Page 1

CTJC bulletin

Pesach

Nissan 5778 March 2018


CTJC Cambridge Traditional Jewish Congregation Bulletin number 122

Contents A note from the Editor............................................................................. 3 From the Chair ......................................................................................... 3 Community news ..................................................................................... 7 Communal information ........................................................................... 7 Four more questions ............................................................................... 9 The Neshama meeting for women. ....................................................... 10 Recollections of Yeshivat Hakotel.......................................................... 11 Faith and Activism ................................................................................. 13 No place to lay one's head..................................................................... 17 The Cambridge University Jewish Society Ball ...................................... 19 Machos .................................................................................................. 21 Festival calendar .................................................................................... 23 From the children .................................................................................. 25 For the children ..................................................................................... 27 Views expressed in this bulletin do not necessarily represent the views of the bulletin Editor, nor of the Committee of the CTJC.

2


A note from the Editor Jane Liddell-King Shalom All, I am writing this while staying in Canberra where I am working. I am delighted to be including contributions from the younger members of the community. May that become a tradition. Meanwhile, a huge thank you to Jonathan and Barry for their work in getting this bulletin to you before Pesach. Meanwhile, Pesach sameach

From the Chair Jonathan Allin, Chair, CTJC It seems only yesterday that we completed the Chanukah bulletin, and here we are with the Pesach bulletin. Time passes ever more quickly. Why? Well, I know of at least two theories: the first is that as an adult, four months is only a small fraction of our life, but for a child, four months is almost a life time. The second theory is that subjectively we measure time by "memorable moments", rather than by years, months, or days. As children every moment was novel, exciting, and hence memorable. But as the years pass what was novel becomes mundane. We look up and another year has gone. So let me risk continuing my theme from last Pesach's "From the Chair". As slaves in Egypt life would have been dull and repetitious with one day being indistinguishable from the next. Although on the one hand each day would probably have seemed never ending, I suspect as the years went by we'd look back and would have wondered where they went. However this is ‫זמן חרותנו‬, and we have the gift of freedom. We are blessed with a calendar bursting with potential memorable moments. Let's use our freedom to search out those moments, and in particular let's see what we can do to make this Pesach, these Seder nights, even 3


more special. Dress up for the Seder, learn new tunes for those wonderful songs. Don't rush through: make time to discuss interesting questions (and if you want some ideas take a look at Rabbi Reuven Leigh's thoughts in this bulletin). Switching themes, we want our community to grow. Ways to encourage this include maintaining attractive premises, providing a fulfilling shul experience, and outreach. A key element to the last is the CTJC web site, which for many potential newcomers is the gateway to the community. The website has to be attractive and informative. Please take a moment to look at it (www.ctjc.com) and think about how it could be improved, and even better, how you might contribute to it. On a personal note, I'd like to mention the passing of Etel Shephard. Etel was one of the Cambridge Jewish community's greats, and was one of the first people to welcome us when we came to Cambridge Finally, as ever, it's a privilege to thank the Committee for their ongoing hard work. Jane once again has done a wonderful job in creating this bulletin. We have some excellent and insightful articles. You may also have noticed in shul the sudden appearance of emergency exit signs and a warning bell. This is merely a fraction of the work that Tim Goldrein has had to carry out in a very short space of time, to ensure that the building meets fire regulations. Together with Lauren and our family, may I wish you ‫חג כשר ושמח‬.

4


Who does what Chairman Treasurer Secretary Bulletin supported by: CUJS liaison Kiddushim Board of Deputies Gabbai Building CTJC community rabbi

Jonathan Allin Jo Landy Barry Landy Jane Liddell-King Barry Landy Ros Landy Jo Landy Jonathan Harris Robert Marks Yoav Git Tim Goldrein Rabbi Reuven Leigh

CTJC web site: www.ctjc.org.uk

Subscriptions and donations Members who have not yet paid their subscription for this year (201718) should now do so, together with the Board of Deputies levy (£30), the levy to the Chief Rabbi’s Office (£8 which should be paid by each male member), and any donations to the UJIA, the CTJC or the Cambridge Chaplaincy that you wish to make. Donations to the Community Rabbi Fund will be used to support our promise to contribute to our Rabbi’s activities. The subscription fees for 2017/2018, as agreed at the AGM, are: Full family £201.00 Associate family £135.00 Full single £139.00 Associate single £89.00 These fees may be varied to suit individual circumstances. The Treasurer will be pleased to be consulted confidentially. The subscription may be paid by direct bank transfer to sort code 2017-19 account 20199192, in which case please send an explanatory email to the treasurer at treasurer@ctjc.org.uk.

5


Alternatively send a cheque, payable to CTJC, together with this slip indicating how much is being paid in each category, to Jo Landy, 52 Maids Causeway Cambridge CB5 8DD Name: Address:

Subscription: Community Rabbi Fund donation: CTJC donation: Board of Deputies: Chief Rabbi’s Office: UJIA donation: Chaplaincy donation: Total: Visitors for whom membership is not appropriate are invited to make a donation. CTJC is a registered Charity, number 282849. Payment from tax-paid income can be made by Gift Aid, which will enable the CTJC to recover the tax paid. A suitable declaration is available from the Secretary at secretary@ctjc.org.uk. To join the CTJC email list please send an email to secretary@ctjc.org.uk or chair@ctjc.org.uk. If you would like to sponsor a kiddush, please email kiddushim@ctjc.org.uk.

6


Community news Mazel Tov • • • •

To Rabbi Shloime and Rivkah Shagalow on the birth of their twin girls, Clara and Esther To Stefan Reif on the engagement of his grandson (son of Anthony and Tanya Silas) to Yiscah Levi To Benjamin Allin and Jessica Longley on their engagement To Victoria Allin and David Entwistle on their engagement

Communal seder Chabad of Cambridge are holding a Pesach seder on Friday 30 March, and again on Saturday 31 March. For further details and if you'd like to register, please see www.cuchabad.org/seder.

Other events For other Communal events please see the CTJC web site, www.ctjc.org.uk

Communal information Services in the Synagogue Friday evening

Shabbat morning Sunday morning

In Term: Winter Ma'ariv 6.00 pm Summer Minchah and Ma'ariv 7.30pm In Vacation: Check the website, www.ctjc.org.uk 9.30 am in the Synagogue 8.00 am in the Synagogue (most weeks)

Learning, Talmud Shiur Usually 8.00 pm at 23 Parsonage Street, led by Prof. Stefan Reif. The group is currently studying (Masechet Betza). The shiur is held on a convenient evening in those weeks when Prof Reif is in Cambridge. For more information email chevra@ctjc.org.uk.

7


Kosher meat and groceries Derby Stores (26 Derby St, Newnham, 354391) stock prepacked Kosher groceries and meat, and will buy to order. They get fresh from London midday Thursday, and stay open till 8pm. Sainsbury's in Coldham's Lane also stocks a range of Kosher Goods including frozen chicken legs. Ocado has some Kosher foods in its delivery list.

Hospital visiting Contact Sarah Schechter (329172), Tirzah Bleehen (354320) for coordination if you wish to volunteer to help, or need to organise some visits. Barry Landy or Rabbi Reuven Leigh (354603) are prepared to attend hospitals to read prayers. Due to personal privacy concerns the hospital no longer informs us when Jewish patients are admitted. If you wish to be visited, please let one of the above know when you are about to enter hospital.

Chevra Kadisha The Cambridge Jewish Residents' Association (CJRA) Chevra Kadisha, which follows orthodox rites, is available to members of the CTJC. Contact Brendel Lang, secretary (353301), Robert Marks, treasurer (07791 788 584), or Barry Landy (570417).

Religious events For services, barmitzvahs, weddings, brit milah etc, contact Barry Landy (570417) or Rabbi Leigh (354603).

8


Four more questions Rabbi Reuven Leigh In the spirit of the Hagadah of asking questions and seeking answers, here are four more questions that I will be thinking about this year. Maybe there will be a chance over Yom Tov to discuss them further: 1. The Hagadah asks "Why do we eat this Matzah?" and answers that it is because the dough the enslaved Israelites took out of Egypt did not have enough time to rise (Exodus 12:39). However, they had already been commanded to eat Matzah the night before they left (Exodus 12:8). It would appear that the Matzah that we eat on the night of Pesach parallels the Matzah that they ate the night before they left, so why does the Hagadah say that the reason we eat Matzah is because of the dough that didn’t rise when they left the next day? 2. In Exodus 12:39 it says that Israelites baked Matzah because the dough did not have time to rise, implying that if there had been time they would have baked bread. However, in the Tractate Pesachim (96b) it says that on that first Pesach they were forbidden to eat Chametz for the entire first day. Would they not have baked bread even if there had been time? 3. The Hagadah says that were it not for Hashem taking us out of Egypt we and our offspring would still be enslaved in Egypt. However, Hashem had made a covenant with Avraham that his offspring would be in servitude for only 400 years. 4. The Zohar says that Matzah is called the "bread of faith" since it strengthens the Jewish people’s faith. How is it possible that food can affect our faith? Best wishes for a kosher and happy Pesach.

9


The Neshama meeting for women. London, Motzei Shabbat 27 January 2018 Ros Landy The Neshama Festival organised by a team from the Chief Rabbi’s Office was a really uplifting educational event done, unusually, for women only. The prime mover for this was Rebbetzen Freda Kaplan from the HGSS Shul. She has produced many programmes for women in the years she has been in office at Hampstead Garden Suburb and is a charismatic leader with a positive outlook on the role of Jewish women. The total turnout for the festival was an astonishing 600. For the one-evening event on this occasion, there was a choice of fourteen women speakers and one women’s band. I decided to hear our local chaplain, Lea Tarragin-Zeller speaking on ‘Tzniut, for heaven’s sake’. The audience for this session was composed of ultra and modern orthodox women, some 40 in all. As well as covering the familiar and regular modern orthodox background, Lea’s talk introduced us to the educational patterns for teenage girls in the Beis Yaakov movement. The talk was illustrated with slides and information about reference books. Lea explored the girls’ attitude to their way of dressing, which has to be modest in order to obey the tenets of various texts. One source is Bereshit Rabbah 18:2 which outlines the programme of life as "the men are supposed to be learning holy texts and the women are meant to be modest". Lea pointed out that Halachic literature advises people to avoid mixed seating. Nobody in the audience acknowledged the difficulties Haredim have in aeroplanes where the seating plan can place a man near a woman. Another theme addressed intriguingly was the shift in the feeling towards a renewed need for modesty. Girls want to be beautiful but what must they do in order to remain modestly dressed? What is the desired length of a skirt, or of a sleeve?

10


We were given a source in the Gemara, namely Rav Chisdai who said that every woman wants to be beautiful. This led the teachers in the Beis Yaakov setting to encourage this natural wish, while at the same time directing it to the beauty which connects with G-d. Modesty therefore becomes a mission for the ultra orthodox girls. It was an excellent learning session and well received. All thanks to Lea and to the festival organisers.

Recollections of Yeshivat Hakotel Daniel Lederman This past year I was fortunate enough to have studied at Yeshivat Hakotel. It was an incredible experience. For those who want to understand the Israeli perspective, whilst also learning at a high level, I highly recommend the Yeshiva. Yet it was Bnei Akiva’s Torani programme that changed how I perceive Israel on a religious, social, and political level – and all in the company of an exceptionally talented group of people. This was in no small part owed to the work of Michael Rainsbury and our Madrichim, but it is also a reflection of the quality of the participants. This article would like to argue that three features of Torani stand out as being particularly relevant to its success. I will try to limit the superlatives, but in truth, the Torani programme deserves the praise. Firstly, there were the Shabbatot. From the Golan to Eilat, and from Chashmonaim to Tel Aviv, we truly experienced Israel in all manner of settings. The atmosphere at these weekends was unbelievable – the tisches were a particular highlight, providing ruach and spiritual nourishment on a level I doubt I will see again. At their core, the Shabbatot helped us to bond as a group. Given the large diversity of our Torani group, which included six European members, this smoothed the integration process and ensured that we were able to appreciate the year as a collective, rather than as individuals.

11


Secondly, Torani provided an opportunity to engage with world Bnei Akiva and other youth groups from across the globe. This international perspective on Israel provided great value in its diversity, but also reinforced the message that we are part of something greater than ourselves. It is also clear that the Pesach Seminar introduced a nuance and complexity into the Israeli narrative that many of us had not seen before. In meeting people from all sections of Israeli society (Religious Zionists, Secular Zionists, Charedim, and Arabs), we were forced to grapple with familiar issues, but from a different perspective. Talking to Arab teenagers our age was particularly enlightening. It demonstrated, certainly on a personal level, how we can often form unsophisticated and simplistic views if we surround ourselves with closed-minded people. The Pesach Seminar did a great deal to amend this, and I believe the interaction with wider Israeli society represents what Bnei Akiva should be aiming for on a larger scale in the UK. Finally, but perhaps most importantly, Torani ensured our year had focus. We were always aware that we were part of a movement. Consequently, we were able to frame events like Yom Ha’atzmaut and Yom Yerushalayim in the context of what it means for a ‫ בוגר‬of Bnei Akiva UK, not just as a teenager on their gap year. The same also applied to our work on Kibbutz Ein Hanatziv. Although the kibbutz movement has declined in significance, understanding the sacrifice that the early chalutzim made was important. It helped to put into perspective our role as Religious Zionists today, and how we might fulfil the ever-present motto of Torah v’Avodah.

12


Faith and Activism Rabbi Dweck at Sidney Sussex College Cambridge 24 February, 2018 Abigail Isaacson On a cold January evening, Rabbi Dweck spoke compellingly, without a single note, to an audience of students and others on the subject of 'Faith and Activism'. "How much should we do?" he asked, before explaining that the guiding principle of activism is rooted in the concept of 'Brit' (covenant). "The covenant itself includes the idea that we are not merely spectators." Developing the point, he added: "If you refer to the original text, God says to Abraham 'walk before me and be perfect/wholesome'. Compare this with the phrasing used with Noah: 'God walked with Noah'. God had to hold Noah's hand suggesting that Noah was not prepared to go out and change the world. Conversely, Abraham is very different in the way he approaches life. He discovered primal existence, the fundamental force of being. He saw his world as stemming from that singularity: "I am of it as it is of me." Following Abraham's circumcision, God apparently soliloquises, questioning his intentions toward the people of Sodom. He asks, "Am I concealing from Abraham what I am going to do?". What emerges is an image of God's expectation of Abraham's contribution, implying that essentially they co-pilot the nature of reality. And in this example, we see the soliloquy wasn't just about the fate of the people of Sodom, but crucially revealed the nature of God's interaction with the world. Abraham was warning God of a potential PR disaster. "What you do reflects on me, what I do reflects on you." The story of Honi ha'M'agel is another instance in which we see activism, when, at each request for and deliverance of rain, Honi assertively reiterates his frustration with God until eventually he is content with the strength of the much-needed rainfall. As our relationship with God is covenantal, it is essentially the experience of activism which defines who we are as a people. 13


Rabbi Dweck was careful to add a caveat to his argument. "And you shall be perfect/wholesome" he reminded us. And went on to interpret this to mean: make sure that what you perceive to be reality is indeed reality, that your perception can be tested and evidence found to support it, and only then apply it across the board. He continued: "We will often choose to forego a truth in order to be part of a particular group. It takes control and resistance to go against the status quo. Faith is that we are not running solo, that there is another at the end of the covenant. When we talk about activism, it means looking at what's going on in the world, responding as best you can, and testing your ideas." Rabbi Dweck asked us to consider how and when to underwrite decision making with personal responsibility and commitment rather than allowing others to do our thinking for us.

Chaos around the Seder table Rabbi Mordechai Zeller There is often a strange dissonance between the Passover Seder, literally meaning order, and the chaos it takes to get there. In many households, Passover cleaning is a time not just for getting rid of Hametz (leavened bread), it is a time for an intense spring cleaning. This cleaning process is not only a technical feat, it is also an emotional task. And then the Seder night arrives. The entire family gathers together for the reading of the Haggadah and the eating of the Matzah, accompanied with a glorious feast. After weeks of hard work, the host of the Seder finally sits down, and for a short fleeting moment it is a wonderful, and joyous occasion. But that moment doesn’t last long. Very quickly, the drama begins. Sharing a space together, the explosions are almost inevitable. This special moment brings up everyone’s anger, guilt, sibling rivalry, intergenerational tension and pressure. Seder? Sounds pretty chaotic to me‌

14


Many times we perceive these types of family tensions as a failure. But, what if the true essence of the Seder is the thing everyone is trying to avoid? Perhaps, we can view these family dramas as in integral part of the Seder? Difficult children and unanswered questions are a big part of the Pesach drama. Perhaps our sages were hinting at this as they made sure to add depictions of dysfunctional father-son images, sibling rivalry and family feuds to the traditional text of the Haggadah? According to Jewish law, the dough for the Matzah needs to be prepared using mayim shelanu, literally, water that slept, that is, water that was not immediately drawn from the well or faucet. Following this, our sages taught that Matzah should be made with water that was set aside for the making of Matzah, and sat through the night, waiting for the baking of the Matzah the next day (the original reason for this seems to be the fear that water that is a bit warm would possibly make the dough leaven, and water set aside cools through the night). I would like to offer another interpretation to the word Shelanu. When Jacob ran away from his brother Esav, the Torah says that he left Beer Sheba and set out on his way to Haran. He is alone, tired and, fearful of what is yet to come. The verse (Genesis 28:10) says: ‫וילן שם כי בא השמש‬ – "and he slept there for the sun had set". The Zohar explains that the sun setting symbolized his emotional state. He is in the dark. He is heartbroken, sad, perhaps depressed. When it says vayalen sham, the Zohar says this alludes not to him sleeping, but to another verse, describing the people of Israel complaining to Moses ‫וילונו העם על משה‬ .‫" – לאמור מה נשתה‬Vayalono means they complained about their thirst and lack of water". Returning to Jacob, he didn't just go to sleep. He complained. He was angry at God for his harsh fate. When our Rabbis taught that we learn prayer from the Patriarchs, we learn the idea of evening prayer from Jacob at this moment of distress. Prayer is not only about praise, but sometimes our pain and anger can enable powerful prayer as well. With this idea of Vayilono, we can say that we are told to use Mayim Shelanu, water of our discontent, to bake our Matzah. Perhaps we are asked to fuse water of bitterness, anger, and difficulty together with 15


the taste of freedom. Perhaps the taste of freedom has a bitterness to it that needs to be present in the process of the Passover ceremony. From where do we get water of discontent? On Rosh Hashana, the Jewish New Year, there is a custom called Tashlich, the (symbolic) casting away of sins at a natural water source. In Hassidic sources, we hear of a Rebbe who would go to draw his Mayim Shelanu for his Matzah baking from the exact place where half a year earlier he did Tashlich, the casting away of one’s sins. Perhaps before Yom Kippur, we can cast away the parts of ourselves that are unfavorable in our eyes, project them onto a scapegoat, and send him out to die in the wilderness. But on Passover, in order to experience the taste of freedom, we need our sins back. We need to reclaim those unfavorable parts, the split off shadow images of anger, rage, and discontent. Freedom is meaningless without them. Perhaps this year, when someone asks those tough, uncomfortable questions, or when the tightly knit Seder begins to unravel - know and remember: this is the Seder. This is what is supposed to happen. Embrace the conflict, hold the space, let the inter-generational process work itself through. Only by reclaiming our sins, facing our unconscious shadow and owning our anger and discontent can we leave Egypt and truly become free.

16


No place to lay one's head by Françoise Frenkel Reviewed by Jonathan Allin The story behind "No place to lay one's head" is itself puzzling. Frenkel appears to have written it in 1943 and 1944 "on the shores of Lake Lucerne". The book starts with Frenkel establishing the only French bookshop in Berlin in the early 1920s, through to her final escape across the FrenchSwiss border at Haute-Savoie. It's unclear whether the book is, or indeed is intended to be, an accurate autobiography, or whether Frenkel deliberately mixed truth with fiction.

Title page of the original edition of Rien où poser sa tête, 1945

Frenkel was born in July 1889 near Lodz, and died in January 1975 in Nice, however we know very little about her life: she appears on a list provided by the State Archives of the Canton Geneva of people who were recorded at the Geneva border and who were allowed to remain in Switzerland, and on a compensation claim dated 1958. The latter refers to a trunk Frenkel had left in storage in Paris in 1940 and that was subsequently confiscated on the grounds that it was "Jewish property". In 1960 she was awarded 3,500 marks for the despoliation of the trunk. In the early days Frenkel ran the book shop with her husband, Simon Raichenstein, however he's not mentioned at all. We learn from Patrick Modiano's preface that Simon Raichenstein had a Nansen passport, since he belonged to that group of émigrés from Russia, and that until 1933, he and Frenkel ran the bookshop together. In 1933 Raichenstein left Berlin for Paris, where he remained even though the French 17


authorities issued him with a deportation order. In July 1942 he was taken from the Drancy internment camp to Auschwitz. He died on 19 August, though Frenkel would almost certainly not have known this when she was writing this book. Frenkel had to abandon her book shop, and Berlin, in 1939 shortly before the declaration of war. She moved to Paris and stayed there for 9 months, but then had to flee to the Southern Zone (La Zone Sud), arriving in Nice in December 1940, where she stayed in the Hotel Roseraie. Her life there is fascinating with an interesting cast of hotel guests who manage to survive under the most impoverished circumstances. Frenkel escaped the August 1942 round-up of Jews in Nice, thanks to the Mariuses who provide her with refuge in their hairdressing salon. In December 1942 she made her first attempt to cross into Switzerland. She was caught and incarcerated in Annecy, where she was tried and acquitted. In July 1943 Frenkel successfully, and illegally, crossed the Franco-Swiss border. The book provides an insight into Vichy France and the naive belief that most had in Marshal PÊtain's government. Existence was shaped by food shortages, queuing, and propaganda. But somehow life went on. Despite the constant risk of betrayal and denouncement, Frenkel survives thanks to the steadfast friendship of the Mariuses, friendly gendarmes, a helpful brothel madame, and friends in Switzerland who ensured she had a valid Swiss visa. We may, perhaps mistakenly, think of war-time France as comprising collaborators or resistance. However the population in the region of Haute-Savoie somehow managed to maintain an independent spirit and a core of decency, unstintingly offering assistance to regugees. It is perhaps to this, above all else, that François Frenkel owed her life. Frenkel's style is very matter of fact, with no suggestion of complaint. This is a strength but also a weakness: the book provides little insight into the person who was born Frymeta Idesa Frenkel.

18


The Cambridge University Jewish Society Ball Ariel Cohen The Cambridge University Jewish Society Ball was revived last Sunday evening (25th February) at the historic Cambridge Union. With delicious catering by Josepha White, live music from Colonel Spanky, Cambridge’s leading big band and Luka Abeywickrama, an up and coming jazz musician from Leeds, magic by Yoni Lavi, comedy from the Cambridge Impronauts, and award-winning DJ Isaac Squires, the party continued until the early hours of the morning. A committee of 14 freshers students, led by co-presidents Ariel Cohen (Jesus College) and Leeron Haffner (Fitzwilliam College), raised over £1,000 for their chosen charity, Jewish Women’s Aid. Over 155 students from Cambridge and other universities came together for a highlight of the campus social calendar that will be remembered by all as an excellent night.

L to R: Imogen Sinclair, Sabrina Brecher, Jade Charles, Ella Benson

19


Back row: Aure Aflalo, Adina Wineman, Jake Mendel, Leah Shaya, Alex Motzkin Front row: Daniel Lederman, Adam Morland

Ariel Cohen (ball copresident), Mordechai Zeller (chaplain), Lea Taragin (chaplain), Leeron Haffner (ball co-president)

Samuel Isaac, Naphtali Yosef Rabinowitz, Yonah Citron, Alex Rabinowitz, Ariel Cohen, Pesach Eliav Grossman, Eliot Cohen 20


Machos Cinnamon sugar matzah nachos with fruit salsa Helen Goldrein Have you made ‘machos’ yet? These crunchy matzah nachos seem to be having a moment and it’s easy to see why – they’re super-easy and incredibly moreish. A brilliant way to make matzah into something a bit special. I had the idea to make sweet machos after reading this post for chocolate nachos on Recipes from a Pantry. Genius! My version is completely kosher for Pesach and of course a little bit healthier – less chocolate, more fruit – but I hope just as delicious. Certainly I think they are just as addictive. I had to put several metres distance and a sight screen between myself and the plate of machos in order to make sure there would be some left for Kipper. And a little part of me was still encouraging me to just eat the lot and not tell her about them… I am a terrible mother. As it was, she was rather taken by them and somewhat disappointed that I hadn’t saved more of them for her. Me: Would you like to try these? I made them… Kipper: <nibbles> These are YUMMY! <stuffs remaining machos into her face> Can I have some more? Me: Er, you just finished them. There aren’t any more… Kipper: MAKE SOME MORE! MAKE SOME MORE NOW!! I didn’t of course. I made dinner instead. But I hope this interaction demonstrates just how fabulously good these sweet cinnamony matzah nachos are. These would make a great snack, or even a yummy and unusual breakfast or dessert. Competent older kids should be able to have a go at making them themselves, perhaps with a little supervision for the boiling water and the cutting. And they’re SO good! Crunchy, sweet and cinnamon flavoured – the best thing to happen to matzah in a LONG time. 21


The fruit salsa is simply a finely chopped fruit salad. I made it with the fruit I had to hand, but you can really use whatever you have available, such as melon, pineapple, mango, strawberries, blueberries, apple, pear. Use your favourites, but make sure that they are cut into small pieces for ease of scooping! If you want to have a go at regular savoury machos, simply swap the cinnamon and sugar for your favourite nacho seasoning â&#x20AC;&#x201C; paprika, garlic, oregano etc. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and bake as below, then serve with guacamole & salsa. You can pile them up and melt cheese over them if you want to get carried away!

Ingredients for the Machos

Ingredients for the fruit salsa

2 sheets matzah 2 tbsp margarine or butter 1 tbsp sugar

1 ripe nectarine or peach 1 slice melon 1 mandarin or tangerine 10-12 black grapes Lime juice Fresh mint, finely chopped

Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to 200C (400F). Line a baking sheet with parchment or a non-stick liner 2. Place the matzah sheets in a shallow dish and pour boiling water over. Leave to stand for 20-30 seconds then drain off the water and pat with paper towels. The matzah should have softened but not become mushy 3. Using a sharp knife, cut each matzah into 16 triangles. Put the pieces into a mixing bowl 4. Melt the margarine or butter. Stir in the cinnamon and sugar and mix well. Pour this over the matzah pieces then gently mix to coat each one in the cinnamon mixture 5. Arrange the matzah pieces on the prepared baking sheet. Bake at 200C (400F) for 5 minutes. Turn the pieces over and return to the oven for a further 5 minutes 6. Remove from the baking sheet and allow the 'machos' to cool on a wire rack. Pile onto a plate and serve with the fruit salsa for dipping and scooping 22


A squeeze of lime or some chopped mint are great but completely optional. The sweetness of the fruit goes so well with the crunch of the matzah nachos and the lovely cinnamon tastes delicious with everything. Happy Pesach snacking!

Festival calendar Pesach 2018 Anyone who would like to attend a Seder, or who knows someone who would like to attend a Seder, is invited to consult Barry Landy (Cambridge 570417) who will try to arrange a suitable host. Derby Stores (Cambridge 354391) will take Pesach orders. Thursday 29 March Friday 30 March

Saturday 31 March Sunday 1 April Thursday 5 April Friday 6 April Saturday 7 April

Fast of the Firstborn. Shacharit 7am Finish all Chametz by 10.36am Burning of Chametz by 11.53am Festival starts 7.15pm. Minchah, Maariv 7pm Shacharit 10am Shacharit 10am Festival ends 8.19pm Festival Starts 7.25pm. Minchah, Maariv 7.15pm Shacharit 10am Shacharit 10am Shabbat and Festival end 8.31pm

23


Shavuot 2018 Shavuot is in University Term, so the services are organised by the students: Friday 18 May Saturday 19 May

Sunday 20 May Monday 21 May

Shabbat starts 8.37pm Shacharit 9.30am Shavuot starts at the end of Shabbat (9:53pm) Minchah, Maariv to be announced Shacharit 9.30am Shacharit 9.30am Minchah, Maariv to be announced. Festival Ends 9.57pm

Tisha b'Av 2018 Saturday 21 July

Sunday 22 July

24

Fast commences 9.07pm Shabbat ends 10.07pm Maariv and Eichah 10.30pm Shacharit at 8am (expected to finish about 10am) Minchah 1.45pm or 6pm (to be decided on the day) Fast ends at 9.55pm


From the children Rebetzen Rochel Leigh One of the classes at 'The Lehrhaus for kids' are learning about the cycle of the Judges (Shoftim). After our class on Devorah and Barak I asked them to draw pictures for the bulletin.

25


Devorah sitting under a palm tree

I drew Devorah as a bee, as Devorah in Hebrew means 'bee'. I also drew Barak as a goalie, because goalies don't come out of the goal and Barak, though brave, was hesitant to 'play' the role Devorah asked him to. I also drew Devorah and Barak's house as they were married.

26


For the children Lauren Allin Find the 10 plagues and list them in order.

‫ר‬

‫צ‬

‫ם‬

‫ר‬

‫ב‬

‫ד‬

‫ט‬

‫ג‬

‫ו‬

‫כ‬

‫ת‬

‫ס‬

‫ע‬

‫ד‬

‫ר‬

‫פ‬

‫צ‬

‫ר‬

‫ל‬

‫י‬

‫א‬

‫ט‬

‫י‬

‫ם‬

‫ד‬

‫נ‬

‫ס‬

‫ש‬

‫ת‬

‫ח‬

‫ר‬

‫ת‬

‫ו‬

‫ר‬

‫ו‬

‫כ‬

‫ב‬

‫ת‬

‫כ‬

‫מ‬

‫ב‬

‫ו‬

‫ר‬

‫ע‬

‫ז‬

‫ך‬

‫ש‬

‫ח‬

‫ה‬

‫ב‬

‫ה‬

‫מ‬

‫ר‬

‫כ‬

‫ת‬

‫א‬

‫ח‬

‫מ‬

‫ה‬

‫ק‬

‫ש‬

‫ג‬

‫צ‬

‫ט‬

‫ה‬

‫ם‬

‫י‬

‫נ‬

‫כ‬

‫ר‬

‫ק‬

‫ע‬

‫ל‬

‫ר‬

‫ש‬

‫א‬

‫ן‬

‫צ‬

‫ת‬

‫ס‬

Which plagues happened in water, which on land, and which in the air?

27


CTJC Bulletin Pesach 2018  

CTJC Bulletin Pesach 2018

CTJC Bulletin Pesach 2018  

CTJC Bulletin Pesach 2018

Advertisement