m o ra

r we

Va ll ey Ro ad

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

Lo

Vista

No

r

Ea th

st

Ro

ad

R oa

8. Tea Tree Gully Township - Economic & Cultural

d

9. Holden Hill Mixed Use Precinct Activity Centres 10. Crouch Road

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

11. Target Hill Road

Houghton

12. Golden Grove 13. Fairview Park

w Lo

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un 20

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

23

o ad To ll ey R

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

Hope Valley

h Ea st

Tea Tree Gully

Ro ad

St Agnes

No rt

Angove Conservation Park

Sm ar t Ro ad

1

5. Ridgehaven

6. Tolley Road Commercial Precinct

Mi ln e Ro ad

21

4. Golden Grove

Precincts

Mi ln e Ro ad

Valley View

Dernancourt

State Park / Reserve

Upper Hermitage

O-Bahn Track

7

Redwood Park

Modbury Heights

Ly o n s R o ad

C ro uc h R o ad

Go

Th

15

Wr i gh t Ro ad

Holden Hill

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

Surrey Downs

Modbury

Gilles Plains

ad

3

r i ve

19

9

Hills Face Zone

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

4

16

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

Ro

Golden Grove

Th

14

Para Hills

e

10

12

Wynn Vale

ov

d

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

Gr

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

oa

l l 11 Ro ad

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

W y n n Va l e D

Golden Grove Suburb

On e

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

STRATHALBYN

er

N

t or

h Ea s t R oad

14. Surrey Downs 15. Sunnybrook 16. Modbury Heights 17. St Agnes

Highbury

18. Ridgehaven East 19. Modbury North

22

20. Hope Valley Paracombe

21. Holden Hill 22. Highbury

l R o ad

23. Dernancourt Extractive Industry 24. Golden Grove Extractive Industry Zone CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map2_Economy_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Sites of key economic activity Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Key strategic objective 2040: Over the next 30 years, we have the opportunity to create a robust city supporting economic activity in commerce, health, education, creative technologies, construction and light manufacturing as well as home-based, small and emerging businesses.

Modbury Regional Development Area The Modbury Regional Development area will develop into an area of mixed uses and medium-density living linked to the O-Bahn Interchange. It will contain significant retail services, employment activities, education and health facilities and open spaces. It will develop into an attractive and accessible place for people to visit, work and live. Economic development in the Modbury Regional Growth Area will occur with the involvement of and input from community and business stakeholders and government and non-government agencies. It will provide: • retail sites which make a significant contribution to the local economy • enhanced hospitality and entertainment services • a revitalised health services precinct including Modbury Hospital • a higher profile educational precinct, including Tea Tree Gully Campus of the Torrens Valley TAFE • more digital, knowledge-based and creative businesses. The residential areas located between the Tea Tree Plaza shopping centre and Tolley Road are included in the Regional Growth Area as they offer the potential to be developed with a mixture of land uses, including residences in diverse styles, such as townhouses, row dwellings, and apartments ranging in

Our local economy Sound business and employment opportunities through innovative economic development height from three to five storeys. This is in keeping with the State Government’s vision for transit-oriented housing developments.

• digital, knowledge-based and creative businesses

Precincts

• medium-density housing.

9 and 21 The areas marked 1 on the map have potential to develop into a mixed-use precinct supporting light industry with a combination of land uses, including office, commercial and residential. Areas 6 and 7 on the map will continue to support light industry, bulky goods retail and wholesale, and also develop into centres for business clusters/incubation hubs, including new business for digital, knowledge-based and creative industries.

Light and service industry

The Tea Tree Gully Township economic and cultural precinct 8 has remnants of our city’s early history and is a gateway to the Adelaide Hills and Barossa regions, both key tourist areas. The township has high development potential for:

• health and social services

Businesses in the light industry and service sectors serve the needs of our local community (for example, electrical, plumbing or building) and wholesale retailers. These areas have development potential for: • low-impact specialist manufacturing • defence-related services and advanced technology manufacturing • clean technology and emerging industries • digital, knowledge-based and creative businesses capitalising on access to high-speed broadband • business clusters.

• hospitality

Extractive industry

• markets

Our city has a long history in quarrying and brick/paver production and the sector makes a contribution to the City and state economies. It is expected that the lifespan of the mines at Golden Grove 24 will be more than 50 years. The Golden Grove Extractive Industries Zone Management Plan 2006 acknowledges the need for the land to be returned to the public in a form that maximises its potential future uses, once the resources have been recovered. It is expected that this may incorporate wetlands and other environmentally valuable assets, open space and

• creative industries, cultural galleries, events • eco-tourism • walking trails.

Activity centres While our city’s activity centres are dominated by retail for personal and household goods, they have development potential to become centres with a rich mix of business, administrative, retail, employment and residential development. This will be possible by encouraging further development of: • hospitality and entertainment

residential opportunities.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

11


Urban renewal Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll e

ad

ad

W

ay

Golden Grove

ld e Go

Th

e

e

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

m

G ld Go

an

R

oa

Modbury Regional Centre - Mixed Use. Building height is medium rise, maximum 5 storeys

N

d

en

oa

ad

R

Reservoir

d

Modbury Regional Centre - Mixed Use. Building height is low rise, maximum 3 storeys Development along major transit corridors Building height is low rise, maximum 3 storeys

Upper Hermitage

oa d H ai ne s R

Banksia Park ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

Urban Renewal Areas Building height is low rise, maximum 3 storeys - 400 metres radius from activity centre boundary 1. Modbury Heights

yre

2. Surrey Downs

Ro

Mi ln e Ro ad

3. Fairview Park

ad

4. St Agnes

Kel ly Ro ad

Ridgehaven

No rt

4

5

St Agnes

B al m o ra

Lo

w

No er

r

Ea th

st

Va ll ey Ro ad

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

5. Ridgehaven East R oa

d

6. Modbury North 7. Holden Hill

Tea Tree Gully

8. Hope Valley 9. Highbury

Vista

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

w Lo

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

8

h Ea st

Angove Conservation Park

o ad To ll ey R

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

Hope Valley

7

or

ad Gr e nf el l R o

ad Ha n co ck Ro

In t

Modbury

Council Depot

o e R

en

W

R

ng

re

e

ad

ov

Mc

Modbury Heights

Modbury North

Wr i gh t Ro ad

Dernancourt

w

Fairview Park

3

Sm ar t Ro ad

Ly o n s R o ad

ie

Yatala Vale

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

Redwood Park

6

Holden Hill

S

v ea

d oa

Ra

Gr

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Ro ad Mo n t ag ue

Gilles Plains

T re e

O-Bahn Track

N

Mi ln e Ro ad

Major Road

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

Surrey Downs

1

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

Upper Hermitage

e

2

Valley View

State Park / Reserve

C ro uc h R o ad

Th

Wynn Vale

Para Hills

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

n

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

Ro

Hills Face Zone

d

Ro

ov

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

oa

ll

Gr

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

W y n n Va l e D r i v

Golden Suburb Grove

On e

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

er

No

rt

Houghton

h Ea s t

10. Dernancourt

R oad

Highbury

9 Ro

ad

Paracombe

l R o ad

10

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

STRATHALBYN

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map3_UrbanRenewal_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Urban renewal

Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Themes: Key strategic objectives 2040:

Urban renewal means strengthening an area’s economic, social and environmental sustainability by improving its amenity and character. It often involves urban redesign, investment in infrastructure and the upgrading of public spaces. Urban renewal requires participation from the community, private sector and state and federal governments. The City Master Plan urban renewal map identifies the localities within the existing urban areas which will undergo detailed precinct planning. It is at the precinct planning stage that specific issues will be considered. These include overlooking, overshadowing, scale, bulk of buildings, setback from street boundaries, separation distances, loss and gain of urban vegetation, integration of new and existing development and links to open spaces. Urban renewal involves significant engagement with communities and stakeholders.

Modbury Regional Centre: medium-rise The most intensive urban renewal will be focused in and around the Modbury Regional Centre, which is one of five regional centres in metropolitan Adelaide. With its existing mix of uses, and the Modbury O-Bahn Interchange, the Centre has the capacity to become a transit-oriented development. The City Master Plan envisages a concentration of urban development within 800 metres of the O-Bahn interchange. This is defined in The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide as a major transit corridor. Within this space there are opportunities to diversify the

Our housing and living Our transport networks Our population Diversity in housing A diverse population current form of housing to better suit the needs of the future. This area contains a number of significant retail sites. As a transit-oriented development, the Modbury Regional Centre has the capacity for medium-rise development of up to five storeys for residential, commercial and retail uses.

Transit corridors Our city also has road networks that are designated for regular and frequent bus services (Go Zones). The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide defines these as transit corridors. Our Go Zones are Hancock Road, North East Road and Grand Junction Road. These will be reviewed following further discussions with the state government.

The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide identifies a 400-metre radius around transit corridors as the ideal distance in which to diversify housing stock. This is considered to be a comfortable walking distance to bus stops and other services; thus development along these routes is designed to reduce reliance on cars and to increase walking, cycling, and the use of public transport. The City Master Plan encourages development along these routes, but will limit height to three storeys. During the life of the City Master Plan, new Go Zones may be designated. We would consider development in new corridors during the ongoing review process of the City Master Plan.

Urban renewal areas Urban renewal in our city’s older areas will be concentrated around activity centres that serve the population at a

district and neighbourhood level. These areas are identified on the map as urban renewal areas. These areas are predominantly retail and are generally well serviced by public transport, which gives the opportunity to vary the type of housing up to 400 metres around them to better suit our changing demographics. The maximum building height in this radius would be three storeys. As well as providing more diversity in housing styles, these centres offer opportunities for economic development by encouraging mixed-use and improvement of the public realm.

Modbury Regional Centre: low rise By applying a 400-metre radius to the current Modbury Regional Centre zone boundary, an area of urban renewal is identified on the map (shown in lilac). This area can potentially be transformed into a mixed-use zone (commercial, retail, residential) with building heights up to a maximum of three storeys.

Other residential areas Development opportunities in the remaining residential areas will be in accordance with the Development Plan, which allows for low-density developments to a maximum of two storeys, on small and large-sized lots. Council conducts regular reviews of its Development Plan. It is through this process that property owners and other stakeholders can submit any proposal for rezoning in specific localities.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

13


Areas of cultural interest Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll Ro

e

Ro

ay

W

Upper Hermitage

Major Road

ld e

n

O-Bahn Track

Th

Go

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

e

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

G ld

2

Reservoir

or

m

an

R

oa

N

d

en

oa

9

Council Depot

ad

R

Yatala Vale

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

Go

R

o e R

en

W

ew

ng

e

re

ov

Se

i av

d oa

Ra

Gr

ad

e

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

N

d

Community Centres 1. Greenwith Community Centre

Fairview Park

Surrey Downs

2. Surrey Downs Community Centre

4. Holden Hill Community Centre

Banksia Park

In t

oa d H ai ne s R

Mc

ad Ha n co ck Ro

Redwood Park

3. Jubilee Community Centre

Upper Hermitage

ad Gr e nf el l R o

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Modbury Heights

ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

yre Ro ad

Kel ly Ro ad

No rt

Ridgehaven Angove Conservation Park

St Agnes

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

4

B al m o ra

Lo

we

Vista

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

r

r No

th

E

t as

Ro

Houghton

Tea Tree Gully Township - Economic and Cultural State and Local Heritage Site

Lo

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

Holden Hill

Hope Valley

11. River Torrens Linear Park

Va ll ey Ro ad

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

10. Anstey Hill Recreation Park

10

o ad To ll ey R

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

Valley View

8. Goldenfields 9. Dry Creek Linear Park

Sm ar t Ro ad

Modbury

Wr i gh t Ro ad

7. Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

h Ea st R oa d

Tea Tree Gully

Ro ad

6

w

er

No

h Ea s rt t

R oad

Highbury

ad

Paracombe

l R o ad

11

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

5. Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

Significant Outdoor Destinations

Mi ln e Ro ad

Mo n t ag ue

Arts, Cultural Events & Entertainment

6. Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

Mi ln e Ro ad

Modbury North

Dernancourt

State Park / Reserve

C ro uc h R o ad

Golden Grove

8

3

Ly o n s R o ad

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

e

Wynn Vale

Gilles Plains

T re e

ad

Th

5

Para Hills

Hills Face Zone

On e

ov

1

ad

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

Gr

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

d

ll

7

W y n n Va l e D r i v

Golden Suburb Grove

oa

Hi

en

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

Greenwith

an

et

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

STRATHALBYN

MOUNT COMPASS

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map4_AreasOfCulturalInterest_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Areas of cultural interest Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Key strategic objective 2040: Culture can mean different things to different people but is generally about experiencing interaction. Culture can take the form of: • heritage — manmade or natural • arts and events — galleries, markets, sporting events • leisure — walking, reading, meeting friends • community buildings — meeting places for community programs • trails — destination points, walking, cycling, biodiversity. Our current and future residents require a variety of recreational, arts and community facilities and activities. Council, the state and federal governments, and the private sector all have a role in the delivery of these facilities.

Tea Tree Gully Township Tea Tree Gully Township has the potential to be developed into a significant cultural centre, which would attract tourists and also benefit the local community. For example, the scheduled restoration of the former Council Chamber on Haines Road into an art space and gallery will strengthen the cultural appeal of the area. This locality is also recognised as a significant site for the Kaurna people. Other experiences or opportunities that could be explored include interpretive trails, markets, restaurants, public art and festivals.

Our leisure, play and arts Participation in entertainment, recreation, leisure and the arts Civic Park/Civic Centre/Library The Civic Park 6 precinct is a key destination in our city, and is the focal point for community gatherings and outdoor events. The Civic Centre draws people to use and visit the library and other facilities including the Reconciliation Garden in Civic Park. The centre’s surrounds offer playgrounds, shopping, cinema, dining and education facilities. The nearby Modbury Interchange connects the precinct to public transport. There is opportunity to further enhance and develop this area into a highly active and integrated community hub.

Golden Fields and Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre As well as providing sporting and recreation facilities, the Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre 5 hosts arts and cultural events. The Goldenfields Recreational Park 8 nearby has walking trails and youth facilities, and connects to other precincts such as the Cobbler Creek Recreation Park 7  . Nearby shopping, schools, dining, bowling greens, recreation facilities and a swimming pool add to the area’s appeal. It is also well serviced by public transport. There is opportunity to further enhance and develop this area into a highly active and integrated community hub.

signage, bike and walking trails, public art, eco-trails and interesting destinations or stopping points. This would be achieved by forging partnerships with neighbouring councils, as the park runs through several local government areas. More special events would also draw people to this precinct.

Dry Creek Linear Park With its connections to local reserves, wetlands, the Waterworld Aquatic Centre, dog obedience facilities, Jubilee Community Centre and sporting grounds, the Dry Creek Linear Park 9 has the potential to be further developed as a cultural hub. This corridor also connects to Golden Grove, the River Torrens Linear Park, and adjoining councils. There are opportunities to increase and diversify the community’s use of the linear park through improved interpretive signage as well as addition of sporting and leisure facilities.

Heritage sites (built form) Heritage sites help connect us with the achievements and lives of previous generations, as well as enhancing the character and attractiveness of the City for the enjoyment of residents, visitors and tourists.

River Torrens Linear Park

We believe that the adaptive reuse of heritage items is important to ensure that they continue to be valued, both economically and culturally.

The River Torrens Linear Park 11 follows the course of the river. The park has excellent potential for improvement through the addition of interpretive

Council will continue to encourage the conservation, sensitive development, and ongoing use of these sites within the City.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

15


Key Council community hubs Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll e

1

ad

Ro

ay e

e

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

G

Reservoir

N

or

m

an

R

oa

N

d

en

oa

ld

Council Depot

ad

R

Go

R

Yatala Vale

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

d

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library Community Centres

1. Greenwith Community Centre

Fairview Park

In t

oa d H ai ne s R

Mc yre

ad Ha n co ck Ro

7

2. Surrey Downs Community Centre

Upper Hermitage

ad Gr e nf el l R o

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Redwood Park

w

o e R

en

W

6

ie

ng

re

e

ad

ov

S

v ea

d

Ra

Gr

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre oa

3. Jubilee Community Centre

Banksia Park

4. Holden Hill Community Centre ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

Ro

6. Tilley Recreation Park

ad

Mi ln e Ro ad

7. Banksia Park Sports Area

Kel ly Ro ad

Tea Tree Gully

8

Modbury North

d

9. Hope Valley Sports Area Recreation Centres 10. Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

Sm ar t Ro ad

o ad To ll ey R

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

4

B al m o ra

Lo

Vista

o r N we

rt

h

s Ea

9

o tR

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

w Lo

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

Va ll ey Ro ad

Hope Valley

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

Holden Hill

8. Modbury Sporting Complex and Water World t Ro a

St Agnes

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

h Ea s

Ro ad

Modbury

Valley View

No rt

Angove Conservation Park

Ridgehaven

Wr i gh t Ro ad

Sporting Hubs 5. Harpers Field

Mi ln e Ro ad

Mo n t ag ue

Dernancourt

T re e

n ld e

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

2

Modbury Heights

Ly o n s R o ad

Major Road O-Bahn Track

Surrey Downs

3

Gilles Plains

State Park / Reserve

Upper Hermitage

Go

Th

e

Wynn Vale

11

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

5 C ro uc h R o ad

Golden Grove

W

ad

Th

10

Para Hills

Hills Face Zone

On e

ov

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

d

Ro

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

W y n n Va l e D r i v

Golden Grove Suburb

oa

ll

Gr

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

STRATHALBYN

er

No

rt

11. Burragah Recreation Centre

Houghton

12. Turramurra Recreation Centre

h Ea s

t R oad

Highbury

a d 12

Paracombe

l R o ad

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map5_KeyCouncilCommHubs_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Key Council community hubs Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Our buildings and infrastructure Key strategic objective 2040: Physical infrastructure that supports the future needs of our community Our community is well serviced by a variety of Council-owned buildings from which a number of programs are delivered. Council, in partnership with state and federal governments and other stakeholders, will provide dynamic community hubs which are accessible and connected to the community. These hubs will consist of buildings, spaces and facilities where the community and visitors can access recreation, sporting and social programs and services and which will meet the needs of our future population.

Community centres Council’s four community centres are situated in Greenwith, Surrey Downs, Wynn Vale and Holden Hill. Each centre differs in terms of how it relates with adjacent or nearby primary schools and kindergartens and its proximity to playing fields, sporting clubs, reserves and public transport. Each centre has also developed specialist programs for neighbourhood development that support various groups such as young people, families, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, and those with disabilities. Council considers that facilities for neighbourhood activities should be: • located in neighbourhoods • highly visible to the community • within easy walking distance of public transport, main roads and thoroughfares • linked by pedestrian and cycle routes • where possible, co-located with community facilities such as schools,

preschools and recreational areas.

Sporting hubs The City Master Plan encourages development of sporting hubs that combine a range of facilities such as ovals, clubrooms and other amenities for use by clubs and for informal community recreation. The five key sporting hubs are: • Modbury Sporting Complex (which includes Waterworld Aquatic Centre) 8 • Tilley Recreation Park 6 • Hope Valley Sports Area 9 • Banksia Park Sports Area 7 • Harpers Field 5 . We need to connect the various facilities and users of the hubs by adopting shared arrangements and developing management models in order to create hubs which are recognised at local, regional and state levels as leading providers of sporting experiences. Because facilities at the hubs can be used for various purposes, sharing of resources is promoted. Some of the existing facilities could be expanded to include more activities, thereby encouraging greater use by local residents. The establishment of partnerships between Council, clubs, other community users and funding bodies is imperative if we are to create dynamic sporting hubs within our city.

Recreation centres Our city’s recreation centres are well located, close to shopping centres, community facilities, reserves and schools, and on public transport routes. Because they are indoor facilities, recreation centres provide services yearround. We place a priority on ensuring that the environment in these centres is high quality and that people of all ages and abilities have the opportunity to participate. The programs offered include social sporting competitions, junior sports development programs, fitness classes, heart health, junior gym and other community programs. The Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre 10 is surrounded by residential areas, educational institutions, businesses and shopping centres. People from outside our city’s boundaries are also attracted to the Centre. Turramurra Recreation Centre 12 is located on a high-profile main road and is close to several educational institutions, a shopping centre, other commercial land uses and residential areas. Burragah Recreation Centre 11 is situated in a residential area and, and is close to schools, sporting and shopping precincts. Improvements to these facilities will encourage more efficient and equitable use of Council facilities by the community all year round.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

17


Key multi-use community and recreation centres Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll e

ad

ad

W

ay

Golden Grove

1

e

e

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

G ld

Reservoir

or

m

an

R

oa

Key Multi-Use Community and Recreation Centres

N

d

en

oa

Yatala Vale

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

Council Depot

ad

R

Go

R

o e R

en

W

w

ng

re

e

ad

ov

ie

d

d

1. Harpers Field 2. Tilley Recreation Park

Fairview Park

3

4. Burragah Recreation Centre

Banksia Park

In t

oa d H ai ne s R

Mc

ad Ha n co ck Ro

Redwood Park

3. Banksia Park Sports Area

Upper Hermitage

ad Gr e nf el l R o

5. Civic Centre / Civic Park ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

yre

8. Old Hope Valley School

Ro ad

9. Hope Valley Sports Area

Mi ln e Ro ad

Kel ly Ro ad

Modbury North

Tea Tree Gully

Ridgehaven

Angove Conservation Park

Sm ar t Ro ad

o ad To ll ey R

o ad Va li an t R

Aw oo n ga R oa d

Hope Valley

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

B al m o ra

Lo

w

No er

rt

a h E

9

Ro st

Va ll ey Ro ad

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

7

10. Turramurra Recreation Centre h Ea s

t Ro a

d

St Agnes 6

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

Valley View

No rt

Ro ad

Modbury

Vista

8

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

Lo

w

er

No

rt

Houghton

h Ea s t R oad

Highbury

a d 10

Paracombe

l R o ad

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

6. Radar Reserve 7. Tea Tree Gully Memorial Hall

Mi ln e Ro ad

Wr i gh t Ro ad

Dernancourt

S

v ea

oa

Ra

Gr

2

Surrey Downs

Modbury Heights

Ly o n s R o ad

T re e

ld e Go

Th

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

N

5

Holden Hill

Major Road

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

e

Mo n t ag ue

Gilles Plains

Upper Hermitage

O-Bahn Track

ad Gr e nf el l R o

4

State Park / Reserve

C ro uc h R o ad

Th

Wynn Vale

Para Hills

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

n

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

Ro

Hills Face Zone

d

Ro

ov

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

oa

ll

Gr

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

W y n n Va l e D r i v

Golden Suburb Grove

On e

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

STRATHALBYN

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map6_KeyMUCommRecCtrs_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Key multi-use community and recreation centres Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Our buildings and infrastructure Key strategic objective 2040: Physical infrastructure that supports the future needs of our community More efficient use of key existing Council buildings can be achieved by focusing development plans to meet the needs of the community. These buildings have the capacity to meet increasing demand for community spaces to support social and recreational programs. Our city’s four main community centres are in Greenwith, Surrey Downs, Wynn Vale and Holden Hill. These centres are well used for various programs by a range of individuals and groups throughout the year.

• Hope Valley/Highbury

• Tea Tree Gully Memorial Hall

• Vista/Tea Tree Gully

• Radar Reserve (St Agnes)

• Golden Grove/Greenwith.

• Burragah Recreation Centre

Multi-use community and recreation centres

• Civic Park/Centre

Our city has several Council buildings that could be transformed into key multiuse community and recreation centres. This could be achieved by co-locating multiple functions and uses, including recreation, sport, and community or neighbourhood programs.

• Hope Valley Sports Area

The services and programs offered could be expanded to run from facilities in other parts of our city where the community does not have easy access to recreation facilities. Such areas include:

Existing recreation and sporting facilities that could accommodate neighbourhood development programs include:

• Modbury/Ridgehaven

• Banksia Park Sports Area

• Harpers Field

• Old Hope Valley School

• Turramurra Recreation Centre • Tilley Recreation Park. Collaboration with users and stakeholders will ensure shared and equitable use of Council’s buildings and will increase their usefulness to the wider community. We will also explore the possibility of community use of new building infrastructure in schools.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

19


Local and regional connections To Barossa

Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll e

1

ad

Ro

ay

T re e

n ld e

Bikeways

e

e

G

Ro

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay

G

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

N

or

m

an

R

oa

Council Depot

N

d

en

oa

ld

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

ad

R

Go

R

Yatala Vale

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

d

Reservoir Civic Park / Centre

Fairview Park

1. Greenwith Community Centre

Banksia Park

In t

oa d H ai ne s R

Mc yre

ad Ha n co ck Ro

7

Community Centres

Upper Hermitage

ad Gr e nf el l R o

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Redwood Park

w

o e R

en

W

6

ie

ng

re

e

ad

ov

S

v ea

d oa

Ra

Gr

O-Bahn Track

2

Modbury Heights

2. Surrey Downs Community Centre ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

Ro

Sporting Hubs

ad

Mi ln e Ro ad

5. Harpers Field

Kel ly Ro ad

Tea Tree Gully

8

Modbury North

o ad To ll ey R

Hope Valley

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

4

w Lo

er

No

r

Ea th

Ro st

9

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

7. Banksia Park Sports Area 8. Modbury Sporting Complex

Recreation Centres

Houghton

10. Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre 11. Burragah Recreation Centre

Lo

w

er

N

th E a st R oad or

12. Turramurra Recreation Centre

To Adelaide Hills

Regional Connections O-Bahn potential mass transit corridor to northern suburbs To Adelaide Hills

Highbury

To Barossa

a d 12

To CBD & Eastern Region Alliance (ERA) Paracombe

To Port Adelaide To Salisbury, Playford & Northern Region

l R o ad

To CBD Dernancourt & Eastern Region Alliance (ERA)

B al m o ra

Ly o n s R o ad

Vista

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

Holden Hill

To Adelaide Hills

d

9. Hope Valley Sports Area

Sm ar t Ro ad

Va ll ey Ro ad

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

6. Tilley Recreation Park R oa

St Agnes

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

Valley View

h Ea st

Ro ad

Modbury

Wr i gh t Ro ad

No rt

Angove Conservation Park

Ridgehaven

To Port Adelaide

3. Jubilee Community Centre 4. Holden Hill Community Centre

Mi ln e Ro ad

Mo n t ag ue

Gilles Plains

Major Road Local Road

Surrey Downs

3

11

State Park / Reserve

Upper Hermitage

Go

Th

e

Wynn Vale

Para Hills

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

5 C ro uc h R o ad

Golden Grove

W

ad

Th

10 W y n n Va l e D r i v

Hills Face Zone

On e

ov

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

d

Ro

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

To Salisbury, Playford & Northern Region

Golden Suburb Grove

oa

ll

Gr

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

To Salisbury, Playford & Northern Region

STRATHALBYN

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map7_LocalRegConnections_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Local and regional connections Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Key strategic objective 2040: Our city is connected by a network of roads, bikeways, walking trails, footpaths and the Adelaide O-Bahn busway. Our population is heavily reliant on cars, but demand for more sustainable alternatives, such as increased public transport and bicycle paths is increasing.

Regional connections Our community depends on robust road systems and the O-Bahn. Council, in collaboration with federal and state governments, provides not only roads, but also footpaths, bike paths and walking trails.

Footpaths Council aims to provide safe footpaths that comply with design standards and legislation and meet the needs of people with disabilities. While pedestrian safety is Council’s first consideration when deciding where to

Our transport networks Our community linked through effective transport systems locate footpaths, we also consider:

lanes, off-road paths and local street

• pedestrian and vehicular traffic volumes

connections.

• proximity to public transport

pedestrian and bike paths are located

• proximity to schools, reserves, community and recreation facilities • existing footpath networks and walking and cycling trails • connections with shopping and school precincts, aged care and education facilities, community and recreation centres, playgrounds, reserves, and commercial and residential areas.

Our city’s main off-road shared in Cobbler Creek Recreation Park, Dry Creek Linear Park and the River Torrens Linear Park; however, scattered trails and walkways occur throughout the City, where the topography allows. Because of the health benefits of cycling, safe cycling is a Council priority in all transport and infrastructure planning, taking into account on- and off-road facilities, and planning bikeways to

Walks and bikeways

destinations of interest, such as schools,

Walking and cycling are activities that contribute to the community’s wellbeing and improve quality of life.

reserves, sports grounds and shopping

Bikeways include on-road bicycle

significant creeklines.

centres. We also promote shared-use tracks in our open space corridors along

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

21


Key open space areas Locality Map TANUNDA

ROSEWORTHY

CITY OF PLAYFORD

TWO WELLS VIRGINIA

GAWLER

LYNDOCH

ANGLE VALE WILLIAMSTOWN ELIZABETH

City of Tea Tree Gully ADELAIDE

BIRDWOOD GUMERACHA LOBETHAL

URAIDLA

GULF ST. VINCENT

BALHANNAH

LITTLE PARA RESERVOIR

MOUNT BARKER ECHUNGA PORT NOARLUNGA

MACCLESFIELD

MCLAREN VALE ALDINGA BEACH WILLUNGA MOUNT COMPASS

Gould Creek

Legend & Notes

Ro a

d

Council Boundary

H i ll e

Ro

6

ad

ad

ay

W

T re e

Major Road

ld e

n

O-Bahn Track

Th

Go

Civic Centre / Civic Park / Library

e

Th

e

h

ro

it

ve

w

ay en

d

ld

R

Yatala Vale

l e R oa d Ya t al a Va

e

N

10

Surrey Downs

m

R

oa

d

Creekline or River in public ownership Open space Environmentally Valuable Sites Sporting Hubs

Upper Hermitage

ad Gr e nf el l R o

3

1. Harpers Field 2. Tilley Recreation Park

Banksia Park

In t

oa d H ai ne s R

Mc

ad Ha n co ck Ro

Redwood Park

or

an

Reservoir

Fairview Park

ad Gr e nf el l R o

Modbury Heights

Council Depot

d N

oa

G

R

Go

w

oa e R

en

W

Ro

re

e

2

ie

d

ng

ad

G

ov

S

v ea

oa

Ra

Gr

Golden Grove Recreation and Arts Centre

7

9

ADELAIDE HILLS COUNCIL

yre Ro ad

Mi ln e Ro ad

11

Kel ly Ro ad

No rt

Ro ad

St Agnes

13

Aw oo n ga R oa d

o ad Va li an t R

Holden Hill

Hope Valley

HOPE VALLEY RESERVOIR

B al m o ra

Ly o n s R o ad

Dernancourt

Lo

rt

h

o tR

d

7. Goldenfields 8. Wynn Vale Recreation Area 9. Richardson Reserve

Vista

Anstey Hill Recreation Park

Houghton

11. Ladywood Reserve 12. Burragah Reserve

Lo

w

er

No

rt

h Ea s

13. Civic Park

t R oad

14. Tea Tree Gully Sports Area 15. Deakin Reserve 16. Bentley Reserve 17. Balmoral Reserve

Highbury

ad

Paracombe

l R o ad

17

o r N we

s Ea

5

6. Greenwith Oval t Ro a

10. Illayarrie Reserve

ct io n R oa d Gr a nd J un

Va ll ey Ro ad

CITY OF PT. ADELAIDE ENFIELD

15

o ad To ll ey R

ad Re s er vo ir Ro

Valley View

h Ea s

Tea Tree Gully

Sm ar t Ro ad

Modbury

Wr i gh t Ro ad

Angove Conservation 14 Park

Ridgehaven

CAMPBELLTOWN CITY COUNCIL

4. Modbury Sporting Complex

Other Key Open Space Areas

4

Modbury North

3. Banksia Park Sports Area

5. Hope Valley Sports Area

Mi ln e Ro ad

Mo n t ag ue

16

State Park / Reserve Upper Hermitage

Golden Grove

8

Wynn Vale

Gilles Plains

Mount Lofty Ranges Rural Zone

1 C ro uc h R o ad

W y n n Va l e D r i v

12

Hills Face Zone

On e

ov

Built-Up Urban / Rural Land

d

Ro

Cobbler Creek Recreation Park

Para Hills

Golden Suburb Grove

oa

ll

Gr

R

CITY OF SALISBURY

Greenwith Hi

an

et

en

ch

rg

ld

ra

Ta

Go

St

Salisbury Heights

STRATHALBYN

0

0.25 0.5

1

1.5

2 km

Map Projection: Transverse Mercator Horizontal Datum: Geocentric Datum of Australia (GDA) Grid: Map Grid of Australia 1994, Zone 54 Map produced by GHD Services Pty Ltd - 3315711_Map8_KeyOpenSpace_A3_June2011 Data source: City of Tea Tree Gully / GHD (2010), NAVTEQ (2008), Planning SA (2010), DENR (2005), Geoscience Australia (2006). Created by: JJB Š 2011. Whilst every care has been taken to develop this map, GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about its accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason.

JUNE 2011


Key open space areas Strategic Plan 2011–2015 Theme: Key strategic objective 2040:

Our leisure, play and arts Participation in entertainment, recreation, leisure and the arts

Open space in the City comes in various forms: it may be land developed for informal and formal sport and recreation; it may be the natural environment and environmentally valuable sites or green spaces; or it may be used for stormwater management.

also help develop mentally and socially healthy communities by providing places for people to meet and interact.

Our community is seeking a wider

Our city’s public open spaces include:

meet that demand.

• ovals

As a Council, we plan to manage our

• parks

open spaces strategically and flexibly

Open space — natural, treed areas that provide habitats for wildlife — is integral to our city’s character and our community’s quality of life.

• sports fields

focusing on:

• courts

• recreation

• playgrounds

• culture

Our sporting hubs are not just recreation and leisure facilities; they also have public open spaces that provide social, economic and environmental benefits to the community.

• picnic areas

• landscape amenity

Giving people the opportunity to take part in leisure and recreation can also forge a stronger community identity and a more cohesive population. It can

• pedestrian and bike paths

variety of programs, services and event opportunities, and Council will work to

• biodiversity and sustainability.

• linear corridors. Large areas of open space are scattered across the City, and the City also has a strong visual connection with the Hills Face Zone to the east and the Adelaide Plains to the west.

Our strategic approach will aim to carefully guide the management of open space to achieve a balanced provision of quality open space that is well used and valued by the community.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

23


Glossary Activity centre

Activity centres are concentrations of business, administrative, civil, retail, entertainment, employment, research, education and community uses, and increasingly, residential development. The purpose of activity centres is to cluster commercial and employment activity to improve accessibility, productivity and the efficient use of infrastructure. (Source: DPLG 2010, The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide.)

Adaptive reuse

Changing a disused or ineffective building into a building that can be used for a different purpose. When related to a heritage site it should respect and retain the buildingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s heritage significance and will usually add a contemporary layer that provides value for the future. (Adapted from Department of Environment and Heritage)

Business clusters

Business clusters are like-minded groups of cooperative businesses and supporting organisations with common business objectives that work collaboratively for economic growth.

Business incubation

Assistance programs designed to specifically help start-up firms become successful businesses that are able to operate independently and are financially viable.

Community land

Community Land is land under the care, control and management of the City of Tea Tree Gully, as defined by the Local Government Act 1999 Section 193.

Community Panel

A panel of community members who provide online feedback to Council as part of our community engagement. Local residents and business operators can join the panel at any time.

Creative industries

Creative industries have their origin in individual creativity, skill and talent, and have the potential for wealth and job creation through the generation of intellectual property. These might include advertising, architecture, design, visual arts, music, performing arts, publishing, film, television, radio and electronic games.

Development Plan

The principal document used to assess development within the City and within South Australia.

District centres

District centres are large centres that provide a range of retail, office, community and entertainment facilities. Shopping usually provides the most significant role, with associated civic, community, commercial and recreational services. (Source: Department of Planning and Local Government 2010, The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide.)

Eastern Region Alliance

The Eastern Region Alliance (ERA) is a group of eastern metropolitan councils that voluntarily work together for the benefit of their local communities and the eastern region community as a whole. Member Councils of ERA are the cities of Tea Tree Gully, Burnside, Campbelltown, Unley, Prospect, Norwood Payneham & St Peters and the Town of Walkerville.

Mass rapid transit

Regular and significant public transport that uses fixed transit infrastructure such as trains, trams or the O-Bahn guided busway.

Mixed uses

Mixed uses includes a combination of major land-use types such as residential, retail, office, commercial, civic and light industrial. The mixture of uses can be both vertical and horizontal, but not necessarily in the same building or site. (Source: DPLG 2010, The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide.)

Neighbourhood centres

Neighbourhood centres serve local residential communities and incorporate a mixture of services for their daily to weekly needs. (Source: DPLG 2010, The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide.)

Northern Adelaide region

The Northern Adelaide region is one of seven South Australian Government Administrative regions that together make up Greater Adelaide. The Northern Adelaide region consists of the local government areas of Tea Tree Gully, Playford, Salisbury and a portion of Port Adelaide Enfield.

24

City of Tea Tree Gully â&#x20AC;&#x201C; City Master Plan 2011â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2040


Open space

Refers to land that has been reserved for the purpose of formal and informal sport and recreation, the preservation of natural environments and environmentally valuable sites, the provision of green space and urban stormwater management. Adapted from Health Places & Spaces, National Heart Foundation, Planning Institute of Australia, Australian Local Government Association and Federal Department of Health and Ageing.

Place-making

A holistic process that seeks to create good public spaces that we connect with, and that stimulate our senses and enliven us (adapted from Village Well, 2009).

Public realm

Relates to all those parts of the built environment where the public has free access. It encompasses: all streets, squares, and other rights of way, whether predominantly in residential, commercial or community/civic uses; the open spaces and parks; and the ‘public/private’ spaces where public access is unrestricted (at least during daylight hours). It includes the interfaces with key internal and private spaces to which the public normally has free access. (Source: Alan Baxter & Associates and Whitelaw Turkington 2005, Public Realm Strategy).

Regional centres

Regional centres are major strategic centres that provide a full range of retail, commercial, administrative, entertainment, recreational and regional community facilities. They are priority centres for major investments in significant uses that serve regional catchments. (Source: Department of Planning and Local Government 2010, The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide.)

Stakeholder

A person or group with a direct interest in an outcome, strategy, policy or initiative.

Strategic management plans

A suite of documents that identifies Council’s objectives for the management of the City for at least four years. Council is required to adopt these under the Local Government Act 1999.

Transit-oriented developments

Transit-oriented developments comprise mixed-use, higher-density development centred on a major public transport access point. They accommodate residential, high-order retail services and employment activities as well as high quality open space. They are attractive and walkable places for people to live, work, shop and recreate in an accessible and self-contained community (DPLG 2010).

Urban design

The process of creating a vision for an area and then realising it by applying skills and resources. It incorporates a variety of disciplines to create places that are attractive and have a distinct identity (adapted from English Partnerships and the Housing Corporation, UK).

Urban renewal

The practice of improving the amenity and character of an urban area through initiatives that also improve the area’s economic, social and environmental sustainability. It often involves the development of urban design guidelines and urban redesign, investment in infrastructure and upgrade of public spaces.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

25


References and consultation References The following references were used to develop the City Master Plan: City of Tea Tree Gully 2011, Strategic Plan 2011–2015, <www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au> City of Tea Tree Gully 2010, create20forty consultation results, <www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au> City of Tea Tree Gully 2010, GIS data Department of Planning and Local Government 2010, The 30-Year Plan for Greater Adelaide, DPLG, Government of South Australia. Department of the Premier and Cabinet 2007, South Australia’s Strategic Plan 2007, DPC, Government of South Australia London A, Miles C, Drew M & Baldock P 2007, Ecological Mapping of the City of Tea Tree Gully, final report prepared for the City of Tea Tree Gully by Rural Solutions SA Mabarrack A, Drew M & Robertson S 2010, City of Tea Tree Gully: Updating of the Ecological Model Database, report prepared for the City of Tea Tree Gully by Rural Solutions SA QED Pty Ltd 2008, Review of Golden Grove Extractive Industry Zone, report prepared for the City of Tea Tree Gully C K Prowse & Associates Pty Ltd 2006, Golden Grove Extractive Industries Zone Management Plan 2006

Consultation Staff responsible for the City Master Plan consulted with key state government departments and agencies, including: • Department for Transport, Energy and Infrastructure • Department of Education and Children’s Services • Department of Planning and Local Government • Department of Trade and Economic Development • Housing SA • Office for Recreation and Sport • Primary Health Care Services North. We also consulted with the Adelaide North East Division of General Practice and three private property development companies who have knowledge of the property market in the City of Tea Tree Gully.

26

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040


Disclaimer While every care has been taken to develop the maps in this plan, GHD, the City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia make no representations or warranties about their accuracy, completeness or suitability for any particular purpose. GHD, the City of Tea Tree Gully, NAVTEQ, DENR, Planning SA and Geoscience Australia cannot accept liability of any kind (whether in contract, tort or otherwise) for any expenses, losses, damages and/or costs (including indirect or consequential damage) which are or may be incurred as a result of the product being inaccurate, incomplete or unsuitable in any way and for any reason. © Copyright City of Tea Tree Gully. Published 2011. All rights reserved.

City of Tea Tree Gully – City Master Plan 2011–2040

27


For more information, please contact us on 08 8397 7444 or visit www.teatreegully.sa.gov.au


City Master Plan