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Cleveland State University

VS Ohio State University December 18, 2007 Quicken Loans Arena The countdown has begun! T H E S T U D E N T N E W S PA P E R C S U C A U L D R O N . C O M O F C L E V E L A N D S TAT E U N I -


The

Cauldron

For the Students...By the Students

Editorial Staff: Francis X. Bova III, Editor-In-Chief Andrea Mitchell, Managing Editor Jayson Gerbec, Advertising Manager Madison Rabbitt, Advertising Rep. Ebony Cash, News Editor Ilona Westfall, Culture Editor Nick Camino, Sports Editor Steve Thomas, Layout Editor Michael Quintero, Cartoonist Jeff “Z” Stoskus, Distribution Manager Anne Werner, Business Manager Staff Writers: David Imburgia, Mark Jablonski, Faith Larraine, Laura Dynda, Jamie DuBois, Mark Katzbach, Christopher Enoch, Reid May, Scott Arko, Andrea Cervenak, Gary Typerstone, Robert Ivory, Sabrina Peacock Foreign Correspondent: Amanda Richards Contributing Writers: Dave Orzechowski, Alex Friedman, Audrey McCrone, Roman Verzub, Charlotte Morgan, Shanette D. Buford, Dan Hollowell, James Kneblik, Andrew Jonke Cleveland State University 2121 Euclid Avenue UC 10 Cleveland, Ohio 44115 (216) 687-2270 / (216) 687-5155 www.csucauldron.com www.myspace.com/csucauldron The Melting Pot The Cauldron reserves the right to edit letters for space and clarity. All entries must include your name, year-in-school, and daytime phone number for verification purposes. All entries must be submitted by Friday at 5 p.m. To submit editorials, articles, etc. cauldroneditors@hotmail.com Campus Life Releases 100 words or less: Organization name and phone number must be included. Releases are for student organizations only and should include the event date, time, and location. Letters to the Editor 800 words or less: Letters must be in response to a written article or campus issue. Student Columns 600-800 words: Columns can be submitted by students regarding campus issues, positive or negative, and will be sent directly to President Schwartz in order to bring more student awareness. Advertising Policy For advertising inquiries e-mail cauldronadvertisements@hotmail.com or call (216) 687.2270.

This Week

VOL. 105, NO.XV

December 3, 2007

Contents

T he Melting Pot Student’s react to “Porn Nation: One Student’s Reaction” from Nov. 13 issue It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue Andrea’s Anecdotes

News Transfer Tour Tuesdays Cleveland State’s Education Programs Earn National Recognition SGA Roundup Syrian government blocks popular networking site

Feature The Ballte of Ohio

Culture Excellent Acting and Directing Make Factory Theater’s Production of Machinal a Must See Cold Weather Can’t Stop Hardcore Fans Are They Worth a Listen? Factory Theater Sets the Stage for Newest Production Machinal Beauty and the Beast a Treat for the Whole Family CSU Chic CD Reviews

Sports CSU Basketball Notebook Jackson Shines as Vikings Fall Five Quick Questions with Dallas Lauderdale Second Half Surge Leads Matadors Over CSU


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     From the Editor’s Desk  Tara French, Junior  Dynda makes it clear that she was either expecting or desiring “a liberal discussion about sexuality at CSU” and did not think that Porn Nation served those ends. Maybe she did not stay for the questions Leahy took afterwards and resulting discussion, but not too many people spoke out. If she wanted to express her disagreement, she had the freedom to do so like everybody else. No views opposing Leahy’s were expressed. My suspicion is that this is because most of those with opposing positions did not bother attending the event. I overheard people discussing this event prior to its occurrence, and I heard comments like, “I was talking about it with my coworkers, and we’re all liberals so probably none of us will go because we won’t be able to sit through it.” Comments like that are narrowminded, because we should all be willing to “sit through” presentations of views different from our own. I figure if what I believe is really true, then I should not be afraid of listening to opposing viewpoints on campus or anywhere else. Therefore, I applaud Laura Dynda for attending Porn Nation and saying that she “came into this discussion with an open mind.” I also applaud The Cauldron for covering this event. As Dynda shared, Leahy talked about his personal experiences as part of the presentation. Dynda says that he “dropped his porn habit for God.” However, Leahy made it clear that he turned to God, and then through God he was able to begin the process of overcoming his porn addiction. Therefore, I thought Dynda’s quote to be a sarcastic response to a person’s personal experience. Dynda also says that she “started wondering why he wasn’t talking about actual pornography? Instead he was showing pictures and clips from magazine advertisements and television shows. Leahy was saying this was porn.” First of all, Leahy did actually talk about more hard-core porn. He mentioned everything from naked women to viewing graphic sexual acts. Dynda is correct that he did not show naked women or hard-core porn, but did she expect or

Student’s react to “Porn Nation: One Student’s Reaction” from Nov. 13 issue want him to? Second, Dynda says that it is “just ridiculous” to say that the cover of Maxim or the Victoria’s Secret Runway Show is porn. However, according to Leahy and Webster, as Dynda mentioned, “pornography is any material designed with the express purpose of arousing you sexually.” Like Dynda points out, Leahy made no secret that this was the definition he was using for porn. As for Victoria’s Secret, their advertisements can be arousing and they are displayed for all to see in malls. I have heard grown adults; some married and some not, make crude comments about Victoria’s display of her secrets. I have seen boys in the puberty stage blush and turn their heads and mothers covering the eyes of their small children while walking by her scantily clad body. Calling Victoria’s Secret porn may seem ridiculous to Dynda, but there are others who are affected by it. According to Dynda, “any woman that shows a little bit of cleavage” is not porn. Leahy was not saying that. In fact, he did not address modesty in women’s clothing directly at all. His presentation was focused on the dangers of pornography. Hardly anyone thinks “a little bit of cleavage” is porn, so I am not sure why Dynda was arguing that point. Dynda goes on to say “a little bit of cleavage” is “an expression of femininity, fashion, and freedom.” Freedom to do what? That is the real question. You are not going to convince anyone you are female by exposing your cleavage. However, you may convince them of other things about yourself. And how is baring cleavage a fashion statement? Is a low cut shirt its own brand of fashion? If so, what do you call it? Dynda also claimed the presentation was “sexist.” This is a serious accusation; because once people are convinced that something is sexist it is immediately discredited, as it should be. Use of this

term carelessly in news is power-tripping because it would discredit an organization or a person at the whims of those in control of the news. Dynda backed up her statement, saying “only pictures of women were shown” and “men were either shown in an authoritative role or not at all.” However, this says more about the porn industry than Porn Nation. I find it surprising that a female writer would find Porn Nation sexist when one of Leahy’s major points in the presentation was that pornography is dangerous because it is demeaning to women by portraying them as nothing more than sexual objects. Katie McManus, Junior I am not offended my Leahy’s message. I applaud him for going to over 100 college campuses and speaking the truth about the destructiveness of pornography in our culture. Let’s face it: having women used as eye candy in lacy lingerie for Victoria’s Secret Runway is a form of sexual arousal, and its popularity has an effect on this culture. This is a sex-saturated culture, and we allow it to be that way. Dynda wrote, “It is as if the woman’s movement never happened. For Leahy was basically saying that if women didn’t dress proactively, there would be no porn, eating disorders, or issues with selfesteem.” Leahy did point out that eating disorders and problems with self-esteem can occur because of the pornography. This is undeniable. He did not say that if women did not dress provocatively, or even if pornography were eliminated, these problems would go away. He simply stated two of the effects of porn on our culture. This does not discredit women’s rights. Women do not have the right to be viewed as sex objects. According to Cleveland State University Police Crime statistics, there have been 21 reported sexual

“I figure if what I believe is really true, then I should not be afraid of listening to opposing viewpoints on campus or anywhere else” offenses on the campus of CSU since 1999. Pornography is a gateway drug. Arousal may occur by looking at pictures of naked women. When desensitization of this occurs, one may start to look at sexual acts for arousal. When more is needed, one may seek out more violent acts of sex. When desensitization occurs, a person may go out and practice what he has seen. After all, the thousand of images portrayed women as toys for arousal; after seeing it frequently one may begin to consider it true. Being degraded and abused are not rights that the women’s movement was seeking after. It is unfair to accuse Leahy for not quoting sources during his speech. Leahy was given a limited amount of time to speak. He did not have time to roll off the names of those who performed the studies. If there was a concern about the sources or the accuracy he used, it should have been asked of him. He probably had them on hand, but didn’t have time during the speech. Dynda’s article concluded with, “I don’t know about you but I would prefer not to spend any of the school’s money on something like this where there are no cold hard facts, and only opinion and speculation.” Leahy used opinions because this was his story. Dynda did not disprove any of his facts, so it cannot be said that his facts were not accurate. And let’s be honest, most of what goes on here on campus is opinion backed by little or no fact. Almost every class that I sit in is a professor giving his opinion to a class with little facts and no citations. The college campus is one of the most opinionate places, and I can say that without citing a source.


Th e M elting Po t It’s All Over Now, Baby Blue

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Coming to terms with my impending departure from the land of Deutsch Story by Amanda Richards | The Cauldron Foreign Correspondent By the time your hungry little eyes feast upon this column, I will have but a mere three weeks left of my stay in The Germ. During this time, my plan is to cram in as much activity as possible: Term papers, Christmas shopping in various adorable German villages, final exams, and a second trip back to see the love of my life, Dublin. I realize that this amount of activity in such a short period of time seems like a lot to accomplish. It might even be a little crazy. I’ve had a little over three months to do all of these things, and yet, a majority of my time in the past was spent loafing and shooting the breeze here in sleepy old Friedrichshafen. And now, that my time is truly limited, I feel the need to compress my fun and excitement into a period of three weeks. At first, I thought that I was subconsciously planning all of these things so

that I could “make the most” out of my trip, like everyone has been telling me to do all along. So that, even though I spent the majority of the semester riding my bike around town and drinking beers in various apartments, I could come home fresh off a three week spontaneous excitement binge, and somehow fool everyone into thinking that I’ve spent the entire time here as an intrepid, non-stop traveler. But then, when I really thought about it, I realized that the reason I’ve left myself absolutely no time for thought between now and the time I come home is just that: If I do, I’ll have to think about coming home. Don’t get me wrong. Although The Germ and I have had a torrid fourmonth love affair, I think of The Cleve as the old ball-and-chain, my old lady. I’m loyal to her, and even though she might not be as thin, or as pretty, or as

interesting as The Germ, I know that at the end of the day, she’ll always be there. I miss my family, my friends, and my vicious, ungrateful cats, and I’m already getting strong urges for group hugs and high fives. However, that doesn’t negate the fact that it’s still going to be really difficult for me to leave this place, and the people I’ve met here. It’s strange for me to think that my friends here, some of whom I’ve gotten pretty close to, merely exist in a four-month pocket of time, and then will probably, unless fate wants us to meet again, become a fond and distant memory. And in addition to lovable Germans I’m leaving behind, I’m also going to miss the little aspects of what has become my daily routine: Bike rides, coffee at the train station, impromptu trips to the discount grocery store that resembles Aldi, long nights over beers at the bar with big

“It’s not over yet, though. I still have more Germans to canoodle with, more bikes to fall off of, and more spatzle to consume” pictures of John Belushi on the wall, dance parties at creepy German night clubs, and of course, all of the boxes of milk. It wasn’t necessarily the glamorous European whirlwind adventure that many people expected I would have, but it was real, it was exciting, and above all, it was weird. It’s not over yet, though. I still have more Germans to canoodle with, more bikes to fall off of, and more spatzle to consume. Over the next three weeks, it’s all about making it count.

Andrea’s Anecdotes Story by Andrea Mitchell | The Cauldron Managing Editor

I have to wonder how many hours of my life I’ve lost to Facebook.com. Considering I check it once, twice, three times or more a day, that statistic may be hard to figure out. This social networking tool has become a staple to networking my life or at least part of it. The one thing that Facebook caters to more than anything else I can think of is procrastinating. The phenomenon or not-so phenomenon of “playing” on Facebook instead

of doing homework has sparked groups such as I was doing homework, then I ended up on Facebook. Even right now I find myself procrastinating by looking at the new bumper-sticker application, getting mad at my friends who have yet to write back on my wall and thinking about the fact that I need to update my status. Well now that my status is updated to “Andrea is writing an article about procrastinating on Facebook, but ironically is procrastinating on Facebook,” I guess I can try to get to the bottom of just why this tool is such an obsession for me. Harvard dropout Mark Zuckerberg launched Facebook in 2004. Recently Zuckerberg was offered $1 billion from Yahoo.com, yet turned down the offer to pursue the future of the site by opening it

up to everyone, not just college kids. Now that us college students aren’t the only ones on Facebook does that mean that it’s not the same? I have not found a problem as of yet with Facebook being open to all. However, I have yet to be friendrequested by any family members. The thing is that if someday my Uncle Tony or Grandpa Mitchell friend-requests me, I have to admit I will be freaked out. Luckily none of them are on Facebook — yet. The procrastinating that Facebook leads my friends and me personally to is undeniable. Up in the UC if I walk up to someone at a laptop there is a good chance that they are on Facebook. When I call some of my friends they’re usually talking to me about what is going on on Facebook. The thing is that we really don’t need to know everything about each other. I highly doubt that my friends care that I’m writing this column

on Facebook, but it is still my status. In spite of the argument about not needing to know everything about everyone, Facebook has still made it so that we can and ashamedly do look. I will admit this right here and now that I am sadly a “Facebook Stalker.” I will, however, say to go along with that that I pretty much only stalk a couple of people that actually write on my wall and are my closest friends. That kid from my science class last year, or my coworker at the Middleburg Heights Recreation Center is not on my “have to look at their profile” list. My greatest fear with Facebook is how this obsession precluding to procrastination is going to affect the future of my homework, writing and practically everything else? The fact of the matter is I don’t have an answer and right now my best friend just posted some pictures that I have to look at…


News

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Transfer Tour Tuesdays

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Story by Whitney A. Foster and Dave Edwards The Cauldron Contributing Writers

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he Admission Department recently started a new program called Transfer Tour Tuesdays in order to help transfer students better assimilate. Transfer Tour Tuesdays is a successful way of recruiting students to Cleveland State. This special event, which is geared specifically towards transfer students, gives students the information they need as well as a firsthand look at the campus. They have a chance to meet with an admissions representative in a 45-minute information session which covers the basics of anything that a student transferring to Cleveland State would want to know. “Transfer Tour Tuesdays started so that we can address transfer students needs more personally. This is NOT

orientation,” Transfer Admission Coordinator Tara Shuster said. “It is for perspective students to get specific Cleveland State information and see what we have to offer them. It also gives the student a chance to see the campus.” Another major benefit of this program is because it is specifically geared towards transfer students, they don’t have to share the floor with incoming freshman. Also because the event is held on a weekday, visitors can actually see Cleveland State in action. Courtney Graham from the admissions office led the information session on Nov. 27. The information covered topics such as applications, fulfilling general education requirements and campus housing. Following the information session was a tour of the campus. The tour was given by Theo Cady, a junior engineering major. The tour visits most of the campus and is led by an actual student

at Cleveland State. This helps to give an insiders perspective on what being a student on the Cleveland State campus is really like. The tour guides are generally upperclassmen and have a strong involvement on campus. The event is held twice on Tuesday once in the morning at 10:30 a.m. and the second at 5:30 p.m. in the evening. The program began in early Nov. and will continue until Jan. 8. There is an online application for interested students on the CSU Web site at csuohio.edu/ admissions/visit/events/transfertour.html. Another perk, students who attend Transfer Tour Tuesdays and apply while they are on campus gets the $30 admission fee waived. For additional information call (216) 687-5411.

“Transfer Tour Tuesdays started so that we can address transfer students needs more personally. This is NOT orientation” Transfer Admission Coordinator

Cleveland State’s Education Programs Earn National Recognition Story by Ebony Cash | The Cauldron News Editor Cleveland State’s Adult Learning and Development (ALD) program and The Master of Urban Secondary Teaching (MUST) program recently received two national awards. The ALD program provides students with the valuable skills necessary to lead programs and organizations focused on adult learners and their needs. The Curriculum Innovation Award was given in recognition of its leadership in adult education and delivery of the overall curriculum in adult education preparation programs.

The MUST program received the Nancy Zimpher Partnership Award in recognition of educational institutions that exemplify outstanding local partnerships that focus on leadership in education reform and urban education. The MUST Program offers individuals who have a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, science, English, history, social studies, art, Spanish, French or a related field the opportunity to pursue teacher licensure and a master’s degree in 14 months.


News

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SGA Roundup

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Story by Mark Jablonski | The Cauldron Staff Writer Nearly 77 percent of students surveyed are satisfied with the service they receive at the Upper Deck food court located in the UC, and another 66.8 percent said they were happy with the food quality. That’s according to a recent survey conducted by At-Large Senator Kimberly Carr and presented at last Friday’s Student Government meeting. All senators are required to meet periodically with the deans of the college they represent and present their findings to the senate. Carr decided to conduct a food service survey after meeting with Interim Dean of Student Life, Dr. Sandra Emerick. Andthoughmoststudentsaresatisfied with the food and the service, only 44 percent said they thought the prices were fair. Just less than half of all respondents, 49.4 percent, felt the Upper Deck offered sufficient menu options. When asked what alternatives they were interested in seeing served on campus, most students mentioned some form of Mexican fare. “People were saying on the whole, they’d rather see a more wholesome type of menu,” said Carr. While discussing the survey results with Assistant Vice President of Campus Support Services Clare Rahm, Carr learned of some new food outlets being

planned for campus next year, including two eateries in the Main Classroom building and one in the law building. A juice bar in the Rec Center is slated to open later this month. Also presenting to the senate was Science Senator Khadidja Benmerzouga who spoke to College of Science Dean Dr. Bette Bonder about a number of issues. Bonder told Benmerzouga that most of the issues she raised - the odd tasting water in the science building and the lack of a convenient study lounge for science students – were in the process of being addressed. “I’m really impressed,” Vice President Peggy Thompson said of Carr and Benmerzouga’s presentations. “Thank you for going out and talking to students and finding out what’s going on...These two senators – I think everybody in this room could take a lesson from,” said Thompson. The Senate last week approved the Finance Committee’s recommendation to allocate nearly $18,000 dollars to eleven different student groups. Allocating funds to campus groups is one of the chief functions of the Student Government Association (SGA). While none of the groups received the full amount they’d requested, they all got most of what they were seeking.

The exceptions were the Golden Key International Honor Society and the Student Occupational Therapy Association, who both received only about half of the funds they sought. The group Social Work in Action walked away with just a third of the nearly $5,000 dollars they’d asked for. The recent resignation of Secretary Heather Nguyen has produced a gap in the recording of SGA meeting minutes. Vice President Thompson told the Senate that Nguyen had failed to revise the minutes from meetings in September and October, and that she, President Blake Almaguer and Sen. Kimberly Carr where now in charge of the minutes until a new secretary is appointed. “When former Secretary Nguyen left, unfortunately, the records were not in the greatest of order,” Thompson said. Before resigning, Nguyen also neglected to inform the Student Appointments Board, of which she was chair, that minutes needed to be recorded during their committee meetings. This led Thompson to bring the Student Appointments Board before the Investigative and Legislative Committee. “Basically, all this is doing,” said President Almaguer, “is documenting that SGA saw the problem, addressed the problem, and is fixing the problem.”

At the end of each fall semester, SGA members traditionally head to Becky’s after the last meeting of the year for dinner and drinks. This year, pending the approval of Interim Dean Emerick, $300 of Print Shop revenue will be allocated to this social event. Sen. Jacqueline Fry voiced opposition to the plan, saying that she wasn’t comfortable using student funds on a night out. Despite Fry’s concerns, the motion passed, with Dean Emerick adding that she supported the “fantastic social opportunity” for SGA members. The funds will not cover drink purchases, as that would not pass what Emerick called the “front page test.” “If I saw it on the front page of The Cauldron or the Plain Dealer, ‘SGA students drinking at Becky’s on university tab’... that’s my test,” Emerick said. “First off, [we will use] Print Shop money,” added Vice President Thompson. “Second of all, no university money could ever be used to pay for alcohol, so I don’t think there would ever be a headline in The Cauldron saying ‘SGA going out drinking.’” That might depend on how many drinks the Vice President bought for The Cauldron’s reporters.

Syrian government blocks popular networking site Story by Roman Verzub | The Cauldron Staff Writer estimate the move being motivated by fear of Israeli infiltration of the social networks being formed on the website.

In a move that angered many, particularly young people, Syrian authorities announced that they had blocked the popular social networking site Facebook.com from being accessible. Though no government body has explained any reason for this move, Lebanon’s Al-Safir noted that observers

Under the slogan “Knowledge is the a right of all people,” abssyria. freewebpage.org has posted a petition against the blocking of websites in Syria. “The Internet is... one of the most peaceful means in the application of the principle of freedom of expression,” the petition states, “which is guaranteed by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and which it protected by the constitutions of all nations.”

The petition, which has now been loosely translated into English, includes a partial list of 110 websites blocked by Syrian authorities, which range from western sites like Facebook, YouTube, Hotmail, Blogspot, and Skype to proreform and even those websites with religious teachings such as Islam-Online. net are not safe from the ban. Sites such as that of London-based pan-Islamist group Hizb ut-Tahrir are blocked as is the website for Asharq Alaswat, a London-based newspaper that is one of the most widely distributed and read in the Middle East.

“The Internet is... one of the most peaceful means in the application of the principle of freedom of expression,” The reformist website Aafaq.org reported on the ban and notified readers that it too is blocked, having been added earlier this year.


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Feature The Battle of Ohio Vikings and Buckeyes Ready for Showdown By Nick Camino| The Cauldron Sports Editor The beginning of this week marked 16 days before the Ohio State Buckeyes and the Cleveland State Vikings men’s basketball teams square off against each other in downtown Cleveland at Quicken Loans Arena. The home of LeBron James and the Cavaliers will play host to the biggest college basketball game the city of Cleveland will witness this winter. On Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. the scarlet and gray will invade Northeast Ohio to play in the inaugural CSU McClendon Scholarship Classic. The game will mark just the sixth time the two squads have faced each other on the hardwood, and only the second time the Buckeyes have ever come to Cleveland. Ohio State, coming off their third straight Big Ten title, a National Championship appearance last season, and a runner-up finish in the Preseason NIT at Madison Square Garden this season are 5-1 all-time against the Vikings and have won the past two meetings. In 1995 the Buckeyes zipped past

Cleveland State 75-52, and just last season Thad Matta’s squad defeated the forest green and white 78-57. Both of those meetings were in Columbus. The Buckeyes are led by freshman sensation, center Kosta Koufos, who is averaging 16.2 points per game and shooting an outstanding 50 percent behind the three-point arc. Former Villa Angela-St. Joseph High School standout David Lighty has taken a bigger role for the Buckeyes and will make the trip as well. He starts at small forward and is averaging 10.2 points and five rebounds per game, and is the team’s best defender. On the home side, the Vikings have enjoyed early success this season as well. Already this season, Cleveland State has impressive victories against South Florida of the Big East Conference and Florida State of the Atlantic Coast Conference, two of the toughest conferences in NCAA Division I basketball. The ballers from Euclid Avenue are led by junior point guard Cedric Jackson,

who in his first season here has been nothing less than magnificent. The former St. John’s star is averaging 19.9 points and 6 assists per game. Along with Jackson, J’Nathan Bullock is Last season Cleveland State sophomore guard Joe Davis (above, # 4) scored 12 having yet another points against the Buckeyes, and is hoping to once again give Ohio State all they can handle, this time in downtown Cleveland. strong campaign scoring 15.6 and Rock N’ Roll Shootout in the very same grabbing seven rebounds per game. arena where the teams will do battle for the Jackson and Bullock are both strong seventh time. believers that the Vikings can knock off the To get tickets to this upcoming juggernaut Ohio State Buckeyes. showdown go to the Wolstein Center box Interestingly, the only win for Cleveland office or order them by calling 216-687State in the six-game series with the Bucks 9292. CSU students can purchase a ticket came on Dec. 17, 1994 when the Vikings for just $10 when showing their Viking defeated the scarlet and gray 75-73 at the Card upon buying the ticket.

Tale of the Head Coaches

Thad Matta Ohio State University

Years as a Head Coach:

12

8

Gary Waters Cleveland State University

NCAA Coaching Record:

183-58

188-158

Current Team:

Ohio State (‘04-Present)

Cleveland State (‘06-Present)

Previous Teams:

Quick Fact: In his previous seven seasons as a head coach, Thad Matta has guided a team to the NCAA Tournament every season except for 20042005, when the Buckeyes were ineligible for the tournament due to recruiting violations by former OSU head coach Jim O’Brien.

Butler (‘00-‘01) and Xavier (‘01-‘04)

Kent State (‘96-01) and Rutgers (‘01-06)

Post Season Tournament Appearances:

12

6

Players in the NBA: 4 – David West (New Orleans Hornets), Greg Oden (Portland Trail Blazers), Mike Conley (Memphis Grizzlies), and Daequan Cook (Miami

2 - Quincy Douby (Sacramento Kings) and John Edwards (Atlanta Hawks).

Quick Fact: Coach Gary Waters actually has three former players playing professional sports. Along with Douby and Edwards in the NBA, Antonio Gates, a former Kent State forward, is a star tight end for the San Diego Chargers in the NFL.


OSU

Starting 5 Match Ups

CSU

Point Guard On paper it looks like you give the former Mr. Basketball in the state of Ohio and All-Big Ten preseason selection Jamar Butler the edge in this match up, but not so fast. This season Cedric Jackson has proven to be as good as any point guard in the country averaging 19.2 points per game and five assists per outing. Bottom line: Both Butler and Jackson are the floor leaders for their respective teams. While Butler will try and scorch the Vikings from outside the three-point arc, Jackson will drive to the basket forcing defenders to come up to defend him, hopefully not before he finds the open man. Advantage: Cedric Jackson Jamar Butler 6-1 195 lbs.

Jon Diebler 6-6 200 lbs.

Shooting Guard This is a battle of instant offense against shut-down defense. Last season Watson was asked to come off the bench to shut down the other team’s leading scorer. This season has proven to be a little different. He is still shutting down opponents, but now he is starting for the forest green and white. Watson will face perhaps the toughest defensive task of his career though when he matches up with Buckeyes freshman sensation Jon Diebler. Diebler, Ohio’s all-time leading scorer with 3,208 points, has fit in nicely with Coach Matta’s system, and is an integral part of the diverse Ohio State offensive attack. Bottom line: While Diebler may be one of the most prolific scorers on the floor on Dec. 18, he should be careful not to repeat the performance of his teammate Jamar Butler, who played shooting guard last year, against the Vikings. Watson and Cleveland State held Butler to just six points on the night. Advantage: Breyohn Watson

Cedric Jackson 6-3 190 lbs.

Breyohn Watson 6-3 175 lbs.

Small Forward

David Lighty 6-5 215 lbs.

This will be a unique match up as it pits size and strength versus speed and athleticism. Bullock and Lighty were both great high school football players. They may very well duke it out on the court, perhaps at times making it feel like the gridiron again. This year both players have stepped up their offensive games; Lighty is averaging 10.2 points per game, while Bullock is scoring 15.6 per game and shooting over 90 percent from the charity stripe. Bottom line: If the former Villa Angela-St. Joseph Viking gets hot from beyond the three-point arc and is able to drive to the basket, Bullock may be in trouble. Most likely Bullock will focus on an inside offensive game where his ox-like strength allows him to score and get offensive rebounds. Advantage: Even

J’Nathan Bullock 6-5 240 lbs.

Power Forward

Othello Hunter 6-8 225 lbs.

This season Coach Waters has acknowledged the Vikings are having problems stopping opponnents power forwards. Last season CSU had that exact problem with then-junior forward Hunter who scored 17 points and grabbed 11 rebounds leading the Buckeyes to a 78-57 victory. Francis can’t let Hunter have his way again. Already this season Francis has displayed a stronger physical defensive presence than a year ago, and is second on the team with seven blocks. Bottom line: The Vikings will need to help out and double team when Hunter is down low and attempt to force bad shots. If Francis can contain Hunter down low and limit his rebounds, CSU will have an opportunity to compete with the Buckeyes. Advantage: Othello Hunter

Center

Kosta Koufos 7-0 265 lbs.

So far this season Koufos has been the biggest surprise for Thad Matta’s Buckeyes. He is averaging 16.2 points per game and 7.7 boards per outing. The former Canton Glen Oak star is also shooting an unbelievable 50 percent from behind the three-point arc. Nevertheless, what Koufos cannot do, Viking transfer Chris Moore enjoys doing, which is getting physical down low. Last week it was evident against North Carolina that Koufos is not a physical player in the paint, and putting a body on him can affect his scoring. However, this season Moore has proven he can play with the best down low grabbing six rebounds a game and leading the team in blocks. Bottom line: If Koufos’ outside shooting is contained, the Vikings can focus on stopping other aspects of the Buckeyes offensive game because Moore will look to out-rebound and overpower Koufos down low, hoping to keep him from being a factor. Advantage: Kosta Koufos

Kevin Francis 6-8 210 lbs.

Chris Moore 6-9 245 lbs.


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Excellent Acting and Directing Make Factory Theater’s Production of Machinal a Must See Story by Christopher Enoch | The Cauldron Staff Writer

a scene from Machinal

W

hilst driving 80 miles per hour on the freeway in order to be right on time for the Cleveland State Dramatic Arts program’s rendition of Machinal, this writer and would-be audience member wondered if such haste was well deserved. This author at all times attempts to reserve judgment and, unlike the vast number of reviewers who place opinions that can potentially either make or break a production, this author regularly researches the subject at hand. Having read a transcript of Machinal and some articles on Sophie Treadwell, the play’s writer as well an early 20th century feminist, any collegial effort put forth, at least in this author’s mind pre-performance, perhaps would have failed to capture the method and meaning of this dramatic piece. Then I actually saw it.

The Factory Theatre has a deceptive quality to it. Half industrial warehouse and half campus performing arts rostrum, the theater itself is wholly an intimate setting for a production, though you wouldn’t know it from the outside. Take a few steps in (toward the stage) and you find yourself in another reality, decorated in gears and stairwells, posts, and platforms; a setting all too appropriate for a methodical piece such as Machinal. Just imagine being inside of an old pocket watch if the need to visualize strikes you. The plays began curiously. Imagine two dozen men and women in gray flannel suits and office skirts shuffling around for a complete five minutes. As time continues, they find their way to a stairwell, marching up and down complacently until they find their places in their daily work. A fitting mob chaos forms a single file line into mechanical order. The play establishes its thematic tendencies first, rather than waiting so much as even a lone minute in. A viewer here doesn’t waver, he or she gets the idea: this world we are entering into is a machine, devoid of free will and independence, especially for the early 20th century protagonist, Helen Jones, your standard working gal, played by the lovely Christine Miles, a senior here at CSU. The character Helen, a character this writer personally relates with, can’t stand the emotionless, automatic, mechanical life she finds herself leading. Her co-workers ridicule her inefficiency ever so haughtily, and she must continue to resist the, shall we say, aggressive courting of her intoler-

able boss, George H. Jones, played by sophomore Lew Wallace. When Helen ends up conforming to the standard of the women of her age (and perhaps still today?), real drama is set in motion, which is ably carried out by an extensive team of actors and actresses. Outside of the relativity one might experience from a play of this nature, the sheer entertainment value of this play was tremendous. Miles’ performance as Helen was as complex and multifaceted as expected from my reading of Machinal and she certainly captured crowd attention from beginning to close. Wallace’s performance as George H. Jones brought about a different dynamic, and you could feel the audience fill with animosity at this character’s expense. Wallace was indeed right on the proverbial target. First-rate performances were abounding in this production. In my opinion, as excellent as the main duo of Helen and George H. Jones (Miles and Wallace) were on stage, the supporting cast made this play. My two personal favorite performances were from Eric Perusek, a junior here at CSU and Jason Dixon. Having seen Perusek in an earlier production, it must be said that this actor entirely gets inside of his roles, playing an articulately sinister prosecuting attorney in Machinal’s second half. Dixon, who portrayed a priest in the latter part of the play, practically seized the stage when he was on it. His charisma shocked and awed a grateful audience. Val Kozlenko, a Dramatic Arts major at CSU also put forth an impressive performance as Richard Roe, the rugged, seemingly womanizing man of intrigue. As much as the main

and supporting cast defined this performance, something must be said for the quality of directing in this creative piece. Holly Holsinger in every respect tapped into a feeling that she wanted the audience to sense, of not only despair at a perfunctory, mechanical world but also of an audacious anticipation that things will work out for the young Helen. The directing of this piece is what allows you to carry its themes and imagery on home with you upon departure. Just as much, the lighting, sound, and set design allow you to do the same, sketching a lasting image in your play-attending subconscious. So, the play was meaningful and entertaining. Some may even call it riveting. While I’m wise enough to let you, the reader, label the production with those types of superlatives, I’m also smart enough to give this piece my endorsement. Be sure to bring your significant other, it’s the kind of piece where you want someone you care deeply for with you. It’s that kind of piece; and you’ll definitely want someone to talk it over with afterward.

a scene from Machinal


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Cold Weather Can’t Stop Hardcore Fans Story by Scott Arko | The Cauldron Contributing Writer

Despised Icon

It was a damp, bitterly cold Monday night in downtown Cleveland; many kept to their homes, bad weather causing cancelled plans and house-ridden activities aplenty. Despite this, the hardcore crowd showed up in droves, forming a line at Peabody’s Downunder that stretched near to the back of the attached Rascal House pizza shop. What was the attraction? Ask any one of four hundred or so in attendance, and the answer would be simple and immediate: “best hardcore show of the year.” Indeed, the lineup was impressive to anyone who took a fancy to the two-step rhythms and crushing guitar riffs of the modern hardcore/metalcore scene. The Acacia Strain headlined the aptly named “Crashing Through the Holidays” tour, bringing along touring machine Despised Icon, New Yorkers Full Blown Chaos, innovative grindsters the Tony Danza Tapdance Extravaganza, and up-and-comers

Recon. From the start, tensions were high. Peabody’s has been host to countless shows over the years, but Recon’s opening set had to incur some of the most violent reactions yet seen in the club. Two-step, hardcore dancers, and ‘swingfisting’ (for lack of better term) littered the floor, leaving security slightly aghast: a trash can flew across the floor, and the usually vigilant club staff did little but push it aside. Recon has a reputation for being an intensely violent live act (legend has it that on their last run through Cleveland, they damn near destroyed our own Brooklyn Recreation Center), and when finale “Burn This City” blared from the speakers, a storm of at least 50 dedicated fans rushed the stage and screamed into the microphone, literally burying vocalist Chris Roberts in a frenzy of dedicated fandom. Ensuing act The Tony Danza Tapdance Extravaganza wasn’t met with half of the vigor and dedication Recon received; however, in terms of sound and overall performance, the band was leagues above the rest of the acts on the bill. While the band’s recordings (in particular, the band name, song titles, and the occasional skit) retain a sense of humor, the talent on display here is no joke. Songwriting is top notch, frantically dancing from hardcore punk through grindcore and straight groove metal, usually within seconds of each other, all behind

frantic screams and an unbelievable display of skill on the bass guitar (it really has to be seen to be believed). Tony Danza certainly calls to mind the intensity and technicality that defined The Dillinger Escape Plan in their early years. Tensions mounted further as metalcore vets Full Blown Chaos took the stage. Truth be told, the band’s neo-thrash hardcore sound simply sounds dated, a trifle boring compared to the eclectic pummeling the rest of the show threw at us. Certainly the crowd disagreed with this assessment, building on tension and attacking the crowd as heavyweight vocalist Ray Mazzola commanded them to. Ritualistically, the band closed with “Wake the Demons,” the anthemic title track taken from the band’s debut LP. Canada’s finest in deathcore, Despised Icon, took the stage with the brutal screams and ‘ghetto’ stylings they’re known for. The crowd loved them; however, from this reviewer’s perspective, the band has certainly put on better performances in the past. It should be noted that this is no less than the band’s third arrival at Peabody’s in the past six months, so it should at least be expected. As usual, “In the Arms of Perdition” and “Fractured Hand” revved the crowd to frightening extents…at this point of the show, those not engaging themselves in the hardcore dancing were able to do little more than fear for their own safety. At long last, headliners the Acacia Strain took the stage to obnoxious strobe lights and a horribly mixed sound. Vocalist Vincent Bennet, though delivering his usual earnest performance, could barely be heard above the muddied and crushingly heavy guitar lines. The crowd disagreed; bringing back the insanity that trademarked Recon’s set full force. Unfortunately enough, only a few songs in the tension hit a breaking

point; from what could be seen, a dancer went a little too far in their ‘attack the idle crowd’ tactics, and a fight broke out, soon ensuing in a violent mini-riot. A few dozen were ejected from the club, yours truly included. Truth be told, the show was certainly fantastic for those involved in the hardcore lifestyle; for myself, however, a metal fan who simply dabbles, the crowd proved to be a bit too much, to the point that for the bulk of the performances, I could hardly enjoy it. Here’s to a lesson learned: not everyone dances the same way. I must respect a culture, even if I despise its actions. Here’s to hoping the boys on the tour have a good run before the holiday season.

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Or apply at www.winterbreakwork.com


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Factory Theater Sets the Stage for Newest Production Machinal Story by Laura Dynda | The Cauldron Staff Writer Cleveland State’s Factory Theater is set for their newest play Machinal, which opened Saturday. Machinal is based on a play by Sophie Treadwell. It is about how a “seemingly harmless stenographer” is driven to commit murder. According to the press release, this is, “The story of a woman... any woman… ready, eager for life, for love...but deadened, squeezed, crushed by the machinelike quality of the life surrounding.” Treadwell was a journalist in the early 20th century. One of the stories that she covered was about Ruth Snyder who was convicted of murder and became the first woman sentenced to die in the electric chair. This story was

the basis for Machinal. Professor Holly Holsinger who is directing the production said that this play, “Tells the story of one woman in that oppressed society.” Holsinger believes the play to be a “modern tragedy” that is not all dark, because within it, it is human story where there is light. According to Holsinger, the stage is set with multileveled gears. The largest is 22 feet in diameter. Holsinger said that this set is expressionistic because it allows the audience, “To focus in and yet have giant gears with movement of society of the machine.” Denise Astorino, a member of the cast said, “One of the cool things [is that] Holly has double or tripled the cast

in some scenes. So you can have three roles.” Maggie Richardson, who is also part of the ensemble as well as assistant properties mistress said, “You get to be from different walks of life within two hours.” When asked what was unique about this play, Richardson said, “From an actor’s stand point it’s unique because it has principle characters and it’s more about being in a more supportive role and giving energy to the person on stage.” Astorino says that there is a universal theme to the story that shows the main character’s side of the story. Christine Miles, a senior at CSU, plays the lead role. Richardson said,

“[Miles has] fantastic empathy and drive. I always learn something from her. Also [she is] one of those people who will give 110 percent. This is really what she enjoys to do.” Holsinger hopes to try and appeal more to the student body for students to come out and support the shows. Flyers and posters are all over campus to try and get the word out about Machinal. Dec. 6-9 CSU Factory Theater E.24th St. & Chester Ave. Cleveland 8 p.m. Thur.-Sat. 2 p.m. Sun. For tickets call: (216) 687-2109 $5 CSU Students, Faculty, Staff $10 General Public

 Beauty and the Beast a Treat for the Whole Family Story by Whitney A. Foster | The Cauldron Staff Writer

 Friday marked the opening night of Beauty and the Beast performed at the Beck Center for the Arts in Lakewood. This performance, which seems to mirror the Disney cartoon almost perfectly, is a good performance for children and adults alike. A musical, the song and dance numbers tie in very well with the performance. As mentioned above, all of the songs are taken from the movie with some extra ones that help the theatrical performance to flow better. Children, who often get restless after a period of time, are intrigued by the singing, dancing, and

comedy that the actors do a good job of. Fred Sternfeld, director of Beauty and the Beast states, “I am thrilled that we are drawing audiences that might not go to live theater otherwise…our goal as producers of theater is to not only entertain, but move our audiences to laughter, tears and different ways of looking at the world. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast fulfills that goal.” Not only are the audiences diverse, but the cast is as well. The actors that appear onstage range in age from young children to professional actors who are members of the Actors Equity Association (AEA), the union of actors and stage managers. This diversity in the cast reflects and makes the production more appreciated. The show features the same actors in the leading roles as have been in the past: Dan Folino as the Beast, Natalie Green as Belle and Josh R. Noble as Gaston. Josh

R. Noble delivers a comedic performance as Gaston. Other audience favorites are Larry Nehring as Lumiere and Zac Hudak as Lefou. The ensemble in the cast which act as villagers and items in give so much to the performance that they are more than just an ensemble; they are all another character in themselves.The costumes are bright, colorful and creative which are enough to grab the audience’s attention from the moment the characters step on stage. The set up includes sets on wheels that allow for many different settings on one stage. Note that there is an hour and 15 minutes before the 15-minute intermission. Those with restless legs may have to get up a little earlier.             Beck Center for the Arts is located 10 minutes west of downtown Cleveland at 17801 Detroit Avenue in Lakewood. Free, convenient onsite parking is available.

Beauty and the Beast runs through Dec. 30.             To reserve tickets, call the Beck Center Box Office at (216) 521-2540 or log onto beckcenter. org. Tickets are $28 for adults, $25 for seniors, $17 for students (22 and under with I.D) and $10 for children 12 and under (includes a $3 administrative fee applied at the time of purchase). Additional discounts are available for groups of 10 or more.


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CSU Chic

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by Andrea Cervenak | The Cauldron Staff Writer Name:  Tony Ahni Age: 26 Major:  Music Composition Style Inspirations:  Linkin Park and Dong-Dae-Moon. Dong-Dae-Moon is one of the largest clothing stores in Korea. Favorite Clothing Stores:  American Eagle Favorite Fashion Magazine:  Korean Vogue Favorite Fashion Eras:  “I like the simplicity of the ‘70s.” Fashion Philosophy: “I like my outfits to be neat and clean-cut.” What He Loves About Fashion:  “Fashion can be used as a strategy in your life and in your career as well.” What He’s Wearing:  White Gucci Trench Coat, Myeong-Dong, Korea. White Button-Down Shirt, Honk-IK University, $35. Jeans, Hong-IK University, $50. Tan Western Leather Shoes, from Dong-DaeMoon in Seoul, Korea, $70.

CD Reviews Manifesto is keeping the tradition of classic bands alive, they can be, and often are, compared to No Doubt, The Specials, and Sublime. On the album you can hear how the instruments play an important part in every song. All the songs are good so you may not have a favorite when you listen to the album. The band consists of Tomas Kalnoky (lead vocals/guitarist/ Artist: songwriter), Mike Brown (alto/ Victory Records baritone saxophone), Jim Conti Streetlight Manifesto 44444 (alto/tenor saxophone), Peter Album: By Shanette D. Buford Mc Cullaugh (bassist), Mike Somewhere in the Between Soprano (trombonist), Matt Streetlight Manifesto is a large Stewart (trumpet), and Chris seven-piece band that has an original Thatcher (drums). Somewhere in sound, creative band members and the Between is currently in stores, reminds you of early punk rock and the band is on tour now. bands. Their new album Somewhere in There are no upcoming dates the Between is a great album to listen for Cleveland, but the closet while you are in the car, studying, live shows will be in Chicago on or just listening to a new genre of Jan.10th and in Detroit on Jan music for the first time. Streetlight 11th.

Artist: Kenna

Album: Make Sure They See

Interscope Records

and can be describing as “artful, dynamic, other worldly and catchy”. Seven tracks on the album showcase The Neptunes street sleight of hand theatrics alongside Kenna’s dark rock melodies. Kenna is an artist who steps outside his circle, delivers music that he has a passion for and represents who he is as a person and artist. Face is a great album to listen to if you have an ear for new artists.

4444 By Shanette D. Buford

Kenna Zemedkun (ZUH-MEDKIN) was born in Addis Ababa and raised in Virgnia Beach. He attended high school with Chad “Chase” Hugo one half of The Neptunes. His sound is very different from other African-American male artists, and he shows that he loves all genres of music. This album’s sound is experimental, pop, and alternative,

Get Published! Submit local or national CD reviews about 225 words or less to cauldroneditors@hotmail.com. Albums must have been released in the last year. Include your name, album cover, record company (if none please note) and a ranking out of 5.


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CSU Basketball Notebook

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Story by Reid May | The Cauldron Staff Writer CSU Women Sign Three Letters of Intent: The women’s basketball team signed three high school seniors to national letters of intent to attend and play for Cleveland State beginning in fall 2008. Janelle Adams (Milwaukee, Wis.), Kaila Montgomery (Waterloo Ontario, Canada), and Destinee Blue (Milwaukee, Wis.) are the three newest additions to the growing women’s basketball organization at Cleveland State. Adams is a 5’ 11” guard who averaged 15.1 points per game in her junior season at King High School. She is a solid, strong, perimeter player. Cleveland State Head Coach Kate Peterson Abiad says, “Adams gets to the basket. [She is] smooth; [an] athlete and a scorer.” Abiad feels “[Adams] is the best player coming out of the state of Wisconsin.” Blue is a 6’3” post player. She averaged14.1 points per game in her junior season at Milwaukee Vincent High School. She has the ability to play inside and out and will add height to a short Cleveland State squad. Montgomery is a 6’1” versatile player

who can be featured in and out of the paint. She averaged 20.4 points and 11.2 rebounds per game in her junior season at Waterloo Collegiate Institute. Abiad says, “[Montgomery] is an agile, aggressive, physical player with a lot of versatility.” Garland Impresses Early in Freshman Campaign: Cleveland State freshman Shawnita Garland has been very impressive in her first few games. Through the Vikings tough loss to Ohio University on Nov. 26 Garland has averaged 8.8 points per game; second only to sophomore Kailey Klein (19.6 ppg.) G Garland’s excellent play hasn’t surprised everyone, however. Teammate Brittany Korth says, “We knew she would contribute. She did the same thing to us [in practice].” Coach Abiad adds, “[Her] instincts are very good. She’s playing with freedom. She hasn’t reached her potential.”

a personal blog of the women’s team’s journey to Alaska for the Great Alaska Shootout. The blog is available on csuvikings.com, and describes the travels, preparation, and play, as well as some of the sightseeing done on the trip. Klein ties record, named Horizon League Scholar Athlete of the Week: Sophomore Kailey Klein tied a Cleveland State record in the Vikings loss to Ohio University on Nov. 26. Klein, who finished with 22 points, also made 15-of-16 free throws. The free throws made tied the all-time Cleveland State record set by Deb Taylor on Jan. 11, 1990 against Valparaiso. Klein was also named the Horizon League Scholar Athlete of the Week for Nov. 27. This came after she helped the Vikings to a third place finish at the Great Alaska Shootout and was named to the all tournament team by averaging 25.5 points, 6.5 rebounds and 3.5 assists.

Hoying’s Alaska Blog: Jackson Steals Away: Senior forward Robyn Hoying kept

Men’s basketball guard Cedric Jackson increased his team leading steal total to 22 in the loss to Cal State Northridge on Nov. 28. It was Jackson’s fifth game of four or more steals this season. Jackson, who sat out last season to meet NCAA transfer rules, had only 13 multi-steal games in his 54 games at St. John’s University. Only two of those games were four steal games. Men’s Team Attracting Crowds: So far this season, the men’s basketball team has seriously outdone the women’s basketball team in average attendance. In their first two home games the men averaged 2,025 fans, while the women have averaged a measly 240 through their three games. The men are certainly expected to draw a crowd when The Ohio State Buckeyes come to town on Dec. 18. The game required the rental of Quicken Loans Arena, home of the Cleveland Cavaliers, Lake Erie Monsters and soon the Cleveland Gladiators. Expect to see a crowd of at least 10,000 on hand for the showdown with Ohio State.

Jackson Shines as Vikings Fall Second Half Surge Leads Matadors Over CSU Story by Nick Camino | The Cauldron Sports Editor Coming off of a great opening five game road trip in which the men’s basketball team came back to Cleveland with a 3-2 record followed by an easy 10-point victory over John Carroll University, it was going to be a tough task to try and slow down the third best scoring team in the country just three days later, and it was. Powered by 10 three-pointers, including a six-for-10 shooting effort from behind the three-point arc in the second half, the Cal State Northridge Matadors pulled away in the final 20 minutes for a 78-68 win over the Vikings. D’Aundray Brown goes for a layup

Despite holding a 31-29 lead at halftime, the Vikings just could not pull away from the high-octane offense of the Matadors. It was evident early in the second half that Cleveland State did not have enough in the tank to oust a team that averages 95.5 points per game. With 12:20 remaining in the contest and the Vikings leading 46-45, Northridge reeled off 11 of the next 13 points to take a 56-48 lead, a lead the Matadors would never relinquish. After trailing by eight, the closest Coach Gary Waters’ squad would Continued on page 19


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Catching Up With a Friend Five Quick Questions with Dallas Lauderdale Story by Nick Camino | The Cauldron Sports Editor I graduated from Solon High School in 2006. The very next year, Ohio State reserve forward Dallas Lauderdale did the same, however before we both graduated the two of us created an interesting friendship that will last forever. With the upcoming Ohio State vs. Cleveland State men’s basketball game approaching, I gave Dallas a call last week to catch up on some great memories we shared in high school and to get some of his thoughts on the upcoming game against the Vikings.

NC: What was the transition like from playing in high school to playing for a Division I Big Ten college basketball team? DL: Well first of all college practices are more intense than even the biggest high school games. All the players in college are stronger and faster. But most importantly, they are mentally stronger as well. In college you do not have to be the biggest or the fastest, but you definitely need to be smart in the college game.

NC (Nick Camino): How is Ohio State? DL (Dallas Lauderdale): It is excellent. The environment in Columbus is great, the football and basketball games are crazy, and my classes are going very well too. In Columbus there are no professional sports teams, so the entire city rallies around our college sports teams; it is amazing the support that we have.

NC: When you were in high school, did Cleveland State try to recruit you? DL: Yes, both coaches. Their previous coach Mike Garland did, and then right before I committed to Ohio State, Coach Gary Waters did too. My decision had nothing to do with CSU. I think it is a great school and a perfect place to play if you want to stay close to home. Coach

Waters is really going to help the CSU program. I like Cleveland State. NC: Are you excited to come home and play against Cleveland State on Dec. 18? DL: (Laughs) Most definitely. I am looking forward to it so much. People back in Solon and Cleveland are already telling me they have tickets and they are going to come watch me play. And of course my family will be there too. That night is going to be a great time. NC: Dallas, can you give me a prediction for the upcoming game against Cleveland State? DL: Well it’s plain and simple, whoever plays harder and makes more plays will win this game at The Q. I know a lot of guys on the Cleveland State team, I am friends with [guard] Joe Davis, those guys can play. This game is a

Dallas Lauderdale

friendly rivalry that we are really looking forward to playing on the 18th.

Volleyball Squad Ousted in First Round of NCAA Tourney Story by Robert Ivory| The Cauldron Staff Writer For Chuck Voss and the Viking volleyball team, their first trip to the NCAA Tournament did not go as well as planned. The Vikings ran into a streaking University of Albany team, who has lost only once since Oct. 15, but unfortunately, the Great Danes brought their “A” game. Despite their great Horizon League Tournament run, the Vikings dropped three straight sets: 30-20, 30-20 and 30-25 Friday night in University Park, Pa. Although the Vikings’ loss comes to a shock to most of the forest green and white faithful, the state of Ohio fell on hardships as well, only putting the University of Dayton to the second round. In fact, the teams from Ohio won only four out of 13 sets over

the weekend. The Vikings had 29 errors on the day, where Albany only had nine. The mark of 29 or more errors on the season has not been kind to the Vikings. Except for the match against the Dayton Flyers, the Vikings have had 29 or more errors in each of their losses this year. The Great Danes came out firing and the Vikings found themselves quickly down 10-5 in the first set. Freshman Amy Benz’s point put the Vikes back in contention with a kill in the set to make it 107. However, the Danes would pull away and take the first set 30-20. The second set started off on the right foot as sophomores Beth Greulich and Alexis Korovich recorded kills to take the Vikes

to their first lead of the day, 2-0. Again, the team from the American East Conference was too much for the Vikings and jumped out to a commanding 30-20 win in the second set. The last chance for a miracle comeback had to come in the third set if the Vikings were to defeat the Great Danes and face the topranked Penn State Nittany Lions in the next round of the NCAA Championships. Once again, the Vikings started out on fire, jumping to a 3-1 lead. But Albany was once again too much, even when the Vikes came back and made the score 8-8, Albany was just too hot to handle for Cleveland State. Finally, Cleveland’s hopes of their first NCAA win was dashed when Albany’s Amanda

Cowdrey, recorded the last of her game-high 11 kills, and ended the year for the Vikings in a 30-25 loss. Notably, senior Mel Snyder chipped in 29 assists, three digs, two kills and a service ace. Sophomore Greulich helped with 10 kills and two digs. Although the Cinderella season is over, not all is lost for head coach Chuck Voss and the volleyball team. The team reaching the NCAA Tournament has given the Vikings an immeasurable amount of familiarity to winning often and winning championships. With the news of top talent coming to Woodling Gym next year, the amount of depth and stability the team will have will develop into a powerful force in the Horizon League Conference.


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Jackson Shines as Vikings Fall

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Continued from page 17 come within was six, due to the Vikings inability to shoot the ball. Early in the game, the forest green and white went 3-of-16 shooting and then made only three-of-13 (.231) trey attempts, an almost fatal mistake when playing one of Coach Bobby Braswell team’s. However, Coach Braswell knew this would be a different type of game than the three previous games his team won. “I told our guys it wasn’t going to be a 90-point game,” Braswell said. “It was going to be one of those games that we were going to have to grind it out.” “Cleveland State is a great defensive team,” Braswell added. “I played Gary Waters’ teams when he was at Kent State, so I knew what they

could do.” Cleveland State point guard Cedric Jackson had yet another fantastic outing scoring 24 points and dishing out four assists, but it would not be enough to slow down the Matadors, who had four players score in double figures. Forward Calvin Chitwood led Cal State Northridge with 22 points shooting eight-for-eight from the field and a perfect four-for-four from behind the three-point arc. The Matadors also received strong performances from Tremaine Townsend, Josh Jenkins, and Jonathon Heard. In the end, fatigue may have played a role in the Vikings loss, Coach Waters said. “I thought we got tired down the stretch in the last five minutes,”

Waters explained. “Cedric [Jackson] had cramps as well as J’Nathan [Bullock], and we really weren’t getting anything from the other guys.” Jackson summarized the frustrating loss best afterwards. “Basically they were getting a lot of three-point shots up and getting themselves a lot of second chances in the second half,” the Vikings star point guard said. Next up, the men’s basketball team will continue their season by traveling to Chicago State, fol-

lowed by an important stretch of the Vikings season, when they host Youngstown State, Ohio State, and Central Michigan, before traveling to Kent State just four days after Christmas.



Check Out Sports for Camnio’s Conversation with