Page 1

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards Issue 3

In this Issue:

In Their Voices The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.

Bridgewater State University, The Bridge Lit Mag Bridgewater, MA Cactus Shadows, CSPress Newspaper Cave Creek, AZ Chantilly High School, Odyssey Yearbook Chantilly, VA Findlay High School, Blue & Gold Newspaper Findlay, OH Mirman Middle School, Write Your Own Story Yearbook Los Angeles, CA St. Mark’s School of Texas, Marksmen Yearbook Dallas, TX Whitney High School, Details Yearbook Rocklin, CA


Bridgewater State University The Bridge Lit Mag Bridgewater, MA Pages 3-4 “Table of Contents” The table of contents show the breadth of work found in The Bridge and features Volume 8’s unique icon design, carried throughout the book, permitting the reader to move through it with a visual ease conversant with digital formats, but that retains hard-copy pleasures.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Painting

Dreamy Barn

17 54

Bianca Piemonte

Pomegranates

Photography

62

20

Sallee Bickford

Endless Windmills Betsy Scarbrough

98

Rebecca Cushing

Light Beverage

Santorini

38

Zoe Palmer

The Dichotomy of Wholeness Veronica Crowley

Ceramics

Under the Moon

Crystalline Drip Bowl

16

Aimee Maurer Digital Art

Raku

95

13

Untitled Andrew Linde

Hands in the Sky

96

Douglas Breault

Vase

87

Visible Light

Spots

64 97

Kenneth Fontaine

11/4 Tag, 2010 Hillary Batzner

116

Arches Catherine McFarland Stained Glass

Cigarettes Are Death Jenny Nguyen

100

Memory

Sculpture

Catherine McFarland

Butterfly Jing Ting Long

Mixed Media

Spinal Reconstruction Stephen Plummer

Mutations 057 & 004 Colleen Barber

Moving Again Jennifer Hebert

Joseph Curley

106 108

Bookbinding

Untitled Sophia A. Bakas

Andrea Byron

63

Janessa Hanna

Working Shoes Sam Thibault

114

Cheri Amaral

Superhero Music

69

53 94

Sallee Bickford

Pulling Dough Hillary Batzner

66

Jessica Goodchild

Bubbles

31

37

39 110

Blowing in the Wind Alex Pawling

40


Bridgewater State University The Bridge Lit Mag Bridgewater, MA Pages 64-65 “Spots: Skate Spots of My Youth� This thumbnail highlight represents a design element that is not only unique to this volume, but makes its debut for the journal as a whole. It exemplifies our commitment to innovation and individuality with each successive volume.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Spots: Skate Spots of my Youth 路

8" x 13" x .5"

The Bridge

Volume 8

CMYK Process Silk Screen

64

65

Kenneth Fontaine 路


Cactus Shadows CSPress Newspaper Cave Creek, AZ Page 7, February extra, “Through the Looking Glass� The CSPress spotlights students and others as a regular feature. Overcoming a fear of white space makes possible an open and easy to read page.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


SPOTLIGHT

Through the looking glass JAMEE HANSON and LAURA SHIREY discover more about the girl behind the camera lens

Favorite Movie: Into the Wild Everything’s Illuminated

“I think I fell in love with the way that you can see the world differently just by looking through the lens of a camera.”

Favorite Artists: My Chemical Romance Local Natives Bobby Long Favorite Food: “Anything with carbs” Ice cream Favorite Author Ellen Hopkins Brand of Camera: Canon

S

ome people are born with a passion, and for others, that passion is discovered at some point in their life when they least expect it. The latter is how Virginia Prostor acquired her love for photography. “In my sophomore year I was in yearbook. I don’t know whether it was the class or just being able to take pictures, but that’s when I started to get into photography,” recalls Prostor. “I think I fell in love with the way that you can see the world differently just by looking through the lens of a camera.” Prostor does not just stick to photographing one subject, though, as her two favorite things to take pictures of are people and nature. “I love to photograph nature because it’s just so beautiful, and there are so many different things to take pictures of,” says Prostor. “I love photographing people because I try and make their personalities come alive through a picture. I use my friends as models all the time,” she adds with a laugh. Though Prostor would not reveal all of her favorite locations to use as a setting, “one spot I take pictures at is what my friends and I call ‘Narnia’ in Cave Creek.” Prostor also shared that, “I really don’t have any other hobbies besides photography. I mean, even when my friends and I hang out we drive around looking for new places to shoot at.” Julia Johnson, a senior and self-proclaimed “practice model” of Prostor’s loves the style of photography that Prostor uses. “She [Prostor] just knows how to capture something so simple in a picture and make it look amazing,” says Johnson. “The colors are also a reason I love

Virginia Prostor on why she became a photographer.

Virginia’s photography, they are always so rich and beautiful.” Though Prostor cites photography as her main hobby, she has considered turning her passion into a career, like majoring in Fashion Photography at ASU next fall. She has also started to turn her passion into a business. Mainly, she takes senior pictures for anybody that contacts her and expresses interest. “I charge 100 dollars, which is way cheaper than going to a studio like Cameo that can cost thousands. That fee includes driving to the location, or locations, of the shoot, prints of the photos and the editing.” As studios charge per picture, most families only select a few to save money. With Prostor, the only limit is “the amount of photos that

turn out well, which could be hundreds.”

Another aspect of her senior photo shoots that sets her apart from any other studio is that she leaves the location of the shoot and how the model looks up to the senior. “If the person has an idea of where they want a certain portion of the shoot to take place, we’ll drive out and see how it works out,” Prostor explains. “The photos should be a reflection of them, so who am I to interfere with that? But, most of the time, they don’t have any particular place in mind, so they tell me to decide, which I am fine with as well. I’m very flexible.” There is also a strange habit that Prostor has developed over the past couple of years. “I love naming all of my cameras,” she says with a shrug of her shoulders. Just to name a few, Prostors’ collection of roughly eight cameras includes Leo, Maxwell, Lily, and Herman.

Her Canon Rebel T1i, Maxwell, is her current “weapon of choice” when it comes time for a photo shoot. Prostors’ collection includes a Sony cybershot, Nikon P90, two Argus 35mm circa 1938, two vintage Minoltas, as well as another vintage camera. Some were gifts, others she bought on her own time. “I found one at a flea market!” she recalls. Allie Hill, who has been photographed by Prostor many times, thinks originality is what makes Prostor’s photography so beautiful. “You could easily pick out her images among dozens of others. Her work radiates originality,” states Hill. “Virginia is one of the most talented people I know.” Not only does Prostor use her favorite Canon digital camera to take pictures, but also has a wide range of

film and digital cameras from all different decades. “I like to look at film photographs better than I

like taking them, they can just be a pain to take when they don’t turn out the way you want,” says Prostor. “I edit all of my digital photos with Adobe Photoshop 7, which is kind of old, but I love using it since it was pretty easy to get the hang of. I like to give my pictures a vintage feel, since vintage photography is one of my favorite styles.” As for her favorite type of photography and camera to use, in regards to digital or film, “I definitely prefer digital,” she explains. “You can instantly see the outcome of what you photograph. Film is a completely different art form in the way that it’s just like a guessing game. Until the pictures are developed, you never know what you’re going to get.”

photo VIRGINIA PROSTOR FEBRUARY 2011

7


Cactus Shadows CSPress Newspaper Cave Creek, AZ Page 16, March extra “Are We Stuck with GM Foods?� Sometimes color makes so much difference in a page design that it is worth whatever it costs. The use of short and clever heads in bold colors encourages readers to examine all of the page contents.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


U

YOURSELF

5033*-&7:"/% 503*8*-&:recount the history and controversy of genetically modified foods

ARE WE STUCK WITH GM FOODS?

OUJM SFDFOUMZ  HFOFT IBWF POMZ CFFO VTFEUPEFÄ&#x2022;OFBQFSTPOTPVUFSBQQFBS BODF )PXFWFS TUSBOHF UIF JEFB NBZ TPVOE NPSFBOENPSFTDJFOUJTUTBOE GBSNFST JODPSQPSBUF HFOFT JOUP GPPE (FOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPETBSFCFDPNJOHJODSFBT JOHMZQPQVMBSJO i*DBOTFFXIZQFPQMFXPVMECFBHBJOTU<HFOFU JDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPE> FTQFDJBMMZJGJUJOWPMWFTNPE JGZJOH UIF HFOFUJDT PG BO BOJNBM * EP LOPX UIBU TPNF DPVOUSJFT JO &VSPQF IBWF CBOOFE DFSUBJO HFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FE HPPET  TP UIFZ NVTU IBWF TPNFSFBTPOJOHCFIJOEUIBU wTBJE4BSBI5BLFTJBO  BTFOJPS Ä&#x2021;  FGPPETJORVFTUJPOBSFEFSJWFEGSPNHFOFUJ DBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FE PSHBOJTNT BOE IBWF IBE TQFDJÄ&#x2022;D DIBOHFTJOUSPEVDFEJOUPUIFJS%/"CZHFOFUJDBMMZ FOHJOFFSFEUFDIOJRVFT'SFRVFOUMZTFFONPEJÄ&#x2022;FE GPPETBSFTPZCFBOT DPSO DBOPMBBOEDPUUPOTFFE PJM *O UIF QSPDFTT PG NPEJGZJOH GPPE  HFOFT BSF BSUJÄ&#x2022;DJBMMZ USBOTGFSSFE CFUXFFO PSHBOJTNT XIJDI DPVMECFDPOWFOUJPOBMMZCSFE â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have a problem XJUIHFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPETÄ&#x2021;  FZIBWFBMMPXFEGBSNFSTUPEP UIJOHT UIBU QSFWJPVTMZ TFFNFE JNQPTTJCMF Ä&#x2021;  FZ DBOCFBMUFSFEUPSFTJTUEJTFBTFTBOEGSFF[JOH XIJDI DBO JOTUBOUMZ EFTUSPZ DSPQT w TBJE %ZMBO (PPE  B TFOJPS "MUIPVHI TDJFOUJTUT IBWF UIPVHIU BCPVU BOE FYQFSJNFOUFE XJUI HFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FE GPPE GPS ZFBST UIFÄ&#x2022;STUJOTUBODFXBTOPUVOUJM"IVHF DPOUSPWFSTZ BU UIF UJNF  UIF 'PPE BOE %SVH "ENJOJTUSBUJPO '%"  BQQSPWFE UIF Ä&#x2022;STU HFOFUJ DBMMZBMUFSFEGPPE$BMHFOFUPNBUPFT $BMHFOF*ODCJMMFEUIFUPNBUPFTBTCFUUFSUBTU JOH MPOHFSMBTUJOH BOEFBTJFSUPUFBSPÄ&#x152;UIFWJOF "Ä&#x2122;FSJUTTVDDFTT GBSNFSTBMMPWFSUIFXPSMEXBOUFE JO  SFBMJ[JOH UIBU UIFTF NPEJÄ&#x2022;DBUJPOT DPVME VMUJ NBUFMZQFSGFDUUIFJSQSPEVDF

Most of the genetically modified crops

TAYLOR FLAIMINI

FOOD STUFFS DO YOU WANT TO BE WHAT YOU EAT?

BSF HSPXO JO /PSUI "NFSJDB  CVU EFWFMPQJOH DPVOUSJFT BSF SBQJEMZ JODSFBTJOH UIFJS PVUQVU #Z JOUIF64 QFSDFOUPGUIFQMBOUFEBSFBPG TPZCFBOT QFSDFOUPGDPUUPO QFSDFOUPGDPSO BOEQFSDFOUPGUIFTVHBSCFFUXFSFHFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FEWBSJFUJFT(FOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FETPZCFBOT

DBSSJFE IFSCJDJEFUPMFSBOU USBJUT POMZ  CVU DPSO BOE DPUUPO DBSSJFE CPUI IFSCJDJEF UPMFSBODF BOE JOTFDU QSPUFDUJPOUSBJUT i* UIJOL UIBU BT MPOH BT UIF GPPE DPNQBOJFT QVU MBCFMTPOUIFHFOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPET UIFSFTIPVME OPUCFBQSPCMFN People are not forced tPCVZ UIFNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEQSPEVDUT wTBJE(PPE Ä&#x2021;  FSF IBWF CFFO UXP MFHBM JTTVFT JO UIF 6OJUFE 4UBUFTSFMBUFEUPHFOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPET*O+VOFPG  UIF4VQSFNF$PVSUNBEFJUTÄ&#x2022;STUSVMJOHSFMBUFE UPHFOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPETÄ&#x2021;  FDBTFHPFTCBDLUP  XIFO PSHBOJD GBSNFST XFSF DPODFSOFE XJUI HFOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FEBMGBMGBPOUIFJSDSPQT BOETVFE .POTBOUP BDPNQBOZUIBUQSPEVDFTHFOFUJDBMMZNPE JÄ&#x2022;FEGPPET*OSFTQPOTF UIF4VQSFNF$PVSUSVMFEUIBU UIFQMBOUJOHPGBMGBMGBCFIBMUFEJOUIF6OJUFE4UBUFT Ä&#x2021;  FTFDPOEMFHBMBDUJPOXBTBHBJOTUTVHBSCFFUT "HBJO  .POTBOUP XBT RVFTUJPOFE SFHBSEJOH UIFJS CSFFEPGQFTUJDJEFSFTJTUBOUTVHBSCFFUT*O"VHVTUPG  B$BMJGPSOJBKVEHFGPSCBEF.POTBOUPGSPNQSP EVDJOHHFOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FETVHBSCFFUTJOUIF6OJUFE 4UBUFT iÄ&#x2021;  F"HSJDVMUVSF%FQBSUNFOUIBEOPUBEFRVBUFMZ BTTFTTFE UIF FOWJSPONFOUBM DPOTFRVFODFT CFGPSF BQQSPWJOH UIFN GPS DPNNFSDJBM DVMUJWBUJPO w TBJE +VEHF8IJUF UIFKVEHFJOWPMWFEXJUIUIFDBTF *GHFOFUJDBMMZNPEJÄ&#x2022;FE UIF6OJUFE4UBUFTEPFTOPU SFRVJSF UIF GPPE DPNQBOJFT MBCFM UIFJS QSPEVDUT 5P NBOZ UIJTJTBNBKPSDPODFSOCFDBVTFPGBMMFSHJFT*G GPPETBSFVOMBCFMFE POFJTVOBCMFUPJOUFSQSFUXIFUIFS UIFJS GPPE BMMFSHFOT BSF JODMVEFE JO UIF HFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FEGPPE â&#x20AC;&#x153;I definitely think UIBU JU TIPVME CF MBCFMFE KVTUTPUIBUUIFDPOTVNFSLOPXTXIBUUIFZBSFCVZJOH w TBJE5BLFTJBO i*U IBT CFFO SVNPSFE UIBU HFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FE GPPETDBOIFMQTUPQIVOHFSTJODFUIFZBSFBGBTUFSDSPQ BEBQUBUJPO BOE B CJPMPHJDBM  SBUIFS UIBO DIFNJDBM  BQQSPBDIUPZJFMEJODSFBTFT wDPNNFOUFE1BVM$PMMJFS PG0YGPSE6OJWFSTJUZ "DDPSEJOH UP BDUJPOCJPTDJFODFPSH  TPNF HFOFUJ DBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FE GPPET HFOFSBUF CBDUFSJB JO UIF CPEZ UIBU DBO DBVTF SFTJTUBODF UP DFSUBJO BOUJCJPUJDT 0O UIF PUIFS IBOE  TPNF FOWJSPONFOUBMJTUT GFFM UIBU HFOFUJDBMMZ NPEJÄ&#x2022;FE DSPQT IFMQ UIF FOWJSPONFOU CFDBVTFUIFZSFEVDFUIFOFFEGPSQFTUJDJEFT

EAT THIS NOT THAT

Ever take a trip to the supermarket and pick up some snacks to eat? Now, have you ever actually looked at the ingredients used to make those foods? If not, then this is something to look at. Take a gander at a few products consumed at school.

NATURE VALLEY OATS Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; HONEY BARS

Contains Malt: a grain (typically barley) that is sprouted, kiln-dried and ground into a slightly sweet-flavored powder. It is a byproduct of corn and gluten. For anyone who may be allergic to either, be careful.

KELLOGGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FROSTED STRAWBERRY POP-TARTS

Contains six different sugars: Corn Syrup, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Dextrose, Sucrose, Glucose, and Xanathan Gum. Xanathan Gum has its ups and downs, it is used as a substitute by those who cannot have gluten, but if you happen to be allergic to corn, you should not eat it because it may give you intestinal gripes, or diarrhea.

ARIZONA ICED TEAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ARNOLD PALMER

Contains sugars: Sucralose, High Fructose Corn Syrup, and Acesulfame Potassium (a sweetner that is 200x sweeter than any cane sugar.) Besides the black bend brewed tea, and the lemon juice from concentrate that has lost its usefulness, we are shoveling sugar down our throats, one gulp at a time.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Emmanuel Aire

16

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Eat: Pei Wei Spicy Chicken Salad

(560 calories, 24 g fat, 62 carbs, 1570 mg sodium) Do Eat: Pei Wei Vegetable Spring Rolls (110 calories, 3.5 g fat, 17 carbs, 290 mg sodium)

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Eat: Aloha Pineapple Smoothie from Jamba Juice: Original Size (91 g sugar, 410 calories)

Do Eat: Strawberry Nirvana Smoothie from Jamba Juice: Original Size (43 g sugar, 230 calories)

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Eat: Paradise Bakery & CafĂŠ Blue Cheese Salad

(960 calories, 68 g fat, 39 carbs) Do Eat: Paradise Bakery & CafĂŠ Fire Roasted Garlic Tomato Soup (171 calories, 5 g fat, 24 carbs) * One Cream Cheese Brownie at Paradise Bakery & CafĂŠ has 1170 calories!

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Eat: Rubioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cabo Plate: Shrimp Taco + Fish Burrito with pinto beans and chips (1370 calories, 61 g fat, 3260 mg sodium) Do Eat: Rubioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grilled Chicken Street Taco (90 calories, 2.5 g fat, 180 mg sodium)

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;Hannah Karsten INTRIGUE at CACTUS SHADOWS


Chantilly High School Odyssey Yearbook Chantilly, VA Pages 2-3 “All for One” This opening page continues the visual squares from the cover on a large picture of male cheerleaders at homecoming week’s powderpuff game. The fact that they are in a pyramid reinforces the concept that all have to work as ONE in order to succeed.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Sporting official purple skirts, tops and bows, the cheerleaders form a pyramid. Varsity football team players adopted the personna of the cheersquad to rally the powder puff girls teams and amuse the crowd. This event was tradition during homecoming week. photo by Logan Javage

all for one all

On the map, our school was just one place with one name: Chantilly. Our name could not exist based solely on one person. It was a name that we all upheld and honored through our actions, imbued with a spirit that we created as a group and a pride that we displayed no matter how big or small the achievement. Welcome to our world. Jam-packed within this building were 2615 students who created an unstoppable force, fused into one entity by our shared experiences and frustrations. It was more than one car that cut us off in the morning; it was the line of cars all the way down Stringfellow waiting to veer into the parking lot when we were already late to school. United along the sidelines, we celebrated our teams winning, and together we groaned as we heard that we had the choice â&#x20AC;&#x153;to make it a great day or not,â&#x20AC;? but that choice was ours. Hundreds of leadership posters, club banners and other notices plastered our walls leaving a paper trail that cluttered our hallways yet provided a written voice over the noise between classes. It was all about the crowd, the group, the mob, the 658 seniors freezing on the bleachers for their panoramic, as well as the masses of students and teachers clogging a hallway between classes. It was all Chantilly.

002

all

opening

003


Chantilly High School Odyssey Yearbook Chantilly, VA Pages 150-151 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rest in Piecesâ&#x20AC;? This spread was the most difficult to do as it captures forever the destruction of our beloved graffiti shed by AT&T. The copy does justice to the sense of loss felt by the students and the community. The black background is perfect in depicting our mourning at this unexpected event.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


2. 1. After the shed was torn down, a backhoe collects the rubble. For over 35 years, students painted the shed to celebrate accomplishments, mourn losses and advertise upcoming events. 2. With multiple layers exposed, it is evident that the shed was painted thousands of times. This 45 pound segment resides in the yearbook room. 3. After demolition, construction workers clear the remains. The removal of the grafitti shed shocked the entire community. 4. After rummaging through the rubble, students uncovered recent paintings. Alumni, students and parents rushed to take a brick for memories. photos by Mary-Beth Desrosiers

1.

3.

4.

rest in 36 YEAR PRIZED LANDMARK AND TRADITION DEMOLISHED

PIECES

It started out as a normal February day. Hallways resounded with the footsteps of students, but then suddenly rumbled with cries; cries of students in disbelief that a school landmark was unexpectedly taken away from them. The shed symbolized pride, spirit and unity for over 35 years. “The school was not notified about the shed being torn down, so I was just as surprised as everyone else. As I was pulling into the school parking lot in the morning, I saw construction workers and was extremely confused about why they were here. Later that day, I found out that the shed had been demolished due to the road widening project,” said Principal James Kacur. Students did not understand how the construction company could just bulldoze the shed without prior notification to the school and community. “I was outraged that they would take our shed away from us without informing us beforehand. If we would have known, we could have bought the shed from AT&T and moved it on to school property. This way, we would not have lost such an important landmark,” said Krish Perumbala. Even though the shed was lost, students gave their suggestions on how to keep the memories alive. “I think we should make a huge mural or collage to cover one of the walls inside the school. This would keep the memories fresh even though the actual shed is gone,” said Abby Butler. The shed formed bonds not only between students, but also among family members. “My father used to work for AT&T and the shed was one of the locations that he was responsible for. When the school was built, there was a mutual agreement between the school and the company that gave us permission to paint the shed. My father would call me every week to ask what was on the shed. It helped to establish a special connection

150

one

between us, knowing that it meant a lot to the both of us,” said Assistant Principal Timothy O’Reilly. Those who were fortunate enough to have painted the shed will forever treasure those memories, but the unlucky ones who never got the chance missed out on a part of tradition. “I feel like I missed out on an important part of high school because I never got to paint the shed. Being a freshman, it is something you look forward to in your high school career. I run track, so I would have been able to paint it for that if it had not been torn down,” said Max Kochev. Even though not everyone got to paint the shed, it still was considered an important part of the student experience. “The shed was the base of our school spirit and truly bonded us together as one. Whether it was painted to celebrate a birthday, inform the public about school events or to mourn a death, the shed was always there for us to express ourselves. I am 100% dedicated to constructing a new shed as a replacement for our loss,” said Kacur. The shed meant so much to both the school and the community that alumni Greg Hudson held a memorial service in order to honor it. “Over 50 people came to the memorial, including reporters from the Washington Post. The JV band made an appearance and played ‘Chantilly Lace’ in respect for the shed. I was pleased with the turnout, considering it was such a cold and rainy night, ” said Hudson. Losing the shed was like losing a close friend. “Whenever I think of the shed, I think of the song ‘Lean on Me’ by Club Nouveau because the Chantilly High Students and the community have always leaned on the shed for support during both the good times and bad. It truly will be missed, but certainly never forgotten,” said Hudson. BY KATELYN KUKLA, BECCA YOST, AND NATALIE ROBERTSON

remember

151


Findlay High School Blue & Gold Newspaper Findlay, OH Page 4, 3/11/11, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rising Watersâ&#x20AC;? We were really proud of the quality of photos our photography editor brought back, and we wanted to feature them in our news section. The top photo had a lot of dead space and really lent itself to a story-in-thephoto design. The bottom photo showed a lot of expression and complemented the story very well.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


blue & gold

4

friday, march 11, 2011

THE GIST OF IT t&OHJOFFSTBOEQPMJUJDJBOTBSFXPSLJOHPOXBZTUPEJWFSUøPPEJOH t3FIFBSTBMTBSFJOGVMMTXJOHGPSUIF"QSJMPQFOJOHPG(PETQFMM t6QQFSDMBTTNFOTUBSUTDIPPMNJOVUFTMBUFSOFYUXFFLEVFUP0(5

/&84'&"563&

RISING WATERS

COMING SOON

       



By Leah Cramer

In response to the continued flooding in Findlay, the city and county officials are working with the Army Corps of Engineers (ACE) and an engineering firm from Cleveland to create a plan to reduce flood effects. They hope to present the plan at the ACE headquarters in Washington, D.C. by the end of 2011. From there, the next step will be getting the funding needed from Congress. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There would be earthen levees (grass-covered dirt mounds), concrete flood walls by North Main Street and the river and a diversion channel for Eagle Creek,â&#x20AC;? Tony Iriti, former president of the dissolved Northwest Ohio Flood Mitigation Partnership, said. According to Mayor Pete Sehnert, the diversion of Eagle Creek could reduce flooding by three feet, but there are possible negative effects for Putnam County, which is also involved in the project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ottawa is west of us and we want to get the water out of our city, but we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to make it go any faster down the river to them,â&#x20AC;? Sehnert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There would have to be a retention area somewhere. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just think of ourselves; we have to consider the people downstream from us.â&#x20AC;? However, once the plan is worked out, it could provide additional benefits beyond just controlling flooding. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to coordinate with the park district and create more recreational opportunities for the citizens by building bike paths and jogging trails on the levees,â&#x20AC;? Iriti said. Sehnert hopes that the levees, along with the other measures, will be enough to minimize flood damage. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t completely eliminate the problem of flooding, but we can prepare for what we think will be the worst,â&#x20AC;? Sehnert said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The main thing is just that we do something.â&#x20AC;?

DEAD END

# % (        !) #!)# "& ($ ' %   "  #       &#!     ( !    %   '  % %

Godspell set for April debut 

By Leah Cramer

Preparations for the spring musical have swung into high gear as the cast and crew get ready for the April 1 opening of Godspell. Godspell follows the gospel of Matthew with a 70s style twist. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The show is all about the concept of building a community of compassion through the retelling of the parables with the idea of the love of Jesus,â&#x20AC;? senior Isaac Steinhour (Jesus) said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It has a very free feel to it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are a lot of parts in the script where we get to interpret it in our own way and come up with whatever we think will get the point across the best and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very fun and happy.â&#x20AC;? The free, expressive style of the musical is also seen in the variety of songs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The show has everything from folk to rock to very upbeat, happy music to some sadder sounding songs as well,â&#x20AC;? vocal director Craig VanRenterghem said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Musically, it will be a challenge to portray the emotion of what theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re singing about to the audience.â&#x20AC;? Cast members will be working to show that emotion with a sense of togetherness. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone is part of this big community that comes together to worship Jesus,â&#x20AC;? junior Jenna McGlade (disciple Courtney) said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The whole point of the show is to demonstrate that Jesus brought all of these people together. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happening both within the show and outside of it too, with the cast all

coming together, which is really cool.â&#x20AC;? Part of working together will be making decisions as a cast. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With this show, more than any other show Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been trying to give the cast a lot more freedom with decision making,â&#x20AC;? director Debbie Benson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been making choices about things like parts of the set and what we do at rehearsals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interesting because the decisions they make arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t necessarily the ones that I would make, such as choosing whether or not to change certain language, so Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m handing over some control and letting them have a say in as many things as possible.â&#x20AC;? Cast members will be using this freedom of expression as they attempt to bring the audience members into the strong emotion of the show. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We really are going to be very involved with the audience and interact with them throughout the show,â&#x20AC;? McGlade said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go out into the audience a lot and be really energetic and excited to be with everyone. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We want to be able to pull the audience into that celebration with us.â&#x20AC;? Shows are April 1 and 2 at 7:30 p.m. and April 3 at 2 p.m. in the auditorium. Tickets are $10 for evening shows, $5 for the matinee and will be sold in front of the auditorium March 28-April 1 from 3-6 p.m. as well as at the door.

%SVNMJOF DPMPSHVBSE IPTUĂśSTUDPNQFUJUJPO 

By Leah Cramer

Drumline and winter color guard members will host their first Ohio Indoor Performing Arts contest March 12-13 in the main gym. Ninety-two groups will participate in the state circuit competition. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have a fast-paced show,â&#x20AC;? drumline member Zach Climes said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s nothing else like it because all of the drums playing at the same time create a really cool sound.â&#x20AC;? The competition will run Saturday from 2-9:30 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $8 at the door.

#FTUTFMMJOHBVUIPSWJTJUT EVSJOH$PNNVOJUZ3&"% 

By Michaela Marincic

New York Times best-selling author Jamie Ford will speak March 25 at 7 p.m. in Central auditorium as part of CommunityREAD. Fordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hotel on the Corner of Bitter and Sweet is the CommunityREAD feaured book. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re really lucky to have him (Ford),â&#x20AC;? CommunityREAD director Lisa Houck said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t normally have big authors in Findlay; this will be an opportunity to hear and learn something new.â&#x20AC;? Tickets cost $5 and are available at the Arts Partnership, The sCommunity Foundation or at the door.

HEADS UP 6QQFSDMBTTNFOTDIFEVMFT DIBOHFGPS0(5UFTUJOH 

By Michaela Marincic

Juniors and seniors who passed the Ohio Graduation Test (OGT) do not begin school until 8:15 a.m. next week due to OGT testing. These upperclassmen will attend lectures from 8:30-9:30 a.m. Juniors report to the main gym and seniors to the auditorium. Students can volunteer for two hours to be excused from the lecture Friday morning. Freshmen and sophomores will start school at 7:35 a.m. Freshmen will do practice OGT questions while sophomores and upperclassmen who have not passed one or more sections of the OGT take the test.

5XPTUVEFOUQSPHSBNT OPNJOBUFEGPSBXBSET 

JAILED

 (  senior Sophie Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s character in   musical runs April 1-3.  % %

By Michaela Marincic

Both the Blue & Gold newspaper and its news website, www.blueandgoldtoday.org, are finalists for the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA) Gold Crown awards. Both programs will receive either a Gold or Silver Crown at the CSPAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 87th Annual Convention March 16-18 in New York City. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gold Crown is one of the biggest awards in the country for scholastic journalism,â&#x20AC;? adviser Jim McGonnell said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a big deal to be up for one, let alone two, Crown awards.â&#x20AC;? Besides the Crown awards, individual staff members of the Blue & Gold and The Vid were nominated for 22 Gold Circle awards.


Findlay High School — Blue & Gold Newspaper Findlay, OH Page 6, 4/8/11, “Big Picture” We knew this would be a risky page, but we think it paid off. There was no shortage of photos for the school musical, so we were able to pick the best quality images — ones that truly helped tell the story — and by flipping the page on its side, we were able to incorporate more images. Overall, the page highlights some of our design and photography skills.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


#*(1*$563&

friday, april 8, 2011

photo by Krystal Kornblatt

Junior Jenna McGlade (Courtney) plays a ZLSĂ&#x201E;ZOYPJOTHUPU[OLZWYPUNWYVK\J[PVUVM Godspell. The moral of the parable is that no man can serve both God and money.

photo by Emily Wolfe

SHOW STOPPER

t"MMTUVEFOUTXIPBVEJUJPOFEGPSUIFTIPXXFSFDBTU t4UVEFOUTPOUIFQSPEVDUJPOTUBòIFMQFEXJUITFUEFTJHOBOEMJHIUT t5IFDBTUQFSGPSNFETPOHT JODMVEJOHDay by DayBOEBeautiful City 

THE GIST OF IT

*HZ[TLTILYZĂ&#x201E;UPZO[OLPYYV\[PULMVYO, Bless the Lord, My Soul. The fast-paced Gospel-style number in Act I featured a solo by senior Sophie Miller.

PRAY

photo by Taylor McGonnell

Senior Sarah Black (Ann) narrates a biblical story during Godspell. Musical practices started at the beginning of January.

GUESS

photo by Taylor McGonnell

Senior Sophie Miller (Rose) leads the crowd in a game of charades. In this scene, Jesus plays Bible quotations and has the community trying to guess what he is acting out.

PARCHED

6

blue & gold

GREEDY

HEAR US

photo by Taylor McGonnell

Sophomore Price Anders (Marty) sings We Beseech Thee as the gangster disciple. The musical, Godspell, uses comedy and songs to tell the story of Jesus and his disciples. The spring production ran April 1-3.

photo by Emily Eckhardt

Junior Kai Roberts (Ernest) pretends to be a dried up seed, not absorbing the word of Jesus. Ernest is the class clown and does many different imitations.

GET MAD

photo by Taylor McGonnell

Senior Isaac Steinhour (Jesus) sings Alas For You. In this emotional song, he gets angry with his followers, calling them hypocrites.

PUPPETEER

photo by Emily Wolfe

Junior Leah Cramer (chorus) acts out the tale of the Good Samaritan. The cast used sock puppets, putting a twist on the story.


Mirman Middle School Write Your Own Story Yearbook Los Angeles, CA Pages 8 - 9 “Time for a Re(Write)” Part of writing your own story involves revising, whether that’s through traditional academic venues or more personal ones such as altering your appearance or making a change in how you approach life. We thought this spread covered the various types of rewrites our student population encountered.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Draft in Progress Cameron Senevir atne, US4

Work of Art Gregory Schare, 4G

e m i T Re (Write) a r o f

Not many people can get the image in their heads onto a canvas in one try, but if you keep redoing parts of your painting, you get closer and closer every time. These two boys know just how much striving to redo their work can help their cause. Gregory Share, 4G, frequently redoes certain aspects of his artwork. “Duri usually tells me to fix a part of my painting,” says Gregory. Trace Webb of US1 has also reworked his drawings many times, but usually he likes to be more independent. “It’s better to draw mostly on your own, without the critique of others, because then your opinion shows more in your artwork,” says Trace.

Trace Webb, US1

ip, ndsh r e i r f you ed a new spect of ll e r , r a a pape d an . We ten a or revise ot alone e to t i r w ’re n hip, m tim er re u ev relations you, you ation fro o y Have luated a e assure e of situ p a d so reev ell, let m n this ty i d, an you’ve W l s o ? e e e f v li el am ide ours old s you dec ake e find m a to m e s b n e i y . a a h rm of t h time r ag tired g new! O and ove how muc can e r ’ u r ) n ! o r i e r y e h v e t t e at ch r be go May o for som omethin en, no m your tea ur pape s o a s h r g y t o w o ( e you ot to d even ow you prov hen she d m i n g e o t A h w jus rad me ht. ck ay t t rig e d, so y ba re w ow g it jus ou spen one mo this wa e me a l n, but h n’t o y f d v s o e a d e e r n g o k ar in ha tim er td ys th Mrs. S le sh teach d really f time, i a w l e o i . a Engl work a lot oject or pr ool. “My nt I had u put in recalled. e o h you in sc assignm hough y ity,’ ” she t l hope n a n a e u e q n w v o d ‘E rite, me, duce r rew told you pro u o y n s for mea ason while! e r e r th d worth teve Wha it fun an e mak

aeger,

Molly Pyne-J 5C

Rewriting is the most common form of revision. These two seniors of the Upper and Lower School share their experience with teachers making marks all over their first drafts. Cameron Seneviratne, US4, comments on Mr. Brady’s revisions to his history papers: “I don’t usually enjoy my work being trashed by his multi-colored pens, but it does help.” Molly Pyne-Jaeger, 5C, really likes having her teacher’s help: “I like getting critiqued by Ms. Crain better than proofreading myself because sometimes I don’t see mistakes that others do.”

Another way to rewrite is to alter your image. One of these two Upper School girls cut her hair for practicality and fun, while the other did it for a good cause! Odessa Stork, US1, explained why she changed her shoulder length cut to a fun, edgy mohawk: “It wasn’t just for fun. There were two main reasons why I changed it. First, it was more convenient to wash, and second, it helps to keep the hair out of my eyes in tennis. I’ve liked the style since I was sevenish, but currently I’m the only one amongst my friends with it. My parents were okay with it, but they made me photoBefore shop my face with someone else’s mohawk to see how it looked before I cut it.” Ava Gordon, US2, cut her long locks for the organization Locks of Love as her Batmitzvah project. She donated her hair to make wigs for unprivileged patients who suffer from medical hair loss. These students showed to rewrite, all you have to do is to redo your do!

Redo Your Do! After

Odessa Stor k, US1

Ava Gordon,

US2 Before

After

8 Plot

8 8 Even Page

Time for a Re(Write)

Job # 12097

ImIn

5

MICS41101L

©2010 Herff Jones, Inc., All Rights Reserved

WIN MAC Ink Black

PM

5

Job # 12097

8

School Mirman School

Template Template Special Instructions

Special Instructions

FOR PLANT USE

ImIn

WORK ORDER WORK ORDER

School Mirman School

CS CS2 CS3 Includes

Con

HJT QPP

Spot Color(s)

Prep Pro ePro OLP Process

Place

4-Color (CMYK)

Proof

9

MICS41101R

©2010 Herff Jones, Inc., All Rights Reserved

FOR PLANT USE MAC

WIN

PM

CS CS2 Black Ink

CS3

9

Con

HJT QPP

OLP Includes Pro SpotePro Color(s)

Prep

Place

Proof

Process4-Color 4-Color(CMYK) (CMYK) Process

Odd Page


Mirman Middle School Write Your Own Story Yearbook Los Angeles, CA Pages 28 - 29 “Write upon a Wall” We saw a photo from the New York Times last year where people had posted their New Year’s Resolutions on a giant board in Times Square, and we decided to adapt that concept for our theme. We sent out a survey that asked students about their hopes, fears and dreams, and when we put it all together, we tried to make it as interactive as possible by leaving some of the post its blank so that students could add in their own responses.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Let it out: I will try to be nicer to people. -Sophie

I dream that I will look 20 when I’m 40.

I wish for world peace.

Pollack, US2

-Mary

-Benjamin

Oxyzolou, 1B

-Emma

-Magistra

Gabrie

new e my to se ylvania. y r t l s I wil Penn S2 in in cous berts, U o R h - Delila

I’m afraid of being on T.V. -Mason

My dee pest fea r is peo finding ple out abo ut my deepes t secret. -Griff

in Frei tas, US2

Demko,

1B

Are you friends with anyone just to be popular? If so, who?

I’m afraid of my recurring nightmare: that I’m being chased by a giant lima bean.

I’m afraid of singing in public. -Daniella

Khersonsky, US4

-Anonymous

I’m scared of the ide a of having ants crawling on me. Scratch that. Having them near me. Ask Daniella. -Astrid

er make I don’t ev s. n o ti lu reso - Kamilah

What’s mind? on your

Nall, US4

I hope to live to see a world where people treat each other with tolerance, kindness and understanding. -Mr. Rodriguez, P.E.

pet I’m afraid of my use rock Marvin beca I play en wh es tim some and me s hit with him he . rts it hu - non mous

A

I want my computer and binder to be more organized.

y

My darkest fear is my brother walking in on me changing. -Anonymous

Being kidnapped and witnessing my parents being shot. -Anonymous

-Sam

Montanez-Garay, US4

ar is getting My darkest fe scorpions. stung by 100 d. oo w Knock on , US1 -Anton Nuovo

This year, I’m not watching Judge Judy at ALL!

In the new year, I’m not going to eat any pickles.

-Anonymous

You know you want to tell.

-Ava

My darkest fear is thinking about how I’ll cope on my own. -Gaby

During this year, I am five going to walk at least steps. umbrennan, US3

I want to This year, tching to re st pratice ore better, m become a ancer. flexible d US4 - Bella Silver,

Do y a cruou have anyo sh on ne?

Even Page

Did you know that the average person has 1,500 dreams in their life time? What are your wishes, your dreams? You shouldn’t have to keep them ALL a secret.

Fine, just write it down for your own personal use. But that isn’t any fun, now is it? How about we let everyone know? It can’t be that bad... Your

I would be terrified if I had to live with pigeons. -Chaz

-Odessa

This year, I am going to convince my parents to give me an allowance. -Brandon

My greatest fear is electrocution and dyi ng in a plane crash.

Have you slow danced with anyone? Who?

-Jacob

This year, I going to enjoy myself as much as I can because time is precious!

I hate Justin Bieber and Glee. The two together, now that’s a nightmare.

Samson, English

I would be terrified if I was locked in a room with clowns holding chainsaws.

-Lena

Doodle

Here:

I’m afraid of bad guys, but I have never seen them. -Charlotte

Massey,

Foellmer, US3

Taylor, US4

WORK ORDER WORK ORDER

School mirman school

5

Special Instructions

MICS21001L

©2009 Herff Jones, Inc., All Rights Reserved

WIN MAC Ink Black

PM

CS CS2 CS3

Con

HJT QPP

Prep Pro ePro OLP

Place

Proof

5

Job # 12097 Special Instructions

29

©2009 Herff Jones, Inc., All Rights Reserved

FOR PLANT USE WIN

PM

CS CS2 CS3

29

8

School mirman school

MICS21001R MAC

Schneir, 4G

1B

Write upon a Wall

FOR PLANT USE

Broukhim, US1

m Being locked in a roo r, ege Kru y with Fredd m Chuckie, Norman fro n’t wo t tha TV Psycho, a ha stop playing Sunny wit us. top Oc an Chance, and -Etta Friedman, US2

secret is safe with me.

Plot

Job # 12097

Stork, US1

What is the biggest mistake you have made with/in your life?

Phillip Cotton, 5O

Who is your favorite teacher?

-Ivan

28

What do I want to do in the future... Can there be 2 things? Well, the first is to win the French Open for my tennis career. Secondly, I want to have a kitchen with rainbow tiles!

What are you afraid of? You know you want to tell me. Don’ t worry, I won’t say anything. It will just be... between you, me and the wall.

I bet you have something you want to change. Is it personal? I bet you have something that you can confide in me.

Henry Z

-Mrs.

8

Fooks, US2

I want to become immortal. -Luca Pistor, 5O

I wish...

-Anonymous

28

Stills, 5O

o, US2

Kushell, US3

What’s your juciest secret?

I’m afraid of popcorn.

t Yamam ot

-Anonymous

ng My darkest fear is bei t stuck in a room withou ing hav and on, es sho any gs the floor covered in slu s. rm wo and logy -Ms. Ujamaa, Techno

ite a Wrupon Wall -Ken

Do you secretly want to be on I’m afraid of dying reality TV? in 2012.

born

Willard, 5O

Oppenheim o sh, US3 & Kate R u

-Meg

Beckman, 5O

sing My darkest fear is mis d oar gb lon ill, nh a dow session. l McMullen, US4

My darkest fear is being fat.

Myers, Latin

u!

afraid of yo

3 Berson, US

A

-Aaron

You. We’re

is est fear My dark paper in g in h c n’t tou ing. I do the morn it feels. I like how don’t!

1 is My resolution for 201 ate. stin cra pro n’t wo I that - ndrew Sington, 4G I fear eating in public ups places with large gro of students.

This year I want to bee ahh batter spallir.

-Anonymous

This ye get somar, I am going headph e good quali to someth ones, like Beaty ing. ts or

Con

HJT QPP

Prep Pro ePro OLP

Place

Proof

Process 4-Color (CMYK)

Odd Page


St. Mark’s School of Texas Marksmen Yearbook Dallas, TX Pages 28-29 “Keyboarding Filling in the Blanks” This spread features one of the distinguishing characteristics of the 2011 Marksmen: the use of environmental photography. Here, to show the personality of the school’s hockey team, photographers asked team members to express their hockey personality in these staged shots. The left hand page includes coverage of the team, along with a feature on keyboarding skills taught in Middle School — both topics which relates to the component of a St. Mark’s man is “Open.”

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Open

Computer Programming Hockey Middle School Computer Programming Hockey Middle School Computer Programming Middle School

keyboarding: filling in the blanks

F

or many students, learning to touch type is one of the greatest challenges they face in the world of computer science. The easiest way to do it? A blank keyboard. The Metadot DasKeyboard is precisely this. The keyboard does not have a single marking on a key, helping students learn to remember which keys are which without having to resort to staring down at their hands, which drastically decreases their typing speed. All students type at least 40 words per minute by the end of the course, with some typing over 90. Students take a computer applications class every year of Middle School. Beginning in Upper School, they also have the opportunity to take electives in programming and similar fields. In addition to the blank keyboards, students uses the software Mavis Beacon Teaches Typing. This software teaches students through gradual skill-steps. Middle schoolers also learn the ins-and-outs of popular programs such as Microsoft’s PowerPoint and Excel and Adobe’s Flash. In seventh and eighth grade, students synthesize their knowledge of applications to create projects, such as the eighth grade’s presentation in Apple’s Keynote.

Learning the intricacies of complex computer programs in Middle School

Staring at his keyboard during computer science class, sixth grader Daniel Chavez (above) stares at his screen, contemplating his next paragraph. In the foreground is one of the blank keyboards used to teach students touchtyping. Sixth graders Teddy Koudelka (left) and Grant Brooks (top left) boot up their computers and log in to follow along with the teachers as they learn about programs.

Ice cold fury

Looking to win a faceoff, senior Gus Blessing (left) is one of eight upperclassmen on the roster. The team’s season stretches from August to April, and many of the team’s members play other concurrent sports in addition to hockey, which is not sponsored by the school.

HOCKEY ISN’T JUST ANY OTHER NORMAL SCHOOLSPONSORED SPORT

Q&A With hockey veteran Jordan Dyslin

What is it like playing a sport that isn’t sponsored by the school? There are definitely pros and cons. We don’t have to follow all of the guidelines set by the school for their sports, but, at the same time, our games aren’t well-attended and we are often forgotten by the other teams or students at St. Mark’s. Our team is more casual and relaxed, but we get much less glory than many other teams.

Hockey is a sport that demands superb conditioning. Team members share a break in the action of a game to rest up and renew their energies.

What was the defining moment of your season? The mid-season tournament was certainly our most impressive moment of the season. We went undefeated the entire tournament until the championship game against Marcus, a team which we had already beaten in the tournament. Although we outplayed Marcus in the championship game in my opinion, bounces didn’t go our

way and we ended up losing. But I think everybody was impressed with our play that tournament, especially given that we were short-benched every game. We may have gotten second place, but against the competition in the tournament that was still an impressive feat in itself. How do you find time to practice, considering many of the members of the team play other sports? We only have one practice a week, which is Thursday at 7:30 p.m. So although many players come to practice exhausted, we are still usually able to have at least one effective practice per week. Did anything unexpected happen? Garrett Watumull injured a kid. Completely unexpected from such a peace-loving guy. Other than that, no.

Upperclassmen hockey players show off their personality. Top row: Tanner Montgomery, Garrett Watamull, Greg Kinman. Middle row: Gus Blessing, Jordan Dyslin, Jackson Stager. Bottom row: Cole Wright, Connor Thielmann

28 Open

Open 29 Eager 29

COLOR

Job No.: 08860

Page No.

School Name: St. Mark’s School of Texas

TCID:PP

28

Job No.: 08860

Page No.

School Name: St. Mark’s School of Texas

TCID:PP

29


St. Mark’s School of Texas Marksmen Yearbook Dallas, TX Back Endsheet The front endsheet of the 2011 Marksmen presents the book’s concept “I’m a St. Mark’s Man” in organizational structure. Here, the reader sees the 11 components that comprise the St. Mark’s man (in the multi-colored boxes), along with content in each section. Because the story of the year is not told chronologically, the staff presented detailed explanations of what was included in each component above the corresponding boxes.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


Catherine Wetzel thought it was a cool idea: collect one million bottle caps to show her students the massiveness of one million items. But, it was a lot more challenging than she thought, p. 8. Also: Ceramacists Bobby Koudelka and Garrett Watamull p. 12; Middle School Math Team, p. 17.

Tinsley Silcox is a man on a mission. His plan? Bring change to a library that needed vitalization —and make it a place where people actually want to be, p. 24. Also: the hockey team, p. 28; wilderness sherpas, p. 32.

Additionally: Football spring training, Improv Troupe, Pecos, snow days, crew, Fun Day and school pride.

Additionally: Water Polo, gender studies, The ReMarker, band, diversity, wrestling, Carpool Week and eighth grade football.

EAGEr 8

open 24

Also

Two thousand meals for the homeless. The purpose behind the chaos of McDonald’s Week was reached and exceeded by leadership from the Junior Class, p. 34.

It wasn’t the SPC finish they wanted as Coach Greg Guiler’s basketball squad experienced an up and down season, p. 46.

Also: Debate champion Alex Miles, p. 39; independent math studies, p. 42.

Also: Mark Lutz, expert fisherman, p. 50; Breakdance Crew, p. 55.

Additionally: cross country, Feast of Sharing, biology, Pershing tutoring, college counseing, fencing, soccer and junior speeches.

Additionally: pep rallies, band, water polo, visual arts, football, JETS, St. Mark’s and Hockaday musical.

Tested 34

Fierce 46

opening 1 groups 328 index 358 closing 374

In just three years, industrial arts instructor John Frost has raised a new breed of creativity in the woodworking program, p.56

Beth Dunlap found her dream job as an administrative law judge. But, it was in West Virginia and her son, senior McCrae Dunlap, remained in Dallas, p. 72.

Also: The wrestling Papin brothers, p. 60; Robotics Team, p. 62.

Also: Fine arts afficianado Christian Larrave, p. 76; actors Michael Golhke and Will Altabef p. 78.

Additionally: Student Store moms, foreign languages, JV volleyball, spirit parties, lacrosse and family history papers.

Additionally: baseball, volleyball, Lions Pause, JV soccer dynasty, tessellations and senior Christmas decorations.

dynamic 56

BOLD 72

When the city of Dallas undertook a major, nonprofit renovation project on the Trinity River, they knew who to ask for help. With the $100 million project underway, St. Mark’s was among the first to step up, p. 82. Also: senior athletic college recruiting, p. 86; Student Council concession stand, p. 90. Additionally: swimming, wrestling, Christmas party, student council, JV sports, golf and football.

reliable 82

In front of a group of potential applicants dressed in coat and tie and standing erect, no one would ever guess that the distinguished Marksman had been sweating on the football field 30 minutes before. As part of a regular schedule, the Lion and Sword Society members represent the school in a most respectable fashion, p. 92.

Upper schoolers teach fourth graders leadership qualities that will help them grow to be exemplary Marksmen. This is Telos, a leadershipintensive program complimenting the Leadership and Ethics Program, p. 106.

Also: Quiz Bowl academic team, p. 96; pole vaulter Harrison Hewitt, p. 104.

Additionally: Visiting scholars, cheerleaders, Grandparents Day, Father-Son Breakfast, orchestra, Lower School art, iphone programming, crew, faculty directory.

Additionally: soccer, orchestra, hockey and the academic team.

poised 92

More: exchange students, p. 110; Literary Festival p. 112.

connected 106

Many people say that the future lies in the hands of the young. If that’s the case, St. Mark’s lacrosse has nothing to be afraid of, p. 120. Also: Roland Salatino’s Chinese travails, p. 124; photography program’s Turkey trip, p. 128. Additionally: Middle School Latin Competition, Josh Izzard and tennis and James Rowan’s involvement in school’s academic teams.

confident 120

The long—sometimes 12-year— wait is over as seniors hang on through the wild ride of the college process, leading the school, and leaving their legacy, p. 130. Also: ‘Most Likely to’ , p. 134; ‘Best of’, p. 135. Senior Skip Day, goofy Fridays, the extravagant prank, the class tree, seniors walk to take their diplomas, best of 2010-2011, senior portrait pages, advertisements.

primed 130


Whitney High School — Details Yearbook Rocklin, CA Pages 2-3 “Where Spirit Points Mean Just as Much as the Ones in the Grade Book” This spread shows the first part of the opening, which develops the “Where Amazing Happens” concept. Each page has one strong photo to showcase something “amazing” at Whitney High School while introducing the tinted color photo technique and repeating the set of four arrows from the book’s cover. The large photo treatment came based on suggestions from readers in surveys and focus groups, asking for bigger photos.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


2 opening

“WHS is amazing because all my friends are here.” JADEN SWIFT BY A. PETERSON

WHERE SPIRIT POINTS MEAN JUST AS MUCH AS THE ONES IN THE GRADE BOOK WHERE SOME OF THE BEST ATHLETES PERFORM AT HALFTIME

COLOR

Run Prepare for Submission for Color ID information.

LCID: Paper, None, Black, gradient without pink, Paramore Purple, T-Pain Turquoise, MJ Maroon

Job No.: 37189

Page No.

School Name: Whitney High School

2

Job No.: 37189

Page No.

3

COLOR

Run Prepare for Submission for Color ID information.

School Name: Whitney High School

LMCID: Black, None, Registration

TCID:PP

TCID:PP PFS Date: 03/06/2011 Time: 12:12

PFS Date: 03/06/2011 Time: 12:12


Whitney High School — Details yearbook Rocklin, CA Page 244 “ Where Together Anything Seems Possible” This parting page of our book completes the book’s closing section with a strong final image to demonstrate the unity and spirit at Whitney High School. The photo is taken at a school-wide activity in the amphitheater – a major landmark on campus – to echo the idea of the places at school that help make “amazing” experiences. The photo treatment and design style echo the other theme pages.

Columbia Scholastic Press Association 2012 Crown Awards

In Their

Voices

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status. These are their observations as told in their voices, presented in alpha order by school.


WHERE TOGETHER ANYTHING SEEMS POSSIBLE

COLOR

Run Prepare for Submission for Color ID information.

LCID: None, , Black, MJ Maroon, gradient without pink, Paper

Job No.: 37189

Page No.

School Name: Whitney High School

LMCID: Black, None, Registration

TCID:PP PFS Date: 04/11/2011 Time: 14:40

244

CSPA 2012 Crowns — In Their Voices  

The CSPA invited all 2012 Crown Finalists to submit two spreads that their staff believed helped elevate their publications to Crown status....

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you