Issuu on Google+

California State University, Chico 

Annual Report 2010‐2011  Center for Regional and Continuing Education 

The Center for Regional and Continuing Education  strengthens and expands the resources of the University        to respond to lifelong learning needs. 


Center for Regional and Continuing Education 2010-2011 Annual Report


Table of Contents Introduction RCE Strategic Five Year Goals and 2010-2011 Unit Goals Personnel List and Programs & Services Matrix Academic Affairs Annual Report Data Summary for RCE Academic Affairs Goal 1: Enhance Student Learning ............................................................................ 1-1 Strategically Using Self-Support to Enroll, Retain, and Graduate Students: Special Session & Open University ................................................................................................................1-2 Supporting Student Participation in International Learning Opportunities: Faculty-Led Self-Support Travel Study Courses ......................................................................................1-4

Extending Access to Superior Online Student Support Services: ............................................................1-5

Integrating Effective Learning Resources: ........................................................................................................1-6 Supporting Excellent and Distinctive Programs Off-Campus: University Center in Redding and Chico Distance & Online Education..........................................1-6

Demonstrating Educational Effectiveness: ALCI .............................................................................................1-7

Academic Affairs Goal 2: Nurture Excellence in Faculty and Staff ................................................... 2-1 Developing Faculty and Staff Excellence: ........................................................................................................ 2-2

Integrating Student Learning and Service .........................................................................................................2-3

Supporting Superior Professional Growth and Achievement ...................................................................2-3 Celebrating Outstanding Performance ................................................................................................................2-4

Academic Affairs Goal 3: Educate for a Sustainable Global Society ................................................. 3-1

Developing Programs for Sustainability .............................................................................................................3-1 Promoting Creative Activities in Sustainability ..............................................................................................3-2

Providing Leadership for Sustainable Practices and Modeling Sustainability ...................................3-2

Academic Affairs Goal 4: Serve the North State and Beyond ............................................................. 4-1

Addressing Diverse Educational Needs in the North State: Learning in Retirement ......................................................................................................................................4-2 Addressing Diverse Educational Needs throughout California: Workforce and Teacher Professional Development ..............................................................................4-2

Addressing Diverse Educational Needs Beyond California: Localization Certification Programs .............................................................................................................4-3

Collaborating for Mutually Beneficial Public Engagement: Conference Services ..............................4-3


Academic Affairs Goal 5: Strategically Manage Resources ................................................................. 5-1 Marshaling Resources through Fundraising: Osher Foundation Endowment & Re-Entry Scholarships....................................................................5-1

Marshaling Resources: CERF and Research Foundation Revenue...........................................................5-2 Aligning Resources: Campus Distributions & Contributions ....................................................................5-4 Fostering a Culture of Evidence and Accountability: Task Allocation and Evaluation .................. 5-6

Demonstrating Organizational Effectiveness: Process Improvements..................................................5-6


Introduction The Center for Regional & Continuing Education (RCE) strengthens and expands the resources of the University to respond to lifelong learning needs. The 2010-2011 Annual Report for the Center for Regional & Continuing Education (RCE) summarizes RCE’s accomplishments in support of the five Academic Affairs goals and the University’s strategic priorities. Each section of the annual report connects the impact of RCE’s strategic goals and 2010-2011 unit goals to the University’s priorities. Highlights of RCE’s impact in 2010-2011include these accomplishments:  RCE generated 12,124 enrollments in 1,622 self-supporting continuing education offerings that include academic degree courses and programs, non-credit workshops, conferences, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), and the American Language and Culture Institute (ALCI).  Total fiscal year revenue from all sources was $6,527,183.

 Revenue distributions, cash payments from RCE activities, indirect contributions, and reserve expenditures to the campus totaled $5,895,139.

 The Colusa Hall Conference & Event Center opened in May 2011, the culmination of a multi-million dollar investment of RCE’s Continuing Education Revenue Fund (CERF) reserves. The project included the University Landscape Project that resulted in the Creekside Plaza and adjoining educational Creekside Gardens as well as the start of accessible path of travel improvements to the campus core.  RCE partnered with the College of Agriculture to secure Commission on the University funding to develop and launch an MS in Agricultural Education online as part of the AG IDEA consortium of universities.  ALCI enrolled 283 students from 23 countries and collaborated with the Office for International Education to plan for the Chung-Ang University (CAU) 1 + 3 program launch in summer 2011.

 RCE created the Connect • Learn • Engage (CLE) pilot series to connect campus faculty, staff, and students with subject matter experts from around the globe using webinars and two-way video.

 The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute served 789 members and added new classroom locations and programs to serve the North State’s 60+ audience.  RCE hosted the CSU system-wide Counterparts Meeting of Extended/Continuing Education staff and the CSU Intensive English Program Directors Consortium, bringing 117 CSU professionals to the Chico campus (without the need for a single parking space).  Osher Reentry Scholarships and Prime Timers Reentry Scholarships totaling over $56,000 supported CSU, Chico students who are returning to the University to complete their degrees.

 Seven conference events brought more than 1,000 people to campus, including botanists, after school professionals, and mental health service providers.


RCE Strategic Five-Year (2007-2012) Goals and 2010-2011 Unit Goals Strategic Goal 1: Expand and enhance reentry and learning in retirement opportunities to meet diverse educational needs. 1.1

1.2 1.3 1.4

2010-2011 Goals Participate in the Council for Adult & Experiential Learning (CAEL) Virtual Prior Learning Assessment Center pilot program to assess value of Prior Learning Assessment (PLA) for reentry students and adult students matriculated to self-support degree completion programs. With the departure of University of Phoenix from the 500 Orient classroom location, negotiate space for OLLI that meets program criteria in functionality and cost.

Increase OLLI membership by 10% through concentrated appeal to Baby Boomers and increase pool of qualified peer leaders. Establish permanent scholarship application and award process with $1 million Osher Reentry Scholarship Program endowment.

Strategic Goal 2: Create and manage a fully functional conference meeting space that models energy efficiency and integrated design, solely funded by Continuing Education Revenue Fund (CERF) reserves, i.e., non-general fund dollars. 2.1 2.2 2.3

2.4 2.5

2010-2011 Goals Complete construction phase of the Colusa remodel and coordinate with facilities planning to achieve project goals.

Plan and execute a partnership with ECC for Concrete Industry Management students for applied learning with first project to design and install concrete benches on east side of Colusa.

Develop a conference center management plan that addresses marketing, reservations protocols and coordination with Facilities Reservations and FMS, facilities use guidelines for RCE staff and users of the building, budgeting and cost recovery, staffing, and policies/procedures necessary to support a successful operation. Prepare and launch an open house to promote Colusa and RCE conference services.

Begin LEED Existing Building Operations and Maintenance (EBOM) preparation and process with ECC for Construction Management students.

Strategic Goal 3: Strengthen and refine RCE's organizational effectiveness, with an emphasis on process improvement, enhanced communication, and proactive staff development. 3.1

3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5

2010-2011 Goals Plan and deliver an integrated staff development program that includes impactful Live @ 8:05 presentations, monthly hour-long training topics, and all-staff events planned to meet strategic development objectives.

Ensure quality control protocols in all RCE business processes, including communication and web application programming and testing. Develop a Customer Relationship Management process to be integrated into the Drupal WCMS. Complete IT department recruitments: Technology Manager retirement replacement and Technology Coordinator - Foundation.

Update and expand RCE's business continuity plan, including IR's role in RCE IT infrastructure and improved security and redundancy.


3.6

Expand reporting capacity and quality of reports generated to support RCE business needs.

Five Year Goal 4: Expand self-support credit and non-credit offerings, certificates, and degree programs with a variety of delivery modes from face-to-face, to hybrid, to wholly online. 2010-2011 Goals In collaboration with the College of Business, develop a clear goal for the Professional MBA and 4.1 create an implementation plan to document progress toward that goal, including the potential launch in 2012 of a fully online PMBA. 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.8 4.9

With the Provost's support and pending direction by the Chancellor’s Office, plan a Summer Session 2011 which allows either a mode of funding (general fund or self-support). Establish self-support faculty-led study abroad best practices.

Conduct international student recruitment to support a strategic enrollment plan for ALCI, aligned with the campus' strategic international enrollment initiatives. In collaboration with the College of Agriculture, secure WASC approval for a new self-support online MS in Agricultural Education.

Implement the offering of extension credit effective Fall 2011 to meet EO 1047 requirements for matriculation. Establish a separate January Intersession term effective 2012 in CMS.

Implement self-service Open University registration using permission numbers or other appropriate CMS capabilities as determined by the campus.

Re-launch revised self-support RN-BSN degree completion program partially online and partially face to face.

Five Year Goal 5: Strategically support the growth of state-support online and distance education degree programs. 2010-2011 Goals 5.1 5.2 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7

Promote a programmatic focus to developing wholly online degree programs state-support.

In collaboration with BSS, secure WASC approval and re-launch the online SOCI degree completion program. Ensure new GE pathways include online options to serve online degree programs. Implement President's strategy for the University Center as determined by the decisions/negotiations with the McConnell Foundation.

Create and implement a strategic recruitment plan for UC in collaboration with Enrollment Management.

Create separate matriculations for students enrolled at UC through the CSU Mentor application or upon admission.

Five Year Goal 6: Increase grant and contract activity to support revenue diversification. 2010-2011 Goals 6.1

Invest capacity building funds in activities that generate contracts to host conferences.


6.2 6.3 6.4

Pursue advanced grant writing training opportunities.

Explore workforce development training opportunities through Workforce Investment Boards.

Connect funding sources to program needs as determined by market analysis and identify expertise among campus faculty and beyond to strengthen grant and contract capacity.

Five Year Goal 7: Demonstrate responsible stewardship of RCE resources to ensure financial viability of all RCE programs and activities and document RCE's contribution to the University. 2010-2011 Goals Implement an efficient, timely process to increase OU fees to be at parity or to exceed the cost of 7.1 state support. 7.2 7.3

Direct additional resources to the campus through effective self-support programming including Open University. Assess the physical layout of CCE to meet business needs and ensure efficiency in business processes.

Five Year Goal 8: Strengthen the connection between RCE and the mission and values of Academic Affairs by aligning the unit more closely with the college structure. 2010-2011 Goals Foster understanding of Special Session and Open University as a valuable path to student success 8.1 with importance beyond revenue generation. 8.2

Design and implement a comprehensive summer outreach plan that positions summer, whether state-support or self-support, as an integral part of student success and degree completion.


RCE Personnel List–June 2011 Name Debra Barger Clare Roby Elaina McReynolds Jeff Layne William Dantona Pam Hollis Joe Picard Melissa McGowan Dane Frazier Linda MacMichael Koni Needles Tricia Daniels Heather Quilici Dana Massetti Nancy Park Jeanne McMahon Suzie Rhonek Alicia Trider Yuki Rojas Christiana Brands Paul Hoerman Dan Greaney Jason Hale

Position Dean

Associate Dean

Director of Special Session and Extension Director of Distance Education Services

Director, American Language and Culture Institute (FDN) Administrative Analyst/Specialist Marketing Director Marketing Director

Technology Manager

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Coordinator (OLLI) (FDN) OLLI Administrative Support (FDN) Graphic Designer

Conference and Events Coordinator/Extension (FDN)

Admin. Support Coordinator, Special Session and Extension Administrative Support, Distance Education Accounting Technician

Administrative Support

Administrative Coordinator, ALCI (FDN)

Student Services Coordinator, ALCI (FDN) Academic Coordinator, ALCI (FDN) Technology Coordinator

Program Coordinator, University Center

Instructional Support, University Center


RCE Programs & Services Matrix State Support Credit Programs Description

Audience

Chico Distance & Online Education rce.csuchico.edu/online/

Online degree completion and certificate programs. Programs: social science, sociology, and liberal studies.

Degree seekers who live at a distance from campus, including temporary relocations, e.g., military service.

University Center, Redding, CA rce.csuchico.edu/redding/

Degree completion programs in Business Administration and the Masters in Social Work offered at the Shasta College University Center, downtown Redding.

Degree seekers who live at a distance from campus in Northern CA who are eligible for admission to the degree programs offered.

Self-Support Credit Programs Description American Language & Culture Institute rce.csuchico.edu/alci/ Community College Faculty Preparation Certificate rce.csuchico.edu/faculty prep/ Computer Science Program (Chico Education Network/CEN) rce.csuchico.edu/cen/

Intensive English language instruction to meet students’ academic, professional, and personal goals. Introduces American culture and higher education system. Post-baccalaureate certificate in preparation for instruction in the community college and adult learning setting. Special Session bachelor and master computer science degree courses presented live online and self-paced, via Internet and videotaped delivery formats. (Admissions suspended.)

Audience International students (age 16 and above).

Current and prospective community college instructors; content matter experts who desire knowledge and skills in instructional design and delivery. Information technology professionals across the nation (e.g., Hewlett Packard, IBM, General Electric, Agilent).

Benefit Extended access to degree programs for students living at a distance from campus; FTE generation; incubator for instructional innovation. Extended access to degree programs for those living in far northern CA. Offcampus FTE generation; additional options for wide range of students.

Benefit International bridge to University degree programs and the community. Increases diversity of campus and town. Addresses the need for professional development and institutional improvement through wellqualified instructors.

Off-campus access to computer science degree programming.


Self-Support Credit Programs, cont. Description Open University rce.csuchico.edu/openu/ Passport to Learning rce.csuchico.edu/passport/

Access to University courses on a spaceavailable basis, without formal admission to the University.

Short-term faculty ledstudy abroad courses to a variety of international destinations.

RN-BSN rce.csuchico.edu/online/rn -bsn/

Partially online degree completion program for RNs to become BSNs in a cohort model.

Professional MBA rce.csuchico.edu/mba/

Special Session MBA program offered on Saturdays and delivered via two-way video conference to Chico and Redding.

Special Session rce.csuchico.edu/special session/ Summer Session rce.csuchico.edu/summer/

Courses offered in addition to the University's regular semester schedule, e.g., Summer and January Intersession. Fees are charged on a per-unit basis.

Summer courses offered in a flexible schedule on a perunit fee basis.

Audience Individuals seeking future admissions, nondegree seekers, disqualified students and those denied admission. University students and those seeking international travel experiences with an academic focus.

Registered nurses with busy work schedules, and nurses from distant rural areas. Regional MBA degree seekers.

Regularly enrolled University students, those seeking admissions, and individuals interested in courses for academic credit. Regularly enrolled University students and individuals interested in courses for academic credit.

Self-Support Non-Credit Programs Description ElderCollege rce.csuchico.edu/elder college/

Persons age 60 and older take regularly scheduled University courses as a guest on a spaceavailable basis.

Audience Older adults (60+)

Benefit Increased access to University courses and increased the opportunities for degree completion.

Hands-on international learning opportunities under the direction of CSU, Chico faculty. Flexible, primarily online-based format with credit for prior learning to meet the needs of working individuals. Access to a conveniently scheduled MBA for working professionals in the region.

Flexibility to augment the regular schedule and/or degree programs with appropriate self-support courses. Additional options for students to make progress toward degree and prepare for admission to advanced degrees/post baccalaureate study.

Benefit Non-traditional access to University courses. Age diversity within the classroom.


Self-Support Non-Credit Programs, cont. Description In Service to Families, Children & the Courts rce.csuchico.edu/inservice/

Professional continuing education workshops and conferences that focus on issues related to families and children.

Localization Certification Program rce.csuchico.edu/localize/

Comprehensive professional development program for managers in the emerging Web localization field.

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute rce.csuchico.edu/osher/

A peer-led, learning in retirement organization that provides opportunities for intellectual experiences and networking.

Audience Psychologists, marriage and family therapists, social workers, court mediators and custody evaluators, nurses, physicians, educators, law enforcement, and attorneys. International Web developers, product managers, sales managers, application developers, translation experts, language service vendors, client companies. Retirees, older adults (60+) and their spouses.

Services Description Professional Development & Personal Enrichment Workshops & Conferences rce.csuchico.edu/extension/ Osher Reentry Scholarship Program rce.csuchico.edu/osher scholarships/

Programs, workshops, and conferences provide learning opportunities for personal and professional development on a noncredit basis. Scholarship fund for parttime and full-time undergraduate reentry students.

Audience High school students, community members, professional license holders, students, and staff. Residential undergraduate students – ideally aged 25 to 50 – whose collegiate studies were interrupted by circumstances beyond their control for a cumulative five years who wish to resume their university studies.

Benefit Access to high quality continuing education programs for professionals who must maintain State licenses and who seek continuing professional education. High quality education for localization professionals certified by leading industry associations. Access to a selfsupported lifelong learning program for intellectual engagement. National recognition via the Osher Foundation and OLLI Network.

Benefit Access to non-credit programs for personal and professional development and continuing education for relicensure. Successful applicants with financial need have funds applied to tuition/fees. Only University undergraduate scholarship that allows part-time enrollment


Services, cont. Description

Audience

Benefit

Program Development & Custom Education and Training rce.csuchico.edu/solution s/

Contract program development and training. Planning, production and delivery.

Associations, corporations, government agencies, and organizations.

Access to University expertise, program developers and facilities.

Sustainable Conference Planning & Event Management rce.csuchico.ed u/ conferences/

Professional and academic conference and event management services with an emphasis on sustainability.

Professional associations and societies for educators, industry, and not-forprofits; corporations, government agencies, and organizations.

Video Conferencing Services rce.csuchico.edu/solutio ns/

Satellite downlink and twoway video conference transmission. Internet video streaming services.

Faculty, administrators, departments, Colleges, associations, corporations, government agencies, and regional organizations.

Professional/ workforce development with customer service focus. Faculty/academic association participation. Professional continuing education. Economic development. Video conference opportunities facilitate public service, promote collaboration, support personnel recruitment, and reduce travel costs.


Academic Affairs Annual Report Data Summary for RCE Enrollments

#

Chico Distance & Online Enrollments

1707

Special Session Enrollments*

5089

American Language and Culture Institute (ALCI) Enrollments

734

University Center Redding Enrollments Open University Enrollments

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) Participants

430

1092 789

Conference Participants

1082

Teacher Enrollments for Professional Development

951

Workshop Participants

# of Staff Participating in Employee Open University Courses

Total Continuing Education Enrollments

Offerings

354 19

12,124 #

Chico Distance & Online Offerings

66

Special Session Offerings (Includes Summer Session)

280

American Language and Culture Institute (ALCI) Offerings

276

University Center Redding Offerings Open University Offerings

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) Offerings Conferences Hosted

Workshop Offerings

Credit Offerings for Teacher Professional Development

Total Continuing Education Offerings

25

787 91 7

19 72

1622


Academic Affairs Goal 1: Enhance Student Learning


Academic Affairs Goal 1: Enhance Student Learning Regional & Continuing Education’s 2010-2011 achievements supported the Academic Affairs goal of enhancing student learning and RCE’s strategic goals to support the growth of state-support online and distance education and to expand self-support offerings. A particular focus for 2010-2011 was to position self-support as a means to help students achieve their educational objectives with access to additional courses beyond the reduced state-support capacity necessitated by state funding cuts.  Self-support Summer Session and January Intersession schedules were built to maximize student participation with a standard, cohesive schedule within and among colleges. (Goal 4)

 RCE planned and launched a self-support Summer Session 2011. (Goal 4.2)

 A “Think Summer” marketing campaign included new outreach channels and focused on integrating summer as an integral part of student success and degree completion. (Goal 8.2)

 A separate CMS term was created for January Intersession. (Goal 4.7)

 A North State Initiative proposal was submitted in response to the University’s renewed commitment to serving learners in the Redding area and throughout the North State. (Goal 5.5)

 RCE supported the College of Behavioral and Social Sciences and the Sociology in the WASC approval of an online BA in Sociology degree completion program that will launch in Fall 2011. (Goal 5.2)

 RCE partnered with the College of Agriculture to secure Commission on the University funding to develop and launch an MS in Agricultural Education online as part of the AG IDEA consortium of universities and assisted in the preparation and submission of the College’s WASC substantive change proposal. (Goal 4.5)

 The 2009-2011 cohort of the Professional MBA concluded with the graduation of 19 students. (Goal 4.1)

 Self-support faculty-led study abroad best practices were established in alignment with the University’s Study Abroad Advisory Committee processes and the Passport to Learning website was expanded to include extensive program development resources. (Goal 4.3)

 ALCI international recruitment activities resulted in program growth, and ALCI collaborated with the Office for International Education to plan for the Chung-Ang University 1 + 3 program launch in summer 2011. (Goal 4.4)

 Two new cohorts of the RN to BSN partially online self-support degree completion program were launched. (Goal 4.9)

 RCE joined the Council for Adult & Experiential Learning (CAEL) to participate in the Virtual Prior Learning Assessment Center pilot project, Learning Counts. (Goal 1.1)

Strategically Using Self-Support to Enroll, Retain, and Graduate Students: Special Session & Open University RCE partners with colleges to create and deliver academic programs, both state-support distance education and self-support in a variety of models. From WASC substantive change proposals, degree design and assessment, to student academic success, RCE has an important place within the college structure of the University. As architects of self-support educational programs for reentry students, mid-career professionals, and lifelong learners broadly, RCE achieves its mission to deepen and enhance the reach of 1-1


the University. As effective administrators of self-support sessions that serve state-support students, RCE strengthens Academic Affairs’ abilities to enroll, retain, and graduate students.

Summer Session 2010 marked the first fully planned self-support summer since 2004, and a number of strategic commitments and process improvements were implemented to make summer as accessible and beneficial as possible for the students served.  Self-service registration for matriculated students simplified the enrollment process for students.

 A shift from payment-at-the-time-of-registration to fee payment deadlines was required as a result of the self-service registration, resulting in extensive communication efforts to ensure students were well served.

 A cross-functional effort among Student Financial Services, Student Records, Financial Aid, and Information Resources/CMS staff was required to create a batch drop-for-non-payment process.

 While State University Grants (SUGs) were available to eligible students in Summer 2010 based on CO directive, they were not available for Summer 2011 RCE proposed over $286,000 in additional summer financial aid.

A detailed summary of Summer Session 2010 was submitted to Academic Affairs in early Fall to help college deans plan future summers and to illustrate the impact of self-support on the strategic priority to graduate students, including serving the largest number of students since the decentralization of summer planning with the implementation of Year-Round Operations (i.e., state support summer).

Summer Session 2010 Enrollment by College Agriculture

46

Behavioral & Social Sciences

732

Communication & Education

406

Business

693

ECC

74

Graduate Studies

32

Humanities & Fine Arts Natural Sciences

874

Total Enrollments

249

3106

The successful 2010 Summer Session resulted in further improvements for the planning of Summer Session 2011. With the Provost's support and pending direction by the Chancellor’s Office, RCE began centralized planning of a Summer Session 2011 which allowed either a mode of funding (general fund or self-support).  A Think Summer marketing campaign was developed to encourage students to consider summer, whether state-support or self-support, as an integral part of their degree planning. The focus of Think Summer is on long-term integration of summer into how students think about and plan their 1-2


educational path, not just immediate enrollment in the upcoming summer session. The campaign included outreach to new students and targeted communication with parents as well as outreach to continuing students through communication channels such as The Orion and student announcements.

ďƒ˜ Once self-support summer was an option confirmed by the CO and adopted by Cabinet, Colleges used 2010 Summer Session enrollment data in addition to unmet student demand to build a stronger schedule for 2011, with the goal of increasing the percentage of courses scheduled and conducted. As a result, Summer Session 2011 is on track to serve a comparable number of students to 2010 in fewer classes offered.

ďƒ˜ Without a change in summer fees, RCE increased the financial aid allocation from fee revenue to $174, 500 to offset the loss of State University Grants for Summer 2011.

ďƒ˜ Enrollment, financial aid, and payment processes were further streamlined, providing a foundation for further self-service enrollment and enrollment management processes in CMS.

Special Session courses for degree credit and self-support degree programs continue to extend the educational programs of the university.

Special Session Degree Credit* Enrollment Summary 2006-2007 Summer Session

Summer Special Session** Fall Special Session

January Intersession

Spring Special Session

May-June Intersession

Total

2007-2008

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

1247

3106

166

145

303

247

297

85

121

130

1418

1229

138

0

0

226

253

715 346

1675

447 222

1290

264 473

1302

253

366

3450

239

369

4991

* Enrollment figures are based on academic courses that apply to a CSU, Chico degree and were offered on a selfsupport basis. Enrollment figures do not include enrollments in 800-level academic credit courses that are not applicable to degree or credential programs (951 enrollments in 2010-2011 were in this category). **Summer Special Session courses are distinct from Summer Session offerings. Special Session courses are offered as part of self-support degree and certificate programs or academic courses offered at different times and places for different audiences, while the Summer Session primarily serves state-support students with selfsupport courses offered in the summer as scheduled by the colleges.

1-3


January Intersession 2011 Enrollment by College Behavioral & Social Sciences

417

Communication & Education

14

Business

457

ECC

24

Humanities & Fine Arts

247

Natural Sciences

Total Enrollments

70

1229

The self-support RN-BSN degree completion program was re-launched in Fall 2010 with a cohort of 24 students. The partially online program was then modified in order to comply with Assembly Bill 1295, which required implementation of “articulated nursing degree transfer pathways between the California Community Colleges and the California State University.� The second cohort, launched in summer 2011, is the first group of students to enter the streamlined program which eliminated duplicated coursework between the ADN and the BSN, a year ahead of the legislative deadline..

In addition to Special Session, Open University is an opportunity for students to earn degree credit and contributes toward the priority of supporting student success. Open University enrollments decreased by 28% in 2010-2011. Contributing factors may include fewer available spaces in regularly scheduled classes and the overall economic environment in which students may be delaying their education or pursuing other options.

Open University Enrollment Summary 2006-2007 Summer

50

2007-2008 37

2008-2009

2009-2010

2010-2011

68

29

0

Fall

686

643

774

682

543

Spring

627

619

742

692

549

January

Total

11

1374

10

1309

10

1594

0

1403

0

1092

Beginning in 2009-2010, RCE implemented a process of analyzing enrollment data for students participating in Open University to understand student objectives and, as a result, understand how best to reach and support those students. Further refinements of the OU data analysis are planned and include gathering direct survey data from students to confirm the assessments inferred from the enrollment data collected from CMS.

1-4


Open University Headcount and Objective Fall 2010

Objective for Enrolling via Open University

Spring 2011

#

%

#

%

Undergrad earning credit; no degree info

63

21%

50

17%

Disqualified - improved standing, returned to admitted

16

5%

2

1%

Disqualified - taking courses to improve academic standing Preparation for a graduate program

Graduate - professional development or personal enrichment Completing undergraduate degree Future undergraduate admission

89

Employee - courses for personal enrichment

Employee - courses for degree/professional development

Total # Individual Students (Unduplicated Headcount)

26%

18%

84

28%

19

6%

28

9%

21

6

Denied admission

78

54

20

Preparation for credential program

30%

5 4 0

7% 7% 2% 2% 1% 0%

297

32 10 2 1 3 9

11% 3% 1% 0% 1% 3%

299

Observations from the data support the meaningful contribution of Open University toward the strategic priority of recruiting, retaining, and graduating students. ďƒ˜ More students take Open University courses to improve their academic standing after being disqualified than any other objective identified.

ďƒ˜ A significant jump in the number and percentage of students who took courses after baccalaureate as a pathway to admission to a graduate program in both fall and spring (138 students in 20102011 compared to 58 students in 2009-2010) may be a reflection of student need for preparatory course work, how the graduate admission process and timing fits with those students’ ability to apply, the competitive cost of Open University per unit costs in light of State University Fee increases, or a hesitation to commit to a program for economic or other reasons.

1-5


Supporting Student Participation in International Learning Opportunities: Faculty-Led Self-Support Study Abroad Program Development During the 2010-2011 academic year, RCE invested a significant effort to strengthen the best practices used for self-support study abroad program development, including risk management and appropriate documentation to ensure quality and support at all levels of the University, with enhancements to the resources available to faculty who are interested in developing short-term faculty-led programs. Working with the Study Abroad Advisory Committee, RCE created new tools and resources for faculty to help them through the process of developing a safe and effective international travel experience for students. The Passport to Learning website at http://rce.csuchico.edu/passport/ was expanded to create a comprehensive resource for faculty program development and to reach out to students as they explore international learning opportunities.

The Betty’s Hope Archaeological Field School offered through the Department of Anthropology continued its successful track record in 2011, with 10 students from across the country traveling with Dr. Georgia Fox to Antigua for a hands-on field experience. Five of the students earned four units of academic credit while working at a former British sugar plantation considered by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

Following the cancellation of the 2010 program due to US State Department Travel warning, faculty from the Colleges of Agriculture (Dr. Lee Altier), Behavioral & Social Sciences (Dr. Tony Waters), and Humanities & Fine Arts (Dr. Robert Burton) delivered an innovative 9-unit upper division general education theme program that included travel to Chiang Mai, Thailand. Students completed the entire GE theme that includes PSSC 390 Food Forever, SOCI 354 Ethnicity and Nationalism, and ENGL 353 Multicultural Literature while studying and traveling in Northern Thailand. Students participated in a joint class with Thai students, took part in cultural programs, and participated in a service project.

Extending Access to Superior Online Student Support Services: Online Student Resources

Using the MediaSite mobile lecture capture system, RCE expanded the library of online resources available to Redding and Chico Distance and Online Education (CDOE) students as well as to students on campus who are unable to attend the live presentation on campus. Of the 53 MediaSite recordings of lectures, forums, and student services presentations are available, 31 were newly recorded in 2010-2011. With views totaling 2327, the Mediasite presentation recordings demonstrate extended access to student support services for both distance education and campus-based students.

1-6


2010-2011 MediaSite Presentation Summary Student Services Related

Presentations

2010-2011 Views

Student Learning Center

16

516

Wellness Center

10

245

Career Center

Student Health Center

6

314

1

33

1078

Academic Related

Presentations

2010-2011 Views

Anthropology

10

955

Religious Studies

3

72

Totals

Geological and Environmental Sciences

3

Political Science

1

Philosophy

1

College of Communication and Education Computer Graphics Club

3

1

Totals

1

20

122 47 26 21 6

1249

Integrating Effective Learning Resources: ClearWire Pilot Project The University continues to be assigned Instructional Television Fixed Service (ITFS) channels in the Redding and Sutter Buttes areas. These channels are leased to ClearWire, an Internet service provider, and the leases generate income for the University. As part of the lease agreement and to allow Chico State to continue to be assigned these frequencies, a portion must be used to benefit the University. ClearWire agreed to provide free wireless modem service to Chico State students. Academic Technologies manages the lease agreement and suggested that students participating in University Center courses could be assigned modems.

RCE offered University Center students the opportunity to participate during Spring 2011. Five students participated in the pilot project with mixed results. Two students lived in a fringe signal area where the ClearWire signal is not very strong. The other three students, who live where the ClearWire signal is strong, participated in the pilot and effectively utilized the Internet access to conduct their coursework. In late summer 2011, ATEC and RCE will move the project to the next phase. Additional modems, with free ClearWire services, will be offered to 10 Chico State students in the Redding/Anderson area and up to 40 students in the Marysville/Yuba City area. Participating students will benefit by having convenient access to online learning resources while saving the cost of Internet service. 1-7


Supporting Excellent and Distinctive Programs Off-Campus: University Center in Redding and Chico Distance & Online Education RCE’s contribution the strategic priority to support excellent and distinctive programs off-campus continued to focus on the University Center in Redding. Several 2010-2011 accomplishments are part of a longer-term strategic commitment to serving the North State with a physical presence in Redding.

 The McConnell Foundation continued funding for the 2010-2011 academic year; the Foundation and the University mutually concluded the goal of a CSU-funded Redding satellite campus of CSU, Chico was not achievable in the foreseeable future, with grant funding committed to conclude at the end of 2011-2012.  The concept of a Presidential North State Initiative Task Force was proposed to identify strategic actions that will engage a greater cross-section of the campus for increasing the college-going population.

 Dan Greaney, Student Services Coordinator for the University Center, was hired and has participated in Redding area education planning meetings, informational meetings, and chamber of commerce gatherings. He has made connections with Economic Workforce Development, College Options, Shasta Union High School District and numerous Shasta College offices.

 Enhanced processes to follow up with University Center students to encourage and support their persistence and graduation were implemented. This personalized communication and high-touch customer service is designed to enhance the Chico Experience for University Center students, who are often otherwise disconnected from on-campus resources.

 A media push from September-November 2010 included bus stop shelter ads in twelve Redding locations and a display ad in Redding’s Mount Shasta Mall.

 RCE collaborated with Enrollment Management to extend local area admissions from January-June 2011, resulting in an additional twelve applications and five new admits.

 As business administration majors begin graduating and programs mature or change (e.g., Liberal Studies stopped offering face-to-face classes in Redding and cohort programs reach the end of their cycle) University Center enrollments will be impacted, as is reflected in the decrease in enrollments in 2010-2011.

University Center Enrollment Summary

Headcount

Fall 2006 63

Spring 2007 81

Fall 2007 81

Spring 2008 79

Fall 2008 105

Spring 2009 100

Fall 2009 108

FTES UG

27.2

39.3

40

40.7

47.1

51.6

36.8

Enrollments Courses

FTES Graduate

136 10

197 12

203 11

204 11

238

9

259 13

260

13 19

Spring Summer 2010 2010 116 36 317

15

39.2 24.8

71

2

n/a

17.8

Fall 2010 78

Spring 2011 80

22

22.2

186

12

16.2

173

11 15

Chico Distance & Online Education and University Center programs serve a very diverse pool of students in both age and ethnicity. Among CDOE students, average age ranges from a low of 32 for online Liberal Studies to a high 38 for online Social Science (Depth pattern). Thirty one percent of the students are from underrepresented groups. Average age among Undergraduate Business students at the University Center is 28 and among MSW students is 37. Undergraduate distance degree completion programs have consistently 1-8


served a predominantly female audience with as many as 90% or more women enrolled. Participation among men is trending upward with spring 11 enrollment consisting of 18% males. University Center persistence and graduation rates are included in the supporting documents section of this report.

RCE’s support of the Chico Distance & Online Education (CDOE) is an ongoing commitment to enhancing learning for online students through outreach, communication about application deadlines, schedule information, and access to online learning and student service resources. The 2010-2011 decline in CDOE enrollments reflects a number of factors, including the overall schedule constriction resulting from budget cuts and restricted application and admission cycles. Applications for the BS in Sociology degree reflect a positive result of the efforts of the College of Behavioral Sciences and RCE to reinstate that online degree completion program.

Chico Distance & Online Education Semester Enrollments 1200 1150 1100 1050 1000 950 900 850 800 750 700

Enrollments

With regular reminders to the GE Task Force, RCE hoped to ensure new GE pathways include online options to serve online degree programs (Goal 5.4). The goal is not fully accomplished until all necessary online courses exist.

1-9


Demonstrating Educational Effectiveness: ALCI The American Language and Culture Institute (ALCI) continues to strengthen the University’s internationalization and diversity efforts by attracting a varied pool of international students to campus, many of whom pursue conditional admission to CSU, Chico to streamline their progress toward matriculation and degree completion.

ALCI enrollments continue to be strong, with returning and new students reaching a high of 160 in the 2011 Spring Session 2. The 734 total ALCI enrollments were generated by 283 individual students from 23 countries.

The ALCI Academic Preparation Seminars series (APS) continues to prepare ACLI students for matriculation to CSU, Chico and other universities. The APS series of six seminars was delivered twice in both fall and spring, and an accelerated series was offered in Summer 2010.

As the demand for conditional admission among prospective ALCI students strengthens, and as the University pursues partnerships with international institutions, ALCI has demonstrated the ability to manage an increasing number of conditionally admitted students as a percentage of overall enrollments. While the goal of effective program management includes a balance between ALCI program enrollments with enrollments for conditionally admitted students, RCE’s ability to accommodate the increasing and projected volume of conditional admits reflects our ability to extend the resources of the University.

1-10


ALCI-Only Enrollments & Conditional Admission (CA) Enrollments 180 160 140 120

Total CA Enrl

100

80 60

Total ALCI Only Enrl

40 20

0

Summer 2010

Fall 1, 2010

Fall 2, 2010

Spr 1, 2011

Spr 2, 2011

ALCI’s targeted outreach, special programming, and rigorous curriculum resulted in 75 conditionally admitted international students added to the overall campus international student population for 20102011. ALCI’s educational effectiveness is demonstrated by the retention and graduation of those students who begin their University career with ALCI and are conditionally admitted to CSU, Chico. In 2010-2011, 19 initially conditionally admitted students graduated, with an overall 82% persistence rate among ALCI conditional admits since Fall 2006, and a 2010-2011 academic year persistence rate of 99%. ALCI contributes to the diversity of the international students on campus through students who come to Chico specifically for the ALCI language and culture program and through students who come to Chico through the ALCI as conditionally admitted to CSU, Chico pending demonstration of language proficiency. In addition, qualified ALCI students who are not matriculated but who meet language requirements may enroll in regularly scheduled classes through Open University, also adding to the diversity of those classes.

ALCI Impact on CSU, Chico International Student Enrollment Term Spring 2009

All CSU, Chico New International Enrollments

ALCI Alumni New International Enrollments

CSU, Chico New Enrollment % from ALCI

51

28

55%

51

17

33%

Fall 2009

138

Fall 2010

143

Spring 2010 Spring 2011

53 52

45

23

1-11

38% 36% 51%


ALCI Impact on CSU, Chico International Student Enrollment First Term CUM GPA Comparison All International Students

ALCI Matriculants

Spring 2009

2.97

3.03

Spring 2010

Not Available

2.12

Spring 2011

2.89

Fall 2009

Fall 2010

2.54

2.60

2.67

2.47 2.52

RCE plans more research to determine the ALCI preparation and the relationship to and impact on student performance following matriculation.

2010-2011 ALCI Students by Region Europe

Asia-Pacific Americas Africa

Middle East / Gulf Coast

1-12


ALCI Impact on International Student Diversity: 2010-2011 Countries of Origin Total ALCI Unduplicated Headcount Country of Origin

#

Albania

1

Burkina Faso

1

Azerbaijan Brazil

1 9

China

40

Italy

5

Egypt

Germany Japan

Kuwait Mexico

Pakistan

Saudi Arabia South Korea Spain

Sweden

Switzerland

5 7

22 2 1 1

149 15 1 1 1

Taiwan

12

Yemen

1

Turkey

United Arab Emirates

1 7

Total Countries: 23 Total ALCI Enrollments: 283

ALCI-Only Enrollments Country of Origin

Conditionally Admitted ALCI Enrollments #

Country of Origin

#

Albania

1

Brazil

2

Burkina Faso

1

Kuwait

Azerbaijan

1

Brazil

7

China

3

Egypt

5

Germany

7

Italy

5

Japan

17

Saudi Arabia

41

Sweden

1

Mexico

1

Pakistan

1

South Korea

10

Spain

1

Switzerland

1

Taiwan Turkey

United Arab Emirates

12 1 4

Countries: 19

Total ALCI Enrollments: 120

Supporting Documents  Fall 2010 & Spring 2011 Bulletins

 “Think Summer” Flier

 Sociology Online Degree Completion Program Flier  Passport to Learning Web Site Screen Images

 Betty’s Hope Archaeological Field School Flier

 University Center Redding Poster Image

 University Center Persistence and Graduate Rates

 ALCI Academic Preparation Seminars List

1-13

China

37

Saudi Arabia

108

Japan

South Korea

United Arab Emirates Yemen

5 2 5 3 1

Countries: 8

Total ALCI Enrollments: 163


Contents: Fall 2010 1 Open University 2 Fall Special Session 2 January Intersession 3 Chico Distance & Online Education 4 Professional MBA Program

5 Courses for Educators 5 Community College Faculty Preparation Certificate Program 5 Multi-Disciplinary Professional Development for Educators 5 California Teachers Association Conference Credits 6 National Humanities Center Professional Development for Educators

7 Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) Certificate Program 8 Degree Completion Programs in Redding 8 Lifelong Learning – ElderCollege 9 Registration, Policies & Other Fine Print

Center for Regional & Continuing Education California State University, Chico 400 W. First Street | Chico, CA 95929-0250 Tel. 530-898-6105 | Web. rce.csuchico.edu

Open University Open University provides easy access to the hundreds of regularlyscheduled classes taught each semester at CSU, Chico. Enrollment is on a space-available basis with faculty permission and does not require formal admission to the University. Many courses are offered online and in the evenings, making Open University the perfect way to earn academic credits with flexible scheduling options.

online at rce.csuchico.edu/openu

1

Who can take courses through Open University? Community members who want to take a university course Students in high school or from other colleges and universities Prospective students who applied late to Chico State or were denied admission Recent students who need a limited number of courses to complete their degree Current CSU, Chico students who have been academically disqualified Qualified CSU, Chico faculty and staff who want to take a course

Registration Most classes in the current term class schedule are available for Open University enrollment on a space available basis. The complete schedule is available online at www.csuchico.edu/schedule/ Follow Four Easy Steps To Enroll Step 1: Select your Class Step 2: Complete an Add/Drop Form Step 3: Get Permission & Signatures Step 4: Pay Fees The registration deadline for Fall 2010 is Friday, September 17.

Open University is not available if you are eligible to enroll as a state support student or a student taking a Planned Educational Leave. For complete registration information, policies, and procedures, visit the Open University Web site at rce.csuchico.edu/openu

Fall 2010 • University Courses, Certificates & Degree Programs


online at rce.csuchico.edu/fall

Fall Special Session Regional and Continuing Education offers Special Session classes, which are approved academic courses offered in addition to the University’s regular semester schedule. Whether your goal is to take a class to finish a degree, complete a certificate, or simply earn a few units of academic credit, Special Session classes allow you to earn credits toward your academic goal with the scheduling, location, and admissions flexibility you need. Special Session Benefits Admission to the University is not required No limit on the number of units that may be applied toward a degree program Fees charged on a per-unit basis Accelerated course schedules

Fall 2010 Classes Include: Community College and Adult Education—EDCI 630 Explore the history, purpose, infrastructure, successes, and problems of the community college and adult education in the United States. Relationships to the larger context of higher education and profiles of diverse students are discussed. This course is part of the Community College Faculty Preparation/Adult Education Certificate.

Saturdays, 8/28, 10/23 & 12/11/2010 9:00 – 10:15 am Course Fee: $690

Facilitating Adult Learning—EDCI 631 Teaching is an intellectual challenge that involves planning, facilitating, assessing, and reflecting on the process of student learning. Prospective educators learn research-based instructional methods for community college and work place settings related to their areas of expertise. This course is part of the Community College Faculty Preparation/Adult Education Certificate.

Saturdays, 8/28, 10/23 & 12/11/2010 10:30 – 11:45 am Course Fee: $690

Community College Faculty & Adult Education Certification Professional Field Experience—EDCI 689 Specially-designed and supervised field experience activities through coaching or mentoring, appropriate to the level of expertise and profession. Participants enhance competencies related to instruction, curriculum, assessment, and management.

Saturdays, 8/28, 10/23 & 12/11/2010 12:00 – 1:00 pm Course Fee: $750

FOCUS Film Festival—SPED 861 This course explores documentary and feature films which “focus” on and explore the complexity of the human experience: disability, relationships, aging, culture, lifestyle, and more. The Festival features quality films from a wide range of sources bringing North State audiences an opportunity to experience innovation, creativity, and diverse perspectives through the medium of film. In order to receive credit, participants will select and watch three films, complete a reaction survey, create a lesson plan, and then briefly present and discuss the lesson plan. Festival admission is waived for students enrolled in this class. For more information, visit www.farnorthernrc.org/focusfilmfestival

Thursday, 10/14/2010 10:00 am – 10:00 pm Course Fee: $60

January 3–21, 2011 January Intersession 2011 will be administered by Regional & Continuing Education. Registration opens November 1. For up-to-date information about schedules, student resources, registration, fees, and more, visit rce.csuchico.edu/intersession

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • California State University, Chico • rce.csuchico.edu

2


Chico Distance & Online Education online at rce.csuchico.edu/online

Chico Distance & Online Education offers online courses, certificates, and degree programs utilizing a variety of Web-based applications. As part of the online delivery, many of the courses provide live, real-time video streaming of the instructor’s lectures. These classes require that you have a computer with high bandwidth access to the Internet and live at a distance from the Chico campus. You may combine Chico Distance & Online Education courses with other CSU, Chico courses to meet the degree requirements of these programs. Advising is recommended in all distance education degree programs. For current schedule and more information, please visit rce.csuchico.edu/online or call Continuing Education at 530-898-6105.

Bachelor’s Degrees BA in Social Science (Breadth) BA in Social Science (Depth) BA in Liberal Studies (Online) BS in Nursing for RNs BA in Sociology (Pending Approval) Minor Minor in Sociology

3

Master’s Degrees MS in Nursing MS in Interdisciplinary Studies: Science Education Concentration / Certificate Programs Career Planning and Development Concentration California Teachers of English Learners Certificate (CTEL)

Fall 2010 • University Courses, Certificates & Degree Programs


Professional MBA Program

Fully accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International, the Chico Professional MBA Program offers students an exemplary business curriculum that is taught by a talented and well-respected faculty. Since the initial launch of the Professional MBA Program in 1995, CSU, Chico faculty and staff have dedicated themselves to ensuring that the program meets the changing needs of North State residents. This year we are hosting a series of dine+discuss forums focused around the Professional MBA Program. We invite you to join us for dinner and to share insights that will help us shape our next program offering.

online at rce.csuchico.edu/mba

The CSU, Chico Professional Master in Business Administration was developed by the CSU, Chico College of Business and CSU, Chico Continuing Education, in partnership with Shasta College, to prepare working professionals for managerial success in the ever-changing international marketplace.

Be Our Guest dine+discuss forums

Redding, CA August 19 6:00 – 7:30 pm

Chico, CA August 26 6:00 – 7:30 pm

If you are interested in sharing your insights and discussing how the CSU, Chico Professional MBA Program can help you meet your career goals, we’d like to hear from you. Please call Elaina McReynolds, Program Director, at 530-898-5681. With your help, CSU, Chico will continue to provide the North State with outstanding business education opportunities.

share your insights What critical knowledge and skills do you need to succeed? What outcomes would you like to take away from a Professional MBA Program? What learning environments are most effective for you?

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • California State University, Chico • rce.csuchico.edu

4


Courses for Educators Community College Faculty Preparation Certificate Program This 12-unit postbaccalaureate certificate program is designed for the current and prospective community college instructor. Focused on foundational and pedagogical preparation for effective instruction in the community college and adult learning setting, the certificate consists of three courses and professional field experience. Participants learn the importance of the community college and adult education, the needs and natures of diverse adult students, curriculum development, facilitating engaging learning experiences, assessment, reflective practice, and the role of the adult educator as a change agent. Units earned in this certificate program may be applied to the Master of Arts in Education, Curriculum and Instruction Option. Visit rce.csuchico.edu/facultyprep

online at rce.csuchico.edu/teachers

Certificate Courses:

Community College and Adult Education—EDCI 630

Facilitating Adult Learning—EDCI 631

Curriculum Development and Instructional Design—EDCI 601

Professional Field Experience—EDCI 689

California Teachers Association Conference Credits Each semester, Continuing Education and the Department of Education offer professional credit for conferences attended through the CTA Office. Fall conferences include Region I & Region II Leadership, Annual Site Representatives, Gay Lesbian Bisexual & Transgender Issues, Annual Site Representatives, Fall Leadership, and High Desert Leadership. For the complete schedule and registration information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/cta

Multi-Disciplinary Professional Development for Educators Integrating curriculum reform with teaching strategies in a variety of subject matter areas, this course helps educators develop comprehensive, standards-based teaching plans and actions. University credits are earned for every 15 hours of instruction, which may be earned through a variety of delivery systems. For the fall 2010 term, credit may be earned for hours completed between 12/1/09 – 12/1/10. For additional information and to download verification forms, visit rce.csuchico.edu/teachers

5

Fall 2010 • University Courses, Certificates & Degree Programs


A New Program for California Teachers! Through a partnership with the California Department of Education, the National Humanities Center (NHC) is pleased to offer California educators free registration in a series of live, online professional development seminars for history, literature, and humanities teachers. These interactive programs offer educators increased content knowledge, new teaching resources, and fresh instructional approaches. Led by distinguished scholars, the seminars explore historical documents, literary texts, and images to demonstrate and support teaching with primary sources. Upon completion of five seminars, teachers can apply for one hour of university credit through CSU, Chico… the only California institution to offer university credit for taking NHC seminars!

online at rce.csuchico.edu/teachers/nhc

National Humanities Center Professional Development for Educators

Fall 2010 Seminar Schedule: Southern Women and the Civil War Thursday, Oct. 7, 4:00 – 5:30 pm The Iconography of Slavery Thursday, Oct. 14, 4:00 – 5:30 pm Was the American Revolution Avoidable? Tuesday, Oct. 19, 4:00 – 5:30 pm How to Read a Slave Narrative Tuesday, Oct. 26, 4:00 – 5:30 pm Buffalo Bill, American Idol - An American Experience Seminar Tuesday, Nov. 9, 4:00 – 5:30 pm Meaning in Marble: Civil War Monuments and American Identity Thursday, Nov. 11, 4:00 – 5:30 pm To register, or for additional information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/teachers/nhc

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • California State University, Chico • rce.csuchico.edu

6


Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) Certificate Program… Coming Soon! For new business professionals and seasoned business practitioners seeking to develop new skills, the CSU, Chico Enterprise Information Systems (EIS) Certificate Program offers a smart strategy for gaining a competitive edge. Developed through a partnership between the CSU, Chico College of Business and CSU, Chico Regional & Continuing Education, the 12-unit certificate program prepares participants for career advancement within corporations and government agencies that utilize SAP products to integrate business functions and make optimum decisions. Professional SAP certification preparation is embedded in the certificate curriculum so that participants can prepare for successful completion of the SAP certification exam. Four three-unit courses are completed by a cohort of students that begin and end the six-month program together. The first three courses are delivered in an online format, providing maximum flexibility and allowing students to complete the coursework at their own pace. The culminating course merges online content with a practicum requirement, providing participants with hands-on experience in the installation and management of an

SAP enterprise information system. Course content addresses enterprise systems, strategic information systems management, business intelligence and analytics, project management, collaboration, and communication. The EIS Certificate Program leverages a 15-year partnership with SAP and a talented Chico State faculty that develops curriculum that is used by IT instructors throughout the world. Students develop strong IT skills and a holistic understanding of how business works. To receive future information about the EIS program and registration dates for the first cohort, sign up for the mailing list at rce.csuchico.edu/eis

Introduction to Enterprise Systems—BSIS 602 This course introduces students to the concept of enterprise information systems, which can serve as a highly effective tool to integrate and coordinate business processes across all functional levels and management hierarchies within large corporations. Course projects focus on introductory enterprise systems, client-server database systems management, and corporate data networking. Systems Project Management with MS Project and Solution Manager—BSIS 444

online at rce.csuchico.edu/eis

7

This course applies Project Management concepts and tools to systems projects. Students work in teams and apply the concepts to projects and problems in organizations. Business Intelligence and Date Warehousing—BSIS 625 This course examines and introduces students to software products that are currently available to assist managers during decision-making. Students will explore application of several programs in the area of business intelligence, including data warehousing, business analytics, and strategic enterprise management. The course includes case studies requiring computer solutions, professional report-writing, and development of conference-style presentations. Strategic Information System Management—BSIS 620 In this course students, will implement a SAP system for a fictitious organization, including the strategic use of information systems, current information technology, and future technology directions.

Fall 2010 • University Courses, Certificates & Degree Programs


CSU, Chico offers courses at Shasta College and at the Shasta College University Center in downtown Redding. Many courses are offered on site in Redding, with additional classes delivered online. The following degree completion programs are currently offered:

In addition to these programs, we offer a number of online upper and lower division general education courses. Please view the complete course schedule on the Web site at rce.csuchico.edu/redding Students admitted to CSU, Chico may be eligible for financial aid and scholarships. Students not admitted to the University may enroll through Open University.

Business Administration - Entrepreneurship and Small Business Management Liberal Studies Master of Social Work

If you are sixty (60) or older, ElderCollege allows you to take University courses on a non-credit basis with the permission of the instructor. Simply select classes from the class schedule on the CSU, Chico Web site at www.csuchico.edu/schedule After selecting a class, call Continuing Education at 530-898-6105 or stop by our office on campus to receive ElderCollege registration information. Registration is $60 per semester and includes eligibility for a library card and an e-mail account. Fall 2010 ElderCollege Orientation is scheduled for August 17 at the Center for Regional & Continuing Education, Room 107, from 10:00 – 11:00 am. Call 530-898-6105 for directions or additional details. Fall classes start August 23, 2010.

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • California State University, Chico • rce.csuchico.edu

online at rce.csuchico.edu/eldercollege

Lifelong Learning – ElderCollege

online at rce.csuchico.edu/redding

Degree Completion Programs in Redding

8


Registration, Policies & Other Fine Print Course Numbering:

Courses numbered 800-899 may be valid for professional credit at the discretion of local school districts; 800-level courses do not meet degree or credential requirements.

Registration:

Registration in Special Session does not constitute admission to CSU, Chico. If you are interested in formal admission to the University, contact the Office of Admissions at 1-800-542-4426 or 530-898-4428. University admissions requirements are outlined in the University Catalog and are available online at www.csuchico.edu/catalog Continuing Education offers registration online, by phone or fax, in person, or by mail:

Campus Locations:

Many classes are held on the CSU, Chico campus. For specific locations, please refer to the Web site. For directions to the University, or to view a campus map, visit www.csuchico.edu/community/map

Fees:

Payment of fees is due in full at the time of registration. Cash, check, money order, and VISA/MasterCard will be accepted as method of payment of fees. Please make your check or money order payable to CSU, Chico. Registration is complete only after fees have been paid.

online at rce.csuchico.edu

9

Late Fee & Service Charges:

Payment of fees received or postmarked after the date of the first class meeting will be subject to a late fee of $10 per course. A $20 service charge and an enrollment reservation fee of $10 per course are applicable for each dishonored check. If there is an unpaid balance on your account, you may be assessed a past due receivable fee of $20. All fees are subject to change based on Trustee or Legislative action.

Register online at rce.csuchico.edu by selecting your class from the course schedule and following the easy steps to reserve your space and pay your fees. Mail your completed registration form—available from our Web site—along with a check, money order, or VISA/MasterCard number, to: Center for Regional & Continuing Education California State University, Chico Chico, California 95929-0250

Phone in your registration to 530-898-6105 if you are paying by credit card.

Visit the Center for Regional and Continuing Education to complete registration materials and pay fees. Fax your registration to 530-898-4020 and Continuing Education will follow up for payment. Please do not include payment information on the fax.

Adds, Drops & Refunds:

CSU, Chico and Regional & Continuing Education reserve the right to cancel, discontinue, postpone, or combine classes and to change instructors. If a class is cancelled, all fees will be refunded. If you are unable to attend a class after registering, contact Continuing Education immediately to withdraw. Refunds are calculated based on the length of the course and the time of withdrawal. The time of withdrawal is determined by the date of written or phone notification of your withdrawal or by the postmark date on a mailed notification, whichever comes first. Special Session Drops & Refunds: Class cancels: Full refund Drop on or before the 1st day of class: Total fee minus $15 Drop 2nd & 3rd day of class: 65% refund minus $5 processing fee Drop 4th day of class: No refund Classes with schedule to be arranged (TBA)—drops after the end of the 4th week: No refund

Fall 2010 • University Courses, Certificates & Degree Programs


August 23 September 6 October 8–17 November 11 November 22–26 December 13–17 December 18–January 2 January 3 January 24

Fall Classes Begin Labor Day The Chico Experience Week Veterans’ Day Thanksgiving Vacation Finals Week Winter Break January Intersession Begins Spring Semester Begins

online at rce.csuchico.edu

Fall–Winter Calendar

Professional Development & Personal Enrichment Regional & Continuing Education offers a wide range of courses, conferences, and workshops designed to provide learning opportunities in a variety of areas for personal and professional development.

In Service to Families, Children & The Courts Northern California Local Government Leadership Institute Localization Certification Program Education Solutions for Dental Professionals Health & Human Services Paralegal Certificate Course© for Online Presessional Development Online Career Training Personal Enrichment Classes & Workshops Osher Lifelong Learning Institute ElderCollege Conference Planning & Event Management Customized Education & Training Solutions Videoconference Services

Download a brochure today at rce.csuchico.edu/publications

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • California State University, Chico • rce.csuchico.edu

10


How to Register Payment of Fees Waitlists Class Materials Financial Aid Late Fees & Service Charges Withdrawal & Refund Policies Residence Credit Academic Standards Grade Policy Open University Qualifications Open University Fees How to Register for Open University Open University Withdrawal & Refunds

Transcripts Chico State Portal Connection Library Privileges Tax Deductions for Educational Expenses Health Services Textbooks Students with Disabilities Parking Discontinued Classes Veterans Benefits Course Numbering System Campus Closures & Holidays Faculty Resources Campus Map


◂ Need a web addresses? Look for the flower in the upper corner of every page!

National Humanities Center Professional Development Seminars

2

Children In Trauma 2011 Conference

3

Localization Certification Program

3

Northern California Local Government Leadership Institute

4

Health & Human Services

5

Online Career Training

6

Education Solutions for Dental Professionals

6

Test Preparation Workshops

7

Videoconference Services

7

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

8

ElderCollege

8

Conference Services & Event Management

9

Customized Education & Training Solutions

9

Colusa Hall Conference & Event Center

9

Registration, Policies & Other Fine Print

10

Center for Regional & Continuing Education California State University, Chico 400 W. First Street | Chico, CA 95929-0250 Tel. 530-898-6105 | Web. rce.csuchico.edu

Winter–Spring Calendar January 3

January Intersession Begins

January 17

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Observed – Campus Closed

January 24

Spring Semester Begins

March 14-18

Spring Vacation

March 31

César Chávez Day – Campus Closed

May 19-22 Commencement

1

May 30

Memorial Day – Campus Closed

June 1

Summer Session Begins

Spring 2011 • Professional Development & Personal Enrichment


rce.csuchico.edu/teachers/nhc

National Humanities Center Professional Development Seminars Free Resources for California Teachers! Through a partnership with the California Department of Education, the National Humanities Center (NHC) is pleased to offer California educators free registration in a series of live, online professional development seminars for history, literature, and humanities teachers. These interactive programs offer educators:

Increased content knowledge New teaching resources Fresh instructional approaches

Led by distinguished scholars, the seminars explore historical documents, literary texts, and images to demonstrate and support teaching with primary sources. Seminar materials are free, online, and available on-demand. Upon completion of five seminars, teachers can apply for one university credit through CSU, Chico—the only California institution to offer university credit for taking NHC courses!

Spring 2011 Seminar Schedule:

Rethinking Martin and Malcolm Tuesday, Feb. 22, 4:00 – 5:30 pm Martin Luther King, Jr., gave the civil rights movement of the 1960s its moral force. Malcolm X displayed the movement’s anger and frustration. Often teachers frame the civil rights movement between the seemingly stark polarities established by these two leaders. But how different were their positions? How did they play off of each other’s positions and rhetoric to advance the cause of African Americans? How has recent scholarship rethought Martin and Malcolm? The Car and the City: Popular Culture in the 1920s Tuesday, March 31, 4:00 – 5:30 pm Two themes frequently dominate textbook treatments of American popular culture after World War I: the enthusiastic embrace of motor vehicles and the explosive growth of big cities. But many Americans did not have cars and almost half did not live in any kind of urban center. This seminar explores how cars and trucks, deliverers of mobility and freedom, changed the lives of Americans and how the city transformed American life.

Enlightened by the Rockets’ Red Glare: The Meaning of “The Star-Spangled Banner” Thursday, Jan. 20, 4:00 – 5:30 pm We think we know “The Star-Spangled Banner.” But how many of us realize that Francis Scott Key was not looking at the flag we now revere as the original? Explore the context and meaning of “The StarSpangled Banner” and how it illuminates Enlightenment thought and America’s early struggle to define itself as a nation.

Witches and Communists: The Crucible and the Cold War Tuesday, April 5, 4:00 – 5:30 pm Arthur Miller’s play The Crucible is a staple in high school American literature curricula. To what extent is it “about” the Salem Witch Trials and “about” McCarthyism? What can the play tell us about politics, American identity, the individual, women, community, and sexuality in the early years of the Cold War? How has more than half a century given us new perspectives on it?

The Art and Politics of the Harlem Renaissance Tuesday, Feb. 8, 4:00 – 5:30 pm The Harlem Renaissance, or New Negro Movement, is known chiefly for its achievements in literature and the visual arts, not for its political aspirations. Yet its creators sought highly political goals. This seminar explores the political nature of the literature and art of the Harlem Renaissance, how to read them as political texts, and to what extent the Harlem Renaissance was part of the civil rights movement.

The Crash of 1929—An AMERICAN EXPERIENCE Seminar Thursday, Apr. 7, 4:00 – 5:30 pm The Twenties were an era of easy credit, concentrated Wall Street power, and exuberant economic optimism. It seemed that prosperity would never end, until it did on October 29, 1929, when the Great Crash initiated the opening act of the Great Depression. Built around the AMERICAN EXPERIENCE documentary film The Crash of 1929, this seminar will explore the ways in which the Crash resembled and departed from America’s historic cycles of boom-and-bust.

To register, or for additional information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/teachers/nhc Center for Regional & Continuing Education • CSU, Chico Research Foundation • rce.csuchico.edu

2


rce.csuchico.edu/inservice • rce.csuchico.edu/localize

Featured Speakers:

Join us for Children in Trauma 2011, an intensive practicum providing best practices training on bullying, the destructive use of personal power. This landmark conference is for clinicians, teachers and school administrators, emergency personnel, medical care providers, extracurricular and other professionals. Clinical treatment protocol, including assessment and the long-term potential impact of bullying, will be addressed. Attendees will understand the role of the bully, the target/victim, and the bystander.

Dr. J. Marlene Snyder, Ph.D. Director of Development, Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Dr. Melissa K. Holt, Ph.D. Behavioral Scientist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dr. Terrence Webster-Doyle, Ph.D. Author, Educator & Director, Atrium Society/Youth Peace Literacy

Children in Trauma Attendees Will Learn: Featured speakers from the Centers for Disease Control, the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, and Youth Peace Literacy will provide an in-depth understanding of current research and bullying prevention strategies. Clinicians will learn guidelines for assessment and treatment options for children of varied ages. Educators will learn tools for classroom management and how bullying impacts learning potential.

Physicians and nurse practitioners will enhance their understanding of psychosomatic medical implications in the treatment of children and youth. Youth group leaders will learn how to design and manage programs to discourage bullying, be aware of potential problems, and manage incidents. Emergency personnel will learn strategies to help victims feel safe and be able to be verbal during rescue situations.

In Service to Families, Children & The Courts provides professional continuing education opportunities for psychologists, marriage and family therapists, social workers, mediators and custody evaluators, nurses, physicians, educators, law enforcement, and attorneys.

Special Evening Session Friday, March 18

Parents and youth are invited to a special evening session on bullying and violence in the home, neighborhood, the schools, and the community. Dr. Marlene Grant, of the Children In Trauma Advisory Board, will facilitate a discussion with conference presenters and the audience. The Oroville Exchange Club will have packets of information available for attendees, and Youth for Change clinicians will be on site for support and follow up as requested by attendees.

To enroll or for more information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/inservice

Localization Certification Program Coming to San Francisco, CA June 20-24, 2011 Entering its seventh year, the Localization Certification Program was developed by industry experts in response to the growing demand for localization professionals. It offers a mix of online coursework leading to an on-site workshop of lectures and lab sessions, and culminating with a certification exam. For up-to-date details, visit rce.csuchico.edu/localize

3

Localization Certification (San Francisco: June 20-22, 2011)—RCED 916C The Certification begins with self-paced, online instruction developed by program faculty and industry experts. The lessons focus on localization and international e-business concepts, budgeting, ROI, project management, content and vendor management, and localization technologies and solutions. After completing the online instruction, participants join our team of experts for an intensive three-day, hands-on workshop. Localization Project Management (San Francisco: June 23-24, 2011)—RCED 916E Successful localization depends on well-executed project management. Participants learn strategies for project scheduling and evaluation, understand project manager roles in client and vendor organizations, and learn key project management metrics and best practices. This advanced training is ideal for those who have taken or will participate in the Localization Certification Program or who are well-versed in the strategies and tools of the localization trade. Spring 2011 • Professional Development & Personal Enrichment


rce.csuchico.edu/leader

Northern California Local Government Leadership Institute The Northern California Local Government Leadership Institute at CSU, Chico offers the Leadership Development Program: Building Trust Through Character, Collaboration, and Commitment. The program is designed specifically for local government agencies in Northern California who are looking to develop the professional skills it takes to become effective, proactive leaders in the 21ST century.

This Program Is Ideal For: Department managers Administrative staff Supervisors Elected officials Tribal leaders Program directors

The Leadership Development Program is comprised of five workshops that are practitionerfocused and aimed at enhancing organizational effectiveness through personal and professional growth in the most challenging areas faced by local government, special district, and tribal leaders. Led by experienced faculty with successful careers in leadership and local government, each session balances classroom learning with real world application.

2011 Workshops:

Redefining Organizational Leadership March 25 – Scott Winter and John Blacklock

Explore the elements of exceptional leadership and the role of today’s leaders in preparing tomorrow’s leaders. Participants will learn the core characteristics, skills, and behaviors of outstanding leadership and how to coach, motivate, and prepare employees to assume leadership roles in the complex local government environment. Topics include assessment of leadership skills, effective feedback and coaching, leading across generations, and strategies for retention and professional development.

Vision Development & Articulation April 22 – Joc Clark and Tim Howey

The ability to articulate a vision and generate creative and innovative solutions for achieving that vision eludes many of today’s leaders, but is essential for success. Participants will learn strategies to develop a clear, shared vision; generate innovative solutions that maximize resources; acquire the tools necessary to unleash innovation and creativity in themselves and the organization; and articulate that vision broadly, to both internal and external constituencies.

Media Relations & Assessing the Political Landscape May 20 – John Blacklock and Janet Upton

Discover strategies for building positive, proactive relations with the media, citizens, legislators, and interest groups, and a framework for understanding and evaluating the current political landscape. Veteran local government leaders will share real-world, proven techniques essential for successful local government leadership.

Strategic Thinking & Policy Development September 23 – Scott Winter and John Blacklock

In the current environment of increasing complexity and greater interdependence, leaders must be able to think strategically and make decisions through an informed and inclusive process. This course focuses on specific skills required to see and think “big picture” and a deliberate decisionmaking and comprehensive planning process and policy development aimed at optimizing the organization’s success.

Relationship Building & Strategic Partnerships October 28 – Joc Clark and Star Brown

Leaders must know how to appropriately use various power bases to foster collaboration and partnership. This session introduces six bases of power and helps participants assess their own power base, and explores new and effective communication tools to enhance teamwork and cooperation throughout the organization. Explore influence as it relates to building relationships, forging strategic partnerships, and effective leadership. The Leadership Development Program can be brought to your location as a custom program tailored to your organization’s needs. If you are interested in exploring how to extend this unique training opportunity to members of your team, give us a call at 530-898-6105. The Program may be taken as a complete series or individually. Early registration and group discounts are available. For fees and to register, visit rce.csuchico.edu/leader

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • CSU, Chico Research Foundation • rce.csuchico.edu

4


rce.csuchico.edu/health

Health & Human Services Regional & Continuing Education offers a variety of classroom and online workshops to provide professional development and career training in healthcare, psychology, and wellness-related fields. Child Abuse Assessment & Reporting—RCED 942B

Thriving Under Pressure: Applying Stress Management Techniques—RCED 942D

This seminar addresses critical issues that occur when working with survivors of child abuse. Building upon their own experience, knowledge and skill base, participants will learn to successfully help survivors incorporate the use of risk reduction intervention strategies imperative for the protection of the survivor. In addition, participants will explore challenges faced by survivors and learn how to integrate treatment interventions that can be effectively used to assist clients.

Participants in this seminar will learn: (1) to identify the nature and root causes of stress in their life; (2) to assess the patterns of stressors in life; (3) to recognize the effects of physiological, mental, emotional and spiritual stress; (4) practical tips and techniques for reducing stress; (5) relaxation tips to cope with anxiety, pressure, conflict and anger; (6) and how to bring balance to life to renew energy and become more productive.

Date: See website Course Fee: $80

Achieving Clinical Success with Child Abuse Survivors—RCED 942C Child abuse survivors can make up a large percentage of a practice. The purpose of this seminar is to increase the professional’s knowledge base of therapeutic treatment interventions and gain an understanding of some issues that survivors of child abuse may bring into the session. This course will also examine the specific components of the cycle of violence, anger cycle fight or flight response, behavioral indicators suggestive of the four types of abuse and barriers that influence a child abuse survivor’s recovery.

Date: See website Course Fee: $55

Pharmacy Technician Program—RCED 948L This 50-hour course will prepare students to enter the pharmacy field and take the Pharmacy Technician Certification Board’s PTCB exam. Technicians work in hospitals, home infusion pharmacies, community pharmacies and other health care settings under the supervision of a registered pharmacist. Course content includes medical terminology, reading and interpreting prescriptions and defining drugs by generic and brand names. Students will learn dosage calculations, I.V. flow rates, drug compounding, dose conversions, dispensing of prescriptions, inventory control and billing and reimbursement.

For more information and to enroll, visit rce.csuchico.edu/health

5

Date: See website Course Fee: $55

Tuesdays & Thursdays March 22 – May 12, 2011 6:00 – 9:30 pm Course Contact Hours: 50 hrs. Register by March 14 Course Fee: $999 (Textbooks included)

EKG Technician Certification Program—RCED 948M This 50-hour EKG Technician Certification Program prepares students to function as EKG Technicians and to take the ASPT – Electrocardiograph (EKG) Technician exam and other national certification exams. This course includes practice and background information on anatomy of the heart and physiology, medical disease processes, medical terminology, medical ethics, legal aspects of patient contact, laboratory assisting, electrocardiography and echocardiography. Students will practice with equipment and perform hands-on labs, including the function and proper use of the EKG machine, and the normal anatomy of the chest wall for proper lead placement.

Mondays & Wednesdays March 21 – May 9, 2011 6:00 – 9:30 pm Course Contact Hours: 50 hrs. Register by March 14 Course Fee: $999 (Textbooks included)

Dialysis Technician Program—RCED 948N This 50-hour Dialysis Technician Program provides students with the knowledge and skills needed to perform the duties required of Dialysis Technicians. Under the supervision of physicians and registered nurses, Dialysis Technicians operate kidney dialysis machines, prepare dialyzer reprocessing and delivery systems, maintain and repair equipment, administer local anesthetics and drugs, assess patients for complications and be ready to perform emergency measures. They may also be involved in the training of patients for athome dialysis treatment and providing them with the emotional support they need for self-care. Note: This program does not include a national or state certification as part of its overall objectives. Additionally there is no student internship or clinical rotation offered as part of this program.

Mondays & Wednesdays March 21 – May 9, 2011 6:00 – 9:30 pm Course Contact Hours: 50 hrs. Register by March 14 Course Fee: $999 (Textbooks included)

Spring 2011 • Professional Development & Personal Enrichment


rce.csuchico.edu/career • rce.csuchico.edu/dental

Online Career Training Programs Continuing Education offers career training programs in partnership with ed2go, one of the world’s largest and most successful providers of online career training programs. The programs help you develop expertise in a variety of career fields and prepare you for industry certification exams with specific learning outcomes related to industry standards. The courses are self-study so you can begin and end at your own pace. Most programs can be completed in 90 days or less. A qualified instructor is available to answer questions, help you solve problems, and evaluate your progress in the course.

Online professional development courses do not provide academic credit and cannot be applied to a CSU, Chico degree or certificate program.

Courses Include: Healthcare & Fitness Veterinary Assistant Medical Billing and Coding Personal Fitness Trainer Business & Professional Project Management Search Engine Optimization Purchasing & Supply Chain Management IT & Software Development Cisco® Certification Training Microsoft® Certification Training (RFID) Radio Frequency Identification on the Web

Management, Corporate & Industrial Six Sigma Training Non-Profit Management Certified National Pharmaceutical Representative Home Inspection Certificate Media & Design Digital Arts Certificate Video Game Design and Development Web Database Developer

For a complete course listing and enrollment information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/career

Education Solutions for Dental Professionals Education Solutions for Dental Professionals is a program designed to provide required training, relicensure, and continuing education solutions to Northern California dental professionals. These courses meet the training requirements for the California Board of Dental Examiners. All workshops will be held Friday, April 8 on the Chico State campus. For workshop times and to register, visit rce.csuchico.edu/dental

California Dental Practice Act— RCED 949K A mandatory two-hour course required by the Dental Board of California for all dental licensees seeking renewal of their license. Topics include: Section 1005 of the DPA, definitions, written plans and protocols, precautions for bloodborne diseases, Regulatory Directives, and the intent of and proper implementation of the language. Participants receive 2 continuing education units. Infection Control for License Renewal—RCED 949J A mandatory two-hour course required by the Dental Board of California for all dental licensees seeking renewal of their license. This course covers utilization and scope of practice for auxiliaries, scope of practice for dentistry, laws governing the prescribing of drugs, citations, fines, revocation, suspension, and license renewal and supporting regulations. Participants receive 2 continuing education units in Infection Control. OSHA—Annual Mandated Training—RCED 949L This is a refresher course that meets the requirements for annual OSHA training. This fastpaced course covers bloodborne pathogen standards, injury and illness and prevention plans, workplace security, hazard communication, ergonomics, record keeping and documentation, and more. Participants receive 3 continuing education units in Category I.

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • CSU, Chico Research Foundation • rce.csuchico.edu

6


rce.csuchico.edu/testprep

Test Preparation Workshops BTPS (formally Bobrow Test Preparation Services) originated at California State University, Northridge, by the request of the student body in 1973. Since that time, they have assisted over 500,000 students and potential teachers in preparing for graduate, college entrance and teacher certification exams. By request only, these programs are now offered at over 25 California State Universities and Colleges, numerous California School Districts, County Offices of Education, and California Teachers Association. State Boards of Education, publishing companies, and School Districts throughout the Country have also requested these services. The test preparation programs can help students build upon their strengths, eliminate weaknesses and make them feel more comfortable with the testtaking environment. All classes, which are evaluated by students and supervisors, are taught by specialists who are fully credentialed with advanced degrees and have many years of teaching experience. Each class is a carefully planned, researched, tested and evaluated learning experience directed and taught by outstanding educators. For more information and to enroll, visit rce.csuchico.edu/testprep

SAT Preparation—RCED 933C Be prepared for the SAT! These workshops are designed to prepare students for the test by reviewing all the question types, including the writing sections (essay and multiple choice). Fifty percent of the class will focus on math (including enhanced math question types), and the other fifty percent of the class will be used to analyze critical reading, sentence completion, and the writing sections (essay and multiple choice). The classes are taught by credentialed teachers who specialize in mathematics or English. The book included in the course fee is CliffsTestPrep SAT Preparation Guide by Jerry Bobrow, Ph.D. This course has a Free Repeat Policy. For more information contact Bobrow Test Services directly at (800) 426-2769. Section One: Section Two: Saturdays, February 12 & 26, 2011 Saturdays, May 7 & 14, 2011 9:00 am – 4:00 pm 9:00 am – 4:00 pm Course Fee: $325 (Book included) Course Fee: $325 (Book included) Register by February 7 Register by May 2 GRE Preparation Workshop—RCED 933D Maximize your test-taking potential! This workshop includes thorough classroom instruction, in-class short practice exams, and two comprehensive textbooks. Each class meeting analyzes each GRE test section: Quantitative Reasoning, Verbal Reasoning (antonyms, analogies, sentence completion and reading comprehension), the Analytical Writing Assessment, and a short review of Mathematics. The books included in the course fee are CliffsTestPrep GRE General Test Guide and Cliffs Math Review for Standardized Tests by Jerry Bobrow, Ph.D. This course has a Free Repeat Policy. For more information contact Bobrow Test Services directly at (800) 426-2769.

Saturdays, April 16 – May 14, 2011 9:00 am – 3:00 pm Course Fee: $425 (Includes all materials) Register by April 11

Videoconference Services CSU, Chico maintains a state-of-the-art, two-way video facility that can provide your organization access to meeting rooms around the globe. For videoconference scheduling and pricing information, please call Jeff Layne, Continuing Education, at 530-898-6105.

7

Spring 2011 • Professional Development & Personal Enrichment


rce.csuchico.edu/osher • rce.csuchico.edu/eldercollege

Osher Lifelong Learning Institute The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) at CSU, Chico is a peer-led, learning-in-retirement organization that offers a wide variety of non-credit classes on topics ranging from poetry and literature to politics and languages. OLLI provides opportunities for intellectual stimulation, and a meeting ground for members aged 60+ or retired (and spouses of any age) to explore new topics, discuss current events, and network with other talented and interesting people from the community. A yearly fee of $65 entitles participants to an unlimited number of OLLI classes for fall and spring. The OLLI spring peer-led classes begin on Monday, February 7, 2011. For the complete schedule and more information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/osher, email olli@csuchico.edu, or call 530-898-6679.

A Welcome Meeting will be held on Wednesday, February 2, from 10:00 – 11:30 am at the Masonic Family Center, 1110 W. East Avenue, Chico, CA.  For more information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/osher

Funding and support for the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute is provided in part from the generous contributions of the Bernard Osher Foundation, San Francisco. Spring Classes Include:

Armchair Travel Ascent of Man Chico Urban Area Issues and Controversies Classics of French Cinema Ecstatic Poetry of Rumi Japanese Prints: Their History and Hands-on Studies

Media Issues and Ethics Movie Matinee Smorgasbord Physics Thoreau’s Walden - A Leisurely Read World of Opera Writing Your Slice of Life

ElderCollege If you are sixty (60) or older, ElderCollege allows you to take University courses on a non-credit basis with the permission of the instructor. Simply select classes from the class schedule on the CSU, Chico website at www.csuchico.edu/schedule After selecting a class, call Continuing Education at 530-898-6105 or stop by our office on campus to receive ElderCollege registration information. Registration is $60 per semester, and includes eligibility for a library card and an e-mail account. For more information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/eldercollege

Spring 2011 ElderCollege Orientation is scheduled for January 19 at the Center for Regional & Continuing Education, Room 107, from 10:00 – 11:00 am. Call 530-898-6105 for directions or additional details. Spring classes start January 24, 2011.

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • CSU, Chico Research Foundation • rce.csuchico.edu

8


rce.csuchico.edu/conferences • rce.csuchico.edu/solutions

Conference Services & Event Management California State University, Chico Center for Regional & Continuing Education invites you to plan your next conference or event with us. Recognized by the Association of Collegiate Conference and Events Directors as a 1 Stop Certified Conference Facility, Chico State offers an environment where learning is fostered through collaborative work in a relaxed setting. Our experienced staff and the hospitality extended by our community make Chico the ideal location for your next successful conference. We offer:

Sustainable conference planning Financial management Catering and logistics coordination Group transportation packages Exhibitor and sponsor acquisition Program consulting Call for speakers and topics Program marketing

Promotional items Audio-visual technicians Continuing education credit Registration services Facility acquisition Tours and entertainment Presentation handouts On-site management

For more information about our conference planning and event management services, please call Elaina McReynolds, Continuing Education, at 530-898-5681. Read more about our services at rce.csuchico.edu/conferences

OPENING SPRING 2011

Colusa Hall

A State-of-the-Art Conference & Event Center Smart classrooms with the latest technologies to enhance learning Sustainable conference services extend the benefit of your event to the planet Large, flexible conference space suitable for up to 250 Smaller meeting rooms accommodate many group sizes Adjoining Creekside Plaza creates seamless indoor-outdoor events Available for University events, academic conferences, professional retreats & more!

Customized Education & Training Solutions Continuing Education has developed successful education, training, and e-learning solutions for small businesses, corporations, and government agencies for more than 35 years. We can help design, market, deliver, and evaluate on-site, custom programs that provide a high quality learning experience and maximize the return on your investment in professional development. Continuing Education is a full-service customized education and training provider offering: Program development and management Professional continuing education and re-licensure certification Subject matter expertise and experienced facilitators Take the first step today toward reaching your organization’s professional development goals. Contact Elaina McReynolds at 530-898-5681, or visit rce.csuchico.edu/solutions 

9

Spring 2011 • Professional Development & Personal Enrichment


rce.csuchico.edu/programs/geninfo.asp

Registration, Policies & Other Fine Print Class & Workshop Locations:

Many classes and workshops are held on the CSU, Chico campus. For specific locations, please refer to the website. For directions to the University, or to view a campus map, visit www.csuchico.edu/ community/map

Fees:

Fees for professional development and personal enrichment courses, workshops and conferences vary. Please visit the website for specific fee information. Full fees are due and payable at the time of registration.

Registration:

Early registration is suggested for all courses and workshops. By completing your registration in advance, you are assured a place in the class. Please note: If minimum enrollment is not met, the instructor has the option of cancelling a course or workshop. Continuing Education offers registration online, by phone or fax, in person, or by mail: Register online at rce.csuchico.edu by selecting your class from the course schedule and following the easy steps to reserve your space and pay your fees. Mail your completed registration form—available from our website—along with a check (payable to CSU, Chico Research Foundation), money order, or VISA/MasterCard number, to: Center for Regional & Continuing Education California State University, Chico Chico, California 95929-0250

Phone in your registration to 530-898-6105 if you are paying by credit card.

Visit the Center for Regional & Continuing Education to complete registration materials and pay fees. Fax your registration to 530-898-4020, and Continuing Education will follow up for payment. Please do not include payment information on the fax.

Cancellations & Refunds:

CSU, Chico and Regional & Continuing Education reserve the right to cancel, discontinue, postpone, or combine classes, and to change instructors. If a class or workshop is cancelled, all fees will be refunded. If you are unable to attend a class or workshop after registering, contact Continuing Education immediately to withdraw from the class. Some courses and workshops are non-refundable. Please note specific policies and restrictions provided during registration. Refunds are calculated based on the length of the course and the time of withdrawal. The time of withdrawal is determined by the date of written or phone notification of your withdrawal or by the postmark date on a mailed notification, whichever comes first.

Refund Schedule: For classes with 1-3 meetings: After paying fees but before the first meeting: All fees returned less $15 processing fee On or after the first meeting: No refund For classes with 4+ meetings: After paying fees but before the first meeting: All fees returned less $15 processing fee On or after the first meeting: 65% refund After 25% of the workshop has elapsed: No refund

For more information, visit rce.csuchico.edu/programs/geninfo.asp

Center for Regional & Continuing Education • CSU, Chico Research Foundation • rce.csuchico.edu

10


Regional & Continuing Education offers numerous ways to take Chico State courses. Whether your goal is finishing a degree, completing a certificate, or simply earning credit while you learn, we can help you earn credit toward your goal with the flexibility you need.  Download a brochure rce.csuchico.edu/publications Open University • Spring Special Session • Summer Session • Chico Distance & Online Education • Bachelor of Arts in Sociology Online Degree Completion Program • Professional MBA Program • Courses for Educators • Community College Faculty Preparation Certificate Program • Multi-Disciplinary Professional Development for Educators • California Teachers Association Conference Credits • National Humanities Center Professional Development for Educators • Bachelor of Science in Nursing for RNs Online Degree Completion Program • Degree Completion Programs in Redding • ElderCollege • Registration, Policies & Other Fine Print

The Creekside Plaza was completed in September 2010, extending the natural space between Kendall Hall, Colusa Hall, Selvester’s and the creek. A trellised gateway into an open space of patterned brickwork, planters of climbing vines, flowering plants and a variety of trees, and concrete seating walls provide a comfortable and beautiful setting to meet, study, and enjoy a coffee from Creekside Café. The Creekside Plaza also serves as a striking setting for group receptions and an extension of the future Colusa Hall conference center.


California State University, Chico

Bachelor of Arts in Sociology Online Degree Completion Program!*

rce.csuchico.edu/online/sociology

Do you have a passion for studying social groups? Do you have a vision for a just society? The CSU, Chico BA in Sociology online degree completion program combines the theoretical and research traditions of sociology with hands-on practice, preparing you for a successful and rewarding career in sociology-related fields.

Sociology

Sociology is the systematic study of group life, social change, and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. Sociology as a discipline is as broad and diverse as social life within various cultures. It combines scientific and humanistic perspectives in the study of gender, sexuality, crime, cults, family patterns, race and ethnicity, wealth and inequality, popular culture, aging, and the environment. Sociologists investigate the structure of groups, organizations and societies, and how individuals and groups interact within these contexts.

Prepare for a Degree in Sociology

Program graduates are well-rounded job candidates who benefit from a liberal arts education that concentrates on contemporary society and social problems, and helps them to develop computer, writing and research skills learn an appreciation of ethical considerations interpret and analyze quantitative and qualitative data apply sociological concepts creatively in analyzing social phenomena acquire an appreciation of the need for evidence to public policy decision making attain sensitivity to people from various ethnic, religious, racial, economic backgrounds, and sexual identities understand how prejudice and discrimination are sociallycreated attitudes and behaviors critically analyze current events, as well as changes in the global economy and other major social institutions.

* Pending WASC approval

Faculty Cynthia Siemsen, PhD Professor and Chair, Sociology Nandi Crosby, PhD Professor Andrew Dick, PhD Associate Professor Liahna Gordon, PhD Associate Professor Janja Lalich, PhD Professor

Dan Pence, PhD Associate Professor Chunyan Song, PhD Assistant Professor James Sutton, PhD Assistant Professor Tony Waters, PhD Professor Laurie Wermuth, PhD Professor

Paul Lopez, PhD Associate Professor

Careers in Sociology social research, social welfare, business, public service, social work, public administration, law, non-profit business, criminal justice, law, human resources, student services, education, health services, youth services, counseling, professional sociology


California State University, Chico

Requirements for the BA in Sociology Online Degree Completion Program*

rce.csuchico.edu/online/sociology

Course Requirements for the Major: 40 units. Completion of the following courses, or their approved transfer equivalents, is required of all candidates for this degree. Lower Division Core Requirement Transfer Equivalent – 3 units from: SOCI 100 Introduction to Sociology SOCI 200 Social Problems Upper Division Core Requirements – 13 units: SOCI 300 Classical Social Theory SOCI 301 Contemporary Social Theory SOCI 305 Maneuvering the Job Market with a Sociology Degree SOCI 310 Introduction to Social Research Methods SOCI 315 Statistical Analysis for the Social Sciences Upper Division Courses – 3 units from: SOCI 330 Sociology of Gender SOCI 340 Sociology of Wealth and Inequality SOCI 350 Ethnic and Race Relations Upper Division “Applied” Course – 3 units: SOCI 489 Applied Sociology Internship Upper Division “Capstone” Course – 3 units from: SOCI 441 Sociology of World Affairs SOCI 441H Sociology of World Affairs – Honors Sociology Electives – 15 units: Minimum of 9 Upper Division units

Program Learning Outcomes

Critical thinking and communication skills Skill to design, execute, interpret, and evaluate quantitative and qualitative research Understanding of personal agency, social movements, and social change Ability to understand and critically interpret, apply, and synthesize sociological theory Understanding of the structural and interpersonal basis of social inequality Ability to understand and appreciate cultural diversity Proficiency in the use of technology in online and library research Understanding of social institutions in relationship to everyday lives Ability to understand the process and implications of globalization Understanding of the processes of social control and how they shape our social institutions and lives

* Pending WASC approval

For More Information

ADMISSIONS em.csuchico.edu/admissions/ 800-542-4426 or 530-898-4428

PROGRAM rce.csuchico.edu/online/sociology csiemsen@csuchico.edu TRANSFERS www.assist.org


What:

Antigua: Betty’s Hope Archaeological Field School directed by Dr. Georgia Fox, CSU, Chico Anthropology Professor.

Learn archaeological field excavation at Betty’s Hope, a 300-year-old plantation site. The trip includes fieldwork, lectures, field trips, and trips to the beach to cool off. Three delicious meals are provided each day by our own fabulous cook. Accommodations include fully furnished guest cottages near historic English Harbor and Nelson’s Dockyard.

When: June 25–July 23, 2011 Costs: Credit—$3,845 Non-credit—$3,300

(includes room and board, ground transportation)

How:

Apply by April 15, 2011. $500 deposit required. Upon acceptance to the program: Contact: Dr. Georgia Fox Department of Anthropology For credit enroll in ANTH 280, 380, or 480 898-5583 or gfox@csuchico.edu For non-credit enroll in RCED 979-G Application deadline: April 15, 2011 Center for Regional & Continuing Education

Applications are available online at rce.csuchico.edu/antigua

California State University, Chico

Web: rce.csuchico.edu

Phone: 530-898-6105

Fax: 530-898-4020


Bachelor’s Degree Completion Program • Business Administration: Entrepreneurship & Small Business Management


University Center Persistence and Graduation Rates

The following tables include all students who completed a course at the University Center.

College of Business

Fall '01 Fall '02 Spring '03 Fall '03 Spring '04 Fall '04 Spring '05 Fall '05 Spring '06 Fall '06 Spring '07 Fall '07 Spring '08 Fall '08 Spring '09 Fall '09 Spring '10 Fall '10

Percentage of Cohort Persisting Cohort 1 Year 2 Years 3 Years 4 Years 5 Years 2 2 1 6 5 12 7 13 10 23 13 16 7 22 15 23 5 6

188

Liberal Studies

Spring '03 Spring '05 Fall '05 Spring '06 Fall '06 Spring '07 Fall '07 Spring '08 Fall '08 Spring '09 Fall '09 Spring '10 Fall '10

Nursing

100% 50% 100% 60% 100% 83% 100% 69% 70% 67% 77% 94% 100% 87% 87% 96% 100% 0

100% 100% 0 80% 100% 42% 86% 62% 50% 58% 54% 19% 57% 41% 60% 0 0 0

Total Students

50% 100% 0 60% 20% 8% 0 15% 0 4% 4% 0 14% 9% 0 0 0 0

100% 100% 100% 20% 0 0 0 8% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 20% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Percentage of Cohort Persisting Cohort 1 Year 2 Years 3 Years 4 Years 5 Years 2 1 3 4 9 6 12 4 14 4 10 2 4

100% 100% 100% 100% 89% 83% 67% 100% 79% 50% 90% 100% 0

75

50% 100% 100% 75% 33% 67% 25% 50% 21% 25% 0 0 0

Total Students

100% 100% 33% 50% 11% 0 8% 0 0 0 0 0 0

100% 100% 33% 50% 11% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Fall '01 Fall '02 Spring '03 Fall '03 Spring '04 Fall '04 Spring '05 Fall '05 Spring '06 Fall '06 Spring '07 Fall '07 Spring '08 Fall '08 Spring '09 Fall '09 Spring '10 Fall '10

Spring '03 Spring '05 Fall '05 Spring '06 Fall '06 Spring '07 Fall '07 Spring '08 Fall '08 Spring '09 Fall '09 Spring '10 Fall '10

Percentage of Cohort Graduating Cohort 1 Year 2 Years 3 Years 4 Years 5 Years 2 2 1 6 5 12 7 13 10 23 13 16 7 22 15 23 5 6

188

Spring '07 Fall '07

Spring '08

Fall '08

Cohort 3

12 3

4

4

26

1 Year

2 Years

100%

33%

33%

67%

75%

75%

42%

75%

Total Students

3 Years

0 0 0 20% 0 25% 57% 38% 70% 29% 54% 69% 14% 50% 60% 0 0 0

Total Students

0 0 0 20% 80% 50% 0 69% 80% 71% 62% 75% 43% 0% 0 0 0 0

50% 100% 0 80% 0 58% 0 69% 0 75% 69% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 80% 0 0 0 77% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Percentage of Cohort Graduating Cohort 1 Year 2 Years 3 Years 4 Years 5 Years 2 1 3 4 9 6 12 4 14 4 10 2 4

75

Percentage of Cohort Persisting Fall '06

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 0 0 17% 25% 7% 0 0 0 0

0 0 0 0 56% 67% 42% 75% 29% 25% 0 0 0

Total Students

0 0 33% 25% 67% 83% 58% 0 0 0 0 0 0

0 100% 33% 75% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

50% 0 66% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

4 Years

5 Years

Percentage of Cohort Graduating 4 Years

5 Years

Fall '06

Spring '07 Fall '07

Spring '08

Fall '08

Cohort 3

12 3

4

4

26

1 Year

2 Years

0

100%

33% 0

0

0

67%

67%

75%

75%

Total Students

3 Years


ALCI Academic Preparation Seminars Seminar 1:

“I’ve Gotten My University Recommendation, Now What?” 1) Creating Awareness: 2) Your Role As A Student At An American University: • What Is Expected Of Me? • Know How To Address The Professor • Know Classroom Policies And Procedures • Know Your Assignments And Test Due Dates

Seminar 2:

“Time Is Money” 1) Punctuality: 2) View Of Professor’s Time: 3) Managing Your Time As A Student:

Seminar 3:

“When In Rome…” 1) Individualism • Self Reliance • Tutoring & Counseling Services • Librarians, ESL Resource Center And The Writing Center • Study Groups 2) Know The Rules • Plagiarism • Cheating • Homework

Seminar 4:

“Sometime Silence Isn’t Golden -- Communication In The Classroom” 1) Class Participation 2) Asking And Answering Questions 3) Polite Speech: (Explicit Vs. Implicit Language)

Seminar 5:

“I Want To Learn From Your Mistakes” 1) Former ALCI Students Who Are Now At CSUC Hold A Panel Discussion 2) International Advisors Or Faculty Hold A Panel Discussion

Seminar 6:

“Experience Is The Best Teacher” 1) Students Visit A University Class (On Their Own Time) 2) Show Video Clips Of Students In Classrooms: 3) Review Needs Assessment


Academic Affairs Goal 2: Nurture Excellence in Faculty and Staff


Academic Affairs Goal 2: Nurture Excellence in Faculty and Staff RCE’s 2010-2011 achievements in support of our strategic goal to strengthen and refine organizational effectiveness with emphasis on process improvement, enhanced communication, and proactive staff development included the continuation of several ongoing process improvements and staff development initiatives as well as the introduction of new programs and activities.  RCE joined the Education Advisory Board’s Continuing and Online Education Forum. (Goals 4, 5, and 6)

 The Connect • Learn • Engage (CLE) series was launched with 11 webinars attended by 100 faculty and staff on topics such as developing effective learning environments, fundraising, engaging nontraditional student groups, and online course design and implementation. (Goal 3.1)

 The RCE Amazing Race professional development activity fostered teambuilding and enhanced connections with units across campus. (Goal 3.1)

 The launch of Colusa Hall required the development of many new processes as well as the improvement/application of existing processes to embrace expanded responsibilities for effective building management.

Developing Faculty and Staff Excellence

The opening of the Colusa Hall Conference and Event Center in May 2011 provided development opportunities for RCE staff with the move from the planning and construction phase to the launch and ongoing management of this new campus resource. The focus on excellence in customer service and building management required RCE staff to create new internal teams, to develop new skills, and to build new/stronger relationships with other departments across campus. RCE staff gained valuable experience and development on the job that strengthens our organizational capacity overall.

RCE Conference Services continues to support Academic Affairs’ strategic priority on faculty and staff development by supporting the annual CELT Conference with registration and conference logistics support. The 2010 CELT Conference participation overall was down 30%, with an average of 53% of people who signed up actually attending the sessions. The strength of CELT, the fact that it is offered conveniently on campus during regular semester hours, is also a challenge to the conference in that faculty and staff are often lured away from the conference to address work needs. The flexible design of the conference also results in significant variations in individual session show rates, ranging from less than a third of people who signed up for individual sessions attending to other sessions that exceeded their anticipated attendance as much as five-fold. The result is a nuanced facility scheduling process that RCE conference services staff adeptly manages each year to support this important faculty and staff development event. RCE feedback on scheduling challenges resulted in schedule improvements for the 2011 CELT schedule that should improve attendance overall and support well-attended individual sessions.

2-1


CELT Conference Summary 2010 # of Sessions

41

# of Speakers

93

Participation by Type CSU, Chico faculty

118

CSU, Chico students

12

CSU, Chico staff

58

CSU, Chico administration

Community College faculty

Other (Community and K-12)

Awards Luncheon attendance

19 14 21

136

Total # of Participants 242

Fostering positive teambuilding within RCE and connecting to other campus units to build relationships that enhance our effectiveness is part of RCE’s ongoing staff development approach. The Live @ 8:05 weekly staff development program continues to engage RCE staff in learning about our programs and services as well as engaging with guest speakers from across campus and from the community. Quarterly all staff meetings also provided opportunities throughout 2010-2011 for RCE staff to focus on key issues and organizational priorities.

The RCE Amazing Race event in November 2010 was a new all staff development activity that focused on teambuilding and cross-campus engagement. A series of team challenges were developed in collaboration with faculty and staff from five departments across campus: the WREC, AS Recycling, Meriam Library, Anthropology, and Kinesiology. The activities included team exercises that were both physically and mentally engaging to foster active learning and skill building. This staff development program was showcased at the 2011 CSU Counterparts meeting of Extended/Continuing Education staff from across the state as an example of creative staff development.

Strengthening and Integrating Teaching, Scholarship, Student Learning, and Public Service

RCE introduced the pilot Connect • Learn • Engage (CLE) program in December 2010 to connect campus faculty, staff, and students with subject matter experts from around the globe using webinars and two-way video. Campus colleagues are invited to propose appropriate webinars that are of interest. As a one stop shop, RCE hosts the event by booking and setting up the meeting room, handling the technology requirements, making necessary arrangements to access the webinar, underwriting any registration fees, and tracking participation and feedback. Eleven CLE events were identified, promoted, and delivered in 2010-2011 with RCE investing $1318 of registration fees. In addition to the opportunity for CSU, Chico

2-2


faculty and staff to attend webinars as they are delivered, CLE provides a repository of past programs so interested faculty and staff can view recordings of programs and download presentation slides.

Supporting Superior Professional Growth and Achievement

RCE staff is involved in a number of professional associations and activities selected to support superior growth and achievement. RCE’s membership in these organizations provides access to an extensive network of resources and development opportunities that translate into new program development initiatives, innovative administrative processes, and a sustained commitment to effective leadership.  Education Advisory Board’s Continuing and Online Education Forum

 University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA)

 Association of Continuing Higher Education (ACHE)

 Association of Collegiate Conference Event Directors – International (ACCED-I)  Western Cooperative for Educational Telecommunications (WCET)

 National University Telecommunications Network (NUTN)

 Teachers of English as a Second or Other Language (TESOL)  Association of International Educators (NAFSA)

 American Association of Intensive English Programs (AAIEP)

 The Institute of International Education (IIE)

 Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Network

RCE joined the Education Advisory Board’s Continuing and Online Education Forum as part of our investment in strengthening and developing the quality of continuing education programs and services. This newly formed consortium addresses key challenges facing traditional institutions in higher education’s fastest-growing terrain. The inaugural webinar series first focused on engaging and retaining students. Membership in the forum provides access to resources that support important campus and RCE initiatives, including online learning and international faculty-led programs. We are enthusiastic about the research agenda for 2011-13 which focuses on the relevant questions to our organization as a data-driven enterprise looking to identify and implement breakthrough practices:  How should we respond to increasing demands for transparency and accountability?

 How do we capitalize on new marketing channels and new markets at the right time with the right level of investment?  How can we engage and build lifelong relationships with adult learners?

 How can we better anticipate emerging and future education needs?

Membership in this Forum has already provided rich resources to help RCE staff (and other campus units) to be more effective in our roles. Debra Barger, Dean, continues to serve on the Policy Board of PASSAGES and serves on the budget subcommittee of the CSU Commission on the Extended University (CEU).

2-3


Clare Roby, RCE Associate Dean, was appointed to a second term on the Association of Continuing Higher Education (ACHE) Board of Directors and serves as the Board liaison to the Publications and Communications Committee and on the board of the ACHE West Region. She is the co-chair of the ACHE 2011 annual conference planning committee. Roby and Elaina McReynolds, Program Director, presented a concurrent session titled “Radical Decision Making for Turbulent Times” at the ACHE 2010 annual conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

William Dantona, ALCI Director, was selected to serve as treasurer of the American Association of Intensive English Programs (AAIEP). This appointment follows the 2009 AAIEP Program SelfAssessment that resulted in a five year extension of ALCI’s AAIEP membership. Melissa McGowan, Marketing Director, attended the University Professional Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) marketing conference. Linda MacMichael, Program Coordinator, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI), attended the national OLLI conference to network with other OLLI organizations for program growth and management strategies. Jeff Layne, Distance Education Director, attended the WCET and NUTN annual meetings, following important updates on state regulations for online programs.

In addition to these national and international associations, RCE participates in staff development activities at the CSU system level as well as on campus. In April 2011, RCE hosted the annual CSU Counterparts meeting of Extended/Continuing Education staff from across the CSU and a joint meeting of CSU Consortium of Intensive English Programs. The Counterparts event was supported by the CSU Commission on the Extended University and the Chancellor’s Office through the Statewide Extended Education Dean, Dr. Sheila Thomas.  117 participants from 19 CSU campuses

 5 conference tracks and 30 session facilitators o o o o o

Track #1 Business Operations & Enrollment Management Track #2 Marketing, Promotion & Competition Track #3 Lessons Learned in Program Development Track #4 Organizational & Administrative Efficiencies Track #5 Multi-Campus Collaboration

RCE’s Elaina McReynolds participates in the CSU, Chico Staff Development Committee, and RCE strives to take advantage of the campus-based professional development opportunities the result. Members of RCE’s management team attended the staff development program Project Teams that Work, a multi-day event on campus. Tools and strategies adopted from that workshop have been integrated into several team projects, including the Center for Continuing Education (CCE) transformation project for which planning began in 2010-2011 and will extend into the next academic year.

Recognizing, Valuing, and Celebrating Outstanding Performance

The RCE marketing team took home two awards at the 96th annual University Professional & Continuing Education Association (UPECA) conference held in Toronto. The awards recognize the best of marketing and promotional pieces in the field of professional, continuing, and online education and were given in a number of categories, ranging from entire campaigns to individual media. Continuing Education took gold in the collateral material category for the design of a Chico Bag to promote conference services, and a bronze award in print pieces for the 2010 Open House invitation celebrating the 35th anniversary of distance education at Chico State. Both awards won for colleges with fewer than 25,000 enrollees.

2-4


RCE’s Google Grant won the UPCEA Region West 2010 Outstanding Administrative Process or Service award for our project titled Leveraging the Google Grant Program to Extend Global Outreach. This award is based on RCE’s outstanding management of Google Ads to enhance marketing and outreach, with particular emphasis on international audiences for the American Language and Culture Institute.

Supporting Documents  Colusa Hall Ribbon Cutting Press Release

 Colusa House Open House Brochure

 CELT Promotional Email

 A Look at the RCE Amazing Race

 Connect • Learn • Engage Webinar Sample Flier

 Education Advisory Board Continuing and Online Education Forum List of Research Reports

 A Look at the Annual CSU Counterparts Meeting  UPCEA Marketing Awards New Release

 A Look at the 2010 Continuing Education Open House & 35th Anniversary of the Chico Distance and Online Education Program

 2010 Continuing Education Open House Invitation

2-5


California State University, Chico - NEWS RELEASE

Colusa Hall, the oldest building on the CSU, Chico campus core, will soon reopen its doors as a newly remodeled, state-of-the art conference and event center. The renovation of Colusa Hall was funded by Regional and Continuing Education without state general fund dollars and enhances the University’s capability to host academic conferences and special events. To celebrate the revival of this historic building, President Paul Zingg will cut a ceremonial ribbon at the front doors of Colusa Hall, Tuesday, May 3, 2011, 2:15 p.m. on the Chico State campus. All are welcome to attend this ceremony. The official open house will take place Thursday, May 19, 3:30-5:30pm, when Colusa Hall will be open for the public to tour the new facility. Colusa Hall, built in 1921, is the only building that remains of the original State Normal School. The classic brick building was originally designed as an industrial arts building, complete with large window openings to take advantage of natural light and ventilation. In 1997 the campus made the decision to save the historic building and invested in a seismic retrofit of the hall. Since that time, the space has been used for a variety of purposes, including food service, administrative offices, and classroom space. The current remodeling efforts focused on designing a state-of-the art conference facility that integrates the natural and built environment. The project took advantage of sustainable building practices and materials, while maintaining the historic nature of building. Colusa Hall has been retrofitted with energy saving windows that match the original style, window shading, energy saving occupancy sensors, and a daylight harvesting lighting system. Students from the Construction Management program are participating in a process to attain LEED Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance certification from the U.S. Green Building Council. “The Chico campus is a very beautiful place. Preserving historic buildings, while improving their functionality and energy efficiency, is important in our sustainability efforts. The Colusa Hall remodeling effort will provide an excellent event space available to all our community and help us demonstrate our leadership in sustainable conference management,� commented Sandra Flake, Provost.


The state-of-the-art conference facility provides event space for up to 240 guests, with six additional meeting rooms to accommodate smaller groups. The conference and event facility includes a full business center and a servery space to support catering activities. Meeting rooms feature media control for high quality video projection and computer-based presentations. The facility also includes a four-station computer lab, a two-way video conference room, and wireless network access throughout the building. Colusa Hall adjoins the Creekside Plaza and native gardens creating a seamless indoor-outdoor space that showcases the natural beauty of the campus core and creek side landscape. Concrete benches for outdoor seating at Colusa Hall and the Creekside Plaza space are being designed and created by Chico State students in the Concrete Industry Management program as capstone and internship projects. The CSU, Chico Facilities Planning department managed the $3.3 million remodel project, working directly with local contractors, construction services, and sustainable material vendors. Academic Technologies and Communications Services departments designed and installed the media, computer, and telecommunications systems in the building. Regional and Continuing Education will manage the ongoing operation of the building as part of its full conference and event management services.

###


Open House

M ay 19

3:30 –5:30 pm

A Look Back... Charles Merrill Osenbaugh was appointed the seventh president of Chico Normal School on July 5, 1918. Under his tireless leadership, Osenbaugh devoted himself to building and strengthening the teacher’s college at Chico. His innovative advertising campaigns to increase enrollment worked well and resulted in expansion of the campus, including a single-story brick building completed in the summer of 1921. This building, Colusa Hall, was designed by a state engineering architect, H.L. Saterlee, for use by industrial arts students and built under the direction of Walter Hann, Chief of Maintenance. Thirty-two thousand dollars had been appropriated by the state for this purpose, thanks in large part to the lobbying of Mrs. Elizabeth Hughes. Hughes, a California Assemblywoman and the first woman to head a major chairmanship in the California State Legislature, firmly believed that the Normal School was destined to furnish educational leadership for all northern Californians. The building was used over the years for a variety of purposes, most of them related to industrial arts. Repairs and improvements were made as needed, and in 1997 Colusa Hall underwent a seismic retrofit to preserve it and lay the groundwork for future renovations. In recent years the building has housed the University Print Shop and the Admissions Office. Today, Colusa Hall stands as the oldest building on campus and the only building that remains of the original State Normal School. Its recently completed transformation resulted in a state-of-the art conference facility integrating sustainable building practices and materials, while maintaining the historic nature of building.


Many Hands...


Sustainable Practices The Colusa Hall transformation took advantage of sustainable building practices and materials, while maintaining the historic nature of building. The space has been retrofitted with energy saving windows that match the original style, window shading, energy saving occupancy sensors, and a daylight harvesting lighting system. Students from the Construction Management program are participating in a process to attain LEED Existing Buildings: Operations and Maintenance certification from the U.S. Green Building Council.

Window Shades EcoVeil™ is a non-PVC screen cloth developed for closedloop systems in which every ingredient is safe and beneficial. The material can be reclaimed and recycled and was selected by Environmental Building News as one of the Top-10 Green Building Products of 2004. Synergy Lighting System The Synergy Intelligent Ballast Control (IBC) system utilizes daylight harvesting, enabling each light ballast to respond individually to variable daylight conditions and maximize energy savings. Flooring Flooring materials installed throughout the building were chosen for their durability in high-traffic settings – longer wear results in less added to the landfill – as well as their eco-friendly properties. InterfaceFLOR carpet tiles have a NSF-140 Platinum sustainable carpet assessment rating and consist of 64% recycled content. The Stratica non-vinyl, chlorine-free wood finish floor has undetectable VOC emissions and is recyclable. Acoustical Treatments Colusa Hall’s rotunda, hallways, classrooms, and conference rooms received special acoustical attention to create spaces that are ideal for many varieties of communication, learning, and entertainment. The rotunda, for example, was treated with Pyrok Acoustement, a durable, low life-cycle cost, non-toxic and noncombustible material that requires minimal maintenance but delivers superior acoustical performance. Salvage & Repurpose Reducing the waste stream today and in the future is a focus of the Colusa Hall building management plan. During construction, efforts were made to repurpose components, such as a roll-up warehouse door, in other campus buildings, and to salvage building materials, such as restroom tiles that were hand-crafted by Humanities & Fine Arts students.

The Chico campus is a very beautiful place. Preserving historic buildings, while improving their functionality and energy efficiency, is important in our sustainability efforts. The Colusa Hall remodeling effort has provided an excellent event space available to the campus and community beyond and helps us demonstrate our leadership in sustainable conference management. ~ Sandra Flake, CSU, Chico Provost


Conference Room 100A & 100B The Colusa Hall conference room is an open and airy space perfectly adapatable for large lectures, presentations, banquets, and receptions for up to 250 people. Large windows look out onto Kendall Hall, the Creekside Plaza, and planned educational gardens along Chico Creek. To accomodate smaller groups, an acoustical wall can be closed to divide the room into two spaces, each fully configurable and complete with independent video projection and sound.

Room 110 With a capacity of 48, this mid-size room is especially suited to breakout sessions, smaller presentations, training, and workshop events. This room is equipped with a two-way video conferencing system so that you can easily extend your event beyond our campus.

Room 115 Called “The Rose Garden Room” for its stunning views of the central campus and the George Peterson rose garden, Room 115 holds 24 and is perfectly sized for executive board meetings, strategic planning retreats, and conference breakout sessions. As with each of Colusa Hall’s rooms, you will find state-of-the art presentation technology at your fingertips.

Servery / Catering Kitchen Colusa Hall is equipped with a brand new catering kitchen, or servery, to facilitate your event’s catering needs. On- and off-campus catering services are available to provide a full range of food service, from coffee and refreshments, to cocktail receptions, to formal banquets.

To inquire about event planning or to reserve a date, visit us on the web or contact Conference Services.

http://rce.csuchico.edu/colusahall

530.898.6105


The Annual CELT Conference

http://www.csuchico.edu/celt/emailer/

Please forward to your colleagues in the educational community who may be interested in attending this free conference!

The Annual CELT Conference is scheduled for October 6-8, 2010.

California State University, Chico www.csuchico.edu/celt

The CELT Keynote Presentation will be delivered by: Dr. Laura I. Rendón Department of Education Leadership & Policy Studies Iowa State University College of Human Sciences Thursday, October 7 1:00-2:00pm Keynote Presentation 2:00-2:30pm Reception Friday, October 8 9am-10am Practicum Workshop Please NOTE: The CELT Keynote presentation will take place Thursday, October 7, not at the Luncheon and Awards Ceremony October 6.

Please bookmark: rce.csuchico.edu/celt for the latest up-to-date information.

Sponsored by the Center for Excellence in Learning and Teaching (CELT), the Faculty Recognition and Support Committee (FRAS), and the Office of the Provost at California State University, Chico, the 2010 CELT Conference offers a wide variety of sessions that will engage faculty, staff, and students in a thoughtful exploration of the nature of learning and teaching. Join us to learn more about what each of us is doing, and can further do, to enhance high quality learning and teaching – in the University and beyond. This year's principle theme, Solutions & Strategies, will offer sessions that suggest solutions to perennial or new problems, or that emphasize proactive planning for long-term excellence. In addition to the theme, the conference will have strands in the following areas: Teaching Techniques & Classroom Management Course Transformation Using Technology to Enhance Student Learning Diversity – Teaching to the Whole Student Internationalization Civic Engagement Strands will be highlighted in the online registration. You may register for one or all of the sessions in the strand. Registration is now open at: http://rce.csuchico.edu/celt/. All conference participants are cordially invited to attend the CELT Conference Awards Luncheon on Wednesday, October 6, 11:30am - 1:00pm in the Bell Memorial Union Auditorium, where we will be honoring Outstanding Teacher Saundra Wright, PhD, (ENGL) and Outstanding Academic Advisor Kathryn Silliman, PhD, (NFSC).

If this page does not display correctly, please click here

.


Upcoming Webinar! Using Social Media for Teaching and Learning Monday, April 25 . 10:00 am – 12:00 pm . Location: Colusa 110 Hosted by: Terry Curtis, CDES & CME

* There is no fee and no need to pre-register for this event. * Social media tools, such as Twitter, Facebook, and YouTube, are changing the way that students and faculty communicate, share ideas, and build networks. The interest in social media is quickly increasing, and as with many other technologies, the educational community is looking to harness the potential of these resources to improve teaching and learning. While social media is popular, educators need to better understand how to use it to improve student learning, while being mindful of privacy concerns. In Using Social Media for Teaching and Learning , the instructors will showcase some effective uses of social media in student learning. They will discuss ways to use social media to create experiential learning activities, improve student interactivity and engagement, and develop community and professional networks. Agenda: • Effective uses of social media o Facilitating interactivity and engagement o Experiential learning potential o Developing community and professional networks • What are some best practices in using social media? o Information to guide your use of social media o Examples of different institutions and departments • Considerations for integration of social media into curriculum o Concerns about privacy in the use of social media o Addressing issues that faculty and students may have o Support through educational workshop o Costs and implementation o Evaluating the impact

Instructors Alisa Cooper

Assistant Chair and Professor of English, Glendale Community College Lisa C. Young

Instructional Designer and Educational Technologist, Maricopa Community Colleges

Who Should Attend: Faculty, instructional designers and technologists, academic computing services, and student computing services administrators will learn to use social media tools effectively. For More Information: http://rce.csuchico.edu/professional-development/connect-learn-engage/

Regional & Continuing Education • 530.898.6105 • rce@csuchico.edu • http://rce.csuchico.edu


Partial List of Research Reports • International Programming • Continuing Education Alumni and Soliciting Donations • Developing a Bachelor of General Studies Degree • Engaging Faculty in Online Education • Granting Academic Credit for Prior Learning • Intellectual Property Policies for Online Courses • Maintaining Academic Integrity in Online Courses • Models of Self-service Advising • Using Social Media Marketing to Promote Enrollment Growth


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT:

June 28, 2011

Melissa McGowan CSU, Chico Regional & Continuing Education 530-898-6105

CSU, Chico Continuing Education Marketing Team Wins Gold in National Competition Toronto, Canada and Chico, CA The CSU, Chico Regional & Continuing Education team took home two awards at the 96th annual University Professional & Continuing Education Association (UPECA) Awards held in Toronto. The awards recognize the best of marketing and promotional pieces in the field of professional, continuing, and online education and were given in a number of categories, ranging from entire campaigns to individual media. Continuing Education took gold in the collateral material category, and a bronze award in print pieces. Both awards won for colleges with fewer than 25,000 enrollees. Entries in the collateral material category focused on tangible, takeaway pieces, like a mug or mouse pad. Melissa McGowan, Marketing Director for Continuing Education said, “Our goal was to design a piece to promote our conference services that would be noteworthy, sustainable, and unique to Chico State.” They worked with ChicoBag, a nationally-known company based in Chico that designs reusable tote bags from recycled materials. The resulting gold award-winning piece was a fun “Sling rePETe” bag, with an image conveying why Chico State a great place to hold a conference or event. “The Bag itself, made of 99% recycled content, supports Chico State’s commitment to being a green campus and supporting local business,” said McGowan. The UPCEA judges said that the bag was a “Cool Product”. Other award winners included a T-shirt from The University of Pennsylvania and a Banner Pen from Kansas State. The Continuing Education marketing team also won a bronze award in the print pieces category, which focuses on works like announcements or greeting cards. The award-winning piece was an invitation to the 2010 Continuing Education Open House, celebrating the Chico Distance & Online Education program’s 35th anniversary. The celebration was a resounding success, with over 150 program founders, faculty, staff, alumni, and supporters in attendance. The artwork on the invitation was also featured prominently on additional signage and collateral throughout the event, including large bouquets of red balloons and banners. Other winners in the category included works from Rice University, Colorado State University, and University of North Carolina. ### About the University Professional & Continuing Education Association The University Professional & Continuing Education Association, located in Washington DC, meets the professional development needs of its members through programs, publications, conferences, institutes, seminars, and public advocacy, and seeks to advance university professional and continuing education. The Association's members include public and private accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities, international universities, and nonprofit organizations with a significant commitment to professional and continuing higher education. About the CSU, Chico Center for Regional & Continuing Education As the anchor institution in Northern California, CSU, Chico serves a twelve-county service area, the largest in the 23-campus California State University system. The mission of the Center for Regional & Continuing Education (RCE) at CSU, Chico is to strengthen and expand the resources of the University to respond to lifelong learning needs through distance and online education, teacher professional development, accredited certificate and degree programs, and a wide variety of personal enrichment and professional development courses and conferences.


Continuing Education Open House Thursday, October 14, 2010 • Creekside Plaza Honoring the people and partnerships that have made CSU, Chico a leader in distance education and celebrating Continuing Education's contribution to extending the Chico Experience to learners across the state and around the world.


Regional & Continuing Education

Celebrating the 35th Anniversary of Chico Distance & Online Education!

Honoring the people and partnerships that have made CSU, Chico a leader in distance education, extending the Chico Experience to learners across the state and around the world. Continuing Education Open House Thursday, October 14, 2010 • 4–6 pm The Creekside Plaza, adjacent to Regional & Continuing Education rce@csuchico.edu • 530.898.6105


Academic Affairs Goal 3: Educate for a Sustainable Global Society


Academic Affairs Goal 3: Educate for a Sustainable Global Society Sustainability in its myriad applications is reflected in RCE’s core values and in RCE business operations. Most notably in 2010-2011, our commitment to sustainability was evidenced in the completion of the Colusa Hall remodel project and the opening of the Colusa Hall Conference and Event Center that models energy efficiency and integrated design.

 The construction phase of the Colusa Hall project was completed with the accomplishment of most project goals; original project goals that were not achieved were the result of required scaling back in project scope. (Goal 2.1)  Campus improvements on path of travel were undertaken with $200,000 funding from RCE.

 Educational garden with focus on drought tolerant and culturally significant plants (Mechoopda) installed adjacent to Creekside Plaza (Goal 2.1)

 Students from ECC designed concrete benches for Colusa Hall exterior using sustainable materials and integrating salvaged Orient & Flume art glass that gives the benches a unique artistic quality while connecting to a valuable community resource. (Goal 2.2)

 A conference center management plan was drafted in alignment with campus methodologies whenever possible and with clearly stated methodologies for unique-to-Colusa management issues. (Goal 2.3)  A formal ribbon cutting for Colusa Hall on May 2, partnered with a sneak preview tour for senior management, was followed by the Colusa Open House on May 19. (Goal 2.4)

 Construction Management students prepared for LEED Existing Building Operations and Maintenance with a target of gold certification for Colusa Hall. (Goal 2.5)

 A focus on local purchases for conference goods and services contributed to sustaining the local economy.

Creating Opportunities for Sustainability in the Curriculum: Colusa Hall Projects

RCE’s goal of involving students in the Colusa Hall renovation project resulted in two specific projects that provided opportunities for faculty to integrate sustainability into the curriculum. Construction Management students enrolled in CMGT 471, taught by Dr. Lori Brown, studied and tested for LEED accredited professional certification as part of their capstone course to prepare them to develop the processes and documentation for Colusa Hall’s LEED Existing Building and Operations Maintenance (EBOM).

Students in the Concrete Industry Management program participated in a senior capstone project, with guidance from Program Chair Tanya Komas, to design, and manufacture prototype concrete benches for the east exterior side of Colusa Hall and the Creekside Plaza. The concrete bench project allowed students to apply hands-on techniques to learning from both the classroom and an industry association conference. Utilizing high quality, local northern California concrete products from Buddy Rhodes, the students created a unique design and look by incorporating scrap Orient & Flume glass into the concrete mix. This creative approach to recycling and removing the scrap glass from the waste stream also created a novel connection to a respected community artisan. A summer internship was set-up for production and installation of permanent concrete benches adjacent to Colusa and in the Plaza.

3-1


Promoting Scholarly and Creative Activities in Sustainability RCE’s Conference and Event Coordinator, Heather Quilici, continued a leadership role in the Sustainability Committee for the Association of Collegiate Conference and Event Directors-International (ACCED-I) . In that role, Heather wrote two articles for ACCED-I members and served as association liaison with the Higher Education Associations Sustainability Consortium (HEASC). Conference Services produced new collateral promoting sustainability, such as the “Think Green! 20 Tips for Hosting a Sustainable Event” flier. They also created a Chico Bag with a custom logo as part of efforts to promote RCE’s commitment to sustainable event management. This award-winning bag (see page 2.X) was shared during the CSU Counterparts of Continuing/Extended units across the CSU system, and other extended education units, including Northridge’s Tseng College, followed our lead by creating their own custom version of this creative approach to promoting sustainability. This connection to the local Chico Bag company brought out-of-area dollars to the local Chico economy.

Providing Leadership for Sustainable Practices and Modeling Sustainability Sustainability is at the core of RCE’s management approach for facilities and business operations. Energy efficiency was integrated into all aspects of the Colusa Hall remodel: energy efficient windows with window shades, daylight harvesting and energy efficient lighting systems, occupancy sensors, energy efficient appliances, water efficient plumbing, and separate zones for HVAC to save energy when the building is only partially occupied. Sustainable materials (furnishings, carpet, paint) were used through the building. Conference supplies are selected based on the criteria of sustainable content production, environmentally friendly impact, and durability. Ongoing operations are targeted to achieve LEED Existing Building Operations and Maintenance (EBOM) certification, ideally at the gold level.

A plan to transform the Center for Continuing Education (CCE) to improve significantly the sustainability and safety of the building was launched in spring 2011. Project goals include replacing the original single pane windows with more energy efficient dual pane windows, installing more sustainable lighting, and evaluating the efficiency of the existing HVAC system and making any necessary upgrades to minimize the building’s utilities consumption. Specifications for the project include exploring sustainable features such as solar panels to light exterior signage and the integration of more natural light throughout the building. The project scope of work was submitted to Facilities Management Services for implementation in 20112012.

3-2


Assisting the University to Serve as a Model Sustainable Campus The use of two-way video for administrative meetings is one way that RCE assists the University to model sustainable business practices. The portable two-way video system in the Continuing Education classroom CE 107 that was unveiled in Summer 2010 was permanently installed in Spring 2011. The permanent installation included the addition of a media rack, a second camera, and a large 65 inch monitor. Old lighting was removed and new energy efficient lighting was added. The remodel of CE 107 and the addition of a two-way video equipped meeting room in the newly remodeled Colusa Hall support the use of two-way video as a sustainable alternative to traveling to attend business meetings.

2010-2011 Two-way Videoconferencing Summary Uses

Events

Undergraduate Upper Division Class Sessions

281

Administrative Meetings

42

Professional MBA Class Sessions

Northern California Writing Project

Course Sessions Hosted for Other CSU campuses

Total

36 4 1

364

Supporting Documents  Colusa Hall Benches Project Overview

 “The Greening of Disney Corporation” – An article by Heather Quilici published in ACCED-I Connections  RCE Conference Services “Think Green! 20 Tips for Hosting a Sustainable Event” Flier

3-3


Colusa Hall Concrete Benches Concrete Industry Management Senior Capstone Project & Summer Internship Tony Reyes & Nick Steinberg Bench Features: • Custom Designed & Hand Formed • Buddy Rhodes Glass Fiber Reinforced Concrete - A Regionally Sourced Product! • Non-toxic Water-based Integral Stain • Orient & Flume Salvaged Glass


ACCED-I

1 of 2

http://accedi.informz.net/admin31/content/template.asp?sid=22522&bran...

The Greening of Disney Corporation - Heather Quilici, California State University, Chico If you have children between the ages of 1-91, or you were ever a child yourself (ha ha), then chances are you’ve been touched by the Disney Corporation. In anticipation of the ACCED-I 31st Annual Conference, Creating Magic, I started thinking about the House of Mouse and the extent to which they have jumped on the green bandwagon. Can you imagine how much waste is produced in just one area of one theme park per day? How much electricity the Magic Kingdom® alone consumes? Not to mention, all of the theme parks Disney operates in the course of a year? How much laundry needs to be done daily? The landscaping, while gorgeous, must require a tremendous amount of water…and on and on. When you consider that every element of their business touches the physical and social environment in some way it can be overwhelming. I was not surprised to learn that Disney had a policy about becoming a greener company – most major corporations do at this point. I was surprised to learn that they have a rich environmental legacy spanning more than 60 years and the physical environment is only once piece. Being a good corporate citizen is part of their DNA. They have a comprehensive and strategic corporate responsibility policy in place that governs all aspects of their business including Children & Family, Content & Products, Environment, Community, and Workplaces so that decisions big and small are weighed against it. After researching, it would be hard to include in a short article everything Disney is doing to make a difference for the planet. If you want to view their full report on Corporate Responsibility, you can find it at: http://disney.go.com/crreport /home.html. So, in the interest of brevity, below are just some of the sustainability facts and policies Walt Disney World® has implemented to help make the earth a bit greener and lower the carbon footprint of an area roughly the size of San Francisco (47 square miles). After reading, you might see Disney and your park experience in an entirely different light. And you may even find a small change you could glean from Disney to make your conference and event operation a bit greener! ·

·

·

Walt Disney World® recycles all of the human waste from the parks and hotels. The solids and liquids are separated and the solids are used as fertilizer on the tree farm, where all the trees for the parks are grown. The liquids are then cleaned naturally by growing hydrangeas in them and then the water is sent off to the sprinkler system. When you look around the park, notice the signs that say “THIS IS NOT DRINKING WATER”. You just might want to obey them. All the trash at Disney World is sorted by hand to pull out recyclables such as aluminum cans and water bottles (approximately 13 million bottles of water are consumed annually!). Fifty percent or so of trash is used in incinerators to generate 1/3 of the electricity at Walt Disney World®. Disney’s operation in Orlando has steadily increased its use of reclaimed water over the last 22 years. Today more than 10 million gallons of reclaimed water per day provide for landscape irrigation and cooling tower operation, among other uses. Additional reclaimed water is returned to recharge the Florida aquifer through a system of Rapid Infiltration Basins. Approximately 30 percent of the Resort’s overall water needs and 80 percent of its irrigation needs are met with reclaimed water.

·

·

·

·

·

· ·

·

The majority of props, vases, and This article and newsletter brought to you in part by Unique Venues. containers used by the Disney floral Click on ad below. team for events are made from reusable glass and plastic. Many of Disney’s floral suppliers have received the “VeriFlora” seal of approval, which certifies that the flowers have been grown without harmful chemicals. All Disney Florida Resorts have achieved the Florida Green Lodging certification. In Resort guest rooms, cast members are in the process of replacing incandescent lamps with compact fluorescent lamps that use roughly one-quarter of the energy. When complete, 176,325 light bulbs will have been changed out. The 1,500 Christmas trees at the Walt Disney World Resort® glow with new “conservation” lighting – more than 700,000 LED lights in all. String the bulbs end to end and the strand would stretch for 96 miles or light the path from Jacksonville to Orlando, all while using 1/10th of the power of traditional incandescent bulbs. Cinderella’s Castle glows “green” as well with more than 170,000 LED white lights to glisten the Castle, using the equivalent energy of only 12 microwave ovens. Starting in the early 1990s, the Walt Disney World Resort® voluntarily began to reduce its reliance on pesticides and started work on an Integrated Pest Management program that uses alternatives to harsh chemicals. This innovative approach uses beneficial insects, insect growth regulators, and other methods such as soaps, oil sprays, and baits (instead of sprays). For example, “good” bugs are placed on plants in order to eat “bad” bugs that are destroying the plants. The Disney Harvest program, founded in 1998, distributes nearly 50,000 pounds of food to the Second Harvest Food Bank each month by collecting food which is prepared and not served from restaurants and convention centers. The trains at the Magic Kingdom® run on biodiesel fuel made with recycled cooking oil from the Resort’s restaurants and hotels. Food scraps from restaurants at the Resort are combined with horticulture clippings and other degradable items to create compost which is used locally as rich fertilizer. The “Liberty Oak” which is the focal point of the Liberty Square in the Magic Kingdom®, is the proud parent of more than 500 young trees. They all started out as acorns harvested from the majestic oak.

Even with all of the conservation methods above, Disney plans to cut

8/22/2011 4:54 PM


ACCED-I

2 of 2

http://accedi.informz.net/admin31/content/template.asp?sid=22522&bran...

Good thing because… If you were to wash and dry one load of laundry every day for 44 years, you’d clean as much as the folks at the Walt Disney World® laundry do in a single day. The cast members there launder an average of 240,000 pounds each day. In addition, between 30,000 and 32,000 garments are dry-cleaned daily.

carbon emissions in half by 2012, reduce electricity consumption by 10 percent, reduce fuel use, halve the garbage at its parks and Resorts by 2013, and ultimately achieve net zero direct greenhouse gas emissions and landfill waste. When you visit the park this March, enjoy your time knowing that behind the scenes A LOT is being done to minimize the impact of over 17 million guests and 65,000 cast members that come through the gates each year. Sources: The Walt Disney Company 2008 Corporate Responsibility Report, wdwmagic.com, benefits-of-recycling.com/disneysustainability.html, and explorethemagic.com. Heather Quilici is conference and event coordinator at California State University, Chico in Chico, CA. She can be reached at hquilici@csuchico.edu or (530) 898-5673. Heather is currently serving as co-chair of the ACCED-I Sustainability Project Team.

Association of Collegiate Conference and Events Directors-International (ACCED-I) 419 Canyon Avenue, Suite 311, Fort Collins CO 80521 | (970)449-4960 | www.acced-i.org

8/22/2011 4:54 PM


Think Green! 20 Tips for Hosting a Sustainable Event

ƒƒ Provide walking or biking directions to your event, and encourage car sharing

ƒƒ Incorporate a social or environmental project to create a positive legacy

ƒƒ Serve local, organically grown, and/or vegetarian food to cut carbon emissions

ƒƒ Employ students to gain work experience at your event

ƒƒ Use compostable or recyclable name badges, food containers, and signage ƒƒ Use Fairtrade tea, coffee and sugar to give growers a better deal ƒƒ Tap water tastes as good as bottled and saves on resources, transport & waste ƒƒ Use email instead of paper to communicate with your guests ƒƒ Online invitation and booking systems save paper as well as time

ƒƒ Design giveaways that attendees will re-use ƒƒ Don’t date event materials so they can be reused at future events ƒƒ Print t-shirts on organic cotton shirts ƒƒ If the venue doesn’t recycle, use an outside company to pick up the waste ƒƒ Hold your event during the day to save on energy required by artificial lighting

ƒƒ Ensure all technology is switched off when not in use

ƒƒ Use LED lighting. It can reduce your carbon footprint by more than 70%

ƒƒ Use suppliers who have equipment and products located close to the venue

ƒƒ Include information about the sustainability of your event on the event website

ƒƒ Communicate the importance of efficient water use with your venue and caterers

ƒƒ Use information & resources available from your partners in sustainability

Regional & Continuing Education Conference Services can help you plan and host a sustainable and successful event for your student organization or professional association.

rce.csuchico.edu/conferences


Academic Affairs Goal 4: Serve the North State and Beyond


Academic Affairs Goal 4: Serve the North State and Beyond RCE’s mission to extend the resources of the University to meet lifelong learning needs is embodied in the programs and services that serve the North State and beyond. Strategic priority has been given to expanding reentry and learning in retirement opportunities and creating new self-support offerings as well as establishing a CSU, Chico was an excellent venue for conferences and events.

 Membership in the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) continued a pattern of growth important to RCE’s long term goal of being invited to apply for a second $1 million endowment from the Bernard Osher Foundation. (Goal 1.3)

 New OLLI outreach strategies and programming targeted Baby Boomers. (Goal 1.4)

 An extensive search for permanent additional off-campus classroom space for OLLI was undertaken. (Goal 1.2)

 The opening of the Colusa Hall Conference & Event Center initiated the launch of a conference services outreach plan to stimulate awareness and use of Colusa Hall for campus, regional, national, and international conferences and events. (Goal 6.1)

 Increased outreach to the Redding area to promote the University’s presence in the community as well as the availability of online degree completion options for the North State. (Goal 5.1, 5.6)

 Explore workforce development training opportunities through Workforce Investment Boards. (Goal 6.3)

Addressing Diverse Educational Needs in the North State: Learning in Retirement

The Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) is a learning-in-retirement program for North State residents 60 years and over or retired. OLLI’s 2010-2011 achievements focused on program growth and sustainability.  Reflecting the commitment to serving the North State including and beyond Chico, plans were completed to begin offering OLLI classes in Willows beginning Fall 2011 and specific outreach activities in the Willows area promoted new membership.

 A cooperative venture between an OLLI class taught by retired art professor Yoshio Kusaba resulted in a research project that will benefit the Janet Turner Gallery. OLLI participants volunteered to conduct research on ten Japanese prints, with the research to appear along with the prints when the display opens in Fall 2011.

 OLLI peer instructors offered “Classes without Quizzes” as part of the Alumni Association Golden Grads weekend event for alumni celebrating their 50th graduation anniversary.

 OLLI staff participated in the CARD Senior Expo to promote the benefit of lifelong learning and OLLI membership. Additional new outreach efforts included presentations to more than 400 community leaders and potential OLLI members at the Willows Chamber of Commerce, Sons in Retirement (SIRS), the Chico Rotary, and a meeting of retired public employees.

 Two long-time OLLI members were invited by the Chico Enterprise-Record to write monthly articles for the senior issues column. One columnist focuses on senior issues; the other writes about crafts and hobbies. OLLI was also featured in the Community Snapshots section of the EnterpriseRecord five times this year.

4-1


 General meetings open to the public drew audiences in excess of 125 people. Topics included cloud computing, wellness and aging, and the birds of Bidwell Park.

 As a result of program growth and loss of an off campus lease for classrooms, identifying additional classroom space was a priority for 2010-2011.  With negotiations successfully concluded for multiple, temporary classroom space for OLLI, the Program Coordinator, with the help of a commercial property realtor, conducted an extensive search for permanent classroom space in the Chico area that meets program criteria in functionality, location, and cost; that search has not yet concluded, but the time and research invested in the project have honed the search parameters for functionality, location, and cost.  Creative interim space solutions include the addition of a two new venues: the Sycamore Glen retirement community and the Chico Sports Club for ballroom dancing classes.

Addressing Diverse Educational Needs throughout California: Workforce and Teacher Professional Development

RCE meets professional and workforce development needs through a variety of programs that include academic courses, conferences, and workshops.

Professional and Workforce Development Programs & Audiences 2010-2011

Program Online Career Development Courses

Education Solutions for Dental Professionals

Courses for Educators and MultiDisciplinary Professional Development Community College Faculty Preparation and Adult Education Certificate Program California Teachers Association University Credit Partnership

Localization Certification Program

Scope National

Regional Statewide

Target Audience Career changers, businesses and employees seeking skills upgrades Dental assistants and dentists Teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators

Enrollments 6

79 951

Regional

Community college faculty and postbaccalaureate students with an interest in community college teaching

14

Statewide

CTA members/teachers

244

Global

Localization and marketing professionals, translators, Web developers, project managers

76

In conjunction with system-wide efforts of Continuing and Extended Education, RCE began exploring workforce development training opportunities through Workforce Investment Boards (WIB). The CSU Continuing and Extended Education participated in a statewide WIB conference and Chico joined the effort, following –up through participation in a regional health care initiative meeting in Redding. While some CSU campuses have developed new contract work, RCE has yet to conclude any contract agreements.

4-2


Addressing Diverse Educational Needs beyond California: Localization Certification Programs The Localization Certification and Localization Project Management Certification programs attracted participants from a wide variety of businesses including Disney Online Studios, Nickelodeon Virtual Worlds Group, LinkedIn, PayPal, McAfee, and Adobe Systems. The Fall 2010 programs in Germany generated 16 enrollments; 60 participants enrolled in the Spring 2011 programs in San Francisco. Those participants came from 11 countries and 9 US states. Program speakers included localization professionals from a wide variety of businesses, including Twitter, Yahoo!, IBM, and Facebook.

Reaching the North State and Beyond through the Web: Google AdWords

CSU, Chico was the first campus in the CSU to receive the Google Grant for AdWords. The grant provides advertising media that has increased relevant Web traffic and cost-effectively expanded RCE’s global outreach for the past three years. The online AdWords campaigns have also driven traffic to the ALCI Chico YouTube video, which remains the most internationally viewed video in its category (official university study abroad recruitment videos).

Grant for Google AdWords Year

Cost

Impressions

Clicks

Avg cost per click

2008-2009

$151,775

9,481,244

241,122

.63

2010-2011

$118,150

12,557,863

173,705

.68

2009-2010 Three Year Total

$120,763

12,744,239

$390,688

34,783,346

182,197 597,024

.66 .66

Collaborating for Mutually Beneficial Public Engagement: Conference Services & the Colusa Hall Conference and Event Center RCE’s comprehensive conference management services demonstrate the campus’ commitment to meeting Northern California’s professional development and lifelong learning needs by providing opportunities for more than 1000 conference participants in seven conference events to come to campus to learn, network, and share resources and expertise. RCE offers a single-point of contact for conference events on campus with conference services that range from planning and design to marketing, implementation, and evaluation.

4-3


2010-2011 Conference Services Conference

Scope

After School Summer Conference

Statewide

CELT Conference

Regional

Butte County Office of Education Middle/High School Conference CSU Counterparts Meeting

Northern California Botany Conference Annual Domestic Violence Update and Spousal Abuse Event Children in Trauma

Regional

Statewide Statewide Regional National

Target Audience After school program teachers and administrators Middle school and high school after school site and program coordinators, line staff, teachers and administrators University/community college faculty, staff, students CSU Extended and Continuing Education management and staff Professional Conference

Therapists, psychologists, medical professionals Psychologists, therapists, social workers, educators, nurses, physicians, attorneys, resource providers

Participants 200 135 242 117 255 45 88

The California Indian Fair for Partnerships in Research was a returning conference for CSU, Chico. The twoday event encouraged dialog among Native Americans and government researchers regarding how they can best work together. Researchers explored ways to gather relevant, timely information while maintaining the Native American heritage and integrity of the land on which they work. As a related initiative, significant effort was invested starting in fall 2010 to support the campus’ commitment to host the 2011 California Indian Conference in October. With funding support the President and Provost and conference logistics support from RCE, the College of Behavioral Sciences Department of Anthropology is coordinating representatives from a broad group of tribal representatives to develop a multi-day conference expected to serve 400-500 Native American attendees. RCE invested capacity building funds to stimulate faculty interest in bringing academic conferences to campus by showcasing the opportunities to support their professional organizations in a different way than they may have considered before. A series of meetings with individual colleges and departments began in Spring 2011 and will continue into the upcoming academic year.

The completion of the Colusa Hall remodel project signifies the realization of RCE’s most significant investment in future conference services and program growth capacity. The first event hosted in Colusa Hall was the April 14-15 meeting of the CSU Counterparts and the CSU Intensive English Programs Consortium, which occurred before the building was formally open. A ribbon-cutting ceremony was held on May 2 in conjunction with a Senior Management meeting and sneak peak of the building. The formal Open House on May 19 showcased the building and the many state-of-the-art conference facility features. Since then, Colusa Hall has been in demand for a variety of events, and a comprehensive management plan has been submitted for review and approval.

4-4


Colusa Hall Conference & Event Center Activity Summary April 2011-June 2011 Host

Event Name

Regional & Continuing Education

CSU Counterparts

95

Office of the President

Senior Management Meeting

50

Regional & Continuing Education Regional & Continuing Education Regional & Continuing Education Undergraduate Education Undergraduate Education Office of the Provost Office of the Provost

University Advancement

Butte County Office of Education Information Resources

Academic Technologies

College of Communication & Education Regional & Continuing Education Regional & Continuing Education

# Attend

CSU-IEP Consortium

22

Colusa Hall Ribbon Cutting

15

Colusa Hall Open House

175

Council of Academic Deans Retreat

20

First Year Experience–Town Hall

150

First Year Experience–Economic Challenges

160

College of Business Interim Dean Interviews

40

University Foundation Board of Governors

25

Northeastern Regional Curriculum Consortium

35

Director's Retreat

Manager's Retreat Co-STARS Reception, Advisory Board, Thesis Presentations Connect•Learn•Engage Webinars ALCI Student Orientation and Training

10 8

50

Total

20

100

1015

Supporting Documents  OLLI & Elder College Flier

 OLLI in the News

 Dental Solutions for Educational Professional Flier

 2011 Localization Project Management Certification Program Agenda & Presenter Roster  2011 After School Conference Promotional Postcard

 2011 “The Remix” Middle/High School After School Conference

 2010 Domestic Violence Update Marketing Flier  2011 Children In Trauma Conference Flier

4-5


Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI) of Chico is a

peer-led, learning in retirement organization that offers a wide variety of special classes on topics ranging from poetry and literature to politics and history. OLLI provides opportunities for intellectual stimulation and a meeting ground for members age 60+ or retired (and spouses of any age) to explore new topics, discuss current events, and network with other talented and interesting people from the community. Fee: $65/year Contact: 530-898-6679 Spring classes start on February 7, 2011 Prospective Member Meeting

Date: Wednesday, February 2, 2011 Time: 10–11:30 am Location: Chico Masonic Family Center, 1110 W. East Avenue Visit Osher Lifelong Learning Institute online at rce.csuchico.edu/osher

ElderCollege is an opportunity

for persons age 60 and over to attend University courses on a noncredit, space-available basis with the permission of the instructor. As a guest in the course, you’ll gain the knowledge you desire without the homework you don’t have time to do! And while you learn, your life experiences and insights enrich the educational experience of the younger college students. ElderCollege is a great way to explore new disciplines and enjoy learning for the joy of it! Fee: $60/semester Contact: Regional & Continuing Education 530-898-6105 Classes start January 24, 2011. ElderCollege enrollment is open until February 18, 2011. for the ElderCollege Orientation or call any time for more information.

Date: Wednesday, January 19, 2011 Time: 10–11 am Where: CSU, Chico, Regional & Continuing Education, room 107 Visit ElderCollege online at rce.csuchico.edu/eldercollege

Phone: 530-898-6105 Fax: 530-898-4020 Web: rce.csuchico.edu E-mail: rce@csuchico.edu

May 20, 2011


Continuing Education presents three professional development workshops that meet training requirements for the California Board of Dental Examiners. Visit rce.csuchico.edu/dental for the most up-to-date information.

RCED 949L

OSHA—The Annual Mandated Training

RCED 949K

CA Dental Practice Act

This is a mandatory two-hour course required by the Dental Board of California for all dental licensees seeking renewal of their license. This course covers acts that are in violation of the Dental Practice Act, including utilization and scope of practice for auxiliaries, scope of practice for dentistry, laws governing the prescribing of drugs, citations, fines, revocation, suspension, and license renewal and supporting regulations. Participants receive two continuing education units.

RCED 949J

Infection Control

As mandated by the Dental Board of California, for license renewal all dental licensees are required to complete a two-hour course on Section 1005 of the Dental Practice Act in Infection Control. Regulatory Directives, the intent of language and proper implementation of the language, shall be explained. All attendees will receive materials to take back to the office and begin using right away. Topics include: Section 1005 of the DPA, definitions, written plans and protocols, precautions for bloodborne diseases, and much more. Participants receive two continuing education units.

RCED 949K–01 California Dental Pittman J October 21 F 8:30–10:30am Practice Act Infection Control Pittman J October 21 F 11am–1pm RCED 949J–01 RCED 949L–01

OSHA-The Annual Pittman J October 21 F 1:30–3:30pm Mandated Training

professional development workshops online at rce.csuchico.edu/dental

This is a refresher course that meets the requirements for annual OSHA training. This fastpaced course covers subjects that are mandated by OSHA, including bloodborne pathogen standards, injury and illness prevention plans, workplace security, hazard communication, ergonomics, record keeping and documentation, and more. You will receive materials to help you develop, implement, train, measure, and update policies and procedures that will bring your office into compliance or give you the information to double check what you are already doing. Upon completion of this course, participants will receive two continuing education units available only to dental professionals. All other health care workers may take the course and meet their annual training requirement, but they will not receive continuing education units.

CSU, Chico Continuing Education, Room 107

$40 10/14/2011

CSU, Chico $40 10/14/2011 Continuing Education, Room 107 CSU, Chico Continuing Education, Room 107

$40 10/14/2011


2011 Session Descriptions: Localization Project Management Certification Project Management Principles Karen Combe, Vice President of Localization, PTC In this session, the presenter discusses three guiding principles that inform project management activities. These principles are then applied to the key processes recurrent in the majority of localization projects. Community Localization Carsten Kneip, International Program Manager, Microsoft Carsten Kneip will present community localization and how to manage community localization projects. He will also explore appropriate technology solutions to manage community localization. Project Management Budgeting Willem Stoeller, Director, Lingotek Willem Stoeller will present project management budgeting concepts and specific approaches to maintain fiscal control over complicated translation and localization projects. Agile Methods for Project Management Karen Combe, Vice President of Localization, PTC This session will include an overview of the agile development methodology. The session will explore corresponding localization strategies in the agile environment range, from the traditional, bulk translation and testing process, to a continuous flow of activities. The essential is to minimize re-work while achieving the desired release date and agreed levels of quality. The session will be interactive. Leveraging Client-Vendor Relations for LPM Success Scott Schwalbach, Director of Global Solutions, VistaTEC “I need this 5000 word translation tomorrow.” As the vendor, how do you react to such a request? Commonly, vendors tend to jump through the hoops to satisfy the client’s sometimes unreasonable requests. Doing so leads to stress, mistakes, and a breakdown in a successful client engagement. We will discuss how client communication and education is important to the success of any relationship with the client, as well as the within your own team.

2011 Localization Certification Program and Localization Project Management Certification San Francisco State University Downtown Center San Francisco, California, USA

Project Management Tools Stephan Cocron, Senior Localization Manager, Yahoo! This session will provide an overview of the key components of a robust localization project management system while delving into the details of some of the industry’s leading applications. The presenter will discuss what is really needed, what can be done with the most commonly available productivity tools, and what you may need depending on whether you will be working for a translation vendor or an in-house translation department on the client side. The presenter will explore specific PM tools and discuss industry trends and landscape. A Q+A session will follow the presentation. Project Management Tools—Microsoft Project Carsten Kneip, International Release Program Manager, Microsoft Learn how to use Microsoft Project for your localization projects. In this hands-on session, we’ll be creating a localization schedule from scratch. Participants will learn how to utilize MS Project for scheduling, duration estimation, and resource assignments. We’ll cover a variety of scheduling scenarios and some of the typical problems we encounter when faced with day-to-day schedule issues. Virtual Teams Willem Stoeller, Director, Lingotek This session will explore how to create and manage effective virtual teams. What are global virtual teams? How and where do they effect project management? We will discuss global teams and cultural differences: ethics, decision-making, negotiation and team leading. We will also explore technology solutions for global virtual teams. Case Study: Challenging Localization Processes Marie Salet, Principal CMS Engineer, Language Technologies Group, Autodesk Autodesk, a world leader in 2D and 3D design, engineering, and entertainment software, delivers the broadest product portfolio to empower customers to digitally design, visualize, and simulate their ideas. We have over 9 million users in 185 countries. Approximately 60% of our revenue comes from outside the Americas. We successfully delivered over 12 million localized words in 19 languages last year. So why would we change our processes? How did we make use of the latest technology? Were we successful? What did we learn? Follow Autodesk as we challenge our localization processes.


2011 Schedule At A Glance: Localization Project Management Certification TH U R S DAY, J U N E 23, 2011 7:30–8 am 8–8:15 am 8:15–9:45 am 9:45–10 am 10–11:15 am 11:15 am–12:30 pm 12:30–2 pm 2–3:30 pm 3:30–3:45 pm 3:45–5 pm 5:30–7 pm 8–8:45 am 8:45–9 am 9 am–10:30 am 10:30–10:45 am 10:45 am–1 pm 1–2:30 pm 2:30–4 pm 4–5:15 pm   5:15–5:30 pm

Registration Welcome Project Management Principles   Karen Combe, PTC Break Community Localization   Carsten Kneip, Microsoft Project Management Budgeting   Willem Stoeller, Lingotek Lunch Agile Methods for Project Management   Karen Combe, PTC Break Leveraging Client-Vendor Relations for LPM Success   Scott Schwalbach, VistaTEC Reception at the Serrano Hotel FR I DAY, J U N E 24 , 2011 Certification Exam Break Project Management Tools   Stephan Cocron, Yahoo! Break Project Management Tools—Microsoft Project   Carsten Kneip, Microsoft Lunch Virtual Teams   Willem Stoeller, Lingotek Case Study: Challenging Localization Processes   Marie Salet, Autodesk Wrap Up

2011 Localization Certification Program and Localization Project Management Certification San Francisco State University Downtown Center San Francisco, California, USA


JOIN US!

AU G U ST 1 - 3 , 2011

C AL IFO R NIA STATE U N I V ERS I T Y, C H I CO C A M PU S Strengthen your After School Programs with hands-on learning and best practice strategies!

Take home tools to make your programs fun and exciting Learn a variety of new curriculum ideas Get valuable leadership training to continue your professional development Network with colleagues and have fun! Register today! $225—Registration opens March 29 Empower your super Registration closes June 30

heroes to save the day:

Up… Up… And Away! It’s time for the 5TH annual After School Professional Development Institute

Paraprofessionals Site & Program Coordinators Line Staff Teachers & Partners Administrators (day one)

For more information,

Opening keynote presentation: Monday, August 1ST at 9:30 am Special recognition event: Monday, August 1ST at 11:15 am A collaboration of CSU, Chico Continuing Education, the Butte County Office of Education & Learning Support Region 2.

registration information, and presentation applications, contact: Butte County Office of Education at 530-532-5686 or rce.csuchico.edu/afterschool


rce.csuchico.edu/afterschool


2010 Legal and Social Science Update for California Rule of Court 5.230 Instructor Emberly Cross will present on topics including the use of different types of restraining orders in domestic violence cases, new laws relating to domestic violence, mediators and custody evaluators, new social science research regarding families experiencing domestic violence, societal factors that contribute to domestic violence, cultural and same sex considerations, and community resources. 7:30 – 8:00 am

Registration & Continental Breakfast

8:00 – 8:10 am

Welcome & Introduction

A CSU, Chico member welcomes participants on behalf of CSU, Chico; gives a brief review of the content and format of the training; and introduces the trainer. Ms. Cross will then survey of participants by agency, position, and length of time doing work interacting with domestic violence victims.

8:10 – 9:30 am

Legal Update

Using lecture and small group discussion, trainer will present new civil legislation regarding domestic violence and child custody; new criminal legislation regarding domestic violence; and final recommendations of Elkins Family Law Task Force, including small group discussion of implementation in local courts.

9:30 – 10:30 am

A Domestic Violence Victim's Using video, group exercise, and brief lecture, this segment will help participants evaluate the experience of victims in domestic violence situations, including batter-generated and View of the Legal System

life/social factor-generated risks the victim may face. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss the context of violence and the immediate, short-term, and long-term needs of victims in domestic violence cases.

10:30 – 12:00 pm

Teens & Dating Violence

A new and timely topic for this year’s DV Update, this segrment uses videos, lecture, case scenarios, and large-group discussion to help participants recognize dating violence in teens and young people and be able to distinguish bullying from dating violence. Focus will be on types of abusive and controlling behaviors in teen relationships; prevalence of dating violence; consequences of dating violence; emerging issues, including use of technology in perpetration of abuse and in intervention; and resources for practitioners.

About the Presenter Emberly C. Cross, JD MSW, Coordinating Attorney

Cooperative Restraining Order Clinic, San Francisco, CA Emberly Cross has been the Coordinating Attorney at the Cooperative Restraining Order Clinic in San Francisco since 1996, helping domestic violence victims obtain restraining orders and child custody and support orders. She obtained her law degree and her Master’s of Social Work degree from the University of Michigan. Prior to working at CROC, she was in private practice in family law in San Francisco. She is currently a member of the Advisory Committee of San Francisco SafeStart, a federal initiative to reduce the incidence and impact of violence on young children ages 0-6 and a member of the California Partnership to End Domestic Violence’s Public Policy and Research Committee. She has been a co-chair of the Children Witnessing Domestic Violence subcommittee of the California Alliance Against Domestic Violence’s public policy committee, and a co-chair of San Francisco’s Domestic Violence Consortium. She routinely conducts trainings on restraining orders and legislative updates in the Bay Area and throughout California.

rce.csuchico.edu/inservice/dvupdate2010.asp

AOC approved (4 hours). CSU, Chico Continuing Education is an approved continuing education provider for the Board of Registered Nursing (Provider 00656), the Board of Behavioral Sciences Examiners (Provider PCE 799), and the California Psychological Association Accrediting Agency (MCEP Provider CAL-123).


Children in Trauma 2011: Bullying and Violence in the Youth Community

Join us for Children in Trauma 2011, an intensive practicum providing best practices training on bullying, the destructive use of personal power. This landmark conference is for clinicians, teachers and school administrators, emergency personnel, medical care providers, extracurricular and other professionals. Clinical treatment protocol, including assessment and the long-term potential impact of bullying, will be addressed. Attendees will understand the role of the bully, the target/victim, and the bystander.

Agenda Friday, March 18:

Saturday, March 19:

Registration & Breakfast: 7:30 am

Breakfast: 7:30 am

Conference: 8:30 am – 4:30 pm (Lunch Provided)

Conference: 8:00 am ­­– 12:00 pm

CDC Presentation: Research findings on the nine types of bullying, including cyberbullying.

Clinicians will learn guidelines for assessment and treatment options for children of varied ages.

Olweus Bullying Prevention Program Presentation: Efforts to stop bullying in schools and communities. Tools to assess and modify environments through a comprehensive bullying prevention program.

Elementary and secondary teachers will learn tools for classroom management, and how bullying impacts learning potential.

Community forum for families and youth to share personal stories and real-world experiences with bullying prevention experts: 5:30 – 7:00 pm

Physicians and nurse practitioners will enhance their understanding of psychosomatic medical implications in the treatment of children and youth. Youth group leaders will learn how to design and manage programs to discourage bullying, be aware of potential problems, and manage incidents. Emergency personnel will learn strategies to help victims feel safe and be able to be verbal during rescue situations.

Featured Speakers Dr. J. Marlene Snyder, Ph.D.

Dr. Melissa K. Holt, Ph.D.

Director of Development, Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Behavioral Scientist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Dr. Marlene Snyder serves as the point of contact for the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, working with conferences and media. She works with the National Anti-bullying Campaign, Stop Bullying Now, and is a Consultant for the U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. She is the Organizing President and now Past President for the International Bullying Prevention Association (IBPA).

Registration Fees: Single Participant: $195 Group—4+ from one organization: $185 ea. CSU Faculty & Staff: $105 Evening Session— Parents, Families & Adults: $20 Evening Session—Youth Aged 14-18: $3

To register, call 530-898-6105 For more information, visit the website

Dr. Melissa Holt is a Behavioral Scientist in the Division of Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Her research focuses on youth violence, with an emphasis on bullying and the intersection between bullying and victimization in other domains. Dr. Holt has extensive experience conducting school-based studies on bullying, with a particular emphasis on low-income, urban communities.

Earn 11 Hours of Continuing Education: BBS (Provider PCE 799) BRN (Provider 00656) MCEP (Provider CAL123) MCLE (Provided by Butte County Bar Assoc.)


Join us for Children in Trauma 2011, an intensive practicum providing clinical best practice training for clinicians to assess and treat victims and perpetrators of bullying ages 3 to 18. Featured speakers from the Centers for Disease Control and the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program will provide an in-depth understanding of current research and bullying prevention strategies. This landmark conference is for clinicians, teachers and school administrators, emergency personnel, medical care providers, extracurricular and other professionals.

A Special Forum for Parents & Families Friday, March 18

5:30 – 7:00 pm

CSU, Chico BMU

Parents and adolescents are invited to a special community forum to share personal stories and real-world experiences with bullying. Experts from The CDC, The Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, and Youth for Change will be on-hand to answer questions, address concerns, and give tools to advocate for children in the community. Dr. Marlene Grant, of the Children In Trauma Advisory Board, will facilitate a discussion with conference presenters and the audience. The Oroville Exchange Club will have packets of information available for attendees, and Youth for Change clinicians will be on site for support.


Community Forum on Bullying Fri, March 18th, 5:30-7:00 pm

Chico State, BMU Auditorium

The 9th annual Children In Trauma Conference focuses on the theme of bullying and violence throughout the lifespan -- with special focus on the youth community. National experts from the Centers from Disease Control and Prevention, the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, and Youth Peace Literacy will be sharing extensive research into the dynamics and far reaching effects of bullying, including playground, cyber-bullying, neighborhood bullying, school and social bullying. Parents and families are invited to a special community forum to share personal stories and real-world experiences with bullying. Experts will answer questions, address concerns, and give tools to advocate for children in the community. Dr. Marlene Grant of the Children In Trauma Advisory Board will facilitate a discussion with conference presenters and the audience. The Oroville Exchange Club will have packets of information available for attendees, and Youth for Change clinicians will be on site for support.

Featured Speakers Dr. J. Marlene Snyder, Ph.D.

Dr. Melissa K. Holt, Ph.D.

Director of Development, Olweus Bullying Prevention Program

Registration Requested: There is no fee to attend Pizza, salad & beverages will be served Please RSVP online or by calling 530-898-6105

Dr. Melissa Holt is a Behavioral Scientist in the Division of Violence Prevention at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Her research focuses on youth violence, with an emphasis on bullying and the intersection between bullying and victimization in other domains. Dr. Holt has extensive experience conducting school-based studies on bullying, with a particular emphasis on lowincome, urban communities.

Thank you to our sponsors:

Dr. Marlene Snyder serves as the point of contact for the Olweus Bullying Prevention Program, working with conferences and media. She works with the National Antibullying Campaign, Stop Bullying Now, and is a Consultant for the U.S. Dept. of Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention. She is the Organizing President and now Past President for the International Bullying Prevention Association (IBPA).

Behavioral Scientist, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Academic Affairs Goal 5: Strategically Manage Resources


Academic Affairs Goal 5: Strategically Manage Resources RCE has a unique role to play generating and managing resources that support the mission and strategic priorities of the University. The overall budget uncertainties in 2010-2011 provided an opportunity for RCE to contribute to the campus in many tangible ways. The use of self-support to serve students in January and Summer Session generated additional revenue to the campus in the forms of both reimbursement of costs incurred and revenue share. The following accomplishments reflect RCE’s goals of increasing grant and contact activity and contributing to the University through responsible stewardship.  The investment of RCE resources ($2,467,689 in FY 2010-2011) to renovate historic Colusa Hall and revitalize the campus core for the long-term strategic purpose of supporting RCE’s programs and conference services created an exceptional resource for the University. (Goal 2.1)  RCE’s contribution to the campus through direct cash payments for services, indirect cash payments, and the major capital investment in Colusa Hall total $4,879,925.40. (Goal 7.2)

 RCE contributed $38,360 in staff time to a variety of campus initiatives that are not connected to RCE programs and services but reflect RCE’s engagement in the overall effectiveness of the University. (Goal 7)

 The Center for Continuing Education (CCE) Transformation project was launched with a scope of work submitted to FMS for improvements to CCE for energy efficiency and safety. (Goal 7.3)

 Open University fees were adjusted to reflect increases in State University Fees to ensure OU fees remain at parity or exceed the cost of state-support fees and to generate revenue for campus initiatives, identified by the President this year to be the North State Initiative. (Goal 7.1)

 Establish permanent scholarship application and award process with $1 million Osher Reentry Scholarship Program endowment. (Goal 1.5)

 RCE’s information technology infrastructure was strengthened by the hire of a new Technology Manager and a systematic approach to fully aligning RCE’s IT infrastructure with campus best practices. (Goal 3.2, 3.4, 3.5)

 Process improvements moved forward the goal of expanded reporting capacity and quality of reports generated to support RCE business needs. (Goal 3.6)

Marshaling Resources through Fundraising: Osher and Prime Timers Reentry Scholarships With the award of Osher Reentry Scholarship Program Endowment of $1 million in the previous fiscal year, RCE established a permanent scholarship application and award process. The generosity of the Osher Foundation included a $50,000 bridge grant which allowed nine former scholars and eight new scholars to be awarded Osher Reentry Scholarships in 2010-11 academic year. Future interest earnings on the $1 million endowment will support reentry students in 2011-12 and for decades to come. In addition, Osher Lifelong Learning Institute fundraising efforts contributed $6600 to the Prime Timers Reentry Scholarship fund for reentry students.

5-1


Summary of RCE Fundraising Activities 2007-2008 Osher OLLI Endowment

Osher Reentry Endowment OLLI Bridge Grant

Osher Reentry Scholarship Prime Timers Scholarship

2008-2009

$1,000,000

$50,000

$4,220

Total $1,054,220

$50,000 $50,000

$5,848

2009-2010

2010-2011

S1,000,000

$1,000,000 $50,000

$3,710

$105,848 $1,053,710

Total

$1,000,000

$50,000

$6,600

$150,000

$23,323

$6,600 $2,223,323

Marshaling Resources: CERF and Research Foundation Revenue RCE fee revenue for self-support academic degree courses and programs is managed through a state trust account, the Continuing Education Revenue Fund (CERF). Revenue from grants, contracts, conferences, and workshops is managed through the Research Foundation. In 2010-2011, revenue from all sources totaled $6,527,183. General Fund $227,576.00 Grants & Contracts CERF Interest $106,939.00 $21,426.70

CERF

Research Foundation CERF Interest

Research Foundation $1,860,578.83

General Fund

CERF $4,169,790

The strategic use of self-support in January Intersession and Summer Session to meet student demand resulted in a strong year of CERF revenue and provided the campus additional revenue for current operations as well as strategic initiatives.

5-2


In addition to the indirect generated from the following grant and contract activity, RCE’s non-credit feebased programs generated $132,368 in administrative fees that support the incentive pool allocated by Academic Affairs to support further grant efforts.

RCE Grant & Contract Activity & Impact 2010-2011 Sponsor

Project

Butte County Office of Education Northern California Botanical Society CSU Commission on the Extended University

Amount

Status

After School Professional Development Institute

$33,583

Funded

$23,361

Funded

MS in Ag Education

$49,995

Northern California Botany Conference

Total Grant and Contract Funding

$106,939

10/11 RF admin fees from fee-based programs; supports incentive pool

$132,368

Total Grant and Contract Activity & Impact

$239,307

Funded CERF

Aligning Resources: Campus Distributions & Contributions In 2010-2011, CERF revenues were distributed to the campus in the form of both direct and indirect cost reimbursement and in revenue sharing. CERF funds provide discretionary dollars for campus units to cover operational expenses and fund initiatives that are not covered by the General Fund budget. New this year was the Chancellor’s Office directive that all CERF revenue shared with campus units must continue to be managed in CERF, resulting in the creation of multiple CERF sub-accounts to allow departments to access the funds once they are distributed.

RCE Financial Impact on CSU Chico 2010-2011 Special Initiative Funding $55,658

Faculty Salaries $929,384 Indirect Payments $24,098

Revenue Sharing $1,349,823

Direct Cash Payments $711,211

Campus Capital Improvements $2,824,965

5-3


The remodel of Colusa Hall, the University Center Landscape Project that created the Creekside Plaza and educational gardens, and the start of the accessible path of travel project are tangible and long-term contributions to the campus. Self-support programs, services, and conferences generate revenue to many service providers on campus, including the Research Foundation and Associated Students. These contributions are predominantly in the form of direct cash payments; RCE related cash contributions come in the form of revenue generated directly to the service provider as a result of RCE’s activities.

RCE Campus Financial Impact Summary 2010-2011 Campus Capital Improvements

$2,824,965

Creekside Plaza and Gardens, Colusa Hall Remodel and Campus Path of Travel

Campus-wide Infrastructure and Building Improvements

Revenue Sharing

$1,349,823

Program Revenue from Open University, Special Session and Summer.

Distributions to VPAA, VPSA, and Cabinet

Direct Cash Payments

$711,211

Cash generated from RCE activities for Campus Services

Payments to Business & Finance, Student Affairs, Academic Affairs, Associated Students, Research Foundation, and University Foundation

Faculty

$929,384

Academic salaries and benefits

Special Session, CEN/CSCI, PMBA, Noncredit Instruction

RCE Indirect Payments

$24,098

RCE expenditures in support of general fund programs or personnel.

CELT, Connect•Learn•Engage, Sustainability Conference, Notary Services, Union Released Time and support for General Fund events in Colusa Hall and CE 107.

Special Initiative Funding

$55,658

RCE investment of Open University Revenues

Funding for special outreach programs, e.g., the proposed North State Initiative.

Total Campus Impact`

$5,895,139

Demonstrating Organizational Effectiveness: Process Improvements RCE remains committed to process improvements as a unit priority for the effective stewardship of our resources.  The task allocation process implemented in 2009-2010 resulted in the ability in 2010-2011 to document the labor costs associated with individual programs as well as business sustaining

5-4


activities and those activities that were contributions to the General Fund. The result is information to support more effective budgeting and planning.

 The OLLI registration process was moved from a paper-based process with back-end data management via Excel spreadsheets to a database and web-interface to streamline data entry and management of registration, course scheduling, and membership management.

 The OLLI Board developed a ride-sharing board to link potential riders with volunteer drivers.  RCE’s technology group has implemented a process of ongoing improvement to identify, standardize and document procedures, processes, and IT needs.

 The Evisions product “Argos,” a business intelligence tool, has been tested to prototype data needs across disparate data sources and systems. Several proof-of-concepts projects for data entry and data manipulation have resulted in significant improvements in generating ad-hoc and business critical reports, streamlined communication between students and faculty, and conference services data manipulation and reporting. These results support sustainability, efficiency and improvement, and enhanced student-centered learning environments.

 RCE’s technology group coordinated with the ALCI staff to achieve multiple days-of-labor savings for level and elective placement. Previously requiring multiple staff members for multiple days at the beginning of each session, this process has now been streamlined to take one day.

 A process for automated enrollment into the Moodle LMS created an improved learning environment for ALCI students and instructors, with electronic course materials (syllabi, links and other resources) replacing printed copies. Students are now automatically enrolled in their appropriate Moodle sessions, replacing a manual process. Our goal to develop a Customer Relationship Management (CRM) process to be integrated into the Drupal Web Content Management System (Goal 3.3) has not yet been realized due to delays in implementing Drupal. We remain confident that with the progress made to date, AY 2011-12 will see full implementation.

Supporting Documents  CEU Grant Abstract: Online Master of Science in Agricultural Education

 Evisions Argos Enrollment Application - Proof of Concept

5-5


Commission on the Extended University Grant Proposal Abstract

Online Master of Science in Agricultural Education: A Program Partnership of the AG*IDEA Consortium of Universities California is the nation’s top agricultural state, with a robust network of agricultural educators who are challenged by time and distance in meeting their ongoing need for post-baccalaureate professional education. The Online MS in Agriculture Education project is an innovative approach to leveraging outstanding agriculture education curricula from across the US and contributing distinctive California expertise in international issues/globalization and diversity management. This project will create the West’s first online MS in Agricultural Education and the first MS in Agricultural Education in the CSU with a significant culminating research component. The online MS in Agricultural Education will be developed in collaboration with the AG*IDEA consortium, a national partnership of universities offering programs and courses in agriculture disciplines. AG*IDEA is an affiliate of the Great Plains Interactive Distance Education Alliance (IDEA), founded in 1994 to capitalize on the institutional resources of 11 major research universities. This project leverages the expertise of top agriculture faculty across the nation and Chico’s strengths in distance learning and the expertise of our California-based faculty. The AG*IDEA partnership significantly streamlines the degree development timeline while exposing students to some of the finest faculty and highest quality online courses available. Using proven online instructional design approaches and embedding assessment measures into the course development process, CSU, Chico College of Agriculture faculty will develop the innovative online courses to complete the degree program, including electives in international issues and managing diversity and the culminating thesis/project and comprehensive exam. The project meets all of the strategic priorities for CSU, Chico, as well as embraces the objectives both of the CSU’s Framework for Action and the Access to Excellence strategic plan. Inter-institutional collaboration through the AG*IDEA consortium will allow strategic allocation of scarce resources while augmenting CSU’s capacity to grow and serve a larger clientele through a broader and deeper commitment to graduate agricultural education delivered online. Target clientele for the online degree will primarily be credentialed high school agricultural education teachers; a secondary audience will include personnel in related educational positions in the agricultural profession such as county Farm Bureau executive directors, California Department of Education regional agricultural consultants (regional FFA supervisors) and others involved in agriculture who wish to enhance their professional development portfolios. The degree program will be self-supporting through the innovative AG*IDEA revenue share model that returns a percentage of the common student fees to student’s home institutions and a revenue share to CSU, Chico for enrollments in the courses developed by this distinctive project.

Status: Funded - CERF Grant Amount: $49,995 Project Timeline: 2011-2012


Evisions Argos Enrollment Application – Proof of Concept This is a proof of concept enrollment application designed using the Evisions Argos, Business Intelligence platform (Argos). It highlights a few of the capabilities for data entry and reporting needs within only one division of Regional and Continuing Education, the American Language and Culture Institute (ALCI). This proof of concept mirrored an ALCI business process that was deeply labor intensive, which involved several days of data entry and manipulation by multiple staff, into a much more efficient model resulting in dramatic ‘days’ savings of labor and time. Time to develop this proof of concept spanned approximately one week of one developer’s time, including time to learn the ‘how to manipulate data via Argos’ and how to develop reports in Argos. The concept is level and elective placement (enrollment data manipulation). Reports are sent via email during the first week of classes. Reports are scheduled nightly (M-F, 6pm), run and burst automatically then sent as PDF attachment to the person in which the data is intended (the individual instructor or student). This allows initial placement before the beginning of ALCI terms, and during the allotted period for class changes, it allows a fast edit of the individual student’s data. Daily changes are sent nightly to students and staff during the period of allowed change (first week of classes). Behind the scenes of this business process, the LMS system utilized by ALCI–Moodle–is automatically picking up the daily changes and enrolling and dis-enrolling students from classes where appropriate. Emailed pdf reports are sent to instructors (attendance and class rosters) and students (student class lists). This is in support of the campus priorities including sustainability and toward the goal of enhanced, student centered learning. The tertiary benefit of the Argos platform from a proof of concept is that a particular datablock is designed (for reporting or for manipulation) and then once approved, the IT team is no longer in the cycle for delivery, enhancing efficiency for all units involved. Screen 1: An ALCI Term Is Chosen And The Optional Course Name May Be Selected


Evisions Argos Enrollment Application – Proof of Concept Screen 2: (students are listed, selecting a student gives their details)

Screen 3: Deep detail for a particular student, allowing direct enrollment to classes, student name masked for privacy.

Screen 4: Summarized course enrollments.


Evisions Argos Enrollment Application – Proof of Concept Screen 5: Term enrollments from previous terms, student names masked for privacy.

Screen 6: Instructor class roster, student names masked for privacy, automatically sent via scheduled email.

Screen 7: Student class schedule, name masked for privacy, automatically sent via scheduled email.

Screen 8: Instructor attendance sheet, student names masked for privacy, automatically sent via scheduled email.


CSU, Chico Continuing Education Annual Report