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Research Digest FORWARD ALL REQUESTS TO: The University of Texas at Austin Center for Transportation Research LIBRARY 1616 Guadalupe St. | Suite 4.202 | Austin, Texas 78701 Phones: (512) 232-3126 and (512) 232-3138 Email: ctrlib@austin.utexas.edu In this Issue:

Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Research Reports

Table of Contents Item 1.

MASH Test 3-11 on the Texas T101 Bridge Rail : Research/Test Report (TTI 1002-1).....................

Item 2.

MASH Test 3-11 of the TxDOT Single Slope Bridge Rail (Type SSTR) on Pan-Formed Bridge Deck : Research/Test Report (TTI 1002-3)................................................................................... 1

Item 3.

MASH Test 3-10 on 31-Inch W-Beam Guardrail with Standard Offset Blocks (TTI 1002-4).............

2

Item 4.

Collision Loads on Bridge Piers : Phase 2. Report of Guidelines for Designing Bridge Piers and Abutments for Vehicle Collisions (TTI 4973-2)............................................................................

2

Item 5.

Steel Fiber Replacement of Mild Steel in Prestressed Concrete Beams : Technical Report (UH 5255-2).................................................................................................................................................. 3

Item 6.

Implementation Report on PASSER V-07 Training Workshops (TTI 5424-01-1)....................................3

Item 7.

Incorporating Sustainability into TxDOT's Transportation Decision Making : Summary of Work Performed, Methods Used and Results Achieved (TTI 5541-01-1/P2)............................................. 4

Item 8.

Development of Field Performance Evaluation Tools and Program for Pavement Marking 4 Materials : Technical Report (TTI 5548-1)...................................................................................................

Item 9.

Strategies to Improve and Preserve Flexible Pavement at Intersections (UTEP 5566-1)...........................5

Item 10.

Realtime Monitoring of Bridge Scour Using Remote Monitoring Technology (TTI 6060-1).................. 5

Item 11.

Development of a Precast Bridge Deck Overhang System : Technical Report (TTI 6100-1).................. 6

Item 12.

Assessment of Need and Feasibility of Truck-Mounted Changeable Message Signs (CMS) for Scheduled and Unscheduled Operations : Technical Report (TAMUK 6167-1)................................

6

Item 13.

Delivery of Pilot Workshop on Preserving and Enhancing the Functionality of Highways in Texas (TTI 6208-01-1).......................................................................................................................

7

Item 14.

Updated Workshop Materials for Preserving and Enhancing the Functionality of Highways in Texas (TTI 6208-01-P1)....................................................................................................................

7

Item 15.

Development of Performance-Based Evaluation Methods and Specifications for Roadside Maintenance : Technical Report (TTI 6387-1)..........................................................................................8

Item 16.

Evaluating the Impact of Overweight Load Routing on Buried Utility Facilities : Technical Report (TTI 6394-1)...................................................................................................................................8

Item 17.

Operational Performance Management of Priced Facilities : Technical Report (TTI 6396-1)..........

Item 18.

Evaluating the Impact of Transit-Oriented Development (UTEP 6511-1)............................................ 9

Item 19.

TxDOT Administration Research : Tasks Completed FY2010Technical Report (TTI 6581-TI-2).....

Item 20.

Is Texas Ready for Mileage Fees? : A Briefing Paper (TTI 6660-P1)..................................................... 10

Item 21.

Assessment of Public Involvement : Final Report (TSU 6662-1)........................................................

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 1 MASH Test 3-11 on the Texas T101 Bridge Rail : Research/Test Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 1002-1 • 2011 The Texas T101 bridge rail is widely used in the state of Texas. Previous testing demonstrated its ability to contain and redirect passenger cars and a 20,000-lb school bus. Based on this testing, the Federal Highway Administration accepted the T101 bridge rail as an NCHRP Report 350 TL-3 barrier. However, its impact performance with pickup trucks was never evaluated. Under research project 0-5526, Impact Performance of Roadside Safety Appurtenances, researchers conducted a performance assessment of Texas roadside safety devices to help evaluate the impact of adopting the new MASH guidelines on current hardware. Testing and evaluation of the T101 bridge rail was recommended as a high priority. This recommendation was based primarily on the absence of pickup truck testing on the system, and concerns that the 27-inch rail height may not be compatible with pickup trucks and SUVs under design impact conditions. The T101 bridge rail did not meet MASH evaluation criteria for test 3-11. The vehicle overturned after losing contact with the barrier. If continued use of the T101 bridge rail is desired, it is recommended that an in-service performance evaluation be conducted. Alternatively, a new barrier system that satisfies the same key design criteria as the T101 bridge rail can be developed and tested under future research. Full-text of this report is available for free download (14.3 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/9-1002-1.pdf

Item 2 MASH Test 3-11 of the TxDOT Single Slope Bridge Rail (Type SSTR) on Pan-Formed Bridge Deck : Research/Test Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 1002-3 • 2011 The objective of this crash test was to determine whether the TxDOT Single Slope Traffic Rail (Type SSTR) would perform acceptably on a pan-formed deck when tested according to the guidelines set forth in Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH). The crash test performed was MASH test 3-11 involving a 2270P vehicle (5000-lb pickup truck) impacting the critical impact point (CIP) of the bridge rail at an impact speed and angle of 62 mi/h and 25 degrees, respectively. This report presents the details of the TxDOT Type SSTR on pan-formed bridge deck, description of the crash test performed, an assessment of the test results, and the implementation plan. The TxDOT Type SSTR bridge rail on panformed deck performed acceptably for MASH test 3-11. Full-text of this report is available for free download (5.9 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/9-1002-3.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 3 MASH Test 3-10 on 31-Inch W-Beam Guardrail with Standard Offset Blocks TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 1002-4 • 2011 The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) initiated a review of their guardrail standards based on the outcome of recent crash test results and a Federal Highway Administration technical memorandum pertaining to guardrail height. TxDOT expressed interest in the use of a generic 31-inch tall guardrail to provide enhanced containment capacity for light trucks. However, some concerns were expressed regarding the increased size of the blockout used in the Midwest Guardrail System (MGS). Consequently, TxDOT requested an evaluation of a 31-inch tall guardrail system that incorporates conventional 8-inch deep offset blocks. The test reported herein corresponds to American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) Manual for Assessing Safety Hardware (MASH) test 3-10. This is primarily a severity test that assesses risk of injury to the vehicle occupants. This test was considered to be the more critical of the two tests due to the potential for increased vehicle-post interaction resulting from decreasing the depth of the offset blocks from 12 inches to 8 inches. The 31-inch W-beam guardrail with standard offset blocks met all required MASH performance criteria for test 3-10. Full-text of this report is available for free download (9.9 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/9-1002-4.pdf

Item 4 Collision Loads on Bridge Piers : Phase 2. Report of Guidelines for Designing Bridge Piers and Abutments for Vehicle Collisions TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 4973-2 • 2011 An instrumented, simulated bridge pier was constructed, and two full-scale collisions with an 80,000-lb van-type tractor-trailer were performed on it. The trailer was ballasted with bags of sand on pallets. The simulated pier was 36 inches in diameter and was supported in the longitudinal direction by two load cells. Force-versus-time data were obtained from the load cells. Recommendations for possible revisions to the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications are given. Note regarding full-text link: ZIP folder contains 3 files. 9-4973-2.pdf (15.9 MB report); 429730-2b_DATA.xls (2.5MB) and Pier1b_DATA.xls (410 KB) Full-text of this report is available for free download (14.5 MB ZIP file) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/9-4973-2.zip

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 5 Steel Fiber Replacement of Mild Steel in Prestressed Concrete Beams : Technical Report UNIVERSITY OF HOUSTON (UH). DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ENGINEERING

UH 5255-2 • 2011 The replacement of stirrups by steel fibers in highway beams requires a set of shear design provisions and guidelines for prestressed Steel Fiber Concrete (PSFC) beams. The development of rational shear provisions with wide applications must be guided by a mechanics-based shear theory and must be validated by experimental tests on I- and box-beams. A rational shear theory, called the Softened Membrane Model (SMM), has been developed at the University of Houston for reinforced concrete beams. This theory satisfies Navier’s three principles of mechanics of materials, namely, stress equilibrium, strain compatibility and the constitutive relationship between stress and strain for the materials. The first phase of the research consisted of testing 10 full-size prestressed PSFC panels. This was done to establish the effect of fiber factor and the level of prestress on the constitutive models of steel fiber concrete and prestressing tendons. From this data a set of constitutive models was developed to predict the behavior of prestressed PSFC. Notable findings include the fact that increasing steel fiber content has a beneficial effect on the softening properties of prestressed PSFC. Additionally, the findings show that increasing steel fiber content increases tension stiffening in prestressed PSFC under tensile loading. The second phase of this research project generalizes the SMM shear theory for application to prestressed PSFC beams. This was achieved by feeding the new constitutive models of fiber concrete and prestressing tendons into a finite element program (OpenSees). The accuracy of the new shear theory was evaluated by testing full-size prestressed PSFC I- and box-beams that fail in shear modes. The developed finite element program was used to simulate the shear behavior of the beams with acceptable accuracy. Finally, a design equation and recommendations were provided for use when designing PSFC beams. Using the design equations, a series of four design examples, was also provided. Full-text of this report is available for free download (9.0 MB) from: http://library.ctr.utexas.edu/hostedPDFs/UH_0-5255-2Final.pdf

Item 6 Implementation Report on PASSER V-07 Training Workshops TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5424-01-1 • 2011 The objective of this project was to conduct one pilot workshop and five regular workshops to teach the effective use of the enhanced PASSER V-07 arterial signal timing optimization software. PASSER V-07 and materials for conducting a one-day training workshop were developed in Texas Department of Transportation research project 0-5424, Analytical Enhancements to PASSER V for Arterial and Access Management. This report describes the findings of this implementation project. Full-text of this report is available for free download from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-5424-01-1.pdf

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Research Digest Item 7 Incorporating Sustainability into TxDOT's Transportation Decision Making : Summary of Work Performed, Methods Used and Results Achieved TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5541-01-1/P2 • 2011 This report summarizes the work performed in Fiscal Year 2009 and 2010 under TxDOT implementation project 55541-01 "Regional Workshops on Sustainability Enhancement Tool." This implementation project involved the development of workshop material aimed at disseminating research findings and training participants in hands-on use of the SET through a series of workshops in FYs 2009 and 2010. The work done on [the seven] project tasks are discussed in subsequent chapters. Chapter 2 describes the development of workshop materials, Chapter 3 summarizes the workshops conducted, Chapter 4 discusses local agency implementation and plans to integrate into TxDOT practice, and Chapter 5 provides the conclusion and future research. This report is accompanied by a CD-ROM. The contents of the CD-ROM are available for download as a ZIP file: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-5541-01-1-CD.zip Full-text of this report is available for free download (257 KB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-5541-01-1.pdf

Item 8 Development of Field Performance Evaluation Tools and Program for Pavement Marking Materials : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5548-1 • 2011 Historically the prequalification or selection of pavement marking materials (PMMs) is mainly based on product specifications and lab testing, which do not correlate well with the field performance of the products. On the other hand, there is no consensus on recommended procedure to design test deck and conduct field performance test. The objective of this project is to investigate field evaluation plans and procedures and develop field performance-based evaluation procedures for PMMs. Field decks are designed incorporating regular long lines, long line in the travel lane, and transverse lines for accelerated testing, while also considering different installation procedures. Three different test field deck sites are selected across the state considering area climate, roadway surface type, and traffic condition. Carefully selected PMM products are installed and monitored for their field performance over time. The relationships between transverse and longitudinal test decks are evaluated with correlation analysis. Analysis results indicate that the points on transverse lines have high correlation with the corresponding five or seven longitudinal long lines in the travel lane when retroreflectivity values of all products on a test deck are averaged. For individual products, the correlations between transverse line locations and corresponding long lines in the travel lane exist, albeit at a lower level. A tracking database is developed and can record and interactively query all relevant data, track individual jobs and products, and graphically display performance changes over time. Full-text of this report is available for free download (3.9 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-5548-1.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 9 Strategies to Improve and Preserve Flexible Pavement at Intersections UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT EL PASO. CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE SYSTEMS

UTEP 5566-1 • 2011 Many rural intersections originally constructed with thin untreated flexible base and hot mix or a two-course surface treatment experience severe pushing, shoving and rutting. These failures cause an extremely rough surface that can cause damage to small vehicles and potentially cause motorists to lose control of their vehicle. These distresses almost always result in complete failure of the existing pavement that must be repaired several times during the life of the roadway by maintenance forces. Pavement sections constructed with the same materials adjacent to the intersection perform adequately until the approach (approximately 150 ft in advance) of the intersection and in the intersection itself when failures become apparent. The mechanisms of intersection pavement failures and the best practices to minimize the failures at existing intersection pavements are discussed in this report. The outcome of this project is an expert system that can be used to reduce the frequency of maintenance needed at rural intersections with consideration of the life-cycle cost analysis. Full-text of this report is available for free download (8.3 MB) from: http://ctis.utep.edu/publications/Reports/10TxDOT%20Research%20Report%200-55661%20final%20January%202011.pdf

Item 10 Realtime Monitoring of Bridge Scour Using Remote Monitoring Technology TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6060-1 • 2011 The research performed in this project focuses on the application of instruments including accelerometers and tiltmeters to monitor bridge scour. First, two large scale laboratory experiments were performed. One experiment is the simulation of a bridge with a shallow foundation, and the other is the simulation of a bridge with a deep foundation. A series of instruments were installed on the simulated bridge to monitor the performance of the bridge due to scour. Both the shallow foundation experiment and deep foundation experiment show that accelerometers and tiltmeters can be used in scour monitoring events since both give warning of bridge failure successfully. Subsequently, two individual monitoring systems were designed and installed on two bridges: US59 over Guadalupe River Bridge and SH80 over San Antonio River Bridge in Texas. Real-time data are collected and transmitted to a computer server at Texas A&M University, which can be accessed remotely. The instrumentation on the two bridges does not show great hope of application of accelerometers to monitor bridge scour because of a lack of sufficient excitation from traffic. Another issue with the accelerometers is the high power consumption during the transmission of accelerometer data, which cannot be satisfied with a typical solar panel and battery. Tiltmeters can provide the integral behavior of the bridge, and therefore are very useful devices for scour monitoring. Guidelines and protocols for scour monitoring based on the US59 over Guadalupe River Bridge and the SH80 over San Antonio River Bridge are provided in the study. Full-text of this report is available for free download (18.8 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6060-1.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 11 Development of a Precast Bridge Deck Overhang System : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6100-1 • 2011 Prestressed-precast panels are commonly used at interior beams for bridge decks in Texas. The use of these panels can provide ease of construction, sufficient capacity, and good economy for the construction of bridge decks in Texas. Current practice for the overhang deck sections require that formwork be constructed at the outer edges of the bridge. The cost of constructing the bridge overhang is significantly higher than that of the interior sections where precast panels are used. The development of a precast overhang system has the potential to improve economy and safety in bridge construction. This research investigated the overhang and shear capacity of a precast overhang system for potential use during the construction of bridges with precast overhang panels. The research was performed in three phases: the Phase 1 research including work specifically for the Rock Creek Bridge in Parker County, Texas; the Phase 2 research for general precast overhang panels, and; the Phase 3 research investigating the shear capacity. Grout material characteristics were also assessed for possible use in the haunch; constructability issues were also addressed. Results indicate that the capacity of the precast overhang system is sufficient to carry factored AASHTO loads with no or very limited cracking. Results from the shear study indicate that the shear capacity of threaded rods with couplers is lower than the conventional R-bar system. However, sufficient shear capacity can be achieved if sufficient pockets in the precast overhang panel are provided. A recommendation for the haunch form system for use on the bridge is also provided. The use of the precast overhang system evaluated can be implemented in bridge construction. However, further testing is needed to determine the number of pockets on the overhang panel—an issue critical to the constructability and economy of the system. This will be further addressed in report 0-6100-3. Full-text of this report is available for free download (11.9 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6100-1.pdf

Item 12 Assessment of Need and Feasibility of Truck-Mounted Changeable Message Signs (CMS) for Scheduled and Unscheduled Operations : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY KINGSVILLE (TAMUK)

TAMUK 6167-1 • 2011 The goal of this project was to develop implementation guidance that the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) can use to make better decisions regarding the use of truck mounted changeable message signs (TMCMS) during scheduled and unscheduled operations. The objectives of the project were as follows: (1) Perform a nationwide survey with practitioners to determine the state-of-the-practice with regard to TMCMS and to identify what issues or hazards scheduled and unscheduled operations crews are encountering with regard to the motoring public. (2) Develop messages and application alternatives through the use of text or symbol combinations to address specific scenarios. (3) Conduct human factors comprehension studies. (4) Conduct field studies to determine the most promising message and application alternatives. (5) Develop guidelines to address the issues of design and application for the use of TMCMS. This project identified the types of messages/information that could be displayed on TMCMS for different situations, and also developed specific guidance for TxDOT on the use of TMCMS during scheduled and unscheduled operations. Full-text of this report is available for free download (2.3 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6167-1.pdf _______________________________________________________________________________________________

Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 13 Delivery of Pilot Workshop on Preserving and Enhancing the Functionality of Highways in Texas TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6208-01-1 • 2011 This report summarizes the delivery and results of a one-day pilot workshop conducted at the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Waco District office in August 2010. This workshop was based on material developed for research project 0-6208, “Preserving the Functionality/Asset Value of the State Highway System.” This report includes the organization of the workshop, lists the topics covered, describes feedback and suggestions received, and identifies refinements and other changes that are suggested for future deliveries of this workshop. Full-text of this report is available for free download (2.2 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-6208-01-1.pdf

Item 14 Updated Workshop Materials for Preserving and Enhancing the Functionality of Highways in Texas TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6208-01-P1 • 2011 This workshop material is based off of TxDOT research project 0-6208 conducted in 2009. The project included three deliverables. These included a final report, a guidebook, and a summary report. A copy of the guidebook is included in the back of the participants workshop notebook. The 6208 research covered losses to highway functionality over time. It looked at the sources/causes of deterioration, performance measures, counter measures to address losses to highway functionality. The research covered practices and policies in five key areas that impact functionality, benefits of measures that preserve or enhance functionality, and consequences of not practicing these measures. It also included three case studies and lessons learned. Workshop Objectives: To promote the importance of Highway Functionality; To review functionality in highway life cycle; To provide ‘how to’ materials to preserve, maintain, and enhance functionality; To promote coordination between TxDOT and its local partners; To get your input and feedback. This publication includes PowerPoint slides of the 6208-01-P2 workshop, the 0-6208 PSR, and Product 0-6208-P1. Full-text of this report is available for free download (84.7 MB ZIP folder, 4 files) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-6208-01-P1.zip

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 15 Development of Performance-Based Evaluation Methods and Specifications for Roadside Maintenance : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6387-1 • 2011 This report documents the work performed during Project 0-6387, “Performance Based Roadside Maintenance Specifications.” Quality assurance methods and specifications for roadside performance-based maintenance contracts (PBMCs) were developed for potential use by TxDOT. These methods include a set of performance standards and timeliness requirements, a statistical condition assessment method for evaluating compliance with these performance standards, and a method for developing performance-based pay adjustment formulas. The developed performance standards, condition assessment method, and pay adjustment formulas were tested and refined using field trials. The field trials consisted of five 10-mi roadway segments located in TxDOT’s Dallas, El Paso, San Antonio, Tyler, and Waco Districts. Finally, current practices in best-value bid evaluation methods for procuring PBMCs were identified and evaluated using simulation techniques. Full-text of this report is available for free download (1.6 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6387-1.pdf

Item 16 Evaluating the Impact of Overweight Load Routing on Buried Utility Facilities : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6394-1 • 2011 Overweight traffic movements can negatively affect pavement integrity and quality. However, it is less known to what degree buried utility plant along and across the right of way is affected by these overweight loads, especially if the utility facility is aged, placed under an exception to the Utility Accommodation Rules (UAR), and/or subjected to repetitive loads. Routing decisions for repetitive overweight loads may be determined without consideration of cumulative impacts to utility infrastructure, particularly municipally owned lines that could be aged, accommodated under an exception, or of substandard materials. Given the growth in volume in overweight load (particularly midheavy and superload) permits, the adequacy of the UAR is unknown. This report focuses on the year one project objectives, which were (a) provide a review of technical design and engineering requirements for utility accommodation in Texas, (b) provide a preliminary assessment of potential impact of overweight loads on buried utilities, (c) provide a preliminary assessment of UAR adequacy to deal with overweight loads on buried utilities, (d) provide preliminary recommendations for a business process for TxDOT overweight routing coordination, and (e) provide recommendations for the phase 2 utility damage evaluation. Full-text of this report is available for free download (4.3 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6394-1.pdf

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Research Digest Item 17 Operational Performance Management of Priced Facilities : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6396-1 • 2011 The Texas Department of Transportation and its agency partners have implemented various forms of lane management and pricing over the past three decades, including HOV lanes, managed lanes, and toll roads. As more of these complex transportation facilities are planned and constructed throughout the state, there is a need to understand how these facilities may operate over time. Ideally, the long-term operations should be based on metrics that are agreed upon in advance. By defining what metrics can most effectively measure the performance of a facility and outlining what thresholds trigger a change in operation, policy-makers and the public can anticipate and appreciate how a facility’s operation may change over time. This understanding allows the facility operators to focus on the tasks of efficiently operating a smooth transportation network rather than focusing on how to get the necessary changes made in a timely manner. This study provides a framework in which operating decisions for priced facilities can be made and can guide the changes in operational strategies for a facility over time. The research process was initiated with a literature review and targeted interviews of toll and managed lane operators to assess the state of the practice in performance measurement for pricing and other operational changes. The research team then developed guiding principles for identification, selection, and communication of performance measures and targets. A conceptual framework was formulated and data collection infrastructure needs were also documented. The conceptual framework was then developed into a more detailed version in a web-based format. This report documents the research findings and results and provides guidance on the use of the web-based framework tool. In addition, several outreach products were developed under this study to assist agencies in communication of performance management principles for proactive management of priced facilities. Full-text of this report is available for free download (2.5 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6396-1.pdf

Item 18 Evaluating the Impact of Transit-Oriented Development UNIVERSITY OF NORTH TEXAS. CENTER FOR ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH (CEDR)

UTEP 6511-1 • 2011 Transit-oriented development (TOD) is an increasingly popular urban form. Based on a survey of residents of TOD projects in areas served by Dallas Area Rapid Transit, Fort Worth T, and Capital Metro (Austin) rail transit, moving into TOD decreases VMT by an average of 15 percent, or about 3,500 miles per year, which impacts TxDOT motor fuel tax revenues. The data also indicate that these households shift their choice of route to include more arterial roads versus highways. Differential behavior is observed among the three areas studied with the greatest impact being on the DART system and the Capital Metro system showing smaller changes in TOD resident travel behaviors. Residents of TOD choose their housing based mostly on commuting distance and lifestyle characteristics, such as proximity to dining and entertainment venues. Proximity to a transit rail station is at least moderately important for 57 percent of respondents. The report recommends that TxDOT look to incorporate TOD into facility planning and design and seek ways to extract value from TOD projects. Full-text of this report is available for free download (2.2 MB) from: http://www.unt.edu/cedr/FHWA-TX10-0-6511-1.pdf _______________________________________________________________________________________________

Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 19 TxDOT Administration Research : Tasks Completed FY2010 Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6581-TI-2 • 2011 This research project evaluates numerous transportation issues and develops findings and/or recommendations based on results. This project has been structured to address some of the emerging, critical, and unique considerations related to transportation. Full-text of this report is available for free download (10.9 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6581-TI-2.pdf

Item 20 Is Texas Ready for Mileage Fees? : A Briefing Paper TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6660-P1 • 2011 In late 2009, recognizing the impending funding problems for state highways and in response to interest from elected officials, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) tasked TTI to explore whether a mileage fee system could address some of the major deficiencies in the fuel tax and to provide direction on potential policies. This project conducted a preliminary evaluation of how mileage fees might be used as an alternative funding mechanism in Texas. Researchers interviewed stakeholders, technology experts, and the general public to gather feedback on the challenges and opportunities associated with implementing mileage fees in Texas (see Appendix A). Researchers also prepared a decision matrix (see Appendix B) that can aid policy makers in evaluating the various trade-offs in policy necessary to successfully implement a mileage-fee system. In addition to conducting a literature review, the research team also solicited different perspectives on the issue from around the state. Researchers collected input from 13 transportation stakeholder groups representing a variety of interests, a nationwide panel of technology experts who reviewed public opinions about possible deployment options, and focus groups conducted with the general public in five communities of varying size and geography. The project's findings and recommendations are presented in this briefing paper. Full-text of this report is available for free download (6.9 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6660-P1.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 21 Assessment of Public Involvement : Final Report TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY (TSU). CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION TRAINING AND RESEARCH

TSU 6662-1 • 2011 The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) employs a range of methods and strategies to incorporate Texans in the many aspects of planning, project implementation and partnerships. This public involvement process is supported by TxDOT specific, state of Texas and federal legislative codes, which define involvement and cover basic requirements for meetings, hearings, inclusion of underrepresented groups and environmental processes. In addition, TxDOT designed guidelines, manuals and other materials to assist staff in conduct of public involvement activities. Because public involvement is a core component of transportation planning and project implementation, the public’s expectation is that their values and opinions will be included in each phase of the transportation process. The Texas Sunset Advisory Commission’s 2009 report recommended that TxDOT develop a more meaningful, consistent public involvement process, along with a policy statement reflecting the agency’s philosophy. With that objective, several key tasks were undertaken to strengthen TxDOT’s liaisons with the public. This project analyzed several meetings held by TxDOT, reviewed TxDOT’s literature and regulations, and assessed documents from other states. Also, interviews with representatives of governments that worked with TxDOT, TxDOT staff, and representatives of the Texas Sunset Advisory Commission were conducted. These synthesized findings led to the development of a policy statement and recommendations for consideration by TxDOT staff. Full-text of this report is available for free download (675 KB) from: http://www.tsu.edu/PDFFiles/academics/science/program/transportation/CTTR/Publications_Reports/TxDOT%200662 2%20Final%20Report.pdf

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