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OUR TEAM. OUR PASSION. OUR SUCCESS.


FROM THE DEPARTMENT HEAD

OUR TEAM OUR PASSION OUR SUCCESS INSIDE THIS ISSUE From the Department Head.................2 From the Dean.........................................3 Industry Partnerships.......................... 4-8 Alumni News........................................ 9-11 Department News............................12-21 Students............................................22-23

PUBLISHING INFORMATION The CM Newsletter is published by the Department of Construction Management, College of Health and Human Sciences, Colorado State University.

OUR TEAM, OUR PASSION, OUR SUCCESS I want to start this year’s message with a thank you to my CM team of faculty, staff, students, and industry partners. I would also like to thank the Colorado State University administration and Jeff McCubbin, dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences, for their continued support of the mission and the vision of our program. This newsletter highlights our team achievements, commitment, and passion to build a program of excellence at CSU. Sadly, in December 2015, our team went through the pain and sorrow of the sudden death of one of our team members. Natalya Bowen served our program as the communications and special projects coordinator for six years. In every single story she wrote, every website she designed, and every flyer she developed, she used her talent to celebrate our team: faculty, staff, students, and industry. She was talented, resilient, committed, and a passionate professional who made her work and actions define her. I will miss a great friend and colleague. During the last number of years, we engaged in writing the story of building an exceptional construction management program and developing a legacy of excellence at CSU. I remember vividly when I started my career as an assistant professor in construction management (CM) at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the concerns expressed by some of my colleagues about how CM was perceived in the College of Engineering. At the time, I saw CM as a “hidden gem” in higher education -- a discipline created by the industry and the market that we serve today. I saw CM as a great example of a higher education program with a defined market place. What excited me about construction education and the opportunities then is what drives me today as a faculty member and department head. As a result of the passion, vision, and commitment of our collective team, CM at CSU is no longer a “hidden gem” or the “best kept secret.” CM at CSU is highly recognized nationally by our peer institutions, our industry, and our CSU administration. Now, it is one thing for us to talk about our success, it is quite another to have others tell us how successful we are. Here are some recent examples of comments from some of our stakeholders: •

“The quality of the great programs at this university...and construction management – did not become what they are because people settled for less than excellence. They did not attain this status because we had the deepest pockets or the most resources. These programs exist because we, and those who came before us in these programs, rolled up our sleeves, committed to the work needed to excel and held ourselves accountable.” Tony Frank, CSU President

“What is your secret sauce?” Mary Ontiveros, CSU Vice President for Diversity.

“Against the national standards, the CM department is viewed as exceptional.” Dean McCubbin

“I am proud to declare the CSU Construction Management program as one of the best in the United States.” Rick Tucker, (’90), Hensel Phelps, Executive Vice President, Construction Management PADB Chairman.

“I love what I do and where I work!” Anna Fontana, (’97) Construction Management, Internship and Outreach Coordinator, Phelps Placement Office.

Website: www.cm.colostate.edu Managing Editor: Dan Ricci Photography: John Eisele and Department of Construction Management Staff Writing: Dan Ricci or as noted Project Coordination, Design, and Production: Dan Ricci, Department of Construction Management, and Communications and Creative Services, Colorado State University Send letters, comments, and address changes to: Dan Ricci Department of Construction Management Colorado State University 1584 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-1584 Phone: (970) 491-0435 Fax: (970) 491-2473 Email: Daniel.Ricci@colostate.edu

Vince Lombardi once said, “Every time a football player goes to ply his trade he’s got to play from the ground up - from the soles of his feet right up to his head. Every inch of him has to play. Some guys play with their heads. That’s O.K. You’ve got to be smart to be number one in any business. But more importantly, you’ve got to play with your heart, with every fiber of your body. If you’re lucky enough to find a guy with a lot of head and a lot of heart, he’s never going to come off the field second.” I am honored to work with a great team of faculty, staff, students, and industry partners with a lot of head and a lot of heart. This is our secret sauce. Now, our challenge is to build upon the momentum gained and to ensure that we do not lose track of what is important. Our legacy is to build a program of excellence, to lead construction education, and strengthen our industry partnerships. Our goal is to maintain a program that empowers people to undertake actions and achievements beyond personal goals and that aligns people with shared values and the ability to achieve results collectively. I am proud to be part of a great team!

Mostafa Khattab, Head, Department of Construction Management 2 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016


FROM THE DEAN OUR TEAM, OUR PASSION, OUR SUCCESS The Department of Construction Management is one of the strongest programs on campus due to the passion of their faculty, staff, and students, as well as their determination to thrive regardless of the circumstances. This past year has been especially difficult for the Department of Construction Management due to the tragic passing of an influential staff member and two undergraduate students. Ms. Natalya Bowen was a valued team member and friend of the department and the college, in fact this newsletter was part of her administrative responsibilities. From my perspective, the CM team shined during this difficult period as faculty and staff supported each other following Natalya and her daughter’s sudden death. We were also saddened by the sudden deaths of two CM students this past academic year. Dealing with such tragic loss is hard, and yet I am confident that the memories of these young professionals will provide an inspiration to others within the CM family to continue working to be best they can be for the department, college, and the University. On a brighter note, this year was also very positive as the department prepared for the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE) accreditation. This is a complicated process requiring an extensive self-study report and rigorous submission process. In addition, a team of experts from around the U.S. made a visit to campus to evaluate curriculum, facilities and administrative operations, and to meet with our administration, faculty, staff, and students. The positive final report from ACCE indicated that our Department provides an excellent educational experience for our students, and we earned another full six-year accreditation. This is due to our outstanding departmental leadership, excellent faculty, and great industry partners who provide financial support and experiential learning opportunities that help to prepare our students to enter the workforce with confidence after graduation. Feedback from the external review committee helped to solidify the exceptional reputation of our department. I want to thank the faculty and staff who made this a successful process. With all of the highs and lows from the past year, one thing has remained constant: the steady support of our alumni, friends, and College family members. Some of these important advocates are part of two teams of alumni and friends of the College of Health and Human Sciences, who support our development mission. The Executive Leadership Council is made up of key leaders in their profession, who work to help CSU grow and prosper. Darrell Eastwood (CM ’74), Senior VP with Saunders Construction has served as an excellent council member and continues to share his passion for CM and the College. We also have an Emerging Leaders Council of younger professionals, who have excelled early in their careers and share a commitment to CSU. Within that group we have three outstanding CM alumni, Gabe Dunbar (’11), Reese Lasley (’10), and Sergio Ortiz (’09). These emerging professionals have contributed their time and talents to support College initiatives and helping form the vision for the future. I am very appreciative of the contributions these professionals make to the College. The Department of Construction Management has emerged from the past year stronger than ever and that is due in large part to you. It is through our shared passion for student success and community outreach that we have made a significant impact in the field of CM and our communities.

CM PROGRAM RECEIVES ACCE ACCREDITATION RENEWAL The Department of Construction Management is pleased to announce that it has secured a six-year accreditation renewal from the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE). The renewal period runs from February 2016 to February 2022. The official announcement was made Feb. 19 at the ACCE annual mid-year meeting in Mobile, Ala. ACCE is a leading advocate of quality construction education programs around the world, with its primary goal is to promote and improve construction education in colleges and universities. It provides accreditation to those that request the evaluation and meet the standards set forth by the Council. The program must demonstrate exemplary curriculum, faculty, and facilities capable of providing the best and most current education possible to students. Program strengths noted by the ACCE visiting team included department leadership, highly coordinated and effective administrative staff, dedicated and passionate students, and ongoing industry support.

“This is a tremendous accomplishment by our department team of faculty, staff, and students, and would not have been possible without the strong support from the CSU administration, and our construction industry friends and colleagues.” Dr. Mostafa Khattab, Head, Department of Construction Management

Jeff McCubbin Dean, College of Health and Human Sciences

CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 3


INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

RETURNING HOME: CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT ALUMNI AND INTERNS PLAY CENTRAL ROLE IN CSU CAMPUS REVITALIZATION The campus building boom is an exciting time for CSU. With $700 million worth of projects slated for completion by the end of 2017, the campus is undergoing a significant makeover. The CM department is not just watching projects happen, but also watching graduates and interns at work. It brings us great pride to see so many alumni and interns demonstrating the skills and qualities learned during their construction education. The opportunity for alumni to return home and participate in CSU’s revitalization is also very special.

“I consider it the pinnacle of my career to come back to CSU and build something like the CSU Health and Medical Center.” – Doug Johnson (’95), Vice President, Adolfson & Peterson Construction

“We’ve had the pleasure of working with a lot of great design-build contractors in Colorado, and many employees on their teams have graduated from CSU’s construction management program. They have a lot of pride in what they do and in building a campus that was once home to them and will be home to other Rams into the future.”

“I am very proud. It is a great honor to come back here and build the stadium on campus for Colorado State University.” – Cameron Moss (’14), Project Engineer, Mortenson Construction and Former Rams Football Player

– Cass Beitler, Assistant Director of Capital Construction and Project Management, CSU

Below are just a few of the construction management students and alumni working on projects around campus.

STADIUM

MORTENSON CONSTRUCTION AARON FARMER (’14) ADAM DRAGUL (’10) BRAD WHITNEY (’95) BRANT DILLON (’93) CAMERON MOSS (’14) CHRIS ZECH (’08) DAN KIESEL (’85) DARRELL FIELD (’08) DAVE LEOPOLD (’15)

JEFF LINDSAY (’91) JOSE NIETO (’15) LANE BRUGMAN (’14) PATRICK ANDREWS (’11) STEVE KENYON (’14) TYLER VAN EECKHAUT (’13) INTERN: CAMERON SCHLUTER INTERN: CONNER NUSS INTERN: CONNOR LAFAYETTE

ENCORE ELECTRIC DAVID MCLAUGHLIN ’12 INTERN: COLTON BETTGER INTERN: PATRICK MICHAELS

DOUGLASS COLONY INTERN: JOSH CLARK

LPR CONSTRUCTION CODY HADICKE (’10) JAY CARROLL (’16) PETER RADICE (’02)

STRESSCON CORPORATION BRANDON FARLEY (’11)

U.S. ENGINEERING BILL HAZLETT (’96) PATRICK BARNETT (’10) TAMMER KHATTAB (’12)

CHEMISTRY BUILDING HASELDEN CONSTRUCTION ASHLEY VESELY (’09) BRIAN BANISTER (’94) COLBY STODDEN (’98) DAVID MARSH (’04) JEB BAIR (’10) INTERN: BLAKE WARNER

DUN-RITE EXCAVATING DAVID KASPERBAUER (’02)

LITHKO CONTRACTING OWEN THURSTON (’15)

4 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

PHASE 2 COMPANY

JOSH MELTON (’10)

SODERBERG MASONRY JOHN NACOS (’03)

WRAY PLUMBING AND HEATING

SCOTT PETERSON (’15)


INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

AGGIE VILLAGE NORTH REDEVELOPMENT RK MECHANICAL

PCL CONSTRUCTION

INTERN: HARRISON TUCKER INTERN: LEXIE SILLS INTERN: NICK NARETTA INTERN: RAECHELLE FIELDS

BRAD BLOCK (’07) BRIAN COONTS (’92) CAMERON FOX (’15) CHASE WOLFE (’16) DAN DEATS (’02) DYLAN TOMLINSON (’15) RACHEL DUNHAM (’16) ROBERT ENNIS (’15) SEAN HOWELL (’15) INTERN: ANTHONY HILL INTERN: CALVIN LUDWIG INTERN: JUAN CONEJO

STURGEON ELECTRIC DANIEL PEYTON (’11) DANIEL PROUD (’15) NORBERTO CRUZ (’07) INTERN: PATRICK SUZUKI

BIOLOGY BUILDING

HASELDEN CONSTRUCTION ASHLEY VESELY (’09) BRENT HASELDEN (’09) CHRISTIAN EKSTROM (’96) COLBY STODDEN (’98) DAVID MARSH (’04) DEREK OLIVER (’03) JAKE FOX (’11) JEB BAIR (’10) TYLER RAFFA (’14)

INTERN: RYAN HASELDEN INTERN: TARIK WARVARIV

GALLEGOS CORPORATION J.C. SLOCUM (’97) RYAN TURNER (’07)

HALDEMAN HOMME OSWALDO CANTOR (’13)

RK MECHANICAL

INTERN: HARRISON TUCKER INTERN: LEXIE SILLS INTERN: NICK NARETTA

HEALTH AND MEDICAL CENTER ADOLFSON & PETERSON CONSTRUCTION DOUG JOHNSON (’95 KIRK JENSEN (M.S.,’11) ZELLA GOETTSCH (’05)

FRONT RANGE ROOFING KENT NELSON (’88)

ISEC

CONNELL RESOURCES, INC . MARK ROBERTS (’16)

U.S. ENGINEERING

BRANDEN DERKS (’98) DORI HAUSER (M.S.,’95) JAY DAVIS (’94) INTERN: BLAKE NOWLAND

TOP GUN CONCRETE

GARRETT HANSON (’10) MIKE PARKER

DAVID MARROU (’99)

SOUTH COLLEGE PARKING STRUCTURE

PINKARD CONSTRUCTION

BRANDON LINDSEY (’12) EFREM WOLDU (’13) JACK COCHRAN (’86) JEFF TREFZ (’10) MARK OLESEN (’79) REID KALSOW (’16) STEPHANY JIRKOVSKY (’11) TROY BOHLENDER TYLER MORGAN (’08)

QUALITY STEEL SERVICES

CODY FIFFE (’09)

SODERBERG MASONRY

JOHN NACOS (’03)

FRONT RANGE ROOFING SYSTEMS

AAA WATERPROOFING PAUL POLETTI (’95)

SPACECON SPECIALTY CONTRACTORS BRIAN CONN (’84)

WRAY PLUMBING AND HEATING

SCOTT PETERSON ’(15)

KENT NELSON (’88) RYAN LAUER (’06)

CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 5


INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

PATTERSON FAMILY AND BEAVERS CHARITABLE TRUST GROW HEAVY CONSTRUCTION INITIATIVE

“We want to support those building the next generation of leaders in the industry.” – Roy Patterson

opportunities such as competitions and onsite learning experience.

BY KATIE BRAYDEN

REACHING RETIREMENT IS ONE OF LIFE’S GREAT ACHIEVEMENTS, OFTEN MARKED WITH PARTIES, TOASTS, AND TOKENS OF APPRECIATION. But as Doug Patterson, a 1976 construction management graduate, prepares to retire from Kiewit Corporation after 38 years in the industry, the milestone has been honored through a donation from him and his family to the Department of Construction Management at Colorado State University in support of heavy construction education and research. “The goal with CSU was to meaningfully contribute back to the school that was instrumental in Doug’s successful career,” said Roy Patterson, president of Patterson Family Group and Doug’s son. “Heavy construction is important to the future well-being of the United States, and we want to support those building the next generation of leaders in the industry.” The Patterson family’s gift was matched with a gift from the Beavers Charitable Trust, a social and honorary organization founded in 6 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

1977 with the goal of supporting universities who are helping teach the heavy construction industry’s future leaders. Kiewit Corporation, Doug’s employer, and Gordon Marks, a 1966 industrial-construction management graduate and Beavers member, also made substantial gifts, which collectively has created a $1.2 million endowment to provide funding for this initiative in perpetuity. “The Patterson Family and Beavers Charitable Trust Heavy Construction Initiative Endowment will provide a necessary and sustainable funding stream that will allow us to focus on this sector of the industry through hands-on learning, industry partnerships, and enhanced research and classroom experiences,” explained Mostafa Khattab, head of the department. The Patterson family hopes this gift will provide the department with opportunities to enhance the learning environment by engaging industry professionals in real world curriculum design and instruction. Additionally, they intend the gift to provide students with unique

“Mostafa’s vision for the program and his solid steps to constantly improve the program set CSU among the top CM programs in the country,” added Dave Woods, executive director of Beavers Charitable Trust. “CSU’s program has worked hard to provide a heavy construction track.” The Patterson family and Beavers Charitable Trust have charged CSU to continue fundraising for this endowment, with a goal of raising another $300,000, bringing heavy construction funding in the department to $3 million in endowed funds. In 2005, dozens of heavy construction companies came together to donate $1.5 million to create a heavy civil endowed faculty position in the Department of Construction Management. Jeff Wilkes currently holds the Heavy Civil Endowed Chair. “Colorado State University’s commitment to the heavy construction industry is to provide faculty who can inspire and lead students to choose heavy construction management as a career choice,” said Jeff McCubbin, dean of the College of Health and Human Sciences who oversees the Department of Construction Management. “The CM department is creating a culture of understanding about heavy construction and its importance to the future of our state, region, and nation.”


INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

A MESSAGE FROM THE PADB CHAIR FROM RICK TUCKER (’90), EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT AT HENSEL PHELPS CONSTRUCTION COMPANY As most are aware, the Colorado State University CM program was recently re-accredited by ACCE last semester. The CSU CM program is the only ACCE accredited program in the state of Colorado. One of the prerequisite requirements of the accreditation is to have an industry board to interact with. This is why the Professional Advisory and Development Board (PADB) exists. As the chairman of the PADB, I have the privilege and opportunity to interface with the faculty and staff, and attend current events within the CM department. Reflecting on the past year, I am once again amazed at the outstanding developments and achievements of the CSU CM department and students. Some of these results are as follows: •

CSU CM is one of the few CSU departments that hosts their own recruiting fairs (the 2016 Fall recruiting fair was sold out in early June, before the fall semester even started.)

CSU CM graduates have the 6th highest average starting salary ($61,000) out of 85 potential bachelor degrees at CSU.

Phelps Placement Office continues to assist students in finding internships and full-time employment.

CSU CM graduates enjoy a near 100 percent placement level with graduates receiving an average of 2.8 offers.

CM student competition teams placed 6 out of the 7 participating teams at the ASC Reno Competition this year. This placement rate (86 percent) is the highest of the 24 universities having more than two teams participating.

CM Cares continues to significantly impact the communities and those individuals participating in it.

New faculty hires John Killingsworth and Mohammed Hashem Mehany were added to the department along with instructors Nick Rubino and Pierre Sirois.

The highest accolade and acknowledgement to the success of our program is that many other universities are trying to replicate the CSU CM program. Others do not yet understand WHAT makes the CSU CM program unique. CSU CM has become the elite program due to the exceptional leadership from each and every faculty and staff member in the department. The PADB executive council believes this statement to be true and wanted to express this to the faculty and staff. So, to put their money where their mouth is, the executive team sponsored an appreciation dinner for the entire CM faculty and staff. This celebration dinner was held on Sept. 8, 2016 at the Rio Grande in downtown Fort Collins. With many other universities trying to replicate what CSU CM has become, now is not the time

to just be satisfied but rather it is a time to continue to forge ahead. Industry support has been a key to the success in the past, currently, and certainly will be just as important in the future. If you are in the industry and are not involved in the PADB, you should ask yourself “why not?” You can learn more at www.cm.colostate.edu/industry or by contacting Dr. Mostafa Khattab at: Mostafa.Khattab@colostate.edu. I look forward to the coming year of continued celebration and success for the CM department. Thank you to all of the faculty, staff, industry friends, and University executives who have helped to make CSU CM continue to be one of the best programs in the nation!

INDUSTRY PARTNERS CONTRIBUTE TO CM UPGRADES Industry partners made several improvements to CM classrooms and facilities during the past year. Hensel Phelps’ donated a BIM (Building Information Modeling) box., which is a lockable solar powered computer station that can be located on the job site. BIM boxes allow project and field managers easy access to plans and modeling software as they make decisions about daily work flow, and they have become a crucial tool in the construction industry. Caterpillar donated an excavator simulator that will allow heavy civil students to get a feel for, and appreciation of, the skill needed to run a piece of equipment, as well as a better understanding of its capabilities. These donations will contribute to students’ success by exposing them to the latest industry equipment and techniques.

In addition to classroom enhancements, Wagner Equipment Co. completed a makeover of the Guggenheim Conference Room. Wagner worked with their interior designer to create a more modern business atmosphere for the space. They then worked with contractors to complete an extensive remodel that included new paint, flooring, fixtures, artwork, and furniture. CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 7


INDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS

CM CARES ENDOWMENT OFF TO STRONG START THE CM CARES INITIATIVE WAS STARTED IN 2011 AS A MANIFESTATION OF OUR CORE VALUE TO BE PART OF SOMETHING LARGER THAN OUR INDIVIDUAL SELVES. CM Cares is an initiative that teams students, faculty, staff, and industry partners to assist with construction-related projects for people with special needs or local community service agencies needing assistance that cannot be provided by other sources. Since its inception, 77 students have taken the leadership courses, more than 300 volunteers have assisted on CM Cares projects, and more than 20 construction service projects have been completed. In addition to the community service aspect, the initiative provides students with real-world opportunities to put their classroom training to work. CM Cares has quickly turned into a focal point of the academic year and an important part of the program’s focus on developing leaders. As CM Cares grew, it quickly became apparent that a stable funding source was needed to ensure the long-term viability of the program. With this in mind, the CM Cares Endowment campaign was launched in 2015. The goal is to build a $1 million endowment, providing approximately $45,000 annually to fund the program. While students will still be tasked with securing funds, materials, and services for individual projects, the endowment will provide a foundation of support. The Endowment was launched with the support of Swinerton Builders, the first Pillar Partner - Gold Sponsor, with a pledge of $100,000, and the Associated General Contractors of Colorado Future Leaders Forum, the first Pillar Partner - Silver Sponsor, with a pledge of $50,000. Joining Swinerton as Gold Sponsors are PCL Construction and The Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation, whose generosity was enlisted with the support of Interstate Highway Construction, Inc. The Roofing

Industry Alliance for Progress pledged $50,000, to become a Silver Sponsor. At the Pillar Sponsor Bronze level, The Beavers and U.S. Engineering each pledged $25,000. Ram Built, representing CM Alumni individual donations combined together, is also recognized as a Bronze Sponsor.

The construction management department wants to recognize its partners who contributed to this important initiative. CM Cares’ success is a testament to your dedication to the program and community.

Pillar Partners Gold $100,000+ Sponsors

Championed by Interstate Highway Construction

Silver $50,000 - $99,999 Sponsors

Bronze $25,000 - $49,999 Sponsors

ALUMNI “We want to do our part to give back and build community.”

“CM Cares provides an opportunity for the students to really gain perspective and to experience what true leadership is all about, as the work to improve the lives of very deserving families.” – Jared Hoeflich, Project Executive, Swinerton Builder

– Shaun Yancey (CM ‘80), President of U.S. Operations, PCL Construction

“It has been a truly humbling experience to be able to carry out Ralph’s wishes and legacy by serving the causes and people that he cared so deeply about.” – Mary M. Wilson

8 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016


ALUMNI NEWS

DENNIS CONWAY (’69) GIVES BACK AT ONE TIME, DENNIS CONWAY WANTED TO ATTEND OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY. But after moving back to Colorado prior to his senior year at Littleton High School, he decided that Colorado State University was the better choice. His father worked for GM’s heavy equipment division so Conway was familiar with the construction industry and knew he wanted to pursue a career in the field. This initially led him to major in civil engineering, but he didn’t feel that it was a good fit. He thought about switching to a business, but he found the Department of Construction Management and knew that he had found a home. In 1969, Conway graduated with a degree in construction management. Upon graduation he qualified for Sigma Lambda Chi, the international construction honor society. During his time as a student, Conway had become friends with students from Hawaii who lived in the adjacent house, which was directly across from Guggenheim Hall. Upon graduation he asked his friends about general contractors in Hawaii. They told him Hawaiian Dredging & Construction was the largest in the islands. So Conway sent his resume to Hawaiian Dredging. He was contacted shortly thereafter and invited to Hawaii for an interview. When he was offered a position, the owner told Conway he was the first construction management student to be offered a job by the company. “I am tired of hiring engineers who can’t write business letters and business students who can’t read a set of plans. I hope you can do both,” he said. Conway spent the next 26 years working in Hawaii, the South Pacific, and Asia, including three years in Guam and three years in Singapore and Southeast Asia. In 1983 he returned to Hawaii and was offered a job as president of Honolulu Roofing, the largest roofing contractor in Hawaii and the South Pacific. In 1995, after selling his interest in

Honolulu Roofing, Conway moved to Las Vegas and formed Commercial Roofers, Inc. with partner Scott Howard. Commercial Roofers is now the largest roofing and waterproofing contractor in Nevada. In his different roles Conway is proud to have worked on numerous landmark projects in Hawaii and Las Vegas. Projects in Hawaii include Honolulu International Airport, Hyatt Waikiki, Hilton Waikoloa, Ritz Carlton Kapalua, Honolulu Stadium, and Ala Moana Shopping Center. In Las Vegas, projects include Bellagio, Wynn Hotels, Paris Hotel, Southwest Airlines Terminal, and T-Mobil Arena. But Conway’s career encompasses much more than his work experience. His time in the industry instilled in him the importance of high quality training and education in the construction management field and, as one might expect, the commercial roofing trade. To promote this, he has been active in numerous associations and trade groups including his current role as the chairman of the board for the National Roofing Contractors Association, a leading trade association focused on information, education, technology, and advocacy in the roofing industry. He also serves on the CM department’s Construction Management Professional Advisory Development Board. Several times a year, Conway visits the construction management department to give guest lectures on construction materials, roofing systems, and potential careers in the roofing industry. In recent years Conway has donated generously to the CM department. “There comes a point where you realize it is time to give back,” he said. Several years ago, inspired by the work being done by Department Head Mostafa Khattab, Conway and his wife decided to tour CM’s newly renovated Preconstruction Center

building. Dennis looked out the window of the conference room and saw the house he had lived in years ago while a student at CSU. It was one of those moments were everything just felt right, and the Conways decided to sponsor the room, providing a significant financial contribution to the department. When asked why he had chosen to support the CM department, Conway gave a response echoed by many other CM alumni, “I wouldn’t be where I am today without the CSU CM department.” He also talked about the alignment between his beliefs and programs like CM Cares and how they teach the importance of, “students getting early ideas about giving back.” This perfectly captures the sense of passion CM alumni feel about the program. It also speaks to the core value of being something larger than our individual selves that the department seeks to instill in students. Dennis Conway is Ram Built!

For more information on the CM Cares initiative, endowment, and projects, visit

www.cm.chhs.colostate.edu/cm-cares

CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 9


ALUMNI NEWS

BEYOND THE DIPLOMA: MARTORANO’S (CM ‘98) PASSION FOR CONSTRUCTION BENEFITS CSU STUDENTS AND CHANDA PLAN FOUNDATION GIVING BACK TO THE GREEN AND GOLD Nearly 20 years later, Martorano is still with Hensel Phelps, working as a chief estimator, and has become their main recruiter of CSU students. Additionally, he is a member of the Department of Construction Management’s Professional Advisory and Development Board, a supporter of CM Cares, an instructor in the department’s boot camp program and a guest speaker in several classes. He recently donated estimating services through Hensel Phelps to begin plans for the renovation of the Industrial Sciences Lab Building on CSU’s campus. “Ryan is everywhere in our program and is a very dedicated alumnus, giving back in a variety of significant ways,” says Mostafa Khattab, head of the Department of Construction Management. “We are grateful for all his efforts.”

Ryan Martorano By Katie Brayden

“THERE IS A SPOT FOR EVERYONE IN CONSTRUCTION,” EXPLAINS RYAN MARTORANO, A 1998 GRADUATE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT AT COLORADO STATE UNIVERSITY. “NO MATTER WHAT YOUR PERSONALITY TYPE OR YOUR STRENGTHS, THERE IS A SPOT FOR YOU IN THE INDUSTRY.” Late CSU Professor James Parnell first lit the construction fire in Martorano during the program’s introductory course. “I was hooked,” he says. Martorano felt at home in the program, participating in competition teams and making lifelong friends. Martorano’s message to current and prospective students comes from a place beyond alumni nostalgia; it’s rooted in unique personal experience. Just weeks before graduation, Martorano became paralyzed in a 10 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

fall. He had just accepted an offer to work for Hensel Phelps Construction. “One of the first guys who comes in to see me [in the hospital] is the guy from Hensel Phelps who interviewed me,” says Martorano. “He said, ‘We hired you for your brain, and your doctors tell me your brain is still intact. We’re waiting for you when you’re ready.’” Parnell and other professors brought Martorano’s final exams to him in the intensive care unit so he could complete his degree, and his first project with Hensel Phelps was Yates Hall at CSU, named in honor of President Emeritus Albert Yates. “I was the first guy at the job site. I set up the trailer and got the fence up,” he recalls. It was a year after his accident.

For Martorano, there are several reasons why he continues to stay involved. He reports feeling well-prepared and that he had a solid foundation to build from when he graduated. “I learned how to learn … I’m still learning every day,” he says. He also realizes the unique contributions that active industry members can have on construction education. “When I was in the program the professors were fantastic, but there is nothing like talking with someone who is currently in the game. I have the ability to share stories on what’s happening now, which I think is valuable,” says Martorano, adding that he feels responsible for being an active contributor in the educational process. “I’ll be working with the students someday, whether it’s at Hensel Phelps or somewhere else. It’s a small world.” He also attributes his desire to give back as a pay-it-forward approach. “After my accident, it was a physically and mentally challenging time for me. I witnessed so many people trying to help me,” he says. “I couldn’t believe the amount of support I had, even from people I didn’t know. I feel obligated to do the same for others.”


ALUMNI NEWS

Chanda Plan Foundation Board of Directors

SUPPORTING THE CHANDA PLAN FOUNDATION PROJECT Colorado State isn’t the only place benefiting from Martorano’s expertise and generosity. In September 2015, Martorano was introduced to Chanda Hinton Leichtle, executive director of the Chanda Plan Foundation, whose current project is a 6,000-square-foot health center that provides a holistic, person-centered approach for individuals with long-term disabilities. Martorano’s personal experience in a wheelchair taught him firsthand the benefits of integrating his primary care with other therapies like acupuncture, massage, chiropractic care, and nutrition and mental health counseling. “Living with a spinal cord injury, I know the value of the services the Chanda Plan Foundation provides,” Martorano explains, adding that many people in his situation cannot afford this type of care, because most insurance companies do not cover it. Martorano’s passion for helping the foundation brought him back to Hensel Phelps, the company that was a critical piece of his personal story of recovery. “I approached the team at work and explained why it was important to me,” says Martorano. “We agreed that we could deliver what Chanda needed.” Hensel Phelps is donating its general contracting services toward the project. “It was the right thing to do,” says Allan Bliesmer, a 1990 graduate of the construction

management program at CSU who serves as Hensel Phelps’ Plains District manager and vice president. “Ryan’s passion for helping the community is not just about donating professional time, but personal time and resources as well. We wanted to help him make a difference.” The Chanda Plan Foundation’s mission is to improve the quality of life for people with physical disabilities by providing direct access to integrative therapies for treating symptoms of spinal cord injuries, muscular dystrophy, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis, spina bifida and brain injury. The results of the integrated approach are reduced pain and need for pain medication, lessened time spent at medical visits, and increased hours engaged in community or work. The Foundation also creates systemic change to increase access to integrative therapies, lower health care costs and improve health outcomes for people with physical disabilities who rely on Medicaid. “Every dollar we save on construction is a dollar we can put directly toward helping persons with disabilities,” says Hinton Leichtle. “In addition to navigating through the world with a spinal cord injury, Ryan knows what it’s like to fight for good health care. I am extremely grateful for the personal time he has given to this project, but I am most grateful for the friendship we have built. “Ryan is an extremely important person to me personally,” she adds. “I know I speak for us both when I say that our meeting was not

a coincidence. He has such a powerful story and our connecting is unique. He is fierce with accomplishments and I truly look up to him.”

‘PROUD OF EVERYTHING RYAN DOES’ “We are proud of everything Ryan does in our community and with Colorado State,” says Rick Tucker, a 1990 construction management graduate and executive vice president at Hensel Phelps Construction. “Helping CSU’s construction management program produce quality graduates is important to our company’s future.” Ram pride runs deep in Martorano’s team at Hensel Phelps, and teamwork is a skill he refined at CSU. “The biggest thing for me is that you can’t accomplish a construction project by yourself. It’s always a team effort,” explains Martorano. “CSU puts students in situations to teach them to extend their hand to complete projects as a team.” Teamwork is a commonly heard and regularly emphasized word in Guggenheim Hall and the other construction management buildings at CSU. Khattab explains, “All of our classes include an element of teamwork, and we are proud to have Ryan on our team.” For more information about the Chanda Plan Foundation visit: http://www.chandaplanfoundation.org CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 11


DEPARTMENT NEWS

CM CARES SPRING PROJECTS

Sharon and Ernie Zamora pose with student project leaders on their new deck

STUDENT LEADERS FROM CM CARES PRESENTED THEIR PROJECTS AND CELEBRATED ANOTHER SUCCESSFUL SEMESTER OF COMMUNITY WORK IN FRONT OF A PACKED HOUSE OF DONORS, VOLUNTEERS, STUDENTS, FACULTY AND STAFF ON MAY 12. CM Cares, the Department of Construction Management’s community service-learning initiative, infuses leadership traits, teambuilding and ethics through community service activities. More than 20 projects have been completed since the program’s inception in 2010. “CM Cares is not just a program, it’s a legacy,” said student project leader Alex Romero. Two years ago, Romero was a student volunteer on a CM Cares project, and the experience motivated her to continue volunteering and serve as a project leader for the first time this year. More than 40 companies and organizations supported two projects this spring: the Schneider Family Project and the Zamora Family Project. “It’s amazing to watch the students bond with these families,” said Joe Dominic of Bobcat of the Rockies, a third-year donor and volunteer.

12 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

Linda and Chuck Schneider with student project leaders and volunteers

Sharon and Ernie Zamora were in need of several home modifications for wheelchair accessibility. Sharon has had several surgeries, including one on her spine that left her with limited mobility and the need to use a wheelchair. The project included a new deck and ramp for access to the backyard and modifications to one of the home’s bathrooms, including a roll-in shower. Previously, Sharon had not been able to access the backyard patio due the steep steps, but now she looks forward to having a tea party with her grandchildren and enjoying colorful Colorado sunsets on the new deck. The Schneider Family Project also included accessibility modifications to a home. Linda and Chuck Schneider are both retired teachers and have been challenged by regular daily living since Chuck suffered a stroke. The project included a small addition to the house, providing an accessible bathroom and safe access to the outdoors with a ramp and landscaping. “Our entire perspective on quality of life will change now that Chuck is able to access the areas of our home that he used to enjoy so much,” Linda said.

Faculty member Mike O’Reilly demonstrates automatic level to CM Cares volunteers


DEPARTMENT NEWS

GRADUATE PROGRAM REVAMP

The CM department is putting the final touches on a 2 1/2 year revamp of the graduate program, offering a Master of Science in Construction Management. As part of their continuous drive to improve programs, CM began looking at ways to strengthen the graduate program several years ago. While the program was academically rigourous, it was open to applicants regardless of their academic and employment backgrounds. As a result, students frequently entered the program without the foundational knowledge of construction management necessary to fully support faculty research priorities. Additionally, due to their inexperience in the construction field, the department sometimes had trouble meeting graduate students’ career expectations. This was neither maximizing the department’s research goals nor our students’ career needs. In 2014, the graduate committee was tasked with remedying the situation and asked to develop short and long-term plans to improve the overall program. After a comprehensive investigation that included an external review and numerous faculty and student interviews, the graduate committee proposed several changes to sharpen the program’s focus and quality. The first change was to limit applicants to those with construction, architecture, engineering, and business degrees. This will ensure that new graduate students come equipped with a foundational understanding of construction practices and terminology. CM also implemented a leveling requirement for students coming from disciplines other than baccalaureate

“The work opportunities and experience I received as a teaching and research assistant at CSU were instrumental in building my resume. With the support and networking resources of my research committee, my research project led to my successful transition into a career in BIM strategy and business consulting with Autodesk, the AEC industry’s leading solution provider.” – Girija Inguva (MS ‘14)

construction programs. Depending upon their academic backgrounds and work experience, they may now be required to take full semester courses in estimating, contracts, and scheduling rather than shorter “boot camp” sessions. The combination of these two changes will ensure that graduate candidates are prepared to contribute to the construction management field. The second change was a top to bottom overhaul of the graduate curriculum to emphasize coursework supporting the commitment to applied research and industry outreach. The new program has a stronger focus on research, and combining theory and application focusing on applied construction management. Three core research alliance areas were identified: sustainability, transportation infrastructure, and productivity and workforce development, to ensure that applicants understand the research interests of the faculty and department. 2016-17 will mark the first full academic year since the completion of this process and the department is excited to see the improvements.

OZBEK AND STRONG INVESTIGATE TRANSIT-ORIENTED DEVELOPMENT Integrating public transportation into site development is a hot topic. Frequently referred to by the acronym TOD, or Transit-Oriented Development, these projects are increasingly common in the development landscape. But what criteria should transit agencies use to evaluate different site options? Surprisingly there is little research on the topic. CM Professors Mehmet Ozbek and Kelly Strong received funding from the Mountain-Plains Consortium (MPC), a competitively selected university program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation, to investigate this question. They established a research team to explore the factors that make sites desirable and how agencies can prioritize site choices. The ultimate goal is to produce a decision support framework that will allow transit agencies to answer these questions and guide them to the best site choices among the available options. Utilizing a mixture of literature review, case studies, interviews, and quantitative tools, the team identified a variety of factors that contribute to the success of TODs. They then met with various experts to distill the identified factors down to the most impactful. These factors were then weighted using a multi-criteria decision-making method to determine their relative importance to one another. They don’t want to divulge their final results since the report and article are awaiting publishing, but their findings will provide a valuable tool for guiding future TODs. Stay tuned for more information!

Mehmet Ozbek

Kelly Strong

The Mountain-Plains Consortium (MPC) theme is “Transportation Infrastructure and Operations to Support Sustainable Energy Development and the Safe Movement of People and Goods.” MPC is a competitively selected university program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Transportation through its Research and Innovative Technology Administration.

For more information about the Mountain-Plains Consortium visit: http://www.mountain-plains.org/ CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 13


DEPARTMENT NEWS

NEW STAFF FRONT OFFICE COORDINATOR Dan Ricci is the new front office coordinator and will be responsible for the coordination of administrative activities and development of CM communication materials. Originally from Kentucky, Ricci moved to Fort Collins 1½ years ago when his wife accepted a position with a local foundation. Prior to moving, he spent the last several years as a trailing spouse in Washington D.C., Central Asia, and Central America. His work experience includes administrative positions with the Larimer County Workforce Center and the U.S. Department of State. He also spent a number of years as a residential remodeler. Dan received his B.S. in management from Linfield College.

ACADEMIC SUCCESS COORDINATOR Jennifer Fyhrie joins the Department of Construction Management as the academic success coordinator for the advising office. As a graduate of the University of California- Santa Barbara with a bachelor’s in psychology, she brings an enthusiasm for helping students align their actions with their goals. She has 10 years of combined experience in case management, success coordination, and academic advising. She strongly believes that success requires a student to develop his/her whole self, not just the academic aspect. She encourages everyone to join a club, travel abroad, network with people, take cooking classes, or maybe even learn to play the djembe! In the past, Fyhrie managed the holistic care of foster teens and guided inner-city youth on self-advocacy, goal setting and achievement, and employment preparation. She encourages students to discuss anything with her that may affect their studies and to consider her role as more than just advising. In her free time, Fyhrie enjoys hiking, traveling, live music, being sarcastic, and working on her skills as a semi-decent photographer. She lives in Fort Collins with her husband Josh, their son, and their carrot-loving dog.

CELEBRATING SERVICE MILESTONES The CM department would like to recognize the following faculty and staff for their dedicated service to Colorado State University:

5 YEARS:

Karlie Braley

14 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

Kelly Strong

15 YEARS:

Mike O’Reilly

Mary Nobe

20 YEARS:

Bolivar Senior

25 YEARS:

Becky Bell


DEPARTMENT NEWS

BUILDING THE FUTURE U.S. WORKFORCE JON ELLIOT AND JOHN KILLINGSWORTH ARE CONTINUING THEIR WORK WITH THE FLORIDA TRAINING FOR MANUFACTURED CONSTRUCTION CONSORTIUM (TRAMCOM). The project is part of the U.S. DOL Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grant program. The intent of the program is to, “expand the capacity of the American community college system to provide accessible training programs that connect people to available jobs in growing industries in their communities.” The TRAMCOM began in 2014 and is working to address training shortfalls in the rapidly expanding manufactured construction field. Three levels of training have been created and implemented and are being offered at four participating colleges. To date, the program has enrolled over 300 students, including nearly 50 prison inmates. The enrollment numbers are expected to continue rising over the next several years as additional funds become available.

Composition and Construction Methods and Materials. Students study composition through the context of construction and learn to analyze construction documents, understand genre writing, and write using several forms of appeal. Effective writing and communication skills are extremely important for employment success and advancement, yet are frequently lacking in traditional training programs. The response has been incredibly positive from both students and industry, and the research group is exploring how integrated teaching can be expanded to additional fields.

The project is unique for its focus on curriculum enhancement and communication skills. One of the innovative approaches is the use of simple 3D interactive renderings to illustrate basic principles of methods and materials in the building process. This contrasts with the more common vocational technique of constructing full scale models and buildings. The new approach greatly reduces the cost and time necessary to impart an understanding of the building process while still allowing students to explore and learn scale, dimension, and reasoning.

IN MEMORIUM: NATALYA BOWEN Natalya Bowen, communications and special projects coordinator for the Department of Construction Management, died unexpectedly on Dec. 9 at age 33. She graduated from Colorado State University in 2004 with a bachelor’s degree in history and continued her life at CSU in Fort Collins as an employee, where she worked for 11 years. She proudly served in the CM department for six years. Many students, alumni, and industry members met or interacted with Bowen as she was the face of the CM Front Office and an integral part of our program. The CM department will recognize Bowen’s dedication and commitment to the program with the Ram Built Hard Hat Award at this fall’s awards banquet. This award, first presented in 2004, is a recognition bestowed upon members of the Colorado State University community for their invaluable contributions to construction education. Bowen was both a Denver Broncos and CSU football fan, and forever Ram, so it seemed only fitting that the CM staff and faculty purchased a brick for the new stadium in her memory.

A second distinguishing feature is the focus on communication and writing skills. Killingsworth and a former colleague at the University of Wisconsin – Stout, Mitch Ogden, are piloting a dual taught course for English

FACULTY AND STAFF AWARDS

2016 ASC Regional Teaching Award Rodolfo Valdes-Vasquez

2015 Faculty Member of the Year Jeff Wilkes

2015 Staff Member of the Year Khristy Preston CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 15


DEPARTMENT NEWS

CHASING PERFECTION IT WAS ANOTHER BANNER YEAR FOR CM GRADUATES AND THE PHELPS PLACEMENT OFFICE The CM Department graduated 45 students in the Fall 2015 semester, 48 students in the Spring 2016 semester, and is projected to graduate 98 students in the Fall 2016 semester. While justifiably proud of this, the department is even more impressed with our graduate’s job placement numbers: 96 percent of Fall 2015 graduates and 98 percent of Spring graduates received job offers before graduation! An average starting salary of over $61,000 shows the value that companies place on CSU construction management graduates.

who challenge themselves daily to provide students with the highest quality construction management education possible; it is also their colleagues in the Phelps Placement Office, who dedicate themselves to ensuring that students have rich internship opportunities and that partner businesses provide strong mentoring to them. It is industry partners that generously

offer their financial support and technical expertise. It is the College of Health and Human Sciences and Colorado State University whose support provides the foundation upon which the department is built. Finally, and most importantly, it is the students, whose dedication and perseverance fuels their success.

“[The Phelps Placement Office] helped me to get placed in both an excellent internship and a full-time employment position when I graduated. I have...only gratitude!”

What accounts for the success of CM graduates? The CM Team and the passion and professionalism they bring to their job. The team is not just the administrative staff and faculty,

– Alumni Senior Exit Survey

CM student speaks with industry representative at the annual career fair.

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT PLACEMENT STATISTICS Colorado State University

Department of Construction Management Compiled from Senior Exit Survey data collected the week before commencement

The CM Career Fair hosts more than 95 companies each semester.

May 2016 (Spring) 98% $61,000

% Placed Before Graduation Average Base Salary Colorado California Arizona Texas Washingto Wyoming Utah Hawaii Missouri Montana Minnesota

28 3 0 1 0 0 0 1 1

Colorado California Texas Hawaii Missouri Montana Minnesota

Geographic Location

(56% with intern sponsor) (CO Avg  $60,600) Commercia Heavy Civil Heavy High Transporta Industrial/P Power/Util Multi‐ Custom Ho Constructio Mechanica lectricalSup C Vendor Other Spec

48 2.8

Number of Graduates  Average # of offers per student  29 4 1 1 2 0 2 0 2 0 0 0

Industry

Commercial/ Mixed Use Heavy Civil Heavy Highway Transportation Industrial/Public Works Multi‐Family Construction Mgmt / Project Controls Other Specialty Contractors

Project Eng Field Eng. & Estimating  Scheduling Marketing  Services (S Other

26 Project Eng. & 11 Management 5 Field Eng. & 0 Supervision 0 Estimating & 1 Cost Control 0 Services (Safety,

QAQC, LEED, etc.)

Position

December 2015 (Fall) 96% $60,500

% Placed Before Graduation Average Base Salary Colorado California Arizona Texas Washingto Wyoming Utah Alaska Florida  Illinois Maryland Montana New Jersey

New York Geographic Location Pennsylvan

20 1 0 2 0 0 0 1 1

Colorado California Texas Alaska Florida Illinois Maryland Montana New Jersey New York

1 1

16 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

Pennsylvania

(69% with intern sponsor) (CO Avg  $60,100) Commercia Heavy Civil Heavy High Transporta Industrial/P Power/Util Multi‐ Custom Ho Constructio Mechanica lectricalSup C Vendor Other Spec Industry

45 2.6

Number of Graduates  Average # of offers per student  29 1 0 0 2 2 0 2 0 0

Commercial/ Mixed Use Heavy Civil Industrial/Public Works Power/Utility Custom Homebuilding Mechanical Contracting Electrical Contracting Other Specialty Contractors

Project Eng Field Eng. & Estimating  Scheduling Marketing  Services (S Other

Position

21 13 Project Eng. & Management 5 0 Field Eng. & 0 Supervision 0 0 Estimating & Cost Control


DEPARTMENT NEWS

THE PHELPS PLACEMENT OFFICE CONNECTS STUDENTS AND INDUSTRY Named for 1951 graduate Joseph Phelps, the Phelps Placement Office works with students throughout their academic careers by providing intern and job search assistance and counseling. Services provided include: •

Construction industry career fair hosted each semester

Hassle-free coordination of entire interview process for both interns and fulltime graduates

Graduating student resume link for industry perusal updated each semester

Complimentary year-round job postings

Reservations available for private interview accommodations

Advertising and marketing opportunities

WHY RECRUIT CSU CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT STUDENTS? Interns spend three to six months gaining invaluable experience while sponsor companies get the benefit of working with students before committing to full-time employment. CM graduates hold a bachelor’s degree from one of the oldest and topranked programs in the nation and have a minimum of six months on-the-job structured industry experience. Our interdisciplinary curriculum utilizes state-of-the-art technology as determined by industry input, and students thrive in a department culture that emphasizes teamwork, communication, leadership, and improving the lives of others through community service.

For more information about the Phelps Placement Office visit: www.cm.chhs.colostate.edu/careers-internships/phelps_industry/

DEPARTMENT WORKS TO BUILD WOMEN’S ENROLLMENT

Student recruitment coordinator Kayla Boos discusses the construction management program with prospective students. Companies are working with a more diverse customer base, employing an increasingly diverse workforce, and operating in an increasingly global marketplace. As a result, having a diverse pool of construction management candidates to recruit is increasingly important to their success. One area of particular emphasis for CM is the number of women entering the program. Recognizing that, after several years of steady improvement, female enrollment had dropped, the department is identifying targeted recruitment opportunities with the goal of increasing the number of women entering the program. The department is excited by the initial response and feedback they have received and are looking forward to continued progress towards their recruitment goals.

CM FLOAT DYNASTY CONTINUES First Place in the CSU Homecoming parade for 12 years running!

CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 17


DEPARTMENT NEWS

NEW FACULTY THE CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT IS EXCITED TO WELCOME FOUR NEW FACULTY

MOHAMMED HASHEM MEHANY Mohammed Hashem Mehany has returned to CSU as an assistant professor. He earned his B.S. in civil engineering from Arab Academy for Science and Technology in Cairo, and his masters in construction management and Ph.D. in civil engineering with a focus on construction management from Colorado State University. He joins the department from Missouri State University, where he was an assistant professor. Mehany has extensive construction experience. He has worked as a field engineer and construction manager, as well as running his own contracting company in Egypt, and worked for the facilities project management office at Colorado State.

a world of prospects made possible by their active involvement: participating in discussion, answering questions, or working in groups.” His greatest satisfaction comes from seeing his students excel, succeed, and challenge themselves and others to reach higher goals.

His international experience has taught Mehany to work effectively with individuals from different backgrounds and cultures and reduce barriers to success related to differences. He utilizes a participative model where students are stimulated to think and interact. “One of my duties as a teacher is to wake up dormant forces, faculties, and talents by teaching students how to be critical thinkers and life-long learners,” said Mehany, “I encourage students to explore

As a Colorado State University construction management alumnus, Mehany is thrilled to be returning to his alma mater. “I am grateful to the department for the experience I gained and the social responsibility that I developed through programs such as CM Cares. I envision this department as the Lighthouse of the construction education nationally and internationally and I want to be part of this vision.”

Mehany’s doctoral research focused on construction claims management and dispute avoidance and resolution in the infrastructure industry. He has several research interests and publications including construction claims, risk management, life cycle costing, green and resilient infrastructure, alternative project delivery, construction safety, fracking, construction education, and lean construction.

Mohammed Hashem Mehany

NICK RUBINO CM alumus Nick Rubino (‘07) spent most of the last decade working as a project engineer, project manager, and superintendent in the construction industry. Much of this time was focused on healthcare projects. But he always wanted the opportunity to return to the classroom. So, when the department needed an instructor for CON-351 Construction Field Management, Rubino jumped at the opportunity. Rubino’s academic background, knowledge of core CM fundamentals, and industry experience gives him a strong grasp of the skill sets needed for students to succeed in the industry. Rubino is a big believer in the value of hands-on experience and his classes will emphasize this. He will focus on ensuring that his students develop an understanding of construction

sequences and how they fit into the overall job site picture. He also understands the value of mentoring and looks forward to helping his students develop their construction careers. Rubino also serves as a co-instructor for the CON 464 leadership course, a critical component of the CM Cares Initiative. His knowledge and experience allows him to offer valuable support as student leaders work to complete the project.

“I am excited to use my experience to help students develop their careers.” – Nick Rubino

18 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

Nick Rubino


DEPARTMENT NEWS

JOHN KILLINGSWORTH John Killingsworth is a new assistant professor in the construction management program at Colorado State University. He graduated from the University of Nebraska – Lincoln and spent the first three years of his academic career at UW-Stout. He has experience teaching the capstone course, construction finance, introduction to the built environment, construction methods and materials, and architectural preservation. One of his best teaching experiences has been a faculty-led study abroad course of the built environment. The course brought students through seven European countries and covered centuries of amazing building sites. Construction finance is at the center of his teaching and research interests. This subject continues to challenge students and industry alike. However, it continues to be a subject that separates the best construction managers apart in the industry. Killingsworth has participated on several U.S. Department of Labor research grants focused on the development of employment skills for the construction workforce. Most recently,

he has contributed to the development of curriculum on manufactured construction practices. This curriculum uses virtual reality and transformative learning labs to enhance students’ ability to understand context, scale, space, and construction methods and materials. Additionally, this research has included the development and piloting of an integrated, contextualized curriculum combining construction methods and materials with English composition. This research has served to engage students at a much higher level in developing their written composition and other communication skills. Killingsworth is a native of the San Francisco Bay Area. He grew up surfing Santa Cruz and snowboarding Tahoe. He is an avid baseball fan and follows the Giants. He is married to Ashley and has four children, Rachel, Thomas, Jack, and Michael. He is excited to be a part of the CSU family, and the Fort Collins community. He and his son Jack frequent the many skate parks here in town, and look forward to the first snowfall in the mountains.

John Killingsworth

PIERRE SIROIS Pierre Sirois joined the CM department at Colorado State University in January 2016 as an instructor. He graduated from Virginia Tech in 1998 with a B.S. in building construction and went to work in industry with a focus on the HVAC and plumbing aspects of commercial construction. He had many roles over the years, including project manager for an HVAC / plumbing trade contractor, owner’s representative for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and HVAC inspector for the Veteran’s Administration. Beyond project management and inspection, Sirois has been part of several commissioning teams on larger projects. During his career, Sirois has been exposed to a wealth of different project types. He has been involved with commercial construction, such as a one million square foot, 16 story office building with underfloor HVAC. He

has been on technical projects including a pharmaceutical research and development facility and an Army vehicle power lab research building. He has also worked on healthcare projects, from smaller out-patient medical facilities to a one million square foot hospital. Sirois was born in Alaska and grew up in Sudbury, Ontario, but returned to the United States in his senior year of high school. He has resided in Maryland, Virginia, Michigan, and now Colorado. He is a former SCUBA diving instructor who enjoyed diving the shipwrecks of the Great Lakes and the coast of North Carolina in addition to tropical diving, but since moving to Colorado, he has traded his fins for skis. He enjoys hunting, fishing, cooking, traveling, and plays hockey in a local adult league. He lives in Fort Collins with his wife, two sons, and their Labrador retriever.

Pierre Sirois

CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 19


DEPARTMENT NEWS

SUPPORTING STUDENTS THROUGH SCHOLARSHIPS Each year the Department of Construction Management hosts the CM Scholarship and Awards Banquet to celebrate the philanthropy of generous donors and the achievements of students, faculty, and staff. An annual tradition, the CM Awards Banquet provides an opportunity for industry and private donors to come together to meet the recipients of their scholarships and for the CM program to recognize exceptional work by students and

contributing partners to the excellence of the department. The 2016-2017 Awards Banquet will be held October 26, 2016. This year more than $64,000 in scholarships donated to the CM department were awarded to 61 students. Financial support through scholarships allows students who might otherwise have to concentrate on financial concerns to focus time on academics and extracurricular activities, including

“By receiving this scholarship, I will be

opportunities such as club involvement, servicelearning, and competitions. These provide students with rich personal and professional experiences to complement their academics. Types of scholarships include those supported by industry companies and organizations, CM alumni, as well as memorial scholarships. The department continues to recognize and thank all of our scholarship donors for their support of CM students and construction education.

“This scholarship means a lot to me being a

able to focus more on the most important

first-generation student. I will now be able

aspect of school: learning. Thanks to the

to spend more time focused on school and

donors, I am one step closer to my goal.”

work fewer hours.”

– Jason Martin

“I greatly appreciate this scholarship

– Jesus Meza

“Thanks to this scholarship, I will be able to

opportunity, which will allow me to focus on

concentrate on my education and dedicate

my career at CSU...”

time to being involved in the program.” – Kennedi White

“I cannot express how appreciative and

– Rachel Dunham

“This scholarship provides me with an

thankful I am to know there are people

opportunity to complete the remainder

out there who give back to help students.

of my CM education without having the

Because of donors such as these, students

increased burden of financial obligations.

like me will be able to attend college

This generosity allows me to focus my

and focus less on money and more on

attention entirely on academics this year.”

academics

– Daniel Timmons – Te’Jay Brown

To learn more about scholarships and other ways to support the CM department and its students, visit: www.cm.chhs.colostate.edu/alumni-friends/support-cm.aspx

20 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016


DEPARTMENT NEWS

Scholarships Awarded for the 2016-2017 Academic Year Scholarship Name

Student Recipient

AECOM CONSTRUCTION LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP

MATTHEW BURNETT

AGC OF COLORADO FUTURE LEADER'S FORUM SCHOLARSHIP

TYSON MERKEY

AGC/SOUTHWEST REGIONAL COUNCIL OF CARPENTERS SCHOLARSHIP

GEOFFREY DIEHL

ALPINE CABINET COMPANY CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SCHOLARSHIP

TRAVIS LEST

ASPE/EUGENE L. JOERNS SCHOLARSHIP

ERIC LAWSON

ASPES DENVER CHAPTER 5 SCHOLARSHIP

LEE HOWARD

CFMA COLORADO CHAPTER SCHOLARSHIP

FRANKLIN ALVIS

CHRIS MAUNDER SCHOLARSHIP

ALEXANDRA ROMERO

CM BOARD OF DIRECTORS STUDENT LEADERSHIP SCHOLARSHIP

JAMES DUMANOVSKY

COLORADO ASPHALT PAVEMENT ASSOCIATION SCHOLARSHIP

CRISTIAN MONTES MUJICA, PARKER STOKKE

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT DIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP

TE'JAY BROWN, WILLIAM NGUY, HUMBERTO HERNANDEZ, SOFIA RODRIGUEZ-MORA, SHAWN HILL

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SCHOLARSHIP

TYLER EBERHARDT, KENNEDI WHITE, SAMUEL OKONKWO

COURTNEY PETERSON/HRH CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY SCHOLARSHIP

JOSIAH BURKETT

GERALD RICKE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

CONNOR SKELTON

HEAVY CIVIL ALUMNI SCHOLARSHIP

ALEXANDRA ROMERO

HENSEL PHELPS CONSTRUCTION COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP

STEPHEN WHEELER

JACOBSON CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT SCHOLARSHIP

PATRICK KEMMESAT

JAMES H. SHORT SCHOLARSHIP

CODY ADE

JASON DANIEL WHEELER MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

SIERRA PARKER

JENI GEAL MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

JENNA RICHARDS

JERRY AND SUE CRANE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

JACOB SANCHEZ

JOHN AND DORIS JENSEN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

ZACHARY ALVES

JOHN F. GUTHRIE MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

BROCK ARMSTRONG

JOHN KEILEY MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

ZAYNE WIEST

JOHN STEFANICH, SR. MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

TANNER ATCHISON

KUSHNER/KNAUS FAMILY SCHOLARSHIP

HARRISON TUCKER

MATTHEW MARTINEZ MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

CAMILLE BETANCE

MECHANICAL CONTRACTORS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA SCHOLARSHIP

CHRISTOPHER PETTOFREZZO

MIKE CAMPFIELD MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

SHANE WEISELL

MILE HI CHAPTER, PROJECT MANAGEMENT INSTITUTE SCHOLARSHIP

KAYLA GOLDSTEIN

RANDOLPH B. COLEMAN MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

BARRY HALL

ROCKY MTN CHAPTER OF ABC SCHOLARSHIP

DANIEL SIMMONS

STUPP BROS. BRIDGE AND IRON CO. FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIP

STANISLAV MELETYAN

THE BEAVERS HEAVY CONSTRUCTION SCHOLARSHIP

ALEXANDER BURD

TIC - THE INDUSTRIAL COMPANY SCHOLARSHIP

JUAN CONEJO

TOM MCMAHON MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP

CRISTINA BASSANI, KATELYN LOWE

WESTERN SUMMIT CONSTRUCTION SCHOLARSHIP

TERRY WILLIAMS

An additional 15 private scholarships were awarded to CM students from The Mechanical Contracting Education & Research Foundation, The National Roofing Alliance for Progress, Construction Management Association of America, and Construction Workforce Foundation of Colorado (a foundation administered by Colorado Contractors Association & the Colorado Asphalt Paving Association).

CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 21


STUDENT NEWS

STUDENT COMPETITIONS RECAP CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT COMPETITION TEAMS HAD ANOTHER REMARKABLE YEAR. Continuing to build on their recent successes, CM competition teams brought home another haul of trophies from several regional and national industry competitions. Industry competitions provide students with the opportunity to showcase their teamwork, problem-solving, communication, and technical skills in front of companies and industry representatives. It is a lot of work and pressure, but students love the challenge of the events and the camaraderie they develop. As one participant said, “This experience is exceptional in every aspect.” In addition to the intellectual and technical challenges, the events are great career-building opportunities, allowing participants to network with industry members and companies. While student competitions are extra-curricular, they are an important part of students’ educational experience and the department takes great pride in their achievements!

ABC

MCAA

ASC TEAMS

According to the Associated Builders and Contractors, Inc., the ABC Construction Management Competition is a “hallmark competition that promotes careers in construction management” and is, “designed to challenge construction knowledge, time management, organizational, and presentation skills.” The competition was conducted in three phases. The CSU team was one of 23 teams picked to advance to phase 2 and one of 10 teams chosen for phase 3. In a first for the competition, the team built a REVIT model that was time sequenced with the p6 schedule using Synchro Software creating a project management video. The ingenuity of their proposal and presentation earned them top 3 rankings in 4 of the judging categories and a 3rd place finish overall.

Each year, MCAA’s Student Chapter Competition challenges promising young professionals to demonstrate their knowledge of mechanical systems, the details of a project bid proposal, and the demands on a contracting business while coping with the pressures of being on stage. The project involved the construction of an eight-story multi-use apartment building in San Jose, Calif. that required an energy-efficient HVAC system designed for ease of maintenance, low operating cost, and LEED Gold certification. The 2016 event featured 130 students from 28 student chapters and was held during the MCAA Annual Convention in Orlando, Florida, this past March. The CSU team rose to the challenge and placed 2nd.

This year’s Associated Schools of Construction Regions 6 and 7 competition took place at the Nuggets Casino and Resort in Sparks, Nev. 50 CSU students representing 7 teams attended. CSU was the cream of the competition with 6 teams awarded top 3 or better finishes and 2 presenters winning individual awards.

DBIA

NAHB

The CM members of the DBIA competition team partnered with architecture students from Cal Poly for the Rocky Mountain Region of DBIA competition in September 2015. The competition was modeled on the two-step design build procurement process outlined in the Federal Acquisition Regulations. Phase 1 was a Request for Qualifications statement for a dedicated repurposing of a decommissioned power plant building into a student learning center. 1st place teams in each of the nine regions advanced to the second phase and were invited to respond to an FRP. The CSU team placed 2nd. The 2016 competition will start again shortly and the team is excited to build upon their experience.

This year the National Association of Home Builders’ Residential Construction Management Competition challenged students to determine if a company should buy a 147 acre platted subdivision in Frederick, Maryland, for a given price. The competition showcased student’s ability to apply their classroom learning to a real-world application. They completed a management proposal and presented and defended it to a group of company executives. 34 teams competed and CSU’s team earned a twelfth place finish. Congratulations NAHB team!

In the Region 6 problem categories the Commercial Team took first place and the Design-Build Team earned second place. In the Open Problem categories both the Mechanical and Sustainable Building and LEED teams brought home second place awards while two third place awards were earned by the Pre-Construction and Virtual Design and Construction teams. Zachary Alves of the Design Build Team and Chris Pettofrezzo from the Mechanical Team were awarded best presenter in their competitions.

“It was...an outstanding experience. [It] taught me a lot about teamwork, time management, problem solving, and communication.”

To see Colorado State University ASC teams in action visit: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvD5wvlIE7c&feature=youtu.be

22 | CSU Construction Management Fall 2016

– Competition Team Participant


STUDENT NEWS

MCAA

ABC

2nd Place

3rd Place

ASC Teamss Commercial “Construction is a dynamic industry, the leaders of construction must stay curious and have a desire to learn continually. The competition teams fulfill that need, it is an opportunity to do more, learn more, experience more, and connect more.” – Zachary Alves, CM Senior

1st Place

Sustainable Building and LEED

2nd Place

Virtual Design and Construction

3rd Place

Design Build

Mechanical

2nd Place

Preconstruction Services

2nd Place

Heavy Civil

3rd Place CSU Construction Management Fall 2016 | 23


CSU Construction Management Newsletter - 2016  
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