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Research Digest FORWARD ALL REQUESTS TO: The University of Texas at Austin Center for Transportation Research LIBRARY 1616 Guadalupe St. | Suite 4.202 | Austin, Texas 78701 Phones: (512) 232-3126 and (512) 232-3138 Email: ctrlib@austin.utexas.edu In this Issue:

TxDOT Research Reports

Table of Contents Item 1.

Highway Safety Design Workshops (TTI 4703-01-1)......................................................................................... 1

Item 2.

Guide for the Geometric Design and Operational Factors that Impact Truck Use of Toll Roads

Item 3.

Test Procedure for Determining Organic Matter Content in Soils : UV-Vis Method (TTI 55402 01-P4)................................................................................................................................................................................

Item 4.

Sustainable Transportation Performance Measures Calculator : User's Manual (TTI 5541-01-P2)........... 2

Item 5.

Delivery of Workshops on Corridor Management and Preservation in Texas (TTI 5606-01-1)...........

3

Item 6.

Field Evaluation of Asphalt Mixture Skid Resistance and Its Relationship to Aggregate Characteristics (TTI 5627-2)..............................................................................................................................

3

Item 7.

Symbols and Warrants for Major Traffic Generator Guide Signing : Technical Report (TSU 4 5800-1)....................................................................................................................................................................... ........

Item 8.

Warrants for Major Traffic Generator Guide Signing (TSU 5800-P1).........................................................4 4

Item 9.

Hydraulic Capacity of Type-H Inlets : Final Report (TechMRT 5823-1)......................................................

Item 10.

(TTI 5377-P2)............................................................................................................................................................ .. 1.....

5

Evaluating Existing Culverts for Load Capacity Allowing for Soil Structure Interaction

(TechMRT 5849-1).................................................................................................................................................... 6

Item 11.

A Portable Profiler for Pavement Profile Measurements : Final Report (UTA 6004-2)...........................

6

Item 12.

Progress during the First Year Towards Building the Total Pavement Acceptance Device (TPAD) (CTR 6005-1).........................................................................................................................................

7

Item 13.

Improving Stop Line Detection Using Video Imaging Detectors : Technical Report (TTI 6030-1)......

7

Item 14.

Intersection Video Detection Field Handbook : An Update (TTI 6030-P3)...............................................

8

Item 15.

Laboratory Evaluation of Influence of Operational Tolerance (Acceptance Criterion) on Performance of Hot-Mix Asphalt Concrete (CTR 6045-1)...........................................................................

9

Item 16.

Recommendations and Guidelines on Shoreline Development and Hazards to Navigation (TTI 6225-P1).................................................................................................................................................................... 10

Item 17.

TxDOT and Electric Power Transmission Lines : Technical Report (TechMRT 6495-1)........................

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 1 Highway Safety Design Workshops TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 4703-01-1 • 2010 Highway safety is an ongoing concern for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). As part of its proactive commitment to improving highway safety, TxDOT is moving toward including quantitative safety analyses earlier in the project development process. To assist in achieving this goal, TxDOT research project 0-4703 developed the Roadway Safety Design Workbook for engineers responsible for highway geometric design. This Workbook describes quantitative safety relationships for specific design components known to be correlated with crash frequency. As part of TxDOT Project 0-4703, a series of workshops were developed to share safety information with TxDOT roadway designers. Information in the Workbook was used as the basis for the workshops. The workshops addressed rural highways, urban streets, and freeways. They included a mixture of classroom discussion and hands-on training activities for the participants. The participants indicated that the information presented in the workshops will be beneficial as they make decisions about highway safety improvements. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (170 KB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-4703-01-1.pdf

Item 2 Guide for the Geometric Design and Operational Factors that Impact Truck Use of Toll Roads TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5377-P2 • 2010 The purpose of this guide is to identify the potential factors that could impact truck use of toll roads and managed lanes. The guide summarizes the trucking and freight industry needs through synthesis of existing literature. Geometric design and roadway operational factors that are important to truck drivers and freight operators were identified for inclusion in new toll road design in hopes of building facilities that are more attractive to those users in terms of safety and efficiency. The factors that are organized around facility geometric design characteristics ( e.g., horizontal alignment, vertical alignment, cross section, ramp design), operating characteristics (e.g., signing and pavement markings), industry needs (e.g., safety, travel reliability) and corridor operational strategies (e.g., transportation management, intelligent transportation systems). Full-text of this report ia available for free download (1.5 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-5377-P2.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 3 Test Procedure for Determining Organic Matter Content in Soils : UV-Vis Method TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5540-01-P4 • 2010 The Texas Department of Transportation has been having problems with organic matter in soils that they stabilize for use as subgrade layers in road construction. The organic matter reduces the effectiveness of common soil additives (lime/cement) in stabilization projects. The researchers developed a technique using UV-Vis spectroscopy to measure the harmful organic matter in another project (0-5540). This project consisted of purchasing three UV-Vis instruments, equipping them with software to measure the organic matter and doing two trainings with the Texas Department of Transportation. Following the trainings, four laboratories analyzed 20 natural soil samples and three laboratory standards to determine repeatability and reproducibility between the laboratories. Researchers also continued testing real project soils to see what mitigation techniques researchers could use. Researchers determined that three replicates need to be run to achieve 95 percent confidence that the measured value is the true value. Researchers determined that soils with organic matter below 1.5 percent can be safely treated, and soils with an organic matter to Eades & Grim optimum lime (OM:EG) ratio less than 0.5 have the greatest potential for mitigation with additional lime application. Additionally, calcium chloride added to the soil with the lime improved the formation of pozzolanic reaction products and strengths of some soils. This work illustrates the complex nature of organic interactions with soil stabilizers and the many questions left unresolved. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (125 KB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-5540-01-P4.pdf

Item 4 Sustainable Transportation Performance Measures Calculator : User's Manual TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5541-01-P2 • 2010 The TxDOT Strategic Plan (2009-2013) has the following goals: reduce congestion, enhance safety, expand economic opportunity, preserve the value of transportation assets, and improve air quality. In the plan, funding was recognized as one of the critical issues facing the state and its transportation system. The analysis tool produced in Project 0-5541 can be used to provide a basis for project selection, and impact assessment, providing a solid performance measurement based methodology to a number of funding decisions. Table 2-1 provides an overview of the 12 performance measures used in the sustainable transportation performance measures calculator developed for Project 0-5541 and their relation to the TxDOT strategic plan goals. Chapter 3 details how weightings can be used to change sensitivity of the evaluation to reflect different goals of the strategic plan. In addition, each individual measure is assigned a weighting that reflects its contribution to the overall goal area. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (7.2 MB ZIP file) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-5541-01-P2.zip

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 5 Delivery of Workshops on Corridor Management and Preservation in Texas TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5606-01-1 • 2010 This report summarizes the delivery and outcome of a series of workshops conducted at 23 Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) districts across the state on corridor management and preservation in Texas. The workshops served as follow-up implementation work for research project 0-5606, “Creating Partnerships with Local Communities to Manage and Preserve Corridors.” The report provides an overview of the project and documents the dates, locations, and attendance of workshops implemented during the three-year project period. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (682 KB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/5-5606-01-1.pdf

Item 6 Field Evaluation of Asphalt Mixture Skid Resistance and Its Relationship to Aggregate Characteristics TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 5627-2 • 2010 This report documents the findings from the research that was carried out as part of Phase II of Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Project 0-5627. The research included measuring and analyzing the mechanical and physical properties of aggregates used in surface mixes in the state of Texas. These properties were aggregate shape characteristics measured by the Aggregate Imaging System (AIMS), British pendulum value, coarse-aggregate acid insolubility, Los Angeles weight loss, Micro Deval weight loss, and magnesium-sulfate weight loss. In addition, a database of field skid-number measurements that were obtained over a number of years using the skid trailer was established. Field measurements of selected sections were conducted using the dynamic friction tester (DFT) and circular texture meter (CTMeter). These data and measurements were used to carry out comprehensive statistical analyses of the influence of aggregate properties and mixture design on the skid-resistance value and its variability. Consequently, a system was developed for predicting asphalt-pavement skid resistance based on aggregate characteristics and aggregate gradation. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (1.1 MB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-5627-2.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 7 Symbols and Warrants for Major Traffic Generator Guide Signing : Technical Report TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY (TSU). DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

TSU 5800-1 • 2009 The Texas Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (TMUTCD) provides the definition of regular traffic generators based on four population types but not for major traffic generators (MTGs). MTG signs have been considered to supplement the overall signing system for highways, and can direct road users to important traffic generators, resulting in improved traffic flow operation and decreasing drivers’ frustration caused by missing an exit. These signs would better guide travelers on major highway "gateways" to crucial cultural, business, and recreational destinations, especially for those who are unfamiliar with the area. Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, and British Columbia in Canada have specific guidelines for MTGs in various forms; however, these guidelines are not applicable for direct use in Texas. It is imperative to establish MTG warrants that are suitable for the Texas environment. In this report, practices and manuals used in Texas and other states are scanned and summarized through a literature review, an engineer survey, and an MTG survey. Engineer opinions and the needs of MTGs were obtained in terms of the criteria, types of symbols used, and location and size of symbols/signs. Practices in other states and the opinions of responding engineers are synthesized through proposed fuzzy logic–based algorithms. Together with driving simulator tests and computer slide show tests, the preliminary recommendations about the types of symbols and location and size of symbols/signs for MTGs are then identified. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (2.6 MB) from: http://transportation.tsu.edu/Reports/0-5800-R1-TSU_1208_2009.pdf

Item 8 Warrants for Major Traffic Generator Guide Signing TEXAS SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY (TSU). DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STUDIES

TSU 5800-P1 • 2009 Major traffic generators (MTGs) are important regional attractions, events, or facilities that attract persons or groups from beyond a local community, city, or metropolitan area. MTGs are significant because of their unique educational, cultural, historical, or recreational experience and public appeal. The Texas Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (TMUTCD) provides the definition of regular traffic generators based on four population types but not for MTGs. Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina, and British Columbia in Canada have specific guidelines for MTGs in various forms, but these guidelines cannot be directly applied to Texas. It is imperative to establish MTG warrants that are suitable for the Texas environment. In this product, practices and manuals used in Texas and other states are scanned through a literature review, an engineer survey, and an MTG survey. The opinions of engineers and the needs of MTGs were obtained in terms of the criteria, types of symbols used, and location and size of symbols/signs. Practices in other states and the opinions of responding engineers are synthesized through proposed fuzzy logic–based algorithms. The preliminary recommendations of type of symbol and location and size of symbols/signs are identified based on the study of the literature and survey results, which are then tested in the driving simulator and computer slide show. Through all these efforts, warrants of guide signing for Texas MTGs are proposed. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (534 KB) from: http://transportation.tsu.edu/Reports/0-5800-P1-TSU_1208_2009.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 9 Hydraulic Capacity of Type-H Inlets : Final Report TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY. CENTER FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN TRANSPORTATION (TECHMRT)

TechMRT 5823-1 • 2010 Type H Inlets are frequently used by the Texas Department of Transportation as median drains for divided highways. Despite frequent use, engineers do not have adequate design information to mathematically describe the hydraulic performance of these structures. Typically, it has been assumed that IL-H-G and IL-H-L function essentially the same as road-way grates or curb inlets, but there is no basis for that assumption. Type-H drop inlets were investigated using a database from literature-reported experiments for similar inlets and physical model studies conducted at Texas Tech University. The findings of this study are: Type-H inlets, as studied, perform similar to the HEC-22 expectations when the weir-type conditions are applied (Equation (4-26) in HEC-22). Orifice-type models could not explain the TTU or the literature-derived observations. A power-law model that uses the dimensionless groups suggested by Cassidy (1966), with the slopes omitted, provides a reasonable explanation of inlet behavior. SWMM was investigated as a predictive tool by comparison to the TTU experimental results. The SWMM model was subject to very minimal calibration yet predicted performance reasonably well, especially when full inlet capture may occur. Examples of performance prediction using HEC-22, the power-law model and SWMM are presented to provide some guidance for Type-H inlet design. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (17.8 MB) from: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/techmrtweb/Reports/Complete%20Reports/0-5823-fpr.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 10 Evaluating Existing Culverts for Load Capacity Allowing for Soil Structure Interaction TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY. CENTER FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN TRANSPORTATION (TECHMRT)

TechMRT 5849-1 • 2010 This study explores culvert load rating practices and procedures as applied to TxDOT’s archive of 1477 culvert designs and their inventory of more than 13,000 in-service reinforced concrete box culverts. The problem is that when older culverts are load-rated based on current AASHTO policy, many competent, serviceable culverts are shown to be deficient, requiring load posting, retrofit or replacement. A disconnect exists between culvert structural analysis practices and actual culvert performance. To address this challenge, the research focused on development of a clear, repeatable and reliable procedure for TxDOT engineers and their consultants to use for load rating culverts in the TxDOT roadway system. Articulated in TxDOT’s Culvert Rating Guide, the new load rating procedure uses three increasingly-sophisticated analysis approaches, ranging from a direct stiffness frame model to a production-oriented finite element model which accounts for soil-structure interaction. Validation of the Culvert Rating Guide involved three major tasks. First, the researchers load-rated a statistically representative sample of 100 of TxDOT’s culvert designs. Second, a parametric study was performed to evaluate six independent variables associated with culvert load rating. Third, instrumented load tests on three in-service culverts were conducted to compare measured demands with predicted values. This work showed that the analytical methods in the Culvert Rating Guide produce conservative load ratings yet still allow for reduction in excess over-conservatism in the load rating process. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (4 MB) from: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/techmrtweb/Reports/Complete%20Reports/TxDOT%2005849%20Research%20ReportFINAL.pdf

Item 11 A Portable Profiler for Pavement Profile Measurements : Final Report UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON (UTA) TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

UTA 6004-2 • 2010 This report provides a summary of work performed on Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) Research Project 0-6004. The project was initiated to develop a single path, easy to use, portable profiler. Such a device was developed. The profiler measurements from the device provide TxDOT an instrument that can easily be mounted or removed from the front or rear bumper of typical TxDOT vehicles. The Profile generated is compatible with existing TxDOT formats. Two separate certification tests were successfully conducted on both a full-size TTI pickup truck and a TxDOT full-size van at the inertial profiler certification track located at the Texas A&M Riverside Campus. The project was conducted by Dr. Roger Walker of the University of Texas at Arlington and Dr. Emmanuel Fernando of the Texas Transportation Institute at Texas A&M University. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (5.2 KB) from: http://ranger.uta.edu/~walker/Reports/Final_0-6004-2.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 12 Progress during the First Year Towards Building the Total Pavement Acceptance Device (TPAD) -- revised August 2010 UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH (CTR)

CTR 6005-1 • 2010 During the first year of Project 0-6005, significant progress was made towards developing the Total Pavement Acceptance Device (TPAD). The TPAD will be a multi-function device that will be used to survey continuously along pavements at speeds in the range of 5 to 10 mph. The test functions will include those associated with Rolling Dynamics Deflectometer (RDD), ground penetrating radar (GPR), DMI and high-precision differential GPS, and surface temperature measurements, as well as digital video imaging of the pavement and right-of-way conditions. The basic moving platform for the TPAD was selected and initial prototype tests were conducted at the TxDOT Flight Services Facility at ABIA. Progress was made in developing: (1) improved rolling sensors and associated data analysis methods commensurate with the target testing speeds and (2) an integrated data acquisition and display system that records all test functions on the same time and distance baselines. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (2.8 MB) from: http://www.utexas.edu/research/ctr/pdf_reports/0_6005_1.pdf

Item 13 Improving Stop Line Detection Using Video Imaging Detectors : Technical Report TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6030-1 • 2010 The Texas Department of Transportation and other state departments of transportation as well as cities nationwide are using video detection successfully at signalized intersections. However, operational issues with video imaging vehicle detection systems (VIVDS) products occur at some locations. The resulting issues vary but have included: • camera contrast loss resulting in max-recall operation, • failure to detect vehicles leading to excessive delay and red-light violations, and • degraded detection accuracy during nighttime hours. This research resulted in the development of a formalized VIVDS test protocol and a set of performance measures that agencies can incorporate in future purchase orders and use to uniformly evaluate VIVDS products. It also resulted in the development of a VIVDS video library and conceptual plans for a field laboratory for future projects to deploy a range of VIVDS products at an operational signalized intersection. Researchers evaluated alternative VIVDS stop line detection designs and developed methods for enhancing the operation of VIVDS through adjustments in controller settings for day versus night versus transition periods, zone placement, and camera placement. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (Website) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/publications/catalog/record_detail.htm?id=32614

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 14 Intersection Video Detection Field Handbook : An Update TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI)

TTI 6030-P3 • 2010 "This handbook is intended to assist engineers and technicians with the design, layout, and operation of a video imaging vehicle detection system (VIVDS). This assistance is provided in three ways. First, the handbook identifies the optimal detection design and layout. Second, it provides guidelines for achieving an optimal or near-optimal camera location and field of view. Third, it provides guidelines for laying out the VIVDS detectors such that they will provide safe and efficient operation. Finally, guidance is provided on the need for and schedule of VIVDS maintenance activities. "The guidelines provided in this handbook address the use of a VIVDS to provide vehicle presence detection at a signalized intersection or interchange in Texas. The facility can be new or existing. It can be in an urban or rural environment and on a collector or arterial roadway. To the extent practical, the guidelines are applicable to all VIVDS products. They are applicable to detection designs that use one camera (for each intersection approach monitored) to provide detection at the stop line and, if needed, detection in advance of the stop line. The guidelines apply to intersections and interchanges that use one signal controller. The research does not explicitly address the use of a VIVDS to facilitate coordinated signal operation, beyond that needed to affect stop-line detection in support of such operation. The research does not address the use of a VIVDS for measuring vehicle count, speed, headway, occupancy, or other traffic characteristics beyond that needed for basic intersection (or interchange) control using presence-mode detection." --Objective/Scope Full-text of this report ia available for free download (476 KB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6030-P3.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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Research Digest Item 15 Laboratory Evaluation of Influence of Operational Tolerance (Acceptance Criterion) on Performance of HotMix Asphalt Concrete UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN. CENTER FOR TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH (CTR)

CTR 6045-1 • 2010 The performance of flexible pavements relies heavily on the final quality of the hot-mix asphalt concrete (HMAC) as it is produced and placed in the field. To account for production and construction variability while ensuring the quality of the HMAC, TxDOT has established a set of relevant operational tolerances, which are incorporated into the 2004 Standard Specifications for Construction and Maintenance of Highways, Streets and Bridges. In particular, Items 340/341, 342, 344, and 346 provide acceptance criteria for all HMA mixes used by the Department. The operational tolerances for a series of key control variables that affect performance are given as a guideline in QC/QA practices. However, the relationship between these tolerance levels and mixture performance is not well known. This research project will establish this relationship: how do the operational tolerances affect the expected performance of the HMAC? Once this relationship is quantified, recommendations will be developed that indicate, if necessary, how the current tolerances should be modified. The objective of the study was to determine the effects of variability in key mix design factors, such as asphalt content, gradation, and density, on the laboratory performance of different hot-mix asphalt samples that were mixed and compacted in the laboratory. Variability was kept within specified limits by the allowable operational tolerances, and performance was addressed through the evaluation of the results obtained from volumetric properties and laboratory tests, such as flexural fatigue test, Hamburg wheel-tracking test, and overlay tester. A series of statistical analyses were conducted to develop relationships between the key mix design factors and the observed laboratory performances of each type of mixture. From the analysis, the effects of the main variables on the results of the performance tests used in this study were found. Finally, a statistically-based sensitivity analysis was conducted to reveal the relationship between different tolerance levels and mixture performance for the individual mixtures types. This research facilitates, for both TxDOT personnel and contractors, the evaluation of asphalt mixture performance under different tolerance levels, which will be performance-based and supported by a rigorous and sound statistical analysis. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (1.2 MB) from: http://www.utexas.edu/research/ctr/pdf_reports/0_6045_1.pdf

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Research and Technology Implementation Office

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Research Digest Item 16 Recommendations and Guidelines on Shoreline Development and Hazards to Navigation TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY. TEXAS TRANSPORTATION INSTITUTE (TTI) TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY AT GALVESTON (TAMUG)

TTI 6225-P1 • 2010 This guidebook addresses recommendations regarding encroachment into the Gulf Coast Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW). Encroachment of hazards to navigation creates operational inefficiencies that impede commerce. The shippers who rely on the waterway for movement of goods are impacted greatly. In order to address the problems of location and construction of structures along the waterways, it is necessary to address two major categories of stakeholders: those who build the structures and those who permit the structures prior to their construction. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (538 KB) from: http://tti.tamu.edu/documents/0-6225-P1.pdf

Item 17 TxDOT and Electric Power Transmission Lines : Technical Report TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY. CENTER FOR MULTIDISCIPLINARY RESEARCH IN TRANSPORTATION (TECHMRT)

TechMRT 6495-1 • 2010 Rural areas of Texas are being extensively developed as locations for renewable energy projects and generation facilities. Wind power, solar power, and other renewable energy technologies are viewed by the public as the next economic boom and have been compared to the oil boom of the early twentieth century. However, studies have indicated that the existing transmission network is unable to support significant transmission of electricity from additional wind generation. The Public Utilities Commission of Texas created Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ) to match renewable resources with needs in pursuit of adequate future transmission. The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has the potential for a unique and expansive role in the development of future transmission capacity given the authorizations contained in House Bill 3588 that allow the department to build, own, or operate transmission. The purpose of this study was to provide baseline information and case studies to better define TxDOT’s role in electric power transmission lines and partnering with public utilities. Technical and legal issues were documented in literature and legal analysis undertaken during the study. Stakeholders in electric power generation and transmission were identified, and researchers interviewed a variety of state agencies, transmission providers, renewable energy non-profit organizations, property rights advocates, independent system operators, public utilities and other state departments of transportation. The researchers conclude that at present, the location of transmission alongside transportation is a reasonable and achievable goal. While there are incongruences in the comparative planning regimens of TxDOT and transmission developers, none seem to present an unbreachable barrier to successful joint development. There are numerous examples of successful installations around the country. In most cases, these alignments are placed just outside of the highway right of way (ROW) on private land, though in a few cases they have also been placed within the ROW. Avoiding conflict with landowners and preserving landscapes was found to be the primary motivation for colocation. The research offered recommendations that would be required (federally and locally) to encourage utility accommodation within ROW, and enhance TxDOTs role in this process. Full-text of this report ia available for free download (5.4 MB) from: http://www.depts.ttu.edu/techmrtweb/Reports/Complete%20Reports/0-6495_final%20report.pdf _______________________________________________________________________________________________

Research and Technology Implementation Office

May 2011

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CTR Library's Research Digest, May 2011  

This issue contains abstracts and full-text links to new TxDOT research publications

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