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Inside This Issue!!!

Page II Honor Guard Air Force News Page III Field Training Experience Back To School Bash Page IV Events Recruiting Page V Meet the Editor Welcome New Cadets!

About Us DROPZONE is the property of AFROTC Detachment 772. Its entire contents and style are fully protected by copyright and registered according to copyright laws. Editor: C/4th Class Breanna Beckford bbeckford.det772@ gmail.com Contributors: Cadet Beckford Cadet Johnson, E Cadet Mims Cadet Pfannenstiel Cadet Raab Cadet Sawyer Cadet Wood

Cadet Commander’s Corner

As the Fall 2010 semester's Cadet Wing Commander, I would like to welcome all the new cadets to Detachment 772. I would also like to congratulate and welcome back all the cadets that are returning from Field Training. Our detachment only provides us with two years to do what other detachments do in four years, and we make up for that by the caliber of cadets that we bring into the program and the amount of work that we do. This semester will include many fun events planned by the cadets at our detachment. I challenge each of you to attend as many as you can and learn from the events, because you may be the one planning it the following semester.

Interested in Joining? Detachment 772 at Charleston Southern Univ. is a two-year AFROTC program. Find out more about our program by calling: Capt.Christopher Saldana at 843-863-7144

Use each semester and every opportunity you get to become a better officer candidate. I know that I have grown a lot in the past three semesters and I hope that you do as well. I look forward to working with all of you and participating in our growth as future officers. Remember that mistakes are not only tolerated, but expected. Don't be afraid to try out different forms of leadership and have a great semester!

“A good leader

inspires people to have confidence in the leader; a great leader inspires people to have confidence in themselves” - Unknown

Verse 1 of Air Force Song Off we go into the wild blue yonder, Climbing high into the sun; Here they come zooming to meet our thunder, At 'em boys, Give 'er the gun! (Give 'er the gun hey!) Down we dive, spouting our flames from under, Off with one helluva roar! We live in fame or go down in flames. Hey! Nothing'll stop the U.S. Air Force!


September 2010

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

AFROTC DET 772

To Honor with Dignity

!

Cadet Thomas Raab

The Charleston Southern University AFROTC Honor Guard is off to a fine start for the 2010 fall semester. Detachment 772 has hosted multiple mass Honor Guard practices at the beginning of the semester in order to help develop the abilities of the incoming cadets. The detachment’s first Honor Guard event was the Charleston Southern University Buccaneers home football opener against North Greenville University. The event went off rather well for our cadets that sunny afternoon. If any of the four cadets were nervous about being in front of a large audience, it did not show that afternoon. The detachment has participated in two additional Honor Guard events over the following two weeks. The first was a presentation by the detachment commander, Lt Col Mark Trudeau, to Charleston Southern University on the Constitution. The second event was another Buccaneer home football game. Taking the lessons learned from the first home football game, the cadets were primed to carry out their honor guard mission flawlessly. Over the next few months, the Honor Guard is scheduled to participate in a handful of Charleston Southern University events. One of the upcoming events on the schedule is the Homecoming game against the Virginia Military Institute. The detachment’s Honor Guard also plans to participate in the university’s homecoming parade. As all Honor Guard events do, this event will put Detachment 772’s Honor Guard in the public eye. This is a well-met challenge as Detachment 772 is a well organized, motivated, and highly disciplined group of cadets.

Vandenberg Airmen conduct Minuteman III Flight Test

9/20/2010 - VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE, Calif. (AFNS) -- Technicians here test launched an unarmed Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile Sept. 17 from Launch Facility-09. The missile's single reentry test vehicle traveled approximately 5,300 miles to a pre-determined target about 200 miles southwest of Guam. ICBM analysts, including officials from the Department of Defense and the Department of Energy, plan to use the data collected to ensure the readiness and capability of the ICBM fleet. "The launch process requires tremendous teamwork and involves months of preparation," said Col. David Bliesner, the 576th Flight Test Squadron commander. "The data gained from these launches allows us to maintain a high readiness capability and ensures operational effectiveness of the most powerful weapons in the nation's arsenal." The launch was a combined effort of Airmen from the 576th FLTS, the 91st Missile Wing at Minot AFB, N.D., the 625th Strategic Operations Squadron at Offutt AFB, Neb., and the 30th Space Wing. (Courtesy of 30th Space Wing Public Affairs) Volume VII

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September 2010

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

AFROTC DET 772

2010 Field Training Experience Cadet Eric Johnson

My experience prior to Field Training was very unique as compared to my fellow cadets within the detachment and a very unique experience within my life. Since the middle of January, I was waiting for my six months waiting period to end so I could retake the Air Force Officer's Qualifying Test (AFOQT). However, had I waited the full six months, the earliest I could have taken the test would have been August 1, 2010. Furthermore, if I had any chance at making it into any of the encampments of Field Training this past summer, it was the very last Field Training encampment which began on August 1, 2010. My only chance to make it to Field Training was to pray that a waiver would get approved that would allow me to retake the AFOQT a month earlier. I found out in mid June that the waiver was approved! My retake was scheduled for July 1, 2010; so all I had to do was study hard and get some good scores on the test. I simultaneously studied hard for my summer classes and AFOQT! On July 15, I found out that I passed the AFOQT, however I still was not sure if I would be able to slip into a Field Training session due to the time constraints. On July 17, Technical Sergeant Rogers informed me that I was going to Maxwell 6 on July 31, which was the last encampment of the summer. I was excited and nervous at the same time. Upon arrival to Maxwell 6, there was a lot of yelling, very scared faces, and the deer-in-headlights-looks everywhere. Coming from a prior service background, the yelling did not bother me; however, the “figure it out” mentality that really took me by surprise. This mentality forced me to grow as a leader and as a person.

I believe that my Field Training experience was great, because I learned a lot about myself and how to work closely with others to accomplish a goal. I felt that I was slightly prepared for Field Training due to the short notification that I would definitely attend an encampment. My advice to the new cadets in the Detachment is to pay very close attention in Field Training Preparation! Thoroughly study the Field Training manual and develop the concept of teamwork within the Detachment, these actions will be the key to your success in Field Training.

Back to School Bash Cadet Bridgette Sawyer The back to school bash was held at Cadet Mims’s house where we met his family and the majority of the older cadets. They provided us with food, games, and small talk. My perspective of the senior cadets was somewhat intimidating at first, because I didn’t know what to expect. Nevertheless, as the time passed I think all the new cadets, including myself, started to feel a little more comfortable. I learned a lot about the older cadets that day such as, where they went to school, their majors, hometowns, and hobbies. I would definitely participate again in this event because it was a good way to fellowship and get to know other cadets better. This was also a learning experience because we were able to ask them questions on their personal experience in the Air Force (for those who were prior enlisted), and what to expect out of the program. My perspective did change a little towards the senior cadets but not much since, it is a little difficult to become comfortable with them when they are the superior. In the end, I walked away with more knowledge about the program and about the senior cadets.

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September 2010

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

AFROTC DET 772

Events and Recruiting Rock Climbing Event Cadet Aaron Wood Recently cadets went to the James Island Country Park to participate in the rock wall-climbing event. The rock wall was 50 feet high, and had many different courses for climbers of all skill levels. This event hadn’t been done by the detachment before, but it was definitely a good experience. All the cadets who participated definitely seemed to enjoy themselves. The goal of the event was for the cadets to interact and get to know each other in a casual environment. By scheduling this event at the beginning of the semester, it allowed cadets to interact on a personal level. More specifically, it was helpful in allowing the new and returning cadets the opportunity to get to know each other better. This event definitely helped the cadets to relax and have fun together. The participants said that the laid-back environment made conversations flow freely, and some cadets even conquered their fear of heights.

Recruiting for Fall 2010 Cadet Jacob Phannenstiel As a student at Chapin High School, I always had a passion and respect for the military. Being the Recruiting Officer for Detachment 772 has allowed my respect for the Air Force, in particular, to grow. Coming into this detachment, I did not know what to expect; I grew more and more anxious as the days of starting the program drew near. One of the first rewards I have received from the ROTC as a Recruiting Officer is being able to hone time management skills. This has been a huge help with my studies and being on top of my classes. Being in charge of recruiting is not a walk in the park however; I spend a lot of free time dedicating myself to it and attending events to spread the word about our outstanding program. Although recruiting can be busy and sometimes stressful, it is also equally, if not more, rewarding. The recruiting events have been very enjoyable and I love talking about the Air Force with other students who are passionate about the Air Force like me. Volume VII

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Meet the Editor Of the DROPZONE!!! September 2010

CHARLESTON SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY

AFROTC DET 772

Greetings Fellow Cadets! My name is Breanna Beckford and this semester I will be the new editor of the Drop Zone Magazine. I am so excited to have this opportunity to share with you all the new perspectives of this year’s cadet wing, as well as the up coming events. I hope that you will learn something new and look forward to the interesting things our Detachment is involved in. Raised in Columbia, South Carolina, I attended Spring Valley High School where I was heavily involved in both ROTC and Beta Club. Here at CSU, I am majoring in Biology and minoring in Religion in hopes of going to medical school and becoming an Adolescent Pediatrician. I’m also a member of the African American Society and I’ve recently joined the CSU Housing Staff, serving as a Resident Assistant for upperclassmen. Interestingly enough this has been one of my biggest challenges seeing that I’m always so busy; I don’t get a lot of time to bond with my girls. Joining this program has truly been an eye opening experience. I have always been curious about the Air Force and how it could contribute to

Welcome New Cadets!

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