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Chicago School of Mold Making ™

$25 US

Artisan Pastry silicone molds

Education

Silicone Molds

Materials & Supplies

ChicagoMoldSchool.com


The shape of food is changing

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PHOTO CREDIT: ABOUT FACE PORTRAIT

Over the past few years, we at the Chicago School of Mold Making have been witness to a revolution in the professional kitchen. Silicone molds have gone from being an exotic tool to one that is increasingly sought out for its many creative, reliable, and practical applications. Chefs have found that using cast forms opens up exciting new possibilities for making simple to complex creations. They use their casting techniques for routine as well as special occasions. Internationally recognized chefs now use molds in such competitions as the Bocuse d’Or, Coupe du Monde de la Patisserie, Meilleur Ouvrier de France (MOF), World Pastry Team Championships, and the Internationale Kochkunst Ausstellung (known as the Culinary Olympics). What’s in it for you? Michael Joy, Founder & President Chicago School of Mold Making

Whether you are just looking to save production time or are entering a world-class competition, silicone molds can help you achieve creative, consistent and reliable results. Besides being a creative tool, molds earn back their cost many times because they can be used repeatedly, year after year, for competitions, amenities, showpieces, and daily production. Mold costs are justified by reducing your labor, saving you time, and making you look like a champ, while thrilling your guests. An assortment of molds not only opens up new possibilities but also saves you stress by allowing you to make a wide variety of impressive showpieces quickly and reliably.

Within these pages, you will find educational articles and resources, ready to use molds, mold making materials and supplies and a Chef’s Gallery that shows examples of how molds are used to create a variety of artisan pastry. We enjoy making tools that help highlight your talents and get you the credit you deserve. If you love what you do, we have a lot in common. Let’s get started!

Joy@ChicagoMoldSchool.com

If you are seeing this catalog for the first time and are curious how all these people have come together to share their work, the common denominator is simple - they all know Beatrice Schneider, our creative director. She oversees the production of our marketing literature, educational demonstrations and, most importantly, all things related to the visual presentation of a chef’s work. If you are one of the chefs who has sent an image that was taken on the fly, poorly lit, or from an unusual angle, Beatrice is the person who makes sure the image is brought up to the professional standards you see in this publication. Beatrice has a diverse background that includes work in film and television. She developed her meticulous attention to detail during her days as a fine art restorer. Although a native Chicagoan, her family’s roots are in Bavaria. Her international experience and multilingual skills enable us to reach those of you living outside the United States. Since the opening of this business, her goal has been to present clear information while helping make each chef’s work look as wonderful in pictures as it is in real life. If you have already been featured in our Chef’s Gallery, you know she is doing her job well. For those of you who would like to contribute pictures for future publication, please don’t hesitate to call or e-mail her directly. She would be glad to hear from you. Beatrice can be reached at: Beatrice@ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Beatrice Schneider, Creative Director Chicago School of Mold Making

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Contents

welcome

Ordering Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

Education Book Confectionery Art Casting - Silicone Mold Making for Pastry Chefs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Articles Amenity On Demand . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Showpieces On The Fly . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Sweet Fusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Textured Mats Made Easy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Vinyl Clarity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rolling With Success . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Versatile Artistry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Silicone Simplicity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Calligraphy Transformation I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Calligraphy Composition II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Casting To Win . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Dive Into Chocolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Online Resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Silicone Molds Artisan Molds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Stéphane Tréand’s Showpeels™ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 Geometric Molds . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Botanical Molds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Frame Molds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Pastry Impressions™ Molds & Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Custom Mold Making Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94

Materials & Supplies

Make Your Own Mold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Silicone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Vinyl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102

Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104 Contributors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 204 Appendix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 207 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 209 BLUE molds are made of GeoPress™ FIRM platinum silicone VIOLET molds are made of Flex & Bake™ FLEXIBLE platinum silicone

max temp 300° F/148° C max temp 450° F/232° C 708.660.9707

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Ordering

information

Product Selection If you need assistance finding an item or seek something not in our catalog, please contact us. Call us at 708-660-9707 Shop at our Online Store: www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com E-mail us at Joy@ChicagoMoldSchool.com Fax Orders: 708-660-9161 Send mail to Chicago School of Mold Making 159 N. Marion Street UPS Box 143 Oak Park, IL 60301

Domestic Shipping Most of our orders ship by Ground or Priority Mail service. Express service is available (at additional charge) upon request.

International Shipping Orders outside the United States and its territories ship Express Mail International & Priority Mail International (3-10 business days).

Payment Terms All orders must be prepaid by Visa, MasterCard or company check.

Returns

Please visit www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com for our complete return policy.

Pricing and Descriptions Although every effort has been made to ensure accurate product descriptions and pricing, prices are subject to change and will be verified upon submission of your order. All product measurements listed in this catalog are approximate. If you have any questions or concerns about a product description or price, please call us at 708-660-9707.

Cover Chocolate showpiece by pastry chef Julian Rose. Photo credit: Martine Blouin.

Right The Asian showpiece was created using a Jasmine Butterfly Showpeel™ page 58, Dragonfly Showpeel™ page 58, Large Asian Fan™ mold page 55, Bhutan Dragon™ mold page 55, and 1˝, 2.5˝ and 4˝ sphere molds pages 68 & 69. Copyright © 2008 The Chicago School of Mold Making and Casting for the Arts, Inc. No part of this catalog may be reproduced in any form without written permission of the CSMMCA. Catalog design by Beatrice S. Schneider.

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education

Confectionery Art Casting

Order Code

Silicone Mold Making for Pastry Chefs

BCAC

This first of its kind, illustrated manual provides a bridge between silicone mold making and a variety of applications used in the confectionery arts. A valuable resource for artists and pastry chefs alike, this book starts with basic mold-making concepts and skills and explores in detail how to make silicone molds for casting food ingredients. With each successive chapter, building upon information from preceding chapters, you will be taken on a visual journey from basic to advanced techniques for molding complex three-dimensional sculptures. Following each mold-making exercise, you will see how a chef uses the mold to create a unique sculpture. With its extensive appendix, glossary, resource list, and an average of four photographs per page, you’ll see exactly how each step is done. Over 1200 black-and-white photographs in this step-bystep manual will help you achieve mold-making success. The spiral binding and protective plastic covering enable you to keep the book open-face on the table while making your molds. Join us and see what world renowned pastry chefs Sebastien Canonne, Keegan Gerhard, John Kraus, Ewald Notter and Jacquy Pfeiffer are creating with silicone molds.

To see more sample pages, please visit: www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Testimonials “Confectionery Art Casting is a must in your culinary library if you want to access the ranks of the top chefs in the country.... The book reveals all the little secrets and details for successful mold making. I need to be at my best every day, and having now acquired mold-making experience with this book, I can create almost anything.” Julian Rose-R&D Director / Chocolatier Moonstruck Chocolate “To be the best, you must learn from the best. Michael Joy is a innovative mold maker who has helped leading chefs and their pastry schools reach the height of their creativity. Sure to be a classic, Confectionery Art Casting is a step-by-step inspirational guide to unleash your true artistry.” Barry Bomzer-Founder/Chocolatier Cardinal Chocolates LLC

“The book, Confectionery Art Casting, has entered into my hall of fame of great resourceful books. Michael Joy has helped raise the bar into the next century in sharing his knowledge and talent with many great pastry chefs and confectioners.” Jody Klocko-2006 Bread & Pastry Championship Silver Medal, 2004 & 2005 Top Ten Pastry Chef of the Year, 2003 World Pastry Championship Bronze Medal “In my 18 years of teaching, I have come to understand the importance of molds as an excellent teaching tool. Michael Joy teaches a widely applicable manner of production that ensures perfect results.” Jean-Luc Derron-Associate Instructor International Baking & Pastry Institute Johnson & Wales University, RI 708.660.9707

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Amenity O On Demand “If you have a few molds and plan ahead, you can make a beautiful piece in minutes.” – ST BY STÉPHANE TRÉAND & MICHAEL JOY Stéphane Tréand Meilleur Ouvrier de France, is the Executive Pastry Chef at the St. Regis Resort Monarch Beach. Michael Joy is the founder of the Chicago School of Mold Making and author of Confectionery Art Casting, Silicone Mold Making for Pastry Chefs.

ecently, I visited Chef Stéphane Tréand to photograph him working on a variety of showpieces. During the photo shoot, I had to repeatedly ask him to slow down. His movements were so quick, it was difficult to get clean shots. Realizing my requests weren’t flagging his life-long habits of speed and efficiency, I asked him, “What’s French for ‘slow down’?” Soon after, ‘doucement’ became the word of the day. To Stéphane, fast is his normal pace. It wasn’t until he saw the photo outtakes with him either half-in or halfout of the picture frame, that he gave an understanding laugh.

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I recognized that for Stéphane, speed was the essence of the photo shoot. Time is never on his side in the kitchen so he always keeps a selection of molded chocolate and sugar shapes at the ready for last minute requests. He reminded me and said, “Everyday, I rely on techniques that took years to learn, but with silicone molds, display work is fast and clean. I can put together a nice piece in a few minutes.” Chef Stéphane proves his point well. In the following sequence, he uses a few simple molds to make a showpiece in record time. Aside from pouring Isomalt in advance, the sculpture was made in ten minutes, start to finish. Ready, set, go!

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PHOTOS ON THIS PAGE: ABOUT FACE PORTRAIT


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1. Pour the base

2. Pour the stand

3. Bubbles gone

For a quick base, Chef Stéphane pours ½˝ of Isomalt into a small cake ring. Pouring on a marble surface covered with parchment will help the Isomalt cool quickly. In a few minutes, you can pop the disk right out.

Stéphane places a silicone collar, which has no bottom, on a small sheet of vinyl. Casting tip: There must be a sheet of parchment between the marble and the vinyl or else the vinyl will temporarily stick to the marble and will be hard to remove. The silicone collar can also be set on a textured mat or, if you are working with chocolate, placed on a transfer sheet.

The surface of Isomalt is quickly torched to eliminate small bubbles. Casting tip: Although not shown in this photo, you can create different shapes with the same silicone collar by pushing the side walls inward or pulling them outward. The natural ‘tack’ between the silicone and the vinyl will help hold the reshaped collar in place.

4. Clear sugar

5. Dipping peels

6. Keep it clean

Once the Isomalt has cooled, the swirl shape can be easily demolded. Look at the perfect clarity when you cast on vinyl! Casting Tip: Notice the other shapes in the silicone collar. There are several small half-rounds and a textured swoop shape.

To create the small butterfly at the top of the amenity, Chef Tréand dips a Showpeel into clear Isomalt at 300º F. Casting Tip: To see detailed instructions for working with Showpeels, please go to:

Chef Tréand flips the Showpeel over to allow the Isomalt to flow into the details. Be careful not to let the Isomalt flow over the edges of the Showpeel to avoid breaking the delicate casting when demolding. After dipping, let the Showpeel cool on the marble surface. Casting Tip: When dipping Showpeels, always make extras for later use.

Casting Tip: For an aqua glass look, add only a drop or two of color. Also, if you are going to use just one base, you should cast a few extras so you have them ready to go when you are in a hurry.

www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com, Click on Tips & Tools then click on the yellow butterfly.

Silicone molds are the fastest way to turn a few pounds of sugar or chocolate into a profitable work of art. 708.660.9707

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7. Delicate sugar

8. Clear butterfly

9. Pour the flower

In a few minutes, the Showpeel can be removed. Casting Tip: Cast Isomalt pieces can be stored in airtight plastic containers for months. However, humidity will quickly dull the shine on cast Isomalt. To avoid this, include an open jar of crushed limestone in your container to help absorb moisture. This will keep your castings shiny.

The process is repeated for the other wing. Now the butterfly is ready for use. Casting Tip: If airbrushing, be sure to spray on the textured side of the casting.

It is fastest to make sugar flowers with a ‘flower press’. To begin, a small daub of Isomalt is poured in the center of the press mold.

10. Pressing

11. Crystal finish

12. Shape it

While the Isomalt is still hot and liquid, use a small piece of vinyl to push down onto the flower press. The pressure will force the Isomalt into the crevices of the pattern. Casting Tip: Remember, a flower does not have to be round. Use the clarity of the vinyl to control hand pressure for making additional shapes such as ovals or rings.

As soon as the Isomalt has cooled to a pliable state, the vinyl is peeled away. Casting Tip: Sandwich two silicone floral press molds together without vinyl to give your Isomalt flowers a frosted look.

While the Isomalt is still soft, use your hands to shape a gentle contour into the flower.

...with silicone molds, everything is fast and clean. 8

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education

13. Assembly

14. Structure first

15. Clean lines

Chef Stéphane collects all of the cast shapes and places them within reach. Next, he dips the bottom edge of the ‘swirl shape’ into the pot of hot Isomalt and holds it in place on top of the base. As the Isomalt cools, it hardens to create a strong bond. (See the base poured in photo 1.) Not shown: Previously, Stephane cast several small spheres in clear Isomalt. Extra spheres always come in handy!

Two spheres are first attached to the base. Then, Chef Stéphane carefully attaches the textured swoop shape (see photo 4) to a sphere. Reminder: A casting does not have to be a direct duplication of what the mold created. For a hand-made look, warm the swirl under a heat lamp and manipulate (stretch) it by hand.

When your composition contains parallel lines, a straight vertical alignment will help your piece look deliberate, strong and clean.

16. Balance

17. Accent

18. Result!

Next, Chef Stéphane attaches the press molded flower and a small sphere to help balance the composition. Casting Tip: Spheres are likely to be your most useful element in showpiece construction. They are easy to cast and make excellent attachment points.

Another small sphere has been attached to the upper portion of the swirl. Chef Stéphane then uses hot Isomalt to ‘glue’ each butterfly wing onto the sphere. Reminder: Using a sphere for an attachment point allows you to place the butterfly wings at any angle or position.

As a finishing touch, Stéphane attaches a small string of Isomalt to create the butterfly’s body. It has been about ten minutes and the amenity is complete! To see more casting demonstrations, visit Tips & Tools at: www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

The same molds in different hands are sure to produce different results. 708.660.9707

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Showpieces

on the fly

By Stéphane Tréand & Michael Joy

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hen he saw Master Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand draw with liquid silicone on a silicone mat, Michael Joy could see that Stéphane was up to something truly creative. That something has become the Showpeel™ – a collaboration of Stéphane’s design talent and Michael Joy’s mold making skills. Showpeels are thin silicone sheets with pre-embossed patterns on one side. In about 15 minutes, you can cut out the pattern, dip it in hot Isomalt and peel back the silicone revealing an intricate pattern ready for use.

Chef Stéphane, Meilleur Ouvrier de France, works as an executive pastry chef and knows how fast-paced professional kitchens are. His idea is to create a time-saving tool for the busy executive chef that would also be easy enough for a novice sugar artist to use with quick success. Used individually or in combination with other silicone molds, these delicate designs can add translucency and lightness that make your showpieces fly!

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[1] Materials needed: Showpeel™, razor knife, gloves, colorant, Isomalt, sauce pan, offset spatula, airbrush and non-slip silicone half-rounds.

[3] Prepare the Isomalt. At 300º F/148º C, the Isomalt is ideal for dipping. Chef Tréand adds a few drops of teal coloring for a crystal effect.

[2] Cut out the silicone shape. Chef Tréand uses a sharp razor knife to cut out the four butterfly wings. (Cut outside the outer line along the raised perimeter.)

[4] Dip the Showpeel. The embossed surface of the Showpeel is dipped into the Isomalt. Slide the Showpeel back and forth (twice) to help release trapped air bubbles.

Important Note: It is recommended you make a few practice cuts on the nonpatterned part of the silicone before cutting out the embossed pattern.

[5] Allow the Isomalt to drain. Be careful not to let Isomalt flow onto the smooth side of the Showpeel.

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Stéphane Tréand, MOF Patissier PHOTOS: ABOUT FACE PORTRAIT

[6] Clean the edges. Chef Tréand uses the rim of the sauce pan to gently scrape the liquid Isomalt off the edges of the Showpeel. [7] Drain in the opposite direction. The wing tip is carefully flipped over so Isomalt can flow down the wing in the opposite direction. This ensures full and even coverage of the pattern. [8] Allow the Isomalt to cool. The wings are set flat on parchment paper while Isomalt is dripped over the ‘finger hold’ areas. Note: At this time, additional thickness can be added to thin areas.


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[9] Remove the Showpeel. Chef TrĂŠand carefully peels the silicone Showpeel away from the Isomalt wing. (You will notice when the edges of the Showpeel are not scraped clean while the Isomalt is liquid, it will be more difficult to remove the Showpeel.) [10] The freshly cast wings. [11] Use an airbrush to add color. A bit of quick airbrush work on the back (textured) side of the Showpeel will add great depth.

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[13] Attach the butterfly body. A second daub of Isomalt secures the pulled sugar body to the wings. Be sure to use enough Isomalt to give the body and wings extra strength. [14] The finished butterfly is ready for use. [15] Attach the butterfly to the showpiece. The butterfly is secured to a cast Isomalt sphere for support. [16] The completed effect is stunning!

Resources: To see more techniques for working with sili[12] Assemble the butterfly. cone in the culinary field and to find the materials shown in A daub of liquid Isomalt is poured on the parchment paper this demonstration, visit: to anchor the four wings together. Silicone half-round posts are placed beneath the wing tips to create an angle of motion. Tips & Tools at www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com. 708.660.9707

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Sweet Fusion Chefs from around the world are drawn to the translucent, crystalline qualities of Isomalt sugar. Thanks to the dedication of competition chefs, we get to see their new techniques each year. BY STÉPHANE TRÉAND & MICHAEL JOY hen encapsulation first made center stage, it was a breakthrough. Its continued popularity is apparent with so many chefs eager to duplicate the effect.

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In competition, we see encapsulation become cleaner, yet not necessarily more innovative. Repeating a technique is valuable for day-to-day needs, but those expecting to score points with the judges must do more. To the competition chefs’ credit, they have discovered pouring Isomalt on vinyl will eliminate air bubbles. They have also learned to double encapsulate shapes to prevent re-melting under the heat of a fresh pour. Chefs have also found that having control of their medium while allowing the material to behave naturally can make their showpiece more harmonious. Balancing both control and a fluid understanding of his material, Chef Tréand demonstrates a new method of encapsulation. Using a two-part sphere mold, Stéphane is able to arrange a pattern in the very center of the sphere. Ideally, his technique will spark your creativity, leading you to try new ways to create forms inside of other shapes. Take your pick: drawing out a pattern, building layer by layer or perhaps encapsulating multiple components, such as a sphere, inside a sphere, that itself is inside another sphere. With a few molds and a creative mind, the possibilities are endless! Stéphane Tréand MOF Patissier is an executive pastry chef at the St. Regis Resort Monarch Beach. Michael Joy is the founder of the Chicago School of Mold Making.

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For an edgy look, Chef Tréand positions the sphere in the center of crystal ‘shards’ made by shattering a cast Isomalt spire.


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2. Define & pour

3. Inside design

Fill the bottom half of a four-inch sphere mold with clear or lightly colored Isomalt and allow it to cool. Next, make a smaller Isomalt sphere using a separate, smaller mold. Of course, any cast shape could replace the small sphere. Note: For geometric shapes, two-part molds made of firm silicone work best. The firmness prevents the rubber bands from compressing the mold out of round and losing registration.

The small sphere has been torched onto the surface of the Isomalt. (Use a dash of gold leaf to define the shape of similarly colored objects.) Next, use contrasting colors to draw out your pattern. Helpful Hint: Use a torch to flame off any small surface bubbles on your encapsulated shape (small sphere). If you don’t, the surface bubbles will stay in the casting.

Allow your design to cool. (For a different effect, mix the colors on the surface while the Isomalt is still liquid.) Helpful Hint: Do you want the center sphere to stand out more? Cast it in a contrasting color or gold leaf the entire surface. How about placing an airbrushed piece of pastillage inside?

4. Top off the pour

5. De-mold

6. Finishing touch

The two halves of the mold are secured together with strong rubber bands. Fill the rest of the mold with Isomalt cooled to 140º C/ 284º F. Set the mold aside for a few hours to cool. Helpful Hint: When casting in a silicone mold, pour your Isomalt as cool as possible. Silicone’s insulating characteristics will allow the Isomalt to continue to boil in the mold. To keep bubbles from forming, don’t stir the Isomalt prior to pouring.

When the mold has cooled to the touch, separate the two halves to reveal your handiwork. Push the sphere out from the bottom side of the mold. Make sure you are ready to catch it when it pops out! Notice how the gold leaf did not migrate to the outer surface of the sphere, nor did the red color drops fuse together in a swirl-like manner. With some practice, you could write words or even draw a decorative symbol.

The interior of the mold is glossy smooth. However, air within the boiling Isomalt can deposit micro bubbles on the surface of the sphere. A quick pass of the torch will melt the surface bubbles and dissolve the fine seam line. Your spheres will look like glass!

1. The set up

To see more casting demonstrations, visit Tips & Tools at: www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Cook the Isomalt without water at 170º C/ 338º F (a good temperature for transparency). Then allow it to cool to at least 140º C/ 284º F before pouring it into the mold. The temperature can vary with the mold size. Pour large molds cooler, small ones hotter. 708.660.9707

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Textured Mats

made easy by Michael Joy

M

old making is the perfect process for chefs looking to create unique patterns and shapes not available commercially. Textured mats are invaluable for adding flair to your pastry designs, and the good news is, they are simple to make. With the ever increasing demands pastry chefs face to be more creative with less time, this is a great technique to quickly enhance the surface of chocolate, sugar, fondant, and many other flavorful mediums. For this demonstration, we have chosen to make a silicone mold from textured wallpaper. If you have never made a silicone mold before, this is an excellent way to learn basic techniques while creating a beautiful and useful tool for your kitchen. [5] Weigh out silicone While wearing gloves and safetyglasses, pour 400 grams of GeoPress™ Silicone Base (white) into the mixing container. Next, add 40 grams (10%) of GeoPress™ Silicone Catalyst (blue). [6] Mix silicone [2] Cut wallpaper The Base and Catalyst are thoroughly Prepare the wallpaper by trimming it to 11 ½˝ x 16˝. Important Note: Use only mixed together until uniform in color. Visit www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com vinyl-based wallpaper. Fiber-based for online demos and detailed instructions. wallpapers will stick to silicone. [1] Materials needed: Textured wall paper, food-grade silicone (GeoPress™ Starter Kit), spatula, ½ sheet pan, digital scale, safety glasses, ruler, razor knife, torpedo level, shims, 3˝ scraper, and Vaseline™.

[3] Use Vaseline™ as glue Stipple (dab in an up–down motion) a small amount of Vaseline™ (just enough to create a light texture) on the back side of the wallpaper. Stipple the entire perimeter and center of the wallpaper. If the Vaseline™ permeates through the front of the wallpaper, you have applied too much and should start with a new sheet. Too much Vaseline™ can prevent the silicone from curing where they touch each other.

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[7] Pour silicone in a thin stream This is a very important step. Pour the GeoPress™ from 18˝–24˝ above the wall paper so that it stretches into a thin stream. This is called “needling” and it prevents air bubbles from accumulating on the surface of your mold.

[8] Pull liquid silicone over paper Use a wide scraper to lightly pull liquid silicone over the surface area of the wallpaper. Be careful not to lift the corners of the wallpaper up from the pan. Push them back down if you do. [4] Lay wallpaper in sheet pan [9] Level out the sheet pan In a flat sheet pan, gently press the Level the sheet pan with a torpedo wallpaper Vaseline™ side down, into level and shims to ensure the mold the pan. Make sure the corners are well cures perfectly flat. Allow the mold to adhered to the pan. cure for at least 24 hours. It will be firm to the touch. www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Michael Joy is the author of Confectionery Art Casting – Silicone Mold Making for Pastry Chefs and founder of the Chicago School of Mold Making and Casting for the Arts.

[10] Remove wall paper After the silicone has cured, peel the wallpaper from the silicone mold. [11] Trim silicone mold Use a razor knife to trim the excess edges off the mold. Not shown: Place the mold in an oven at 100º F. for 1–2 hours to complete the cure. Wash the mold with soap and water before using with food. GeoPress™ is not intended for baking. Do not heat GeoPress™ above 300º F./150º C. [12] Using your new mold Your textured mat is complete and there are many uses for it! Here are a few ideas: 1. Set a cake ring on top of the mat or cut the mat into strips and line the inside of a cake ring (or log mold) and fill it with mousse (plated serving shown). 2. Fold the mat in two and use it as a press mold to create double-sided pastillage shapes. 3. Press fondant on the mat and use it to decorate a wedding cake. Resources: To see more ideas for mold making in the culinary field and to find the materials shown in this demonstration, visit www.ChicagoMoldSchool. com. You can also register for a handson mold-making class.


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Vinyl Clarity The secret is out. When smooth, glass-like transparency is needed for your sugar work, vinyl is the way to go. Written by Michael Joy and Anthony Chavez Produced by Beatrice Schneider Executive Pastry Chef Anthony Chavez from 2941 Restaurant and Michael Joy from the Chicago School of Mold Making worked together to create unique effects for his run at the 2007 Paris Gourmet’s U.S. Pastry Competition.

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ach year, chefs from around the nation gather in New York City to compete for the title of Paris Gourmet’s Pastry Chef of the Year. As with any competition, unique challenges must be overcome. The first and foremost obstacle is logistics. Since the event does not provide kitchens for the chefs to work in, participants must bring everything they need with them, including their partially assembled showpiece components. They have three hours to build a showpiece (constructed of both chocolate and sugar) and must present three cakes.

Competitors in the event face the difficulty of transporting delicate showpiece elements, which is tough enough controlling temperatures and packing to avoid breakage on a cross-town venture but especially daunting on a multi-day drive across the country. Upon arrival, chefs have only the equipment they brought with them. Despite these constraints, competitors are able to create sculptural compositions of impressive size and color combinations that demonstrate capable hand skills, clean casting techniques and – very importantly – innovative effects that capture the judges attention. To build his showpiece, Chef Anthony perfected several techniques, including special applications for working with vinyl. Although vinyl is commonly found in kitchens, using it can be challenging due to its tendency to warp and its difficulty to cut. In the following demonstration, pastry chef Anthony Chavez shows successful techniques for employing vinyl to its full potential as an effective and quick tool for creating eye-catching showpieces.

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1. Pastry chef Anthony Chavez prepares to make a custom vinyl casting template. He begins with a 24˝ long sheet of 1/8˝ thick vinyl sheet.

2. The leaf template (black) was made by tracing a real leaf onto paper and cutting it out. Next, Anthony uses a marker to trace the pattern onto the vinyl sheet. Be sure to leave a 1˝ perimeter from the edge of the pattern to the edge of the vinyl.

3. To soften the vinyl before cutting, Chef Anthony puts it in a preheated (empty) oven at 300° F. With the door cracked open, he heats the vinyl for 3 minutes (maximum). Note: Be sure to place parchment paper beneath the vinyl to keep it clean. Do not leave oven unattended.

4. Place the warm vinyl on marble so it will not slide during cutting. While warm, the razor knife will slice through in a single pass. The result will be a cut with clean, smooth edges. Re-heat the vinyl if cutting becomes difficult.

5. The pattern is cut out in less than 10 minutes. If the vinyl was cut while cold, it would have taken at least an hour. More importantly, cold cutting requires strong knife pressure, which is quite dangerous.

6. To prepare for sugar casting, Chef Anthony stacks layers on the marble: 1st Parchment on marble surface 2nd Flat (uncut) 16˝ x 24˝ sheet of vinyl 3rd Vinyl leaf template 4th Half silicone Noodle™ divider.

7. Chef Anthony prepares a small amount of clear Isomalt to pour into the vinyl leaf template. Remember, there is a sheet of vinyl directly beneath the leaf template. (The white parchment prevents the vinyl from touching the marble.)

8. A torch is used to remove surface air bubbles. When using a torch near vinyl, keep the flame moving. Vinyl can catch on fire and give off toxic fumes.

9. After the Isomalt has cooled for about 10 minutes, the Noodle™ divider is removed. The torch is used again to heat the side wall where the Noodle™ was in contact with the sugar. This will help keep the Isomalt flexible enough to bend. 17


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10. Chef Anthony lifts both sheets of vinyl off the marble and drapes them over a premade slump mold. (The slump mold is made of ÂźË? thick foam core board.)

11. After allowing the Isomalt to cool for another 10 minutes, the vinyl leaf template is removed.

12. Once the sugar casting is cool enough to hold its shape, the vinyl can be removed from beneath the leaf. With contoured flat shapes, it is best to hold the casting in one hand and gently pull the vinyl down from below.

13. Anthony repeats the casting process in order to create a second leaf. Both leaves are torched together to make them self-supporting. Chef Anthony sets the leaves aside while he prepares to cast an upright base section for the showpiece.

14. To do this, he layers parchment on marble, then vinyl, then silicone (blue) and lastly, he places a silicone inclusion within the blue silicone collar mold. Note: Wooden rails are used to assure perpendicular shaping of the silicone.

15. Chef Anthony pours clear Isomalt directly onto the silicone inclusion. The liquid pressure from the pour pushes air bubbles off the surface of the silicone inclusion. The collar mold is filled to the top, completely covering the purple silicone.

16. Once the Isomalt has cooled, the silicone collar mold can be removed.

17. Next, Chef Anthony stands the casting upright and gently peels the vinyl sheet off of the Isomalt casting. Notice how the purple inclusion is still fixed into the casting.

18. With care, the purple inclusion can be peeled from the casting.

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19. The jaguar looks as if it is embedded inside of the sugar. Notice the difference in clarity between the smooth surface poured on the vinyl sheet and the ‘sandblasted’ look where sugar was poured over the textured silicone inclusion.

20. Next, Chef Anthony prepares to assemble the sugar base structure. In order to secure the showpiece to the work surface, he places a daub of hot Isomalt on the table top. The foot of the cast section is then set onto the hot Isomalt.

21. Using the collar mold again, Chef Anthony casts a second base section (without the jaguar). Both sections are joined while Anthony checks the vertical level. If the base sections are not vertical, the upper portion of the showpiece is likely to be unstable.

22. Using a simple geometric mold, Chef Anthony unmolds an oval platter.

23. Once he is certain the two sections are equal height, Chef Anthony glues the oval platter in place. Not Shown: A second oval platter cast in chocolate is attached atop the sugar oval. The resulting surface allows the chef to join chocolate elements to a sugar structure.

24. Chef Anthony finishes the last details of the showpiece. Notice how he used the vinyl leaf template to cast two fullsized chocolate leaves. Artistically, this helps unify both top and bottom of the showpiece.

25. Chef Anthony has placed the cast leaves in between the base structure. Next, he places a sugar disk on top of the leaves.

26. As the final step, Chef Anthony places his cake onto the sugar leaves. The transparent sugar creates the illusion of the cake floating on air.

27. To fully appreciate the 3-dimensional effect of the clear sugar and jaguar inclusion, a dark background provides the necessary contrast. To learn more about casting with vinyl, visit Tips & Tools at www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com.

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Rolling

with success How to make your own textured rolling pin.

by Michael Joy

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ometimes, to stand out in the crowd, you have to make your own equipment. A select few chefs take naturally to this, while others believe they either do not have the time, or access to special construction tools or materials. In this demonstration, we will show you how a small amount of silicone, a sheet of textured wall paper and a trip to your local hardware store can result in a highly versatile textured rolling pin. Since the rolling pin’s surface is silicone, it is ideal for adding texture to chocolate, fondant, sugar, bread dough, pastillage and even marzipan. Because the rolling pins are not for sale, the only way to get one is to make one. The good news is, they are simple to make.

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[1] Primary materials needed: Textured wall paper (vinyl backed), silicone (Flex & Bake™), PVC pipe 1–12˝ L x 3˝ diameter, 1–13½˝ L x diam., 1–16˝ L x 1½˝ diam., 2–1½˝ PVC unions, 1–2˝ diam. PVC end cap, 1–PVC 3˝ diam. inside fit closet flange with test cap.

[2] Measure the wallpaper. Make a cardboard template (93/8˝ x 10½˝ interior). Set on wallpaper. Position the 10½˝ (red) sides to find where the pattern repeats. The 10½˝ (red) lengths must match up for your rolling pin seam line to repeat invisibly. (See # 7)

[3] Precisely cut a 93/8˝ x 10½˝ sheet. A craft rolling knife is the best way to cut textured wall paper. Use a metal ruler to make sure the cut is straight. If your cuts are sloppy, they will show up as flaws on your rolling pin surface.

[4] Vaseline the wallpaper surface. With the low setting, use a heat gun to liquefy the Vaseline in the jar. Brush the liquid Vaseline over the entire surface of the wallpaper. (Textured side only.)

[5] Melt the Vaseline into the detail. With the heat gun on low, melt the Vaseline into the wallpaper. When the wallpaper darkens (see left side of paper), you have proper Vaseline coverage.

[6] Remove excess Vaseline. Use paper towels to ‘mop’ up the excess Vaseline. The surface should look saturated (darker) but not greasy. Vinyl backed wallpapers from Anaglypta® and Lincrusta® work the best.

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[7] Tape the wallpaper together. With the textured side of the wallpaper facing down on the 2˝ diameter pipe, tape the edges (10½˝ length) of wallpaper together. The entire length of paper must be tightly taped together (no gaps).

[8] Center and secure the 2˝ PVC pipe. Stack two pop sickle sticks on each side of the 2˝ pipe to help center it within the flange. Next, tightly seal the gap between pipe and flange with oil clay. Remove the sticks and fill in the gaps. Clean up the seal.

[9] Line the 3˝ pipe with acetate. Place three sheets of 8½˝ x 11˝ acetate (long side down) into the 3˝ pipe. Each sheet should overlap the other by at least 50%. If you don’t do this, the silicone will stick to the pipe. Disaster.

[10] Place wallpaper inside of 3˝ pipe. Gently compress the wallpaper cylinder so it will slide inside the 3˝ pipe. You must be sure the wallpaper is touching the acetate sheets inside the pipe. If the paper does not fit snugly against the acetate, silicone will leak in-between (See photograph 17).

[11] Flatten the wallpaper seam inside. Place the 1½˝ pipe inside the 3˝ pipe. Use a gentle rolling motion to press the wallpaper cylinder flat against the inside surface of the 3˝ pipe. If the wallpaper was not cut accurately, it may not lay flat. Fix it by re-cutting your paper.

[12] Put the 3˝ pipe over the 2˝ pipe. First, pull the acetate up so a ½˝ tall lip extends above the 3˝ pipe. Next, slide the wallpaper upwards so it is flush with the top edge of the 3˝ pipe. Vaseline the flange (short post at bottom) before securing the 3˝ pipe on flange.

[13] Center the 2˝ pipe. There should be a consistent ¼˝ gap between the 2˝ pipe and the inside of the 3˝ pipe. This is the gap where the silicone will flow into. If the gap is not uniform, carefully tilt the 2˝ pipe until it is perfectly centered.

[14] Cap the 2˝ pipe. Carefully, set the 2˝ end cap onto the pipe. Do not push it down more than ¼˝ onto the 2˝ pipe. Seal the bottom joint of the 3˝ pipe and the flange with oil clay. If you do not do this, silicone will leak out the bottom of the pipe.

[15] Pour the Flex & Bake silicone. Mix 450 grams of base and 45 grams of catalyst from your Flex & Bake™ kit. Pour the silicone in a slow, thin stream over the end cap. You might choose to sit down while pouring. as it will take about 6 minutes to slowly fill the pipe.

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[16] Allow the silicone to cure. In 24 hours, the silicone will be ready to remove. Use a razor knife to trim off the ½˝ tall acetate lip and the excess silicone that it contains.

[17] Pry the 3˝ pipe off the flange. Remove clay seal from the flange base. Use a screw driver to pry the pipe off the flange. If you didn’t use enough Vaseline on the flange, you will have to stand on the flange and pull upwards with force.

[18] Push the silicone out of the pipe. Use the 2˝ end cap as a pushing block to help force the silicone cylinder out of the 3˝ pipe.

[19] Use force to free the cylinder. This is the moment of truth. The only reason why the cylinder slides out of the pipe is because of the acetate liner (step 9). If you forgot the acetate, no amount of force will help you free the cylinder.

[20] Remove the acetate liner. Peel off the acetate sheets and trim away the silicone ‘flash’ (excess material that leaked around the edges).

[21] Peel off the textured wallpaper. Carefully peel away the paper. If you applied enough Vaseline, it should come off easily. After removing the paper, the silicone will feel greasy. Wash off the Vaseline residue with soap and water.

[22] Insert the roller pipe. Place the 1½˝ D x 16˝ L pipe inside of the 2˝ pipe. Push the 1½˝ PVC coupler onto the end of the 16˝ L pipe.

[23] Add rolling pin handles. Turn the pipe over and put the second coupler onto the 16˝ L pipe. Push firmly. If you do not permanently glue the ‘handles’ on, the center roller can be reused for another textured rolling pin.

[24] The completed rolling pin. If you would like to see an extended version of this demonstration and learn more about the materials used to make the rolling pin, please visit Tips & Tools at www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com.

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Versatile Artistry Creating free-form shapes with Silicone Noodles™.

BY STÉPHANE TRÉAND & MICHAEL JOY PHOTO: About Face Portrait

Stéphane Tréand (MOF) is the Executive Pastry Chef at the St. Regis Resort Monarch Beach. Michael Joy is the founder of the Chicago School of Mold Making and author of Confectionery Art Casting, Silicone Mold Making for Pastry Chefs.

few weeks ago, I caught up with Chef Tréand while he was teaching a sugar casting class at the Maui Community College (MCC) in Kahului, Maui. MCC pastry instructor, Teresa Shurilla, has hosted several prominent guest chefs including; Stanton Ho, Ewald Notter, Jacquy Pfeiffer and Drew Shotts, at their new seventeen-million dollar state-of-the art culinary academy, built by the University of Hawaii.

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While in Maui, I couldn’t help but notice the irony of visiting a place where so much sugar is grown and processed, yet the high humidity inhibits chefs from using it to make ornamental decorations. For those of you experienced with sugar work, you already know humidity is the enemy. It causes the crystal shine to turn cloudy and its surface to become sticky in a matter of hours. Never one to pass up a sugar challenge, Chef Stéphane thought these circumstances would be a great opportunity to show the class some helpful tips on how to design and construct a sugar showpiece in a high humidity environment. As Stéphane said, “Don’t let the humidity stop you from being creative with sugar.” He continues, “Your job will be easier if you cook the Isomalt hotter, work in a dehumidified room and spray your work with lacquer immediately after assembly. Working like this, you can make an impressive showpiece, even on an island.” Here are a few tips Stéphane shared with the class. Let’s pour! To see more casting demonstrations, visit Tips & Tools at:

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1 Layout Chef Tréand arranges

2 Trace Once satisfied with the lay-

3 Insert A sheet of vinyl is set on top of the paper. The Noodles are repositioned on the drawing and a Showpeel leaf is set inside. Casting Tip: Hot Isomalt will cause vinyl to stick to marble. You MUST have paper beneath the vinyl so it can be moved on the marble surface. (See photo 7 & 14)

4 Cook & color In humid environments, cook your Isomalt to 370º F without water. Stéphane adds two drops of green and two drops of blue coloring to make an aquamarine color.

5 Pour Let the Isomalt cool to 300º F

6 Torch After pouring, Chef Tréand

7 Move To help the Isomalt cool more quickly, Stéphane slides the entire layout (paper and all) towards the top of the marble where it is colder. Remember, without paper beneath the vinyl. It would be impossible to move.

8 Bases While the long center-

9 De-Noodle In about 30 minutes,

two flexible silicone Noodles to create a retaining wall for the cooked Isomalt. For ease of movement, Stéphane arranges the Noodles on top of a piece of craft paper.

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out, Stéphane traces the inside perimeter with a marker. Copying the contour onto paper will allow him (or an assistant) to accurately duplicate the same design without effort.

/ 148º C. Fill the Noodles slowly so they don’t lift up. Pour in the center of the shape and allow the Isomalt to flow towards the Noodles. After pouring an even ½˝ thickness, pour more Isomalt at the bottom to add thickness for strength.

section is cooling, Chef Tréand fills individual Noodles to create tear-drop shaped bases. Casting Tip: Pouring Isomalt onto silicone baking mats (instead of vinyl) will create a slightly frosted look.

uses a small torch to remove surface bubbles from the Isomalt. Casting Tip: When using a torch, always keep the flame moving. Do not hold the torch in one area too long. Vinyl is flammable.

the center section is cool enough to remove the Noodles. Casting note: The purple silicone half-rounds (far left) were put on the vinyl at the same time the Showpeel was inserted in photograph 3.


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10 Remove The tear-drop bases

11 Spheres Stéphane demolds

12 Assemble The surface of the

13 Attach Chef Stéphane attaches

14 Slide & peel This is tricky.

15 Instant height Stéphane positions and attaches the center structure to the base. Within an hour, Chef Tréand has created a simple but elegant four-foot tall showpiece.

16 Remove Stéphane uses a razor

17 Special effect Next, the

18 Finishing touch To unify

are removed from the silicone baking mat. Casting Tip: When creating a showpiece in a humid environment, it is important to build it as quickly as possible.

the top base plate onto the spheres. Casting tip: It is important for all the spheres to be the same height. If they are not, the base won’t be level. (A tall showpiece needs a perfectly level base.)

knife to carefully pry out the silicone halfrounds. (These can be seen at the top of the centerpiece in photograph 9.)

sugar spheres from a 1.5˝ pop-up sphere mold. The spheres will be used as posts to support the two base sections.

Stéphane carefully slides one end of the vinyl off the table. Inch by inch, the sugar section is slid off the table, as the vinyl sheet drops away from the sugar. (This is best done with two people.)

Dewdrop Showpeel leaf is peeled out of the Isomalt. Notice the engraved effect in the sugar where the silicone Showpeel contacted the Isomalt.

Isomalt base is quickly torched so the spheres can be attached. Once attached, they are torched again to eliminate small bubbles.

the artistic elements of the showpiece, the sphere and Dewdrop Showpeel are used again to create a tropical flower. To protect it from the humidity, Stéphane will spray the entire showpiece with food lacquer. 25


Silicone Simplicity Susan Notter, Pastry Chef Consultant

Modernn art with minimal effort

Susan_Notter@yahoo.com

Michael Joy, Chicago School of Mold Making Joy@ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Produced by Beatrice Schneider

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ome chefs have the ability to make things look easy. Pastry chef Susan Notter is one of these people.. She is among a growing number of pastry chefs being ng asked to provide an artistic bridge between classical hand skills and innovative new casting techniques. Ass a seasoned competitor, Susan knows judges want to see strength in hand skills such as pulled and blown sugar. She also recognizes that they want to be surprised with new designs and techniques.

Chef Notter Nott has coauthored several books and travels the world, teaching a wide range of classes. She knows first-hand the creative pastry cla challenges today’s chefs face in professional challenge With less time and higher expectations kitchens. W norm, we want to help bring some balance as the norm the equation. To help chefs meet this back into th Chef Notter and I will demonstrate two challenge, C techniques. The first is a quick and easy versatile tech make custom silicone shapes and the way to ma second is a fast-track casting technique. The results will startle you with how easy it is res to achieve individual, creative results in a short period of time.

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1. Primary materials needed: Flex & Bake silicone, ½˝ thick foam core, Elmer’s glue, Vaseline®, scissors, X-Acto knife, acetate sheet.

2. Cut out the paper shapes. Three designs (from a book of symbols) are copied and enlarged. Next, the inside shapes are cut out.

3. Transfer the images to foam core. Before transferring the images, cut the foam core into a manageable 8½˝ x 11˝ section. This is the same size as the acetate you will place beneath it in photograph 8.

4. Cut out the shapes. With a new blade, cut out the foam core shapes. Next, cut connecting lines between all three shapes. This will create a multi-piece template that can be separated to release your silicone shapes.

5. Sand the edges smooth. Using an emery board or sand paper, smooth the inside surfaces. The edges don’t have to be perfect, but they should not be jagged or rough. (Do not sand in an area where food is prepared.)

6. Seal the foam edges with glue. Use Elmer’s craft glue to seal the inside foam edges. Feed the glue onto the edge and then smooth it with your finger. When dry, the layer of glue will reduce the porosity of the foam. (Glue has been pigmented for clarity.)

7. Apply Vaseline as a release agent. Once the glue has completely dried (about two hours), apply a thin layer of Vaseline to the inside surfaces. Only a thin ‘glaze’ is needed as a thick gloppy coat may inhibit the cure of your silicone.

8. Reassemble the template. Not shown: A sheet of acetate is taped into a new sheet pan. Next, apply drops of Elmer’s glue to hold down the foam core to the acetate surface. (Without acetate, the silicone will stick to the sheet pan.)

9. Press the foam core flat. To ensure a tight contact surface between the foam core and acetate, small bags of rice are used to weigh it down. Allow the glue to dry for several hours. 708.660.9707

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10. Mix the silicone. From the Flex & Bake starter kit, 200 grams of ‘base’ are weighed out. When using liquid silicone materials, gloves and safety glasses should be worn. Do not mix or pour in areas where food is prepared.

11. Add the catalyst. Flex & Bake silicone is mixed in a ratio of 10:1 by weight. To complete the batch, 20 grams of catalyst (purple) are added to the base. Mix until a uniform violet color is achieved.

12. Pour the silicone. To reduce air bubbles, pour the silicone in a slow, thin stream (needling). Most bubbles will stretch and burst before entering the form. It is alright for some small air bubbles to remain on the surface.

13. Allow the silicone to cure. 24-36 hours later, the foam is flipped over and unmolded. If the silicone is still tacky (cold rooms can slow the cure), do not unmold. Place entire sheet pan in a 100°F oven (or warm area) for several hours. Leave alone until silicone firms.

14. Clean up the silicone shapes. Fiskars® curved-tip craft scissors are the best for trimming flash (excess silicone) from the edges. Remember to save your foam core template. It can be used again.

15. Post-cure the silicone. Before using your silicone shapes, wash them in warm soapy water and bake them in an oven at 300°F for 3 hours. This is necessary to complete the cure of Flex & Bake silicone.

16. Parchment under vinyl. When casting on vinyl, always put paper beneath so it won’t stick to your table. The two silicone Noodles™ are contoured around the silicone shapes on top of the vinyl. www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

17. Pour the black Isomalt. First, Chef Susan Notter cooks and pigments the Isomalt. Next, she adds a teaspoon of pearlescent powder and swirls it into the pot before pouring the Isomalt into the Noodle forms.

18. Add clear Isomalt for a special effect. Chef Notter pours a small amount of clear Isomalt into the forms. The clear Isomalt will enhance the metallic effect. At the same time, she fills the (back right) corner shape with clear Isomalt.


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19. Pour the red Isomalt. Isomalt is cooked and pigmented red. Next, a teaspoon of white pearlescent powder is swirled into the pitcher. While pouring very slowly, Chef Notter completely covers the silicone shapes.

20. Unmold the Noodles. The Isomalt is allowed to cool for at least thirty minutes before the silicone Noodles are removed.

21. Remove the silicone shapes. Chef Notter carefully removes the silicone inserts.

22. Remove the embedded shapes. The red casting is flipped over to expose the encapsulated silicone inserts (see step 16). Chef Notter uses a scissor tip to help pry the shape out.

23. Peel the vinyl off the casting. Since the black casting is more delicate, Chef Notter pulls the vinyl downwards off the edge of the table. Pulling the vinyl down and away from the sugar is better than trying to pry it up off the vinyl.

24. Compose the sugar elements. When working with bold, geometric shapes, Chef Notter comments, “Don’t be overly fussy with extra decoration. Beautiful results can be had quickly when you keep your designs clean and simple.”

25. Second composition. With the remaining elements from the pour, Chef Notter builds a second amenity. Once again, it is a simple, non-fussy design that creates a strong effect.

26. Result! Notice how Chef Notter placed a bright red sugar sphere to draw your eye to the front of the piece. Add a few truffles and the result is first class. Look at that metallic effect when the light hits it!

27. Encore ! Two simple shapes + two simple colors = one VIP amenity ready to go! Thank you, Chef Notter for sharing your artistic skills. 708.660.9707

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Calligraphy transformation Part I from inspiration to presentation

by Susan Notter & Michael Joy Susan Notter, Pastry Chef Consultant Michael Joy, Chicago School of Mold Making

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reative chefs are always looking for new designs to incorporate into their culinary artwork. While studying sculpture in art school, I learned that new ideas can often be found by looking into the past. When discussing showpiece design with chefs, I recommend they turn to calligraphy for inspiration. In fact, it doesn’t take long to find a Chinese or Japanese character whose composition has both exciting motion and appealing balance. With some slight modification, a calligraphy character can be transformed from a twodimensional shape into a three-dimensional form. In this article, pastry chef Susan Notter and I have teamed up to show how quickly a calligraphic character can be used to make a casting mat that has unlimited creative potential for sculptural expression in pastry.

1. Primary materials needed: Perfectly flat half sheet pan (new), GeoPress™ firm silicone, Elmer’s® glue, razor knife, French curves and one sheet of ¼˝ thick foam core.

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2. Modify the calligraphy image: Download and print a calligraphy image from the internet. Use a French curve to accentuate the sweeping lines to your liking. The image should look sharp and clean. Simple symbols work best.

3. Reinforce the thin areas: Use the marker to widen any areas that are too thin. If an area is thin, it will be weak when made of sugar. Remember, everything you draw in black, is going to become a sugar shape.


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4. Enlarge the image: Once you have modified and adjusted the image to your liking, enlarge it on a copy machine. Be mindful not to enlarge it beyond the size of your half sheet pan. Make a few extra copies.

5. Cut out the image: Cut out several copies of the shape. Keep the extra shapes near bye. If there is extra room, they can be included into the casting mat.

6. Transfer patterns onto foam core: Trace the shapes onto the foam core. Be creative, use the French curves to draw a few small free hand shapes onto the board. They will make excellent construction elements for your centerpieces.

7. Cut out the shapes: To make clean cuts in foam core, always use a new blade. Also, if you cut with a hot blade, it will melt the foam and create a clean edge. Keep an alcohol lamp nearby for frequent reheating.

8. Seal the edges with glue: Because foam is porous, it should be sealed with Elmer’s® glue to prevent silicone from sticking to it. Allow the glue to dry. If your cuts are really rough, apply a second layer. (Glue was pigmented for clarity.)

9. Glue the shapes into the sheet pan: Pre-arrange your shapes without glue to decide a sensible arrangement. Next, apply a thin bead of glue around the bottom perimeter of your shape. Smooth the glue to the very edge of the shape. Be mindful your shapes are ‘right side up’.

10. Arrange the shapes efficiently: Put as many shapes as possible onto your sheet pan. The only guidelines; leave a 3/8˝ space around the outside edge of the sheet pan and don’t crowd shapes closer than ¼˝ apart from each other.

11. Weigh the shapes down: Fill bags with sugar to make weights. Shapes must be held down while the glue dries. Note: For perfect circle shapes, fix metal cutters on the pan . (Use oil clay to hold them in place.)

12. Weigh out the silicone base: GeoPress silicone comes in two liquid parts. Part A, is white ‘base’. For this mold, 350 grams of base are weighed out. Always wear gloves and safety glasses when using liquid silicone. 708.660.9707

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13. Add the silicone catalyst: GeoPress requires a catalyst (part B) to change it from liquid to rubber. Correct ratio for GeoPress is 10:1 by weight. Formula = 350 grams of base (white) to 35 grams of catalyst (blue).

14. Mix the silicone: Use a rubber tipped spatula for mixing. Mix until all white liquid has changed to an even light blue color. Be sure to scrape down the sides of the mixing bucket.

15. Pour the silicone: Once catalyzed, GeoPress is liquid for 30 minutes. Pour in a thin stream (needling) to reduce air bubbles. Be patient. Pour slowly and only between the shapes. Do not pour over the top of them.

16. Remove any excess silicone: While still liquid, carefully remove any silicone that has flowed over the shapes. The silicone should be level with the top of the shapes. Clean the spatula with a paper towel, but leave the mixing bucket as is. The silicone can be easily peeled out of it the next day.

17. Allow to cure for 24 hours: Level the sheet pan and place it in a safe area undisturbed for 24 hours. Immediately clean up your work area. Silicone oils can be cleaned up with Goop™ hand cleaner. (Soap and water will not work.)

18. Unmold the casting: After the mold has cured for a minimum of 24 hours, carefully peel it out of the sheet pan. If you want to make a duplicate casting mat, be sure to hold the shapes down as you remove the silicone.

19. Duplicate the casting mat: If the shapes are still in good condition, re-glue any loose shapes and pour a second mold. Since the prep work is already finished, a second mold can poured quickly.

20. Cut away extra silicone: Use curved tip manicure scissors to trim off excess silicone that leaked above or below the shapes. Fiskar® brand scissors seem to work the best.

21. Post cure the silicone mold: Heat is required to complete the cure. Bake the mold in an oven at 150° F. for one to two hours, then wash with soap and water. Your mold is ready to use!

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Calligraphy composition

Part II

Susan Notter has spent more than twenty years traveling the world teaching eaching and ents. demonstrating sugar artistry to chefs, pastry chefs and culinary students. ar She is a seasoned competitor and a master of blown and pulled sugar ks. decoration, as well a co-author and contributor to several pastry books. Mindful of the time constraints that chefs face and the realities of the industry, Chef Notter has chosen to demonstrate how quickly and easily a casting mat can be used to create modern, expressive centerpieces.

1. Pour Isomalt at 330° F: Chef Notter places the silicone casting mat atop a sheet of vinyl. Whenever pouring Isomalt onto vinyl, you must put parchment paper beneath it; otherwise, the heat will cause the vinyl to stick to the work surface below.

2. Allow to cool and then unmold: The silicone casting mat is only ÂźË? thick and must be unmolded carefully. Helpful hint: When finished with the casting mat, store it flat in a sheet pan. Silicone has a memory and will warp if folded for a long period of time.

3. Peel the vinyl off the sugar: Chef Notter slides the vinyl partially off the table so she can pull the vinyl down and away from the casting. (If you try to lift the sugar off the flat vinyl, you will run the risk of cracking the casting.)

4. Assemble the cast pieces: For this composition, Chef Notter chooses to assemble a winged figure. It looks very similar to the original calligraphy shape.

5. Hand shape small pieces: Using two of the extra shapes made with the casting mat, Chef Notter softens them under a heat lamp and folds them into a flower casing.

6. Position and attach: To help visually balance this composition, Chef Notter chooses to place the flower casing at the foot of the figure. 708.660.9707

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7. Casting multicolored spheres: To add a splash of color to the centerpiece, Chef Notter casts sugar spheres. She makes a multicolored sphere by filling the pop-up mold half-way with clear Isomalt.

8. Marbleize the color: While the clear Isomalt is still liquid inside of the mold, Chef Notter tops off the mold with bright red sugar mixed with a touch of luster dust.

9. Allow to cool and then unmold: In about 45 minutes the spheres can be unmolded. The silicone mold is flexible enough to pop the spheres out without tearing.

10. Clear the spheres with a torch: Whenever casting sugar into a silicone mold, micro–bubbles will appear on the surface. To bring out the depth of color in the casting, the spheres must be ‘cleared’ with a torch. This removes the surface bubbles and creates a glossy shine on the surface.

11. Attach the sphere: When choosing a place to add color, select an area where you want the viewer’s eye to focus. Resist the temptation of filling up empty areas. Sometimes, less is more. (See photograph 27 for a close up of the sphere.)

12. Add a hand made element: Chef Notter blows a white sugar bulb. Here, she opened the bulb and is softening the edges.

13. Attach the flower: From start to finish, this centerpiece took less than 15 minutes to assemble.

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14. Final composition: Chef Notter has created an elegant composition with a good balance between hand blown and molded elements.

“The addition of pulled and blown decorative elements is a choice for each chef to make. Even without these finishing touches, the centerpieces are eye catching and beautiful in their simplicity.” – Susan Notter


Characters with a twist

The h b beautiful f l thing h about b casting mats is their unlimited potential. It is easy to pour several shapes quickly and still have the freedom to change them as you wish. In the previous section, Chef Notter assembled a centerpiece similar to the original calligraphy character. Now, have a look and see how she adds a slight twist to her work.

15. Pour Isomalt: Chef Notter has added black pigment to the clear Isomalt. Once mixed, white pearlescent powder is added to create a metallic effect. (The front shape has been poured in clear.)

16. Pull the color: For extra depth of color, Chef Notter has poured a stream of black Isomalt over the clear Isomalt (front). She then uses a knife to pull the color through the clear Isomalt. The result is a swirling streak.

17. Unmold the casting mat: As mentioned previously, thin casting mats are delicate pieces of equipment that require care in handling. A casting mat made from platinum cured silicone will last for many years.

18. Vary tone and depth of color: Notice the variety of tone Chef Notter has achieved. Keeping your colors in the same tonal range will help make your work look unified and balanced.

19. Remove castings from vinyl: Chef Notter shows you the original ‘core’ shape of the calligraphy figure. As before, slide the vinyl off the table and pull the vinyl down, away from the casting.

20. Alter the shape: To create a completely new composition, Chef Notter warms the casting under a heat lamp, inverts it and twists the legs. 708.660.9707

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21. Add pieces to the construction: Additional cast pieces are added to the trunk. When working with dark colors, keep the darkest color at the base and the lighter colors towards the top.

22. Pulling the sugar: Chef Notter begins to make a white sugar flower by pulling several flat petals from a mass of malleable sugar.

23. Rolling the petals: While the sugar is still pliable, the outside edges of the petal are rolled towards each other.

24. Make lots of petals: For the flower blossom, Chef Notter will need several cone–like petals. Notice that great pearlescent shine!

25. Assemble the flower bloom: An alcohol lamp is used to melt the bottom of each flower petal. One by one, they are attached to each other. The result is a miniature bouquet of delicate flower petals. (With proficiency, it will be possible to make a flower like this in just a few minutes.)

26. Adding the decoration: Using two spheres (cast earlier), Chef Notter looks for the best location to attach them. Since she already knows the white sugar flower will go in the center of the base, she uses the red spheres to create a visual frame that will ‘book-end’ the delicate handwork.

27. Multicolored sugar sphere: Look at the glass-like depth of color in this sphere; simple and elegant. Remember, it only took two colors with a touch of luster dust to create this jewel. (See photographs 7 & 8.) www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

28. Position the flower: As a finishing touch, Chef Notter attaches the hand-made flower to the base. Would you have guessed this piece was made from the same casting mat?

29. Diverse compositions: The potential is limitless. With a few simple tools and a sense of composition, an endless variety of sculptures can be made.


Casting to Win Is there a place for silicone molds in pastry competitions? The 2007 Culinary Casting Challenge, sponsored by the Chicago School of Mold Making, wanted to put this question to the test. Instructed to use silicone molds in as many different ways as possible, seven student chefs came up with great answers. Text by Michael Joy and Chef Paul Bodrogi, Story produced by Beatrice Schneider Photographs by Dan Carmody www.Haigwood Studios.com

A year ago, friends Paul Bodrogi and Michael Joy hatched a plan to organize a new type of pastry competition. Chef Bodrogi, an experienced competitor and pastry chef instructor at the Art Institute of Atlanta, was eager to get started. ypically, competitions place restrictions on the use of silicone molds in the kitchen. Our plan was to turn the tables. In this event, held in March at the Art Institute of Atlanta, each student was outfitted with the same ten silicone molds made at the Chicago School of Mold Making. This way, each person would be starting from the same point, with exactly the same equipment. Their skill, creativity and commitment would be the only variables.

T

Each competitor was fully aware that this competition was about the creative use of molds and their ability to transform a casting into something truly unique. They knew that if they created showpieces only reflecting the shapes of the molds, they would be judged harshly. The chefs competed for the right to keep their set of molds, with the highest points going to the chef who showed the most skill in manipulating his/her molds and castings. The rules where simple: create a sugar showpiece and chocolate amenity using the silicone molds in two five-hour sessions. The judges, led by Art Institute chef instructor Satoko Taniguchi, evaluated the creative use of the molds, kitchen skills, degree of difficulty, artistic value, originality, and fulfillment of the competition’s theme, “Modern Nature.” With no more than two advanced pastry classes each and working with a personal budget less than $100, we were impressed with what each student chef was able to achieve. Let’s meet the contestants...

Many thanks go to Chef Bodrogi for spending so many extra hours with his students to help them prepare. His dedication to teaching is an inspiration to the profession.

Randy Williams took first place with his aquatic theme showpiece.

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Randy Williams, inspired by what he saw on the Food Network, was eager to become a first time competitor. His clean work, strong skill set and creative abilities resulted in a first place win.

Larisa Slaughter and her assistant work carefully to press a Showpeel™ into warm Isomalt to create a textured impression.

At 19, Brandon Neisler was the youngest competitor. Here, he is shown using silicone Noodles™ to create custom shapes for his chocolate amenity.

Scott Millspaugh, a full-time fireman, works effectively under pressure. Pouring multiple sections at once, he was the first to complete his sugar showpiece.

Maia Suzuki had watched chef instructor Bodrogi work on numerous competitions. She learned early that working clean and with a clear plan would help her through any difficulties.

Aaron Salvo is constantly learning by surrounding himself with innovative people. Shown here working with his assistant, they are assembling an Isomalt butterfly created with Showpeels.

Irene Buntaran assembles her well designed showpiece. Unexpectedly, her assistant did not show on day two. Fortunately, fellow competitor Scott Milspaugh had already finished his showpiece and stepped in to assist. Great Sportsmanship!

Great idea: Aaron Salvo used 3M™ Polyimide Film Electrical Tape to manipulate the shape of the 1˝ cube mold. Made of silicone, the tape’s maximum operating temperature is 180º C or 356º F.

At every turn, Randy Williams was scoring points by transforming various molds into objects completely different from what they were originally intended. Here, the Mercury Ripple silicone mold has become a sea horse.

Great idea: Using tape to bind the Noodle into geometric shapes with corners.


education

Scott displays his city-scape adorned with butterflies and wings. Great color choice and balance of geometric and organic shapes!

Aaron presented this giant stylized architectural flower. He made the bold choice of constructing the entire piece horizontally. Upon completion, he lifted the showpiece vertically (very risky) and marched it to the judges table.

As Larisa added a butterfly to her embossed center structure, people began to gather outside the kitchens. Within an hour of finishing time, the hallways were filled with friends, family, co-workers and staff who gathered around to watch.

When the final bell rang, six judges completed their decisions and announced the winners; Randy, first; Maia, second; and Brandon, third. Maia’s cool recovery of a broken showpiece and her consistently clean kitchen paid off.

Brandon Neisler took third place. Throughout the competition, he made large, bold shapes and used his time well. The judges were impressed that such a young competitor could pull this off without the help of an assistant.

Irene’s showpiece was beautiful. Unfortunately, her assistant’s absence on the second day caused her to finish the showpiece late. The deductions cost her a place at the podium. We know we will see Irene again soon in another competition.

Left to Right: Anne Marie Pizzi, Chef Paul Bodrogi, Irene Buntar, Scott Millspaugh, Randy Williams, Jeannie Newton, Megan McManus, Aaron Salvo, Delicia Love, Larisa Slaughter, Brandon Neisler, Maia Suzuki and Jackie Frazier. 39


Dive into Chocolate Tips on creating quick chocolate displays.

P

rofessional chefs are always on the lookout for helpful tips and tools to bring more ingenuity and efficiency into their daily tasks. Today, the combination of silicone, chocolate and colored cocoa butter can provide a fresh recipe for artistic success. When blended with a splash of creativity, these materials can help navigate your imagination to new depths. As pastry chef Stéphane Tréand MOF was completing twenty new nautical theme Showpeels™, he realized they had great potential to help other chefs save time in the kitchen. The thin patterned silicone sheets are easy to work with and provide consistent detailed shapes time and time again. If you have seen Chef Stéphane’s work before, you already know of his unique ability to bring creativity and play together. His skill in uniting shape, color and texture into enticing compositions is the result of a lifetime interest in art and nature. Have a look at how Chef Stéphane utilizes silicone, chocolate, and color to demonstrate fast ways to create ‘underwater’ displays filled with unexpected lightness and luminosity. His methods are quick, effective techniques that are readily adaptable to suit your individual needs whether you are working with chocolate, sugar or pastillage. Dive in, we can’t wait to see what you make!

By Michael Joy, of the Chicago School of Mold Making, and Stéphane Tréand MOF, Executive Pastry Chef at the St. Regis Resort Monarch Beach. Produced by Beatrice Schneider.

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education

1. Getting started Begin by cutting the patterns out of the 8˝ x 10½˝ silicone Showpeel sheet. If it’s your first time cutting silicone, make a few test cuts in non-detail areas until you are comfortable how the X-acto blade cuts through the silicone.

2. Pipe the chocolate Next, cut fitted pieces of parchment for each pattern you will be casting. Fill a small piping cone with tempered chocolate and pipe chocolate along the outside perimeter before filling the interior area.

3. Level the chocolate Shimmy the parchment paper back and forth quickly to level out the chocolate. This must be done quickly, before the chocolate starts to set. Note: The ‘dipping tabs’ on the tail have not been covered with chocolate.

4. Peel & reveal Once the chocolate has set (5-10 minutes in a refrigerator), it is ready to unmold. Gently peel the silicone away from the casting. Not Shown: To contour a casting, allow the chocolate coated Showpeel to “set up” inside the contour of a large bowl.

5. Create the coral structure First, place a thin sheet of acetate onto a ¼˝ thick sheet of Plexiglas. Next, several ladles of tempered chocolate are pooled onto the surface. The chocolate must be at least 3/8˝ thick to have enough strength to stand vertically. (See photo 9)

6. Cut out the coral shape Once the chocolate has achieved the initial set (about 10 minutes in a cool room), Chef Stéphane freehand cuts a coral pattern. The inside cuts will create open ‘windows’ as seen in photo 19.

7. Flip the chocolate slab After the chocolate has completely set (5-10 minutes in a refrigerator), a second sheet of Plexiglas is set on top of the chocolate slab enabling Chef Stéphane to easily flip over the slab.

8. Remove the coral pattern Once the Plexiglas and acetate sheet have been removed, the chocolate remnants can be carefully removed from the coral cut – out. Make sure to save a few large pieces to use as support braces (next photo).

9. Stabilize the coral structure Chef Stéphane attaches the coral onto a base that is heavy enough to anchor the entire sculpture. For additional support, Stéphane adheres a chocolate remnant onto the back of the coral for vertical stability. 41


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10. Airbrush the castings white Conserve time and materials by airbrushing groups of chocolate castings at the same time. To achieve bright colors on dark chocolate, it must first be primed with white colored cocoa butter.

11. Apply second color (yellow) Good airbrush results are made by following a plan. Chef Stéphane knows what colors he will use before he starts painting. If your plan is not clear, find relevant photographs to use as reference material.

12. Apply the third color (orange) To create deep colors, Chef Stéphane layers darker colors over lighter colors. Color intensity can also be controlled by airbrush placement. Close airbrush placement will result in darker shades.

13. Apply the fourth color (green) Notice Stéphane does not use green on all of the patterns. To blend small amounts of complimentary colors, simply add new color to the airbrush cup. Note: First test the color by spraying on a paper towel.

14. Apply the fifth color (brown) Mixing colors in the airbrush can be tricky. By using light colors first, darker shades can easily be made by adding a deeper hue to the airbrush cup. It is easier to go from light to dark then from dark to light.

15. Apply the sixth color (blue) The trick for making a flat shape look 3-D is to paint a dark color around the perimeter and leave the interior a light color. The light color will appear to be pushing forward and will create a contoured effect.

16. Apply the last color (dark brown) As a final touch, Chef Stéphane paints the eyes and fin tips dark brown. Note: Not shown, he also uses a razor knife to scratch off over-spray, to make sharp streaks and fine lines.

17. Preparing for luster dust This is a great master-chef trick. To bond luster dust onto the airbrushed surface, Chef Stéphane lightly melts the surface with a heat gun until the chocolate has a slight shine.

18. Apply metallic powder Working quickly, he blows mixed luster dust off the brush onto the glossy surface. Chef Stéphane mixes pearl luster with gold to give a ‘warm’ effect and pearl with silver to give a ‘cool’ tone.


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19. Composition With so many shapes and sizes to choose from, it is important to select good placement before attaching anything to the coral. Helpful Hint: Keep large shapes low or in middle and small shapes higher.

20. Finish construction A shot of cold spray is used to strengthen the attachment points. Notice how Chef Tréand has kept much of the coral pattern visible. It makes the centerpiece colorful and interesting, but not overcrowded.

21. Fast & fun With these methods, it won’t take long to create a chocolate sculpture that will captivate and delight your guests with the ocean’s beauty.

Seychelles ST013

Baby Blue Marlin ST015

King Seahorse ST016

Big Bali ST018

Big Angel Fish ST022

Ocean Play ST028

Oceana Showpeels™

See the rest of the new Oceana Showpeels™ starting on page 60.

To learn more about casting, visit Tips & Tools at www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com.

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Library

online articles

catch up on your reading, any time

We recognize that education is vital for keeping our customers at the leading edge. That is why we have made two extensive sections of educational material available on our web site, www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com. The Library offers published how-to articles, downloadable for educators, and Tips &Tools offers step-by-step instructional demonstrations. Both sections are sure to inspire your creative mind. Come visit and find out for yourself.

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Tips&Tools online demos

Click to success, any time

“...I was so impressed by the set up and standard of detail, I went through all the various categories e.g. Showpeels, casting mats, spheres, textured mats, etc. Your step-by-step frames made it an absolute joy to follow – I searched the lot. As an educational and motivational tool, the visuals and attention to fine detail are inspired. I can attest that they are popular with my students, many of whom are already using the web site for themselves and are thirsty for more. Fantastic work guys, you’re making the task of motivating any student a non-issue….full marks....” Ken Train, Pastry Chef/Head Teacher Sydney Institute – Ultimo College, Australia

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Artisan molds

Options and choices let you make it your own

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hen time is tight and the demands are high, these molds will get you out of the fire fast. The artisan molds are an eclectic collection of building blocks that enable you to create focal points that will intrigue and delight your guests. Each mold is remarkably versatile and offers you dozens of unique uses for impressive quick results!

Silicone Noodle™5´ N005 page 51

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Jumble Box™ 6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

Golf Ball Mold GLF1 page 53

Silicone Half-Rounds SilHalf page 72

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Small Jeweled Base Base02 page 47

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

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c eated by p cr pastry chef Stéphane Tréand


silicone molds

in ½

½

Small Jeweled Base- Base01 Large Jeweled Base- Base02 This bevel-edged base will help unify your mini showpieces while offering great stability and support. Two sizes are available allowing you to stack them together for a tiered effect. Both have faceted edges on all eight sides and are excellent for encapsulation. For a sleek and slender look, fill the mold halfway with sugar or chocolate.

See a cast Jeweled Base on pages 46, 108 & 162.

Platter Ellipse

½

Base01 Base02

Size: Small base is 5˝ (13 cm) diameter x 1˝ (2½ cm) thick. Size: Large base is 6˝ (15 cm) diameter x 1˝ (2½ cm) thick.

½

½

Order Code

The Platter Ellipse was originally made as a support platform for a chocolate showpiece. However, the more time we spent with the mold, the more uses we found. Want an Asian theme? Attach the platter to the back of two Zanzibar Elephants™ and let them carry your guests’ imagination to far away lands. If sugar is your thing, cast the platter with a ½ round insert in Isomalt and then slump the mold to give it a graceful curve or set the platter on a large sugar sphere and you will have a modern looking piece the Jetsons would be proud of!

Base09

Size: Approximately 12˝ long x 7˝ wide x ½˝ thick. Size: Approximately 30 cm long x 18 cm wide x 2½ cm thick. See a cast Platter Ellipse on pages 46, 110, 138, 153, 185, 187 & 192.

½

Spiral Base 6˝

½

½

Our spiral base mold is perfect for casting small, elegant bases for chocolate and sugar amenities. When cast solid in chocolate, these shapes make great anchors to support your decorative displays. If cast hollow, the result will be delicate chocolate cups. Add a small base to the cup (using the Ring GeoMat, page 72), and you can have a chocolate tea set! If you prefer sugar, cast a hollow shell of sugar into the mold and then contour the casting by hand to create a unique flower. (See page 156)

Base03

Size: Cup are 3½˝ diameter tapering to ¾˝ x 1½˝ deep. Size: Cups are 9 cm diameter tapering to 2 cm x 4 cm deep. See a cast Spiral Base on pages 154, 159, 164 & 165.

Stepped Base ½

½

10˝

The Stepped Base mold shares the same potential uses as Spiral Base mold does, yet offers a more modern, geometric look. You can change the flat top surface of the mold by placing a silicone half-round (SilHalf page 72), flat side down, into the mold. Next, fill the mold and remove the SilHalf after the sugar has set. The result will be a stepped base with a hemisphere indentation at the top. Use the indentation to secure a chocolate sphere in the sugar base, and you will have connected sugar and chocolate together seamlessly.

Base04

Size: Cups are 3˝ diameter tapering to 1½˝ x 1˝ deep. Size: Cups are 7½ cm diameter tapering to 4 cm x 2½ cm deep. ½

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silicone molds Order Cod de

Base05

cm 1

Small Faceted Base (Base05) Large Faceted Base (Base06) If your job demands you build a lot of amenities or centerpieces, the Faceted Base molds will help you keep up with the pace. Almost every pastry chef has used metal cake rings to create quick bases, but when you want something unique, nothing beats the efficiency of a silicone base mold. These shapes are specifically designed to give you an easy way of anchoring your work. The small base (Base05) is ideal for petite amenities and the large base (Base06) is heavy enough to support mid-sized centerpieces. The solid weight of the bases and the wide perimeter will stabilize your work for easy transport to a guest’s room without breakage. Both bases are so perfectly balanced that we choose to include them as an integral part of Stéphane Tréand’s Coral Construction Kits (online).

Base06

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3

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5

6

7

8

9

Size: Small base is 4˝ diameter tapering to 2˝ x 1½˝ thick. Size: Small base is 10 cm diameter tapering to 5 cm x 4 cm thick.

10

Size: Large base is 6˝ diameter tapering to 3¼˝ x 1½˝ thick. Size: Large base is 15 cm diameter tapering to 8 cm x 4 cm thick.

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See cast Faceted Bases on pages 145, 156, 163 & 164. 12

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Spanky Half-Rounds

Base07

Another great center support structure to design your amenity around. When you need that ultra modern look, these Spanky Half-Rounds will deliver. A gentle bevel runs along the perimeter from the base to the top. They look great standing upright or as a base resting on their side edges. Size: Each half-round is 8˝ tall x 3½˝ wide x 1˝ thick. Size: Each half-round is 20 cm tall x 9 cm wide x 2½ cm thick.

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See cast Spanky Half-Rounds on pages 184 & 191. 19

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Knox Bars

Base08

Put a lock on your kitchen door! This ingot mold is going to make you a fortune. Now you can cast your own solid chocolate gold bars! Stack them up in a pyramid for your lobby or just put a ribbon around them to make a VIP amenity. The super smooth surface is perfect for placing a transfer sheet into the mold or for silk-screening a logo onto the chocolate bar. This mold is also great for casting bases for your decorative amenities! Size: Each bar is 6˝ tall x 3˝ wide x 1˝ thick. Size: Each bar is 15 cm tall x 7 cm wide x 2½ cm thick. See cast Knox Bars on pages 123, 171, 173, 188 & 191.

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silicone molds

in ½

Floral Press Mold 1˝

½

This press mold has become a standard item in the professional chef’s toolbox. Ever need to make a flower in a hurry? Just pour a daub of isomalt onto the surface, press with vinyl (for a crystal clear look), remove the mold, flex and shape the isomalt flower while it is still soft. For the finishing touch, make a half-sphere from our 1˝ sphere mold and put it in the center of the pressmolded flower to complete the effect. It could be the fastest flower you have ever made!

Order Code

PM001

Size: 4˝ (10 cm) diameter ½

See a cast Floral Press on pages 127, 141, 152, 153 & 192.

Mercury Ripple ½

½

The repeated circular pattern is reminiscent of the ripples created by a stone on calm water. With this mold, you see the ripple effect throughout your showpiece. It gets a little deeper with each level, it’s amazing in sugar. Perfect for use as a small base beneath a minishowpiece or as a display platter for petits fours. Your guests will love the soft rounded edges of this curvy delight.

PM002

Size: 4˝ (10 cm) diameter See a cast Mercury Ripple on pages 176, 178, 181, 182 & 187.

½

Candy Caviar 6˝

½

A small amount of sugar is all it takes to make this mold sparkle and for you to add some bling to your showpiece. Our Mini Bug Collection Showpeel™ (page 58) as a variety of delicate creatures that will look great hovering above the center of this giant sunflower. Don’t want the outdoor look? How about using it as a micro platter for your ultra modern looking petits fours? Rarely can a small amount of sugar have such an impressive impact!

PM003

Size: 3˝ (7½ cm) diameter ½

See a cast Candy Caviar on pages 108, 109, 141, 142, 176 & 179.

Jetty Press (Large Floral Press Mold) ½

½

10˝

The large Jetty Press has everything its kid brother has and more. Its large size allows you to make a variety of shapes. For instance, instead of filling the entire surface, you can use the surface as a drawing board to drizzle sugar and chocolate to make swirls, loops and more. To create a more organic look on this uniform geometric texture, we have added small flecks and chips to the surface detail. Do you see the ancient fossil of a nautilus shell in this mold? If not, be sure to look through the chef’s gallery to see what can be done with this mold!

PM004

Size: 9½˝ (24 cm) diameter See a cast Jetty Press on pages 114, 115, 127, 144, 164 & 199.

½

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silicone molds Order Code

SPR001

cm 1

Tapered Spire-27 inch We hear it from a lot of chefs. “In my showpieces, I need height fast.” For this, we offer our 27 inch (68 cm) tapered spire mold. You can use the mold as a simple tower to build onto or twist the mold to make an unusual spiral shape. If you partially fill the mold, you can make long narrow bands that can be bent and shaped to your needs. The possibilities are endless!

2

3

4

Size: 27˝ tall x 2˝ wide at base tapering to 1¼˝ at the top. Size: 68 cm tall x 5 cm wide at base tapering to 2½ cm at the top.

5

See a cast Tapered Spire on pages 112, 115, 116, 127, 130, 133 & 148.

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7

Half Round Spire-24 inch

SPR002

Need a roundabout way to get to the top? Our tall, half-round spire will help get you there. Cast two half-rounds and join them together for a super strong 3 inch (7½ cm) diameter cylinder spire that can be used as the center post for your championship-sized sugar showpiece.

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9

10

Size: 24˝ tall x 3˝ diameter. Size: 61 cm tall x 7½ cm diameter.

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See a cast Half Round Spire on page 139.

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Small Tapered Spire-12 inch SPR003

Need to make an impressive amenity fast? This elegantly shaped 12 inch (30 cm) spire will give you a head start. Fill the mold with sugar and as it cools use a knife edge to create horizontal ridges in the back of the casting (see page 158). Do you see the modern tree in this mold? If not, have a look at page 166 in the chef’s gallery to see what creative minds have done. Stable, impressive and fast.... Now, that’s a formula for success! Size: 12˝ tall x 2˝ wide x 1¼˝ thick. Size: 30 cm tall x 5 cm wide x 3 cm thick. See a cast Small Tapered Spire on pages 158, 168, 171

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Apex

SPR004

This mold creates a thick solid shape that conveys strength and boldness. Although you can’t see it in the photo, all sides of the Apex are beveled at a sharp angle to create a crystalline look. Do movers and shakers stay at your hotel? If so, this is the perfect shape to create an award to honor their achievements. And the award goes to.... Size: 6˝ tall x 3˝ wide x 1˝ thick. Size: 15 cm tall x 7 cm wide x 2½ cm thick.

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See a cast Apex on pages 112 & 171. 26

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silicone molds

in ½

Beveled Icicles 1˝

½

Use these delicately tapered 11˝ (28 cm) tall icicles to add grace to your amenities. Each base is off-set allowing the icicles to rise upward at a gentle angle while the thin, sleek taper allows you to easily bend and shape the tip. These icicles look great standing on their own or as part of a larger showpiece.

Order Code

SPR005

See a cast Beveled Icicle on pages 168, 186, 187 & 188.

½

Twisted Spire ½

½

Is your property on the beach? If so, this mold will help you make funky palm trees all day long. Just add a few green ovals (from the Oval Mat mold) to the top of the twisted spire and you will have the perfect VIP amenity. Or, if the tree look is not for you, try filling this mold with water to make some wild ice towers. (Mold comes with 2 acrylic support plates and rubber bands.) Size: 11˝ tall x 1¼˝ diameter Size: 28 cm tall x 3 cm diameter

SPR006

½

Silicone Noodle™-5 foot long 6˝

½

Everybody loves Silicone Noodles! At a full 60˝ (152 cm) long, these rubbery delights let you take your showpieces to new heights in a matter of minutes! Made of Flex & Bake™ silicone, Noodles are SUPER STRONG yet flexible enough to bend into any contour so your showpiece achieves a fluid and organic look. Our Noodles are wide and heavy, preventing them from sliding on your work surface when being filled.

Don’t cut your long noodle! That’s why we make the short ones. They are perfect for capping the ends of a long Noodle or for use in your Jumble Box.

½

Silicone Noodle™-18 inch (46 cm)

N005

N018

See castings made with Silicone Noodles™ on pages 104, 106, 113, 118, 123, 133, 145 & 198.

Noodle™ Set ½

½

10˝

Make it easy for you and your purchasing director. Get it all in one kit. If your budget does not allow you to buy anything else, this is where you should start. This kit has unlimited potential and will serve you well at every holiday or special event. You will know we are not exaggerating when you see how many forms have been made in the chef’s gallery with silicone Noodles.

NSET NS

This kit includes: One roll of 16˝ (40½ cm) x 48˝ (122 cm) Vinyl, two five foot long Silicone Noodles™, two 18 inch Silicone Noodles™, and one bag of twelve Silicone Half-Rounds™ See castings made with Silicone Noodles™ on pages 120, 121, 134, 135, 141, 196 & 197.

½

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silicone molds Order Code e

cm 1

Petits Fours Platter At 6½˝ (16½ cm) from tip to tip, this deceptively simple shape holds the key to making amenities quickly. Pour chocolate in the textured side to make small platters for your petits fours or individual chocolates. You can even cast 1 inch spheres to use as posts for a multi-level display platter!

PLT001

For those who need sugar shapes fast, the open collar side of the mold is perfect. It’s a platter and it’s a fish. Just put the mold on a sheet of vinyl, fill the collar with clear Isomalt and add a few stripes with the airbrush.

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5

6

See a cast Petits Fours Platter on pages 168 & 172. 7

Showpiece Swirl

EMSwirl

This is a collar mold, and it is remarkably versatile. At almost 8˝ (20 cm) tall, this shape can be used to cast the building blocks for your next amenity. To complement the large swirl, we have included four half-spheres and a smaller textured swoop in the same mold. Need a chocolate amenity fast? Put a handful of nuts in the collar and then fill with chocolate. Add a few decorations and set the swirl on a jeweled base. Voilà, a quickie chocolate amenity (page 91). A piece of vinyl is included with the mold for clear sugar casting.

8

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12

13

See a cast Showpiece Swirl on pages 148, 160, 161, 169 & 179. 14

Swirl Chops

CHOPS

These Chops are a collection of mid-sized silicone shapes intended to be cut (with a razor) off of the thin silicone backing. You can see how these Chops were used to create the centerpieces featured on pages 26 and 183. Once you understand how they work, you’ll find they are the fastest way to create clean modern shapes inside sugar or chocolate. Try using them inside of a Jumble Box (page 71.)

15

16

17

Size: Sheet is 11˝ long x 9½˝ wide x ½˝ thick. Size: Sheet is 28 cm long x 24 cm wide x 1 cm thick.

18

See a cast Swirl Chop on page 180.

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20

Artist Palette

ARTPAL

Make your masterpieces stand out by displaying them on this Artist’s Palette. Your important guests will love it when they discover your edible art presented on an chocolate or sugar pallet. Or, if you prefer, spruce up your buffet table by making lots of palette platters to showcase your mini-cakes, petits fours, or dipping sauces. Your delicious creations will look even a better sitting atop this floral-textured palette. This mold is so easy to use, you will wonder how you ever did without it! Size: 11˝ long x 8˝ wide x ¼˝ thick. Size: 28 cm long x 20 cm wide x 6 mm thick. See a cast Artist Palette on the cover & page 107.

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silicone molds

in ½

Showpiece Dice-1˝ 1˝

½

Purchasing this mold is no gamble. If you work in a casino, this affordable seven-cavity mold is a must. Made of Flex & Bake™ silicone, you won’t struggle to demold these dice because the innovative diagonal-split design opens the mold right down its center. Cast a set in chocolate and send them out to the VIPs at the craps table. They will be very impressed!

Order Code

D-SHW

Size: 1˝ (2½ cm) square See a cast Showpiece Dice on page 168.

½

½

Regulation Dice

When you need the real thing, use our twelve-cavity regulation (5/8˝ x 5/8˝) dice mold. Like the Showpiece Dice mold, this mold opens right down the middle for easy, tear-free casting. Molded from real dice, they are sure to add some game to your creations!

½

D-REG

Size: 5/8˝ (1 cm) square See a cast Regulation Dice on pages 175 & 192.

½

Golf Ball Mold 6˝

½

FORE! Well, actually five. This self-locking, five-cavity mold is an efficient way to make the perfect treat for your golfing guest. This mold is a money maker. If your property has a golf course, it should have this mold. Fill the mold with chocolate and box them up for sale in the pro shop or as a take home gift to show appreciation to that special golf guest. Golf banquets, golf tournaments, golf awards, golf humor, you get the picture!

GLF1

See cast Golf Balls on pages 46 & 167. ½

Large Heart Gem ½

½

10˝

Sure to be the biggest diamond on the property, this heart shaped gem is the perfect symbol of romance and opulence for your guests seeking a romantic getaway. Use the heart gem to embellish a traditional room amenity or as a wedding cake topper. The top and bottom of the mold are specially designed for easy unmolding and, if casting in chocolate, you can customize the surface of the heart by setting the mold onto a transfer sheet before casting. If you prefer a sugar casting, set the mold on a sheet of vinyl for a crystal clear view of the interior of the jewel. Casting tip: To reduce microbubbles on the facets, pour your Isomalt at a very cool temperature.

GEM01

Size: 3˝ (7½ cm) ½

See a cast Heart Gem on page 67 & 153. 708.660.9707

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silicone molds Order Code

GEAR01

cm 1

Star Gear All three gear molds on this page were originally created as elements for a sugar time machine showpiece. They were so well received we decided to offer them to everybody. Now you can add this mechanical look to your sugar or chocolate centerpiece without a hassle. And, if you look closely, you will see other useful shapes within the gear; use the center star, the middle arches or the outer ring individually as accents for your pastry creations.

2

3

4

5

Size: Approximately 6˝ (15 cm) in diameter x ¼˝ (6 mm) thick. See a cast Star Gear on pages 106, 112 & 158.

6

7

Clock Gear

GEAR02

It only takes a few castings from this gear mold to create the look of a clock mechanism. Each gear tooth is smooth and rounded to mesh easily with one another. Try dividing the gear casting into sections to make playful, abstract shapes for accents and decorations.

8

9

10

Size: Approximately 7˝ (18 cm) in diameter x ¼˝ (6 mm) thick. See a cast Clock Gear on pages 106 & 112.

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14

Daisy Wheel

GEAR03

More funky shape than actual gear, this mold is great for adding a quirky effect to your showpiece or dessert. With a little imagination, you will find lots of uses for this mold. Cast flat, you can make a mini chocolate plate to serve your dessert on. If sugar is your thing, make a bouquet of sugar flowers or contour the outer edges to create a unique bowl to cradle your super hip VIP dessert. Size: Each wheel is approximately 4˝ (10 cm) in diameter.

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See a cast Daisy Wheel on pages 112 & 158. 19

20

Wine Bottle

VINO

Red, white or chocolate? This wine bottle is the perfect complement to your wine tasting centerpieces. Put a few chocolate or sugar bottles out on the table and watch your guests sparkle with delight. Cast hollow or solid, each mold is so detailed that you can see the impression of the cork wrapping and paper label. These bottles are so much fun, they would be a great gift shop item or, stamped with the hotel logo and gift wrapped in a box, a memorable promotional gift for VIPs! Size: Bottle is 12˝ (30½ cm) tall x 2½˝ (5 cm) diameter. See cast Wine Bottles on page 130.

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silicone molds

in ½

Crouching Jaguar 1˝

½

Well known for their high intelligence and majestic physical prowess, jaguars will bring some wildness to your table. We originally sculpted this model for a pastry competition (page 16). The results were so stunning that we decided to make it available to others. If your property has animal themes, the jaguar is sure to remind your guests of the beauty of nature. And the good news is that this jaguar is not endangered. You can make as many as you want !

Order Code

TEGA1

Size: Jaguar is 8˝ (20 cm) tall x 6˝ (15 cm) wide x ¾˝ (2 cm) thick. ½

See a cast Crouching Jaguar on page 138.

Zanzibar Elephant ½

½

½

Let the 6 ˝ x 6˝ (15 cm) Zanzibar Elephant bring an exotic flair to your table. The elephant’s trunk is raised above his head (a symbol of good luck) and his body is elegantly adorned with carved flowers. Originally, cast elephants supported layers of a massive wedding cake at a lavish Indian wedding, ideas have been flowing ever since.

ELE01

Create an elephant safari by placing a small chocolate dish brimming with candies on its back. For a statuesque look, set a cast Platter Ellipse (page 47) atop two elephants to create an art deco sculpture. Use it as a regal display for candies or chocolatedipped strawberries. Your guests will talk about it for weeks! See a cast Zanzibar Elephant on page 113.

Bhutan Dragon 6˝

½

This incredibly detailed miniature 5˝ x 5˝ (12½ cm) dragon was a part of the winning Best Sugar Showpiece at the Coupe De Monde for Team USA’s competition in 2003. Now you can use this design to add a mythical flair to your own work. Although this mold is made of our soft Flex & Bake™ silicone, chocolate castings are likely to break along the tail area. To remedy this, you will need to cut relief slices into the mold for chocolate use. Otherwise, this mold works great in sugar, pastillage, gum paste and fondant.

DRGN

See a cast Bhutan Dragon on pages 162 & 175. ½

Large Asian Fan ½

½

10˝

Our fan mold is so detailed you can see the ripples from the paper it was molded from. Cast in sugar or chocolate, this fan is ideal for adorning your buffet table or as a presentation platter for your specialty desserts. Perhaps a fan is not what you are looking for? Look closer and you can see the possibilities of a sailfish’s dorsal fin, fluted shell or abstract sculpture. (The mold comes with a fitted plastic support plate for extra reinforcement during casting.)

FAN

Size: 17˝ long x 10˝ wide Size: 43 cm long x 25 cm See a cast Large Asian Fan on pages 111, 122 & 127.

½

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Introducing Showpeels

“Elegance in a hurry is not usually possible ...now it is.”

Created by Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand MOF using the Nouveau Butterfly Showpeel™

Tips & Tools

Showpeels™

One or two drops of color in your Isomalt is enough to give your Showpeel a crystal-like look. Airbrush some dark highlights around the outer edges and your sculpture will show its best detail. When transparency is not needed, try using your Showpeel™ with chocolate, pressed pastillage, or fondant.

For more Tips & Tools visit:

www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com 708.660.9707

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Showp peels

Stylish, practical & convenient

Stéphane Tréand

Jasmine Butterflies ST002

Dragonfly ST003

Amazon Leaves ST006

Borneo Leaves ST007

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Oceana nautical showpeels

Created by pastry chef Flavio Federico

ST009

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Zebra Leaves

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Nouveau Butterfl Butterfly ST001

Created by pastry chef Robert Epskamp

Created by baker & pastry chef Ciril Hitz

Created by pastry chef James Gallo

Flight ST005

Created by pastry chef Mitzi Walsh

Used individually or in combination with other silicone molds, these delicate designs can add translucency and lightness that make your showpieces fly!

Dewdrop Leaves ST008

Combining Chef Stéphane Tréand’s designs and Michael Joy’s mold making, we are proud to present Showpeels™. Showpeels™ are thin silicone sheets with pre-embossed patterns on one side. Just cut out the pattern, dip it in hot Isomalt and peel back the silicone revealing an intricate pattern ready for use.

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silicone molds Order Code

ST001

cm 1

Nouveau Butterfly Showpeel™ Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand MOF designed each one of the Showpeels in this catalog. Now you can make your own butterfly simply by cutting out the wings and dipping them into hot sugar or Isomalt. Once you assemble the wings, your butterfly will have a wingspan of nearly 12˝ (30 cm)! Showpeels can also be used to make chocolate, pastillage or fondant look amazing. Let your imagination fly!

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Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See a cast Nouveau Butterfly on pages 56, 176 & 194.

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Jasmine Butterflies Showpeel™

ST002

8

The Jasmine Butterfly is one of our most popular designs... and for good reason. This Showpeel contains two sets of butterfly wings allowing you to make either a large or a small butterfly. Both are perfect to bring a soothing, natural look to your showpiece. These butterflies look so realistic, people will likely whisper so as not to frighten them from their perch. See for yourself, look on the following pages to see how beautiful they really are.

10

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

12

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See a cast Jasmine Butterfly on pages 104, 105, 106, 126, 143 & 161. 13

14

Dragonfly Showpeel

ST003

Did you know that dragonflies begin their lives underwater as stealthy aquatic hunters? Only after maturing do they grow wings and leave their water world for a life in the sky. Now you can see this amazing creature up close and in detail. Five individual sections let you create your own four-winged dragonfly, body and all. Measuring more than 12˝ (30 cm) across (when assembled), this is the largest dragonfly we hope you will ever see!

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Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See a cast Dragonfly on pages 123, 143 & 149.

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Mini Bug Collection Showpeel™

ST004

When we made the large butterfly and dragonfly Showpeels, we had showpieces in mind. What we didn’t know was how good they would look if they were much smaller. Count them for yourself: four differently size butterflies and one dragonfly. Not only a great value, but perfect for amenities, wedding cake toppers and that VIP dessert. These little wings are the best!

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Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See cast Mini Bugs on page 144.

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silicone molds

in ½

Flight Showpeel™ 1˝

½

Use these modern-styled wings to add a certain lightness to your creation. The Flight Showpeels are also perfect for making fins for your hand-blown sugar fish or for adding a little flame to your hot rod. This Showpeel requires some careful cutting, but the extra effort is well worth it.

Order Code

ST005

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See Flight cast on pages 105, 116, 122, 151 & 193.

½

Amazon Leaves Showpeel™ ½

½

Celebrate the diversity of the rainforest with these Amazon Showpeels. Now you can capture the beauty of an equatorial ecosystem and create your own tropical paradise. With four completely different leaves, the Amazon Showpeel is wildly sought after by chefs who want to bring a bit of the jungle to their table.

ST006

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See cast Amazon Leaves on pages 104, 105, 113, 169 & 194.

½

Borneo Leaves Showpeel™ 6˝

½

Big, bigger, biggest! These leaves are so big, we could only fit three of them per sheet. The gentle tear drop shapes evoke the broad splendor of a lush rainforest. These wide, beautiful leaves reflect generosity and abundance and are ideal for slumping into a contoured shape to make that relaxed, droopy leaf look. The rain will run right off them. I can feel the humidity already!

ST007

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See cast Borneo Leaves on pages 104, 113, 133, 141, 169 & 173.

½

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeel™ ½

½

10˝

Splish, splash! These playful Dewdrop Leaves capture the feel of raindrops dancing on leaves during a summer rainstorm. These leaves are versatile! Use them to add a bubble effect or to create that whimsical circus-like flair to your showpiece. Six different sizes make them suitable for a range of small amenities to large showpieces.

ST008

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See cast Dewdrop Leaves on pages 104, 105, 114, 126, 148 & 154.

½

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silicone molds Order Code

cm 1

Zebra Leaves Showpeels™ Who says you can’t train a zebra? These giant leaves come pretrained to make you perfectly striped leaves. Let that zebra go, you can use the Showpeel instead.

ST009

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See cast Zebra Leaves on pages 115 & 140. 5

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Spring Leaves Showpeels™

ST010

Spring yourself towards victory with this new Showpeel. It was used as a decorative element in Stéphane Tréand’s Gold medal winning chocolate showpiece for the 2007 National Pastry Team Championship (see page 129). Even if you aren’t going for the gold, these patterns will evoke a fresh burst of energy that is a complement to any fantasy floral showpiece. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See cast Spring Leaves on pages 124, 125, 129, 143 & 156. 13

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Mini Leaves Showpeels

ST011

Add a little leaf bling with new mini leaves. They are perfect accents for centerpieces, amenities, plated desserts and wedding cakes. Look closely: the designs are miniaturized versions of their larger counterparts. The smallest leaf measures 2½” (65 cm) and the largest is just under 4˝ (10 cm). With fifteen designs, this is money in the bank!

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Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See cast Mini Leaves on pages 144, 154, 158 & 189. 19

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Seychelles Showpeel™

ST013

This Showpeel is for all the beachcombers out there. Lazy summer afternoons, the steady sound of waves breaking on the beach, and a cool breeze are all evoked by these three shell patterns. Hurry up, bring some ocean treasure to your table with these six different shell sizes. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See cast Seychelles on pages 163 & 166. 25

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silicone molds

in ½

Blue Marlin Showpeel™ 1˝

½

Capture the essence of one of the most powerful and prized fish in the ocean. Working with Showpeels is fast and easy. In fact, the time you save could be spent reading Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea. I wonder, maybe if he had a Showpeel, his life wouldn’t have been so difficult.

Order Code

ST014

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

½

Baby Blue Marlin Showpeel™ ½

Same power, but in a smaller package. To keep things exciting and different, we added a few extra shells to help you create your own ocean story. These are perfectly sized for specialty cakes. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

ST015

See a cast Baby Blue Marlin on page 166. ½

½

King Seahorse Showpeel™ 6˝

½

This is a beautiful Showpeel and it’s large enough to show off all its intricate detail. (You can see a video of Chef Tréand using it to cast chocolate on our Web site at Tips & Tools.) Since sea horses mate for life, we wanted to honor the bond by making a mirrored pair. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

ST016

See a cast King Seahorse on page 163.

½

Seahorse Family Showpeels™ ½

If you bond for life, you’re likely to have a few little ones. Here you can see, it is all in the proportions. The smaller versions are just as perfect as their parents, but they are sized better for amenities and specialty cakes. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

ST017

½

10˝

½

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silicone molds Order Code

ST018

cm 1

Big Bali Showpeel™

2

Nature supplies the inspiration, and Chef Tréand supplies the drawing. With every Showpeel beginning as a drawing by Chef Tréand, the originality is sure to stand out. From his desk to your kitchen. It is just like you are working together with Stéphane. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See a cast Big Bali on page 145.

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Bali Aquarium Showpeel™

ST019

Have you ever caught four fish at once without a net? Well, now you can with the aquarium showpeel. Each fish has a mirror image so your castings can be put back to back to make a fish with detail on both sides. Very nice! Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See Bali Aquarium cast on page 163. 12

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Big Laguna Showpeel

ST020

Do you get the feeling there is an ocean of Showpeels to choose from? Once you have the collection, you will be able to make your own private reef. But make sure to give the Big Laguna enough room. He can be pushy and needs his space!

15

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See a cast Big Laguna on page 166.

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Laguna Cove Showpeel™ You will have a school of Lagunas in no time with this Showpeel. Check out all that great detail just waiting to be air-brushed on these little guys. Have you tried using Showpeels with tuile batter? They make great looking wafer-thin cookies!

ST021

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Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See Laguna Cove cast on page 146.

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silicone molds

in ½

Big Angel Fish Showpeel™ 1˝

½

The Angel Fish Showpeel is awesome! These big fish have excellent, deep detail. The lines are so clean that you can pipe white chocolate into the recesses and then backfill with dark chocolate. The result will be wonderful zebra-like striping.

Order Code

ST022

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. 2˝

See a cast Big Angel Fish on pages 146 & 165.

½

Angel Fish Aquarium Showpeel™ ½

½

What ocean image would be complete without the amazing Angel Fish? This Showpeel has two more sizes for you to work with. If you buy both Angel Fish Showpeels, you will have a total of three different sizes. The large one is for showpieces, the medium for centerpieces and the small one for amenities. Perfect!

ST023

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See a cast Angel Fish Aquarium on page 163.

½

Big Dolphin Showpeels™ 6˝

½

Everybody knows dolphins love to play. Bring some of their joy to your work by adding these large dolphins to the mix. Just look at how sleek this pattern is. You can almost see the water spilling off their backs as they leap through the air! Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

ST026

See a cast Big Dolphin on pages 145, 146 & 165.

½

Dolphin Pod Showpeels™ ½

When it comes to dolphins, one is never enough. Use this Showpeel to add two more sizes to the family. If you have seen the smile on kids’ faces at a water world show, you know they will have the same smile when they see these on their birthday cake! Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

½

ST027

See a cast Dolphin Pod on pages 145.

10˝

½

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silicone molds Order Code

cm 1

Ocean Play Showpeel™ Imagine yourself snorkeling with the giant sea turtle. His gentle glide will add grace to any display. Hey wait, there’s a starfish over there... and look, a nautilus. This Showpeel is fun!

ST028

Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See Ocean Play cast on pages 145, 146 & 164. 5

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Scallop Shells Showpeel™

ST029

These shells are fantastic decorations for your amenities and plated desserts. Try this casting technique: Pipe chocolate onto the Showpeel, allow it to set up for a few minutes and then place into a large bowl (silicone side down). Allow the chocolate to harden and then peel away the silicone. Presto! Your shells will be contoured. Next, attach two shell halves together and place a sugar pearl inside. Instant amenity! Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See a cast Scallop Shell on page 145.

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Nautilus Showpeel™

ST030

Throughout millennia, the shape of the nautilus, one of the oldest creatures in the sea, has been perfected. Adding one to your display will surely remind everyone of the sea’s timeless beauty. Have you seen what a Showpeel looks like when pressed into dough? Look closely on page 156. Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions.

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See a Nautilus cast on pages 156 & 163. 19

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Bora-Bora Conch Showpeel™ Cast this shell in sugar and gently curve it over onto itself. The result will be a three-dimensional shell that you can hold up to your ear and hear the ocean. Now that’s a realistic Showpeel!

ST031

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Showpeel mats are 8½˝ (21 cm) x 11˝ (28 cm) and come with instructions. See a cast Bora-Bora Conch on page 163.

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Chicago School of Mold Making

introduces

Showpeels

mini

If you like our full-sized Showpeels, you will love the new miniatures. The Mini Bugs and Mini Leaves Showpeels include a slew of different patterns perfect for embellishing your cakes, amenities and deserts. Whether you dip in sugar, pipe with chocolate or press in pastillage, these textured silicone sheets will quickly pay for themselves. (Each Showpeel is 8½˝ x 11˝)

14½˝

Catch and release To make the centerpiece shown: 1. Build a quick retaining wall with silicone Noodles™. 2. Place the Showpeels on a sheet of vinyl ( put paper beneath the vinyl). 3. Cover the layout with clear Isomalt and let cool. 4. After the Isomalt has cooled, raise the Isomalt window upright and remove the Showpeels. 5. Join the window onto a base.

© Cop Copyrig yright yrig ht CSMMC CSMMC MMCA A Inc. Inc. 2008 2008

Play with different layouts and enchant your guest each time. Quick, easy, effective!

‘Midsummer Night’ created by Pastry Chef Stéphane Tréand MOF using Mini Bug Collection Showpeel (ST004) and Mini Leaves Showpeel (ST011) shown here. For more casting demos, visit Tips

& Tools at

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Be the center of attention with this all-around classic

Created by Chef Stéphane Tréand Meilleur Ouvrier de France, using a 4˝ Sphere Mold and a Jasmine Butterflies Showpeel™ PHOTO: ABOUT FACE PORTRAIT

Tips & Tools

Sphere Molds

For this effect; fill your mold with clear Isomalt. Let cool for 10 minutes and drain. (A thin layer of Isomalt will stay in the mold and enhance the glass-like appearance.) Next, partially fill the mold with colored Isomalt. While still liquid, add a second color so they swirl together. For more Tips & Tools visit:

www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com 708.660.9707

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Geometric molds

A shape with strength, stature and grace

Using silicone molds to make clean-lined geometric shapes is one of the quickest ways to bring a modern look to your culinary artistry. It won’t take long for you to discover the endless compositions possible using a variety of specially sized geometric rings, ovals and squares. To see what we mean, be sure to take a few moments to look closely at our new line of GeoMats™ and SliverMats™ (pages 72 and 73). They are sure to be valuable additions to your mold library.

Those of you already using our two-part sphere molds know they are good friends to have around. These molds save you time and are key to making important building blocks for your showpieces and special amenities. Remember to take advantage of the open, two-part mold design that allows for controlled placement of objects during encapsulation. (See Sweet Fusion on page 12.)

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silicone molds Order Code

GS05

cm 1

½˝ Sphere Mold You might be wondering why we would make such tiny two-part sphere molds. Well, the answer is simple. These molds are all about shaping flavor. Listening to cues from top chefs, we learned these spheres are terrific when filled with flavor infused gelatins. Take your flavor filled mini spheres and put them inside another sphere mold to create a one - two flavor punch. It is a bit tedious, but the even the toughest critics will wonder how you did it.

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Size: ½˝(13 mm) diameter Please Note: All two-part sphere molds are made of FIRM silicone.

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¾˝ Sphere Mold

GS075

On first appearance, you might think a one-part mold would make more sense. However, it is the two-part mold design that lets you easily unmold delicate gelatin shapes. Since these molds are so small, you will need to use a squeeze bottle with a small tip to fill them. When filling these molds, be careful not to put the nozzle too deep into the mold. If you do, the air pressure might lift the molds slightly apart causing enlarged seam lines. These small sphere molds do not scream efficiency, but they will advertise Five Star flavor quite well. Size: ¾˝(18 mm) diameter

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1˝ Sphere Mold

GS1

The 1˝-diameter sphere mold has just hit the market and it is already among the chef’s favorites. With this mold, you can make nine 1˝-diameter spheres at once. This specially designed two-part, nine-cavity sphere mold is SELF-LOCKING, so it does not require rubber bands. It registers so tightly together that only a small seam line is visible. Size: 1˝ (25 mm) diameter

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See cast 1˝ spheres on pages 109, 110, 114, 118 & 119. 19

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1½˝ Sphere Mold

GS1-5

Add the 1½˝-diameter sphere mold to your sphere collection. It is sure to get a lot of use! Perfect for encapsulating a 1˝ sphere inside, this 1½˝-diameter sphere mold allows you to make four spheres at once. This specially designed, two-part mold is SELFLOCKING (does not require rubber bands) and registers so tightly together that only a small seam line is visible. The mold has four sub-compartments which allow the user to cast half-spheres with square plates attached to them. Size: 1½˝ (38 mm) diameter See cast 1½˝ spheres on pages 108, 110, 118 & 119.

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silicone molds

in ½

2˝ Sphere Mold 1˝

½

Order Code

Add the 2˝-diameter sphere mold to your collection. It is perfect for triple encapsulating a the 1½˝-sphere inside of the 2˝-sphere mold. With this mold, you can make two, 2˝-diameter spheres at once. Perfect for quick amenities and showpieces! Safety Note: It is critical the user band the 2˝, 2½˝ and 4˝ mold together tightly to prevent it from accidentally separating during use. Wide rubber bands included.

GS2

Size: 2˝ (50 mm) diameter ½

See cast 2˝ spheres on pages 110, 118 & 119.

½

½

2½˝ Sphere Mold Add the large 2½˝-diameter sphere mold to your collection. It is perfect for encapsulation, amenities and showpiece work. With this mold, you can make two 2½˝-diameter spheres at once. Helpful Hint: Use one side of the mold to create half-spheres which are perfect for placing beneath a showpiece base in order to lift the base above the table top.

GS2-5

Size: 2½˝ (63 mm) diameter 5˝

See cast 2½˝ spheres on pages 107, 109, 115, 118, 119, 132, 181 & 185.

½

4˝ Sphere Mold 6˝

½

½

½

½

10˝

Add this jumbo 4˝ diameter sphere mold to your collection. Use both halves of the mold together or one half separately. This sphere is large enough to use with ‘inclusions’. (An inclusion is another silicone shape that is temporarily placed on the inside of the sphere mold.) Put an inclusion in this mold, cast, and then remove it to expose a decorative, negative impression on the sphere casting.

GS4

Helpful Hint: These molds hold a large volume of sugar and will hold the heat due to the insulating properties of silicone. Be sure to pour the sugar as cool as possible in order to prevent the sugar from continuing to boil inside the mold. Size: 4˝ (10 cm) diameter See cast 4˝ spheres on pages 106, 107, 110, 111, 114, 117, 118, 119, 132 & 146.

Set of Five Sphere Molds Have your purchasing department love you even more; order all of them in one convenient set. 1˝ Sphere Mold (Self-Locking) 1½˝ Sphere Mold (Self-Locking) 2˝ Sphere Mold (Banded) 2½˝ Sphere Mold (Banded) 4˝ Sphere Mold (Banded)

GSET5

The set of five comes with plenty of extra-wide rubber bands.

½

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silicone molds Order Code

PopUp1

cm 1

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold™

2

Clean, fast and versatile are the best words to describe these onepiece PopUp Molds™. Made from our super strong Flex & Bake™ silicone, these molds are soft and resistant to tearing. Chocolatiers love these molds because there is no joining of halves and no seam line to wipe away. The wide pouring mouth makes for fast, easy filling and an effortless ‘pop up’ de-molding. They are great for making cake decorations, petit fours, truffles and more. These molds are lean and freeze fast. The faster the freeze, the faster you can de-mold and make more stuff! Flex & Bake™ silicone is food contact safe and can be used for baking up to 450º F. See cast 1˝ PopUp spheres on pages 118, 119, 120, 126, 130, 153, 154, 168 & 172.

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1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold™

PopUp1-5

3

Clean, fast and versatile are the best words to describe these onepiece PopUp Molds™. Made from our super strong Flex & Bake™ silicone, these molds are soft and resistant to tearing. Chocolatiers love these molds because there is no joining of halves and no seam line to wipe away. The wide pouring mouth makes for fast, easy filling and an effortless ‘pop up’ de-molding. They are great for making cake decorations, petit fours, truffles and more. These molds are lean and freeze fast. The faster the freeze, the faster you can de-mold and make more stuff! Flex & Bake™ silicone is food contact safe and can be used for baking up to 450º F. See cast 1½˝ PopUp spheres on pages 118, 119, 120, 130, 135 & 178.

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Cube Mold-1˝

CUBE1

Artistic geometry is effortless when using this cube mold. Each mold has seven cavities for casting seven clean, sharp- edged cubes at one time. Tired of cube molds tearing? You won’t tear these molds because the diagonal-split design opens the mold right down the center without leaving a seam line! Cast them in colors and encapsulate them in a sphere, use them as connection points and posts on your showpieces, fill them with liquid pastillage for airbrushing, or mousse for a flavor burst. The list goes on and on! Size: 1˝ (25 mm) cube

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See cast Cubes on pages 111, 114, 134, 141, 151, 162, 173 20

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Confectionery Casting Frames

(Set of four)

CCF10

Confectionery Casting Frames are adjustable forms that allow you to cast a variety of crisp, sharp-edged shapes. Each section is 10˝ (25 cm) long, 1˝ (2½ cm) thick and has a ½˝ (12 mm) -wide rectangular channel for casting narrow bars. When set on vinyl (page 102), the frames grip onto the surface so that any movement while being filled is restricted. More good news; Confectionery Casting Frames fit snugly into your 10˝ Jumble Box, allowing for even more shapes to be created! To see how Casting Frames are used, turn to Appendix page 207. See cast frames on pages 114, 135, 158, 162, 169 & 170.

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silicone molds

in ½

Jumble Box™-6˝ 1˝

½

½

Order Code ™

What in the world is a Jumble Box ? A Jumble Box is an adjustable mold that can be arranged into various positions for casting different shapes. The Jumble Box is 6˝ (15 cm) square by 1½˝ (38 mm) deep allowing you to make cubes, rectangles, wedges and triangles just by repositioning the inside molds. As an added plus, the two movable sections are also usable molds. Each one allows you to create ¾˝ (2 cm) x 1½˝ (38 mm) tall rectangle posts. The good news is that for one price, a Jumble Box can help you create over 100 different shapes!

JUMBL6

To see how the Jumble Box is used turn to Appendix page 208. See cast Jumble Boxes on pages 46, 111, 115, 124 & 170.

Large Jumble Box™-10˝ ½

½

½

½

½

Think out of the box, in the box. The large Jumble Box™ is 10˝ (25 cm) square by 1½˝ (38 mm) deep and allows you to make really big shapes. You can even put the small 6˝ Jumble Box in the Large Jumble Box to create dynamic diagonal forms. As an added bonus, the interiors of the two movable sections are actually two different-sized cylinder molds! One cylinder is 1˝ (25 mm) diameter and the other is 1½˝ (38 mm) diameter.

JUMBL10

Another plus: our Confectionery Casting Frames™ (page 70) can be used inside the Large Jumble Box as dividing bars to further expand the shaping potential. One thousand shapes and counting! To see how the Jumble Box is used turn to Appendix page 208. See cast Jumble Boxes on pages 112, 118, 134, 150, 170 & 188.

Flavor Drops™ As many of you already know, artisan silicone molds are not just for pastry anymore. Here’s a chance to develop a new creative dialogue with your Executive Chef.

FD05

These silicone hemisphere molds are ideal for filling with flavored gelatins. Add a little color and the many choices of sizes will allow you to compose a wide variety of geometric arrangements. Dinner guests have a double treat: seeing a precious gem appear on their plate and then tasting new flavor combinations. And, transforming inexpensive gelatin into gem-like flavorful morsels adds dollar value to the plate. Simply color, cast and compose!

FD1-5 ½

FD05

FD1-25

FD1

½˝ (12mm) 55 cavities

FD075 ¾˝ (19mm) 45 cavities 9˝

½

FD1

(25mm) 28 cavities

FD1-25 1 ¼˝ (32mm) 18 cavities FD1-5

1 ½˝ (38mm) 15 cavities

10˝

½

FD075

FD05 708.660.9707

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silicone molds Order Code

EcoDome

SilHalf

cm 1

7˝ Eco-Dome™

2

For those of you who need to make a big impression, we offer you these jumbo silicone hemispheres. Why do we call this an EcoDome? It’s simple. Large molds require a lot of raw material and to help the environment, we have developed a way to introduce recycled material into the mold. (Because of the recycled content, this mold should only be used for making display items, not for things that will be eaten.) Due to their large size, these molds are only made on demand and will require a brief lead time. They are perfect for large showpiece bases and are excellent containers if you want to place silicone inclusions (rubber shapes) inside of the mold. Filling the mold and then peeling out your inclusions will reveal interesting recessed patterns on the surface of your dome.

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Size: 7˝ (17½ cm) diameter. Other sizes are available. See a cast Eco-Dome on pages 140 & 167.

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Silicone Half-Rounds

9

These silicone half-rounds are used for propping up sugar items to prevent them from sticking to the surface underneath. (See demonstrated with the Showpeel assembly, plate 12 on page 11.) They can also be put in molds to create cavities when pouring chocolate or isomalt. The uses are limited only by your imagination. A packet includes six 1½˝ (38mm) half spheres and six 2˝ (5 cm) half spheres. See cast Silicone Half-Rounds on pages 112, 125, 137, 139, 182 & 183.

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Ring GeoMat™

GeoMat01

A word to the wise: keep this mat under lock and key. Gone are the days of fumbling with round metal cutters to make hollow rings. The mats are fast, versatile and clean. The best part about working with hollow rings is that your showpiece will look open and airy. This is a plus because chocolate display work can look heavy and dense due to its dark color. With this mat, you will be able to knock out modern, light and playful pieces. If you are not convinced, simply flip through the chefs gallery. You will see the rings again and again.

15

Size: Ring diameters are 5˝, 3½˝, 2½˝, 1½˝ x ½˝ thick. Size: Ring diameters are 12½ cm, 9 cm, 6½ cm, 4 cm x 12 mm thick.

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See cast GeoMat rings on pages 105, 118, 132, 152, 158, 159, 164 & 165.

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Square GeoMat

GeoMat02

Even though the mold is primarily designed to cast hollow squares, a moment of study will tell you that seventeen shapes can be made at once with this mold. Did you miss some? Remember, the inside of the squares count too! These molds are made of our soft Flex & Bake silicone with specially designed hollow centers to help you release delicate chocolate parts with ease. All of these mats are great for sugar and chocolate. Size: Squares are 5˝, 4½˝, 4˝. 3½˝, 3˝ 2½˝, 2˝ x ½˝ thick. Size: Squares are 12½ cm, 11½ cm, 10 cm, 9 cm, 7½ cm, 6½ cm, 5 cm, x 12 mm thick.

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silicone molds

in ½

Oval GeoMat™ 1˝

½

½

This mat is beautiful! If the mat looks this good, just wait until you see what you can make with it. These ovals are designed with thin mid-sections so your castings look like they are being pulled in motion. Another great feature–just like the other GeoMats–is that the shapes can fit inside each other to create gyroscope-like forms. If you’re just starting to work with silicone molds, buying a versatile GeoMat is one of the best investments you can make.

Order Code

GeoMat03

Size: Oval height–9½˝, 8˝, 6¾˝, 5½˝ x ½˝ thick. Size: Oval height–24 cm, 20 cm, 17 cm, 14 cm, 13 cm x 12 mm thick.

Circle SliverMat™ ½

½

½

Directly related to the GeoMats, the SliverMats share the versatility of their big brother, yet are much more slender. These mats are an inexpensive way to begin working with artisan silicone molds and were developed with pastry students in mind. The thin cross section of the mats will allow you to cast several shapes without requiring a large volume of chocolate or sugar. Keep in mind, though, that the 1/8 inch (3mm) thin castings require care when unmolding. SliverMats will give students three advantages: affordable price, efficient use of food ingredients, and practice unmolding delicate castings. This mold is a great trainer!

SLVR01

Size: Full mat is 6½˝ tall x 7¾˝ wide x 1/8˝ thick. Size: Full mat is 16 cm tall x 19½ cm wide x 3 mm thick.

Square SliverMat™ 6˝

½

½

½

½

When a silicone mat is this inexpensive, just one is not enough. The Square SliverMat offers the same qualities as the others, but in more linear form. Each SliverMat holds the potential to create numerous modern looking amenities using only one mat. They are also great for sugar because they are so thin and flexible. You can fill the mat with sugar, let it begin to set and then drape the mold inside a bowl or cake ring to add contour. When the sugar cools, unmold your new curvy shapes. We think SliverMats are great tools for developing a student’s creativity. See for yourself, challenge them to see who can make the coolest micro-showpiece working with only one mat!

SLVR02

Size: Full mat is 7˝ tall x 8˝ wide x 1/8˝ thick. Size: Full mat is 17½ cm tall x 20 cm wide x 3 mm thick.

Oval SliverMat™ Circles, squares and ovals . . . three terrific shapes to welcome you into the creative world of food casting. Any one of these sliver shapes will work well with the plates you already have in your kitchen. See for yourself, cast a few ovals in chocolate and set them beneath your desserts to add a modern flair to your favorite recipe.

SLVR03

Size: Full mat is 9˝ tall x 11˝ wide x 1/8˝ thick. Size: Full mat is 23 cm tall x 28 cm wide x 3 mm thick.

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Leave it to nature

an

d.

by C

hef

Sté ph an

eT ré

to bring fresh ideas to your table.

cla

ss

Suga

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ed

in

ac as ti

ng

Leaff Mold ds For best detail, pour lightly colored Isomalt around the perimeter of the mold allowing the Isomalt to flow toward the center. While cooling, bend the mold to create a contoured leaf. To finish, use an airbrush to apply color on the textured side, then apply luster powder. Your leaves will be luminous!

For more Tips & Tools visit:

www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com 9½˝ Hollyhock Leaf , 18˝ Jungle Rhubarb, 10˝ Arrow Tip Leaf

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708.660.9707


Botanical leaves

Nothing beats Mother Nature, and these molds prove it. Molded directly from real leaves, our molds flawlessly capture the intricate detail of the leaves’ undersides. Made with Flex & Bake™ silicone they are food contact safe and flexible.

Enrich your table with nature These molds can be used with chocolate or sugar and are perfect for competition showpieces, displaying petits fours, buffet tables and VIP amenities. Leaf molds are a must for the creative pastry chef.

9½˝ (24 cm) Hollyhock Leaf Mold

13˝ (33 cm) Catalpa Leaf Mold- (Cast hollow for artistic effect.)

6˝ (15 cm) Maple Leaf Mold

10˝ (25 cm) Arrow Tip Leaf Mold

8˝ (20 cm) Botsil Leaf Mold 708.660.9707

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silicone molds Order Code

BOT101

cm 1

Catalpa Leaf Mold This large Catalpa leaf is approximately 13˝ in length. We list this mold first because of its exceptional value. The large size allows you to make smaller leaves simply by partially filling the mold. You can make half a dozen differently-shaped leaves from this one mold. It is ideal for pressing pastillage, marzipan, or pouring isomalt/sugar into it. Many chefs use this mold in showpieces or for decoration on buffet tables.

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Size: 13˝ (33 cm) tall See a cast Catalpa Leaf on pages 132, 133 & 141.

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Maple Leaf Mold-4½˝ BOT102

Our small Maple leaf is approximately 4½˝ in width. If you haven’t used any of our leaf molds before, this little leaf is a cost-effective way for you to get started.

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Size: 4½˝ (11½ cm) wide See a cast 4½˝ Maple Leaf on pages 130, 185 & 195.

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Maple Leaf Mold-6˝ The medium size Maple leaf is approximately 6˝ in width. This leaf is terrific for making display platters or showpiece decorations. Perfectly sized for complementing your room amenities.

BOT103

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Size: 6˝ (15 cm) wide See a cast 6˝ Maple Leaf on pages 130 & 149.

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BOT104

Maple Leaf Mold - 10˝

21

The large Maple leaf is approximately 10˝ in width. This large leaf mold is perfect for casting sugar. While the hot sugar is cooling, bend the mold to create a contoured, natural-looking leaf.

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Size: 10˝ (33 cm) wide

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See a cast 10˝ Maple Leaf on pages 132, 142 & 149.

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silicone molds

in ½

Fan Elm Leaf Mold 1˝

½

The Fan Elm leaf is approximately 6½˝ in length. Chefs love this modern-looking leaf! Its straight lined veins and spiky edges will make a strong statement in your presentation. If you are casing this leaf in chocolate, dust the finished casting with luster powder to really show off the detail.

Order Code

BOT105

Size: 6½˝ (16½ cm) tall See a cast Fan Elm Leaf on pages 108, 130, 133 & 134.

½

Hollyhock Leaf Mold-9½˝ ½

½

The large Hollyhock leaf is approximately 9½˝ in diameter. It was one of the first leaf molds we ever made, and it has certainly stood the test of time. The round shape makes this mold a favorite for those who want to make lily pads. Casting tip: If casting with sugar, use a light transparent color to bring out the best detail. For extra splash, apply luster dust to the detailed side of the leaf and you will see every vein and ripple!

BOT106

Size: 9½˝ (24 cm) diameter 5˝

See a cast Hollyhock Leaf on pages 139 & 155.

½

Hollyhock Leaf Mold-6½˝ 6˝

½

The small Hollyhock leaf is approximately 6½˝ in diameter. It is every bit as good as the large Hollyhock, albeit a bit smaller and a bit more affordable. Many chefs buy them both so they can create size contrast within their displays. The smaller mold is also better sized for those who want to use the leaf for a display platter.

BOT107

Size: 6½˝ (16½ cm) diameter See a cast Hollyhock Leaf on page 193.

½

Silver Oak Leaf Mold ½

½

The Silver Oak leaf is approximately 8˝ in length. Its quirky outline makes it stand out from the rest of our leaf molds. If you have spent time in the mid-west, you have already seen how beautiful these oak leaves look at the height of the fall. Get your airbrush colors ready!

BOT108

Size: 8˝ (20 cm) diameter See a cast Silver Oak Leaf on page 130.

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silicone molds Order Code

BOT109

cm 1

Arrow Tip Leaf Mold The Arrow Tip leaf is approximately 10˝ in length. Its length makes it an ideal candidate for bending and shaping while the sugar is cooling. Your result will be a gently undulating shape perfectly suited for your buffet display or showpiece. Casting Tip: You can see a casting demonstration using this mold by visiting Tips & Tools on our web site.

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Size: 10˝ (25 cm) tall See a cast Arrow Tip Leaf on pages 130, 139, 149 & 190.

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Botsil Leaf Mold-8˝

BOT110

The large Botsil leaf is approximately 8˝ in length. The Botsil is definitely our wackiest-looking leaf! However, it is also one of the most versatile in our collection. You can make half a dozen different-looking leaves simply by filling selected portions of the mold. And, by the way, those two flat spots in the center of the mold are not flaws. They are where the original leaf had hollow spots. Size: 8˝ (20 cm) tall

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See a cast Botsil Leaf on pages 130, 133, 136 & 149. 13

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Botsil Leaf Mold-5˝ BOT111

The small Botsil leaf is approximately 5˝ in length. Everything the large Botsil has, the baby Botsil has too! The smaller size will help you create a variety of proportions in your showpieces. Plus, the smaller leaf is an ideal size for under plating a small desert or presenting your delectable bonbons. Size: 8˝ (20 cm) tall

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See a cast Botsil Leaf on page 182. 20

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Jungle Rhubarb-18˝ BOT112

The Jungle Rhubarb leaf is approximately 18˝ in length. This mold is massive! This is the giant leaf that Chef Stéphane Tréand used for a recent magazine article, “Showpieces on the Fly.” Stéphane preferred to cast this big leaf with an open center so that a butterfly could be seen flying through the middle. Great idea!

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Size: 18˝ (45 cm) tall See a cast Jungle Rhubarb Leaf on pages 130, 139 & 203.

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Picture frames

These picture perfect frames will tell their story

Casting a chocolate frame is one of the fastest ways to increase the value of a few ounces of chocolate. It only takes a few minutes to cast a frame, pipe on some fancy lettering, and send it out.

These frames are perfect for weddings, birthdays, graduations and anniversaries. Giving that extra special attention to your VIP guests has never been so easy. These molds will be earning you money in no time!

Frames cast (clockwise) by pastry chefs Jean-Luc Derron, Robert Goshe, and on the left all three frames, Robert Epskamp. 708.660.9707

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silicone molds Order Code

F001

cm 1

Fancy Large Frame Mold Are you a chef who is asked to make great amenities with no time to spare? This mold will help get you off the hook. Cast this frame in chocolate, pipe in a personalized message, place it on a chocolate easel and send it up to the room! Be ready for the rush and make a couple dozen ahead of time. This mold should pay for itself in only a few uses.

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4

Size: 11˝ tall x 6¾˝ wide x ½˝ deep Size: 28 cm tall x 17 cm wide x 13 mm deep

5

See a cast Fancy Large Frame on pages 169 & 174.

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Santa Fe Frame Mold

F002

If you work at a hotel in the west, you’ve got to have one of these. This big frame Is a reproduction of an antique carved frame from Mexico. With deep, ornamental detail, it is both a picture frame and a press mold. If you need to decorate a southwestern-style wedding cake, look no further. Press fondant into this lush detail for decorative elements and you are good to go!

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11

Size: 10˝ tall x 8˝ wide x ¾˝ deep Size: 25 cm tall x 20 cm wide x 2 cm deep

12

See a cast Santa Fe Frame on page 174.

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Casting Tip: To customize your casting, inset a photo transfer or edible print to the center of the frame.

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Martha’s Vineyard Frame Mold

F003

A delicate floral pattern winds around the border of this mediumsized frame. It is the perfect size for an individual amenity or table placement. Send one up with chocolate dipped strawberries and your guests will love you!

16

Size: 6˝ square x ¾˝ deep Size: 15 cm square x 2 cm deep

18

See a cast Martha’s Vineyard Frame on page 173.

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Family Classic Frame Mold

F004

This popular frame (8˝ x 10˝ x ¾˝ deep) is surrounded with a classic pattern, perfect for your sophisticated guests or those who want to honor traditional aesthetics. Cast this frame in chocolate to designate table numbers, the bride and her guests will love it!! Size: 8˝ wide x 10” tall x ¾˝ deep Size: 20 cm wide x 25 cm tall x 2 cm deep

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silicone molds

in ½

Small Classic Frame Mold 1˝

½

½

Make four petite frames at once with this production mold. This efficient mold casts both the frame and the support bar needed to hold the frame upright. (The support bar is faster to use than an easel while providing a sleek modern look.) This mold is a MONEY MAKER for weddings. Cast solid, there is enough room in the center of the frame for a special message to your guest. Insert a rice paper image or name, then wrap the entire package in cellophane, and the frame doubles as a seating arrangement and wedding favor for the guest to take home!

O Order Code

F005

Size: 4½˝ tall x 3½” wide x ½˝ deep Size: 11½ cm tall x 9 cm wide x 13 mm deep See cast Small Classic Frames on pages 107, 112, 171, 172 & 174.

½

Nouveau Dessert Tray Mold 4˝

½

This detailed two-cavity mold is ideal for creating delicate name plates for buffets or for ‘under plating’ special desserts. Once you start casting with this mold, you’ll find dozens of unique uses for it. Great for wedding cakes, buffet tables, amenities and much more!

F006

Size: 6˝ tall x 4˝ wide x ½˝ deep Size: 15 cm tall x 10 cm wide x 13 mm deep See a cast Nouveau Dessert Tray on pages 191 & 192.

½

½

Heron Song This classic Japanese style crane mold makes it easy to create an impressive amenity quickly. Brush in chocolate and back fill. When the chocolate has set, de-mold and dust in luster-dust for dramatic results. Your international guests will love this!

F007

Size: The finished casting measure just over 9¼˝ x 7 ¾˝. Size: The finished casting measure just over 23 cm x 19 cm.

½

½

½

10˝

½

Easel Mold for Large Frames This is no ordinary easel mold! The ‘anti-fumble’ design makes assembly a snap. One side of the 7¼˝ (19 cm) tall easel has a special ‘gluing track’ and registration ridge for a fast and strong attachment. Here’s how it works. After demolding both easel halves, lay one side flat on the table, fill the gluing track with chocolate and then set the other half of the easel on top of the gluing track. Push the top half of the easel flush against the registration ridge and let it cool. Strong, perfect easels every time!

FEL

See cast Easel on page 174. 708.660.9707

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Pastry

Small in scale with lots of style

Impressions

Once in a while, there is a company that comes along and raises the bar. Pastry Impressions is one of those companies. Just look at their molds and you will see the care and craftsmanship that went into making these artisan tools. Made with a firm, food-contact-safe silicone, the molds can be heated to 300° F/148° C.

Vodka Jello Shots

Fondant

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Baked Goods

Sugar/Isomalt

Use these molds and you will never be satisfied with anything less. Why do you think they are the only other silicone molds that we distribute? For casting demonstrations visit: www.PastryImpressions.com

Marzipan

Pâte de fruit

Mendiant

Raspberry flavored chocolate on nougatine.


silicone molds

in ½

Ord Order Code 1˝

½

Infinite Knot

This casting was inspired by an antique brooch, harking back to an era of elegant afternoon teas and finger food. The mold is deep enough for solid chocolate or to be filled with a delectable flavor. You can cast a variety of edible yums such as sugar, fondant, marzipan or pâte de fruit to add a touch of elegance year round.

PI009

Mold Size: 4˝ x 5˝ (10 cm x 14 cm) ½

½

Yang Ripple™ Chinese symbolism has always been intriguing. The yin-yang represents the balanced forces of the universe. We have chosen to highlight the yang portion as it represents principles of the sun, creation, heat, light, and heaven. Add a chocolate, marzipan or fondant Yang Ripple to your cake or dessert to give it an Asian flair.

½

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm)

Deco Snaps™

½

Need a retro modern look? New York, Art Deco, Snap! Inspired by the clean lines of the Art Deco movement, which continues to influence designers in all industries, we present the Deco Snap. Use it to create your own chocolate, marzipan or fondant art deco patterns.

PI010

PI011

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4 ˝ (10 cm x 10 cm) ½

Classic Leaf™ ½

This year round favorite is perfect for adding a finishing touch to wedding cakes, petits fours and small desserts. The classically-stylized leaf is great for casting in chocolate, marzipan, fondant and more.

PI013

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm) ½

½

10˝

½

Aragon Amulet™ Named after the famous Aragon ballroom (built in 1920), this crowning jewel takes us back to the opulence of a bygone era. Perfect for a large mendiant (chocolate with roasted candied fruit and nuts) or for casting chocolate, sugar, marzipan, fondant and more. (When casting in chocolate, brush the chocolate in first then backfill.)

PI014

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm) 708.660.9707

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silicone molds Order Code

Twisted Knots™

PI015

This little twist has so much character and zip we couldn’t help but include 25 per mold! Beautiful in chocolate and great in fondant. Use it to disguise a joining point or to top off a design with a tidy, upholstered effect. Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm)

cm 1

2

3

4

5

6

Classic Cameo™

PI016

Cast from a Roman cameo, the pattern takes us back to the elegance of a regal lifestyle in which we can vicariously indulge. Perfect for casting two-tone chocolate toppers, beautiful in fondant, marzipan and more. (When casting in chocolate, first capture the details by using a brush, then backfill.)

7

8

9

10

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4½˝ (10 cm x 11½ cm) 11

Coastal Twist™

PI017

A favorite at swank, sea-side resorts, this plump, stylized shell begs to be popped into your mouth. It can be cast in chocolate, sugar, marzipan, fondant, modeling chocolate and more. Cast a few dozen and create your own patterns to capture the whimsical warmth of summer.

12

13

14

15

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm) 16

Cabochon Crest™

PI022

We discovered this pattern in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Oak Park neighborhood. Celebrating the famous Prairie School of architecture and design, the Cabochon Crest represents the romantic boldness of that era. Stunning in chocolate, fondant, marzipan and more. (When casting in chocolate, first capture the details by using a brush, then backfill.) Mold Size: 4˝ x 55/8˝ (10 cm x 14 cm)

17

18

19

20

21

22

Sterling Burst™ PI023

With its radial petals and high shine, this design is fabulous in chocolate. We have even seen some very patient chefs paint in the details of each petal with colored cocoa butter to enhance the celebration of the bloom. Radiant in sugar, fondant, marzipan and more. Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm)

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24

25

26

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silicone molds

in ½

Order Code 1˝

½

Dragon Eyes

Originally carved in Jade by Mexican craftsmen, the eye of the dragon holds great power in ancient lore. You can now cast the powerful symbol in edible form. Perfect for spicy, sugar bonbons or rich, ethnic chocolates. Make your fiestas fabulous!

PI024

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm)

½

Trinity™ 3˝

½

A perfect balance of half-round spheres and pointed jewels will demand attention when cast in fondant, chocolate or marzipan. Trinity is small but powerful! Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm) This mold ships with specially-placed incisions for demolding ease.

PI025

½

½

Tudor Rose™ Representing a united England, the Tudor Rose became the emblem for the Royal House. This year round favorite will add prominence to any dessert. This design is great in chocolate, fondant, marzipan and more.

PI026

Mold Size: 4” x 4” (10 cm x 10 cm)

½

Quilted Hearts™ 7˝

½

The Quilted Heart is a textured version of the wellloved, classic, heart icon. Welcomed in any season, three delicate sizes beg to be shared. Cast them in chocolate, fondant, marzipan and more.

PI027

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm) 8˝

½

½

10˝

Floral York™ Cast this elegant flourish whole or cut apart its elements to create a variety of new decorations. This mold design is beautiful in fondant, marzipan and modeling chocolate. (A little tricky in couverture, but it can be done.) Perfect for the sides of a cake, individual desserts or decorations on a gift box.

PI028

Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9 cm x 12 cm) ½

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silicone molds Order Code

Poodle Ties™

PI030

Poodle Ties, with their rows of tiny pearls are like no other design you have seen. When we first came out with this stylized bow tie, the pastry chefs in our test kitchen couldn’t keep their hands off of it. When filled with liquid sugar, the trapped air creates a faceted effect (shiny surface) on every detail. It just looks great! Mold Size: 4˝ x 4˝ (10 cm x 10 cm)

Bejeweled™

PI031

The holy grail of pastry molds, the faceted jewel. Cast from actual gemstones, this enchanting collection of six different jewel shapes will impress the most finicky of pastry artists. With a mirror-like shine, they are dazzling in chocolate and spell-binding in sugar. They sparkle from across the room!

cm 1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

Mold Size: 4˝ x 4½˝ (10 cm x 11½ cm) 11

Mime Swirl & Koi Dots™

PI033

Carnival meets Japanese pop culture in this whimsical design. The Mime Swirls are great for topping off petits fours and bite size treats. They are beautiful as multi-colored, sugar bonbons, chocolate swirls or in a pastel-colored fondant. You can taste this party! Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9 cm x 12 cm)

12

13

14

15

16

Ostrich Plume™

PI035

This pattern is a must-have for the stylish connoisseur. With the flair of a Vegas show girl or the wings of a garden nymph, Ostrich Plume works as a stylized plume, leaf or wing. Beautiful in chocolate or as a baked cookie, this shape will help your dessert soar! Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9.2 cm x 12 cm)

17

18

19

20

21

Harem Pillow™

PI037

One of our all-time favorites, the Harem Pillow displays its dramatic folds and jewel accents to evoke the luxury of a storybook harem. Exotic colors, flavors and aromas are whipped up just by looking at it. Have some fun and create your own tale of a thousandand-one nights. Great in chocolate, sugar, fondant, marzipan and more.

22

23

24

25

Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9.2 cm x 12 cm) 26

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silicone molds

in ½

Order Code 1˝

½

Raspberry Caps™ This luscious design evokes the fruitful bounty of summer berries. One of our most popular, Raspberry Caps makes chocolate, sugar, fondant or marzipan look fantastic! As a design bonus, we have also included several little flowers in the same mold.

PI039

Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9 cm x 12 cm)

½

Urchin Bloom™ 3˝

½

This stylized version of a sea urchin has radial ridges to perfectly balance the geometric and organic elements. The sugar Urchin Bloom looks great as a center for an exotic cast flower or in chocolate for trimming an extraordinary cake. As a plus, we have included two sizes of Urchin Blooms in the same mold! (When casting in chocolate, first capture the details by using a brush, then backfill.)

PI040

Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9 cm x 12 cm) ½

Ninja Blossom™ 5˝

½

A cross between a Chinese throwing star and a graceful cherry blossom, the Ninja Blossom captures beauty with just a bit of an edge. The use of the blossom can range from decorating a dainty dessert to being part of a racy costume in a food fashion show. Put some adventure back into your creations!

PI041

Mold Size: 3¾˝ x 4¾˝ (9 cm x 12 cm)

½

Floral Pull™ 7˝

½

Take your cakes to a new level. No need to stop with what comes out of the mold; cut apart the castings! Separate the flower from the loop or work with the different elements of the design to create your own customized look.

PI043

Helpful Hint: This design comes out beautifully in fondant when you freeze it. Mold Size: 4¾˝ x 5¾˝ (10 cm x 14 cm)

½

Sea Dragon™ 9˝

½

10˝

The mythical Sea Dragon with all its power is represented here. Great to accentuate a Chinese theme dessert or decorate the sides of an impressive cake. The Sea Dragon will add an exotic touch to your dessert.

PI044

Helpful Hint: Dragon castings are fragile and will be most successful if done with fondant, modeling chocolate or marzipan. Mold Size: 4¾˝ x 5¾˝ (10 cm x 14 cm)

½

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Pastry Impressions™

Capture their imagination

Gallery

Bejeweled™ B PI031 page 86 P

Poodle Ties™ PI030 page 86

Classic Leaf™ PI013 page 83

Raspberry Caps™ PI039 page 87

Sterling Burst™ PI023 page 84

Classic Leaf™ PI013 page 83

Classic Leaf™ PI013 page 83

Created ted by pastry pa t chef David Ramirez

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Classic Leaf™ PI013 page 83

Urchin Bloom™ PI035 page 86

Raspberry Caps™

Urchin Bloom™

PI039 page 87

PI035 page 86

“Turkish Ladies”

Created by pastry chef Omar Martinez Cabochon Crest™ PI022 page 84

Floral York™ PI028 page 85

Floral Pull™ PI043 page 87

Infinite Knot™ PI009 page 83

Cabochon Crest™ PI022 page 84

Classic Leaf™ PI013 page 83

Floral Pull™ PI043 page 87

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Pastry Impressions™ Gallery

Created by pastry ch hef David Ramirez

Ostrich Plume™ PI035 page 86

Ostrich Plume™ PI035 page 86

Poodle Ties™ PI030 page 86

Raspberry Caps™ PI039 page 87

Bejeweled™ PI031 page 86

Sterling Burst™ PI023 page 84

Raspberry Caps™

PI039 page 87

Classic Leaf™ PI013 page 83

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Aragon Amulet™

PI014 page 83

Raspberry Caps™ PI039 page 87

Urchin Bloom™

PI040 page 87

Vivaldi Medallion™ PI029 online

Sterling Burst™ PI023 page 84

Coastal Twist™ PI017 page 84

1” PopUp Spheres™ PopUp 1 page 70

Poodle Ties™ PI030 page 86

Aragon Amulet™ PI014 page 83

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Pastry Impressions™ Gallery

Bejeweled™ PI031 page 86

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Created by pastry chef Flavio Federico photo by Thomas Kremer


Created by pastry chef Flavio Federico photo by Thomas Kremer

Bejeweled™ PI031 page 86

Dragon Eyes™ PI024 page 85

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Custom

mold making

Your results should always impress

“ We make professional-quality silicone molds every day, satisfying customers worldwide. To us, custom mold making is more than just a job. It is an investment in a relationship.� -Michael Joy

Sculpting & Model-Making Services If you have an idea but do not know how to translate it into three dimensional form, we can make a mold from an existing object or hand sculpt an original model from a drawing or photograph. Pictured are: line art logo, gang mold, and finished, cast, golddusted chocolate.

Silicone Molds For Production Quality and efficient production are goals for any business. Using silicone molds to add custom shapes to your product list can help you attract a variety of new clients. Like our ready-made products, all of our custom molds are made of food contact safe, platinum- cured silicone.

Silicone Molds For New Products & Special Events Award winning chefs are finding new ways to incorporate casting into their menus and special events. If you are an entrepreneur or corporate chef and need something that does not yet exist, we can sculpt your ideas and make well designed, high quality molds. The molds are certain to produce clean, detailed castings while making your production tasks more efficient. We will help you push the envelope without pushing the limits of your staff. Strict confidentiality is always observed. Photo: Sugar castings of the Chichen Itza Pyramid for VIP amenities. The pyramid molds were created for Executive Pastry Chef Raghu Addagada of the Ritz-Carlton Cancuun.

If you have questions about custom molds, please call us at 708-660-9707 or contact us via e-mail: Joy@ChicagoMoldSchool.com

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custom mold making Customize Your Ideas With Confidence We have worked with many students, entrepreneurs, professional chefs and CEO’s to help make their ideas into tangible forms. Perhaps, you want a chocolate logo, giant sugar statue, or maybe, you strive to win the gold. Whichever it is, we will do our best to help you succeed. All it takes is, one-two-three.

1. Contact When you contact us by phone or e-mail, we will ask you the following questions: A. What do you want molded? B. Do you have the object (model) you want molded, or does it need to be created? C. Do you have a artwork (logo, sketch or photograph) that we can use for reference? D. What is the dimension of your object you need molded? E. What is the mold going to be used for? (Chocolate/Sugar/Baking/Ice/Other) F. How many food items do you need to cast at one time? G. When do you need the molds?

2. Approve Once we fully understand your project, we will: A. Provide a written estimate with production lead times and a payment schedule. B. Help modify your designs to ensure easy and efficient casting of your products. C. (Upon firm order) Provide a sample mold (or model) for you to examine, test and approve before any production molds are made.

3. Deliver We will make you strong, durable molds according to your specifications and ship them to your address. International orders are welcomed.

Beautiful things take time to make. Please plan ahead.

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Dozens of uses

“

for your show pieces, amenities, and wedding decorations. Great time savers with consistent results.� J Johnson & Wales W U University Universit i iy

Tips & Tools

using textured mats

For this effect, coat the silicone mat with white colored cocoa butter and then strike the mat with an offset spatula. The color will stay in the recessed texture. Next, coat the entire mat with dark chocolate and let it cool. Place the mat, chocolate side down, and peel the silicone mat away. Finally, cut out your decorative shapes and use them on cakes or desserts. For more information on making your own textured mats, see page 14 or visit Tips & Tools at:

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Make

your own

The power to create your vision We have been in the mold-making business for over 15 years. Teaching people how to make their own molds is what we do. In addition to providing materials and supplies for mold making, we offer three-day, hands-on workshops during which you will learn how to make your own molds. Whoever said, “Nothing’s free,” hasn’t been to our Web site. If you have a keen interest in mold making, we have a lot of free information for you. Our online department, Tips & Tools, is chockfull of photographic demonstrations and helpful hints.

If you want to know how to make your own silicone textured mat, use your GeoPress silicone kits, learn fast facts about our silicones, find out how to use clink boards, work with a mold knife, or view sample pages of our book Confectionery Art Casting, www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com is for you. For more information about the classes or to learn how you can host a mold-making class in your area, please contact us at Joy@ChicagoMoldSchool.com. We want you to succeed!

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materials & supplies Confectionery Art Casting™

BCAC

This book is the first of its kind, an illustrated manual providing a bridge between silicone mold making and a variety of applications used in the confectionery arts. Silicone molds can be used for casting chocolate, aspic, tallow, fondant, pastillage, hot sugar/isomalt and ice. Starting with basic mold-making skills and progressing to advanced techniques, this book reveals how to make food-contact safe and cost-effective, non-food-safe, silicone molds. See page 5 for more information.

Clink Boards™

T-CB

Clink Boards are used to create an adjustable mold box around an object so liquid silicone is contained when being poured over a model. These heavy-duty aluminum Clink Boards are sold in sets of four and come with four spring clamps. Each Clink Board measures 3˝ (7½ cm) tall by 10½˝ (26½ cm) long, allowing you to make a mold box as small as 2˝ (5 cm) or as large as a 10˝ (25 cm) square. (Comes with instructions.) Clink Boards are the single MOST ESSENTIAL mold making tool that you will use. Clink Boards will pay for themselves quickly by reducing the amount of silicone required to cover your model. Remember, an efficiently-sized mold box is much less expensive to fill than an oversized, randomly-shaped container.

Mold-Making Tool Kit

T-TK

All of our students use this kit in our mold-making classes. It contains the essential tools needed for your projects. Save yourself hours of valuable time running around trying to gather these items. (Purchasing two Clink Board sets and work boards separately would almost cover the cost of the entire kit.) The kit includes: 2 (12˝/30 cm square) plastic work boards, 2 mold boxes (8 clink boards/ 8 clamps), 2 pounds of oil-based clay, 2 spatulas, 2 brushes, 1 pair safety goggles, 1 level, 1 apron, 1 small clean up towel, 4 plastic shims for leveling the work boards, 1 mud knife, 1 ink marker, 1 container of Vaseline, 4 wood spacers and 1 fettling knife.

Mold Knife T-MK

A mold knife is a specially-modified, utility knife with a curved blade. It is the second most critical item in your tool kit. This knife holds the secret to making molds that produce seamless castings. When cutting through a thickness of silicone, the curved blade forms a rounded key in the mold´s edge which ensures perfect registration when the mold is banded back together. A mold cut open with a regular razor knife will not register well during casting and will create seam lines that take extra time to remove. Visit Tips & Tools at www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com to see a demonstration of how the mold knife is used.

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materials & supplies Wide Rubber Bands Ah yes, the ever-important, wide rubber bands (or “fat tackies,” as we call them). You will not find these on any shelves at the store. They come from overseas, and they come in bulk. The bands are excellent for holding two-part molds together. They break, they get lost, order extras so you don’t get caught in a bind!

T-WRB

Approximately ½ pound of rubber bands.

Mold-Making Clay This is the best non-toxic, non-drying, reusable oil-based clay we have found for mold making. Each box comes with 10 pounds (4.55 Kgs) of clay. Colors may vary. Helpful Hint: This clay is great for sculpting models and won´t inhibit the cure of silicone.

T-CLAY

For your information: Clays with a strong odor are likely to contain sulfur and should not be used for silicone molding.

Work Boards (set of four) In every class we teach, someone always asks for more work boards. Our lightweight work boards are made of corrugated plastic. They are 12˝ (30 cm) square, non-porous and washable with soap and water. Four work boards per order.

T-WB

Online Demos Be sure to check our online mold-making section at Tips & Tools on our web site for demonstrations on how to use Clink Boards, the mold knife and other items in the Mold-Making Tool Kit.

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Silicone

Formulated for your needs

platinum

Do you want to make a silicone mold that nobody else has? GeoPress™ and Flex & Bake™ are both food contact safe silicones with qualities suitable for almost every culinary moldmaking application. Why is platinum silicone so good? The answer is simple: unlike tin-cured silicone, our platinum-cured silicone molds last two-to-three times longer, are dimensionally stable (don’t shrink) are more tear resistant, and do not break down under high temperature. Selecting the right material for your project is important. Both of our silicones can be used for casting food ingredients

like sugar and chocolate. GeoPress™ is a FIRM, durable silicone ideal for molding geometric shapes and making press molds. GeoPress™ is not for baking (300° F/148° C maximum temperature). Flex & Bake™ is a SOFT, super strong, tear-resistant silicone that is ideal for molding intricate shapes with deep curves and recesses. It is excellent for baking up to 450° F/232° C. Please visit our Web site’s mold making section under Tips & Tools for extensive information about working with platinumcured silicones. If you have any questions about which silicone to use for your project, please call us. We’ll be glad to help you get started.

How many molds can you make with a GeoPress™ Starter Kit? It depends on the shape of your molds and how thick they are. All the silicone molds shown in the photo to the left were made with a single Starter Kit. (For size reference, the two large textured mats are half-sheet pan size.)

The Bulk Refill Kit contains almost three times the amount of material as the Starter Kit. The photograph to the right shows silicone molds made with one Bulk Refill. Even though the Bulk Refill is more economical, we encourage you to make your first molds using a Starter Kit. This way, you will become comfortable with the material and better understand which silicone is more suitable for your project. If you are not sure what material to select, contact us. We will be glad to help.

Key: The light blue molds seen in this catalog are manufactured using GeoPress Platinum Silicone™. They are firm, durable molds

suitable for casting chocolate, sugar and much more. GeoPress™ molds should not be heated above 300° F/148° C.

The violet-colored molds seen in the catalog are manufactured using Flex & Bake Platinum Silicone™. They are soft, strong, flexible molds suitable for casting chocolate, sugar and much more. Flex & Bake™ molds are safe for baking up to 450° F/232° C. Helpful Hint: Always store your silicone molds flat to prevent warping.

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materials & supplies GeoPress™ Starter Kit (4.4 lb-2 kg) GeoPress is a FIRM, food contact safe, platinum-cured silicone. It is ideal for molding geometric shapes and making press molds. GeoPress is a dense, thick material that captures great detail and will not adhere to glass, metal, wood, or plastic. If your GeoPress mold is less than ½˝ thick, it will be bendable but not soft. Thicker molds (like our sphere molds) are firm and do not compress out of shape when banded together.

O Order Code

S-GPSK

GeoPress Starter Kit includes: Mixing instructions 0.4 lb. of catalyst Mixing bucket Silicone hand cleaner 4.0 lb. of silicone base

GeoPress™ Bulk Refill (11 lb-5 kg) The GeoPress Bulk Refill contains the same material as the Starter Kit. It is packed in a 1-gallon paint can (with attachable pouring spout) and easy flip-top bottle for dispensing the catalyst. Although the price saving is appreciable between the 4.4-pound Starter Kit and the 11-pound Bulk Refill, we do not recommend purchasing the Bulk Refill unless you have already used GeoPress and are certain it is suitable for your needs. The GeoPress Bulk Refill comes with mixing instructions but does not include a mixing container or silicone hand cleaner.

S-GPBR

Flex & Bake™ Starter Kit (3.6 lb-1.64 kg) Flex & Bake is a SOFT, tear-resistant, food contact safe platinumcured silicone. Chocolatiers love this silicone because it captures flawless detail yet is flexible and incredibly strong. It is ideal for molding delicate shapes with feather-like detail or deep undercuts which require ultimate flexibility. Flex & Bake is safe for baking up to temperatures of 450° F/232° C.

S-FBSK

Flex & Bake Starter Kit includes: 0.25 lb. of catalyst Mixing instructions Silicone hand cleaner Mixing bucket 3.4 lb. of silicone base Note: Both silicones contain the same volume; Flex & Bake™ is less dense therefore lighter and more flexible.

Flex & Bake™ Bulk Refill (10 lb-4½ kg) The Flex & Bake Bulk Refill contains the same material as the Starter Kit. It is packed in a 1-gallon paint can (with attachable pouring spout) and easy flip-top bottle for dispensing the catalyst. Although the price saving is appreciable between the 3.6-pound Starter Kit and the 10-pound Bulk Refill, we do not recommend purchasing the bulk refill unless you have already used Flex & Bake and are certain it is suitable for your needs. Flex & Bake Bulk Refill comes with mixing instructions but does not include mixing container or hand cleaner.

S-FBBR

Note: Both silicones contain the same volume; Flex & Bake™ is less dense therefore lighter and more flexible. 708.660.9707

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Vinyl

materials

Who would have thought it was this easy?

Sugar artists and competition chefs know the important role vinyl plays in making sugar showpieces. If you want to make crystal clear, glass-like sugar castings, vinyl is the way to go. When pouring onto vinyl, always have a sheet of parchment paper beneath for easy removal.

102 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Note: We ship our vinyl in rolls. To help flatten it, reverse roll it on a flat surface and weight the back down with sheet pans. You can also unroll it and place it in the sun. It will return to its flat shape. Do not use vinyl for baking.


materials & supplies

in ½

Sugar Showpiece Vinyl-24˝ (61 cm)

Order Code

The secret is out. If you make sugar showpieces, you already know what this stuff is for. To create glass-like, bubble-free clarity in your sugar/isomalt, pour against this vinyl surface. Vinyl will not cause sugar to bubble, as many silicone surfaces do.

½

V24

Vinyl sheet measures 16˝ (40½ cm) wide x 24˝ (61 cm) long x 1/8˝ (3 mm) thick. 2˝

½

Sugar Showpiece Vinyl-48˝

½

This extra-long length of vinyl is great for using with your Silicone Noodles™ (see page 51) and for cutting out custom shapes and stencils. Vinyl sheets can be cut and stacked to increase the depth.

V48

Vinyl sheet measures 16˝ (40½ cm) wide x 48˝ (122 cm) long x 1/8˝ (3 mm) thick. ½

½

Sugar Showpiece Vinyl Strips Cutting your own vinyl strips can be frustrating and possibly hazardous. (One slip of the blade: ouch!) Hand cutting vinyl strips will result in uneven edges that will not sit flat on your table. When the edges of the vinyl are not flat, they will allow casting material to leak beneath causing unsightly blemishes. We machine cut our strips so they are uniform in width and sit flat on the table.

½

VSTRP

3 vinyl strips, each one is 4´ (122 cm) long x ¾˝ (2 cm) wide.

½

Here’s How

½

½

10˝

Showpiece element created by Chef Stéphane Tréand.

Use vinyl beneath Silicone Noodles™ for that clear gloss finish.

Use vinyl beneath your Confectionery Casting Frames™ for a clear gloss finish.

Use vinyl strips to create an original shape inside another mold.

½

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presentation

Deconstructing the showpiece

Pastry chefs are so busy, they have few opportunities to see what other chefs are creating. Here, on the next 100 pages, we have captured some very creative works of culinary art. Each gallery image outlines the various silicone molds used to help create the showpiece. We hope you will be inspired!

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 0 page 59

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

104 ww www. w.Ch C icca ag go oM Mol od dS Scch hoo o l.l co com om

Crrea C eate ted b byy pas astr trry ch try chef ef S Sté téph té p an ph ane e Tr Tréa éand éa nd d


Crea Cr eate ea ted te d by a ass ssis ss ista is tant ta nt p pas astr as tryy ch tr chef ef N Nat a ha at ani niel e Rei el ed

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Mini Bug Collection Showpeels™ ST004 page 58

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Vincent Pilon

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Clock Gear Gear02 page 54

Star Gear Gear01 page 54

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

EcoDome Mold page 72

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Created byy pastry p y chef Vincent Pilon

Chef’s Gallery

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Artist Palette ARTPAL page 52

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Small Classic Frame Mold F005 page 81

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

EcoDome Mold page 72

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Frederic Lo oraschi

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Fan Elm Leaf Mold BOT105 page 77

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68 ™

Silicone Noodle -5´ N005 page 51

Fan Elm Leaf Mold BOT105 page 77

Jeweled Base-5˝ Base01 page 47

108 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Chef’s Gallery Crea ated by pastry chef Frederic Loraschi

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Fan Elm Leaf Mold BOT105 page 77

Silicone Half Rounds™ SilHalf Page 71

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Jeweled Base-5˝ Base01 page 47

photo credit Sergei Shauchenka 708.660.9707

109


Ch f’ G ll

Created by pastry chef Fre ed Moreau

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

110 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry ch hef Stéphane Tréand

ry

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Large Asian Fan FAN page 55

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Jumble Box™-6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

Cube Mold 1˝ CUBE1 page 70

708.660.9707

111


Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Julian Rose

Clock Gear

Daisy Wheel™

1˝ Sphere Mold

Gear02 page 54

Gear02 page 54

GS1 page 68

1½˝ Sphere Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Apex SPR004 page 50

Silicone Half-Roundss™ SilHalf Page 71

Large Jumble Box™-10˝ (Cylinder Inserts) JUMBL10 page 71

112 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Small Classic Frame Mold

Tapered Spire-27˝

F005 page 81

SPR001 page 50


Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Created by pastry chef Julian Rose

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Large Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

Zanzibar Elephant ELE01 page 55

708.660.9707

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Chef’s

Created by pastry chef c Laurent Branlard

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Cube Mold CUBE1 page 70

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

Confectionary Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

114 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Laurent Branlard

Chef’s Gallery

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Zebra Leaves Showpeels™ ST009 page 60

Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Jumble Box™-6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

708.660.9707

115


Created by pasttry chef Robert Epskamp

Arched Lady- Custom Mold page 94

Flight Showpeel™ ST005 page 59

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Tapered Spire-27˝ SPR001 page 50

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

116 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry che ef James Mullaney

ery

4Ë? Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Custom Mold page 94

2Ë? Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Custom Mold page 94

Custom Acrylic Base page 94

708.660.9707

117


Chef

Crea atte e by pastry chef James ed s Mullaney

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 68

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

118 www.ChicagooMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef James Mullaney

Chef’s Gallery

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 68

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

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119


Chef’s Gallery

Created db byy pastry chef Norm man Love & Team

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 68

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

120 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry ch hef Romain Renard

llery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

70 08.660.9707

121


Chef’s Gallery

Large Asian Fan FAN page 55

Flight Showpeel™ ST005 page 59

Custom Mold page 94

122 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com hool com

Created by pastry chef Anthony Polakowski


Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Chef’s Gallery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Dragonfly Showpeels™ ST003 page 58

Knox Bars™ Base07 page 48

708.660.9707

123


Chef’s Gallery

Created by lead cook Meredith Miller

Silicone Half-Rounds™ SilHalf Page 71

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Jumble Box™-6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

124 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Chef’s Gallery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

Silicone Half Rounds™ SilHalf Page 71

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

708.660.9707

125


Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Mercury Ripple™ PM002 page 49

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

126 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Chef’s Gallery

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Tapered Spire™-27˝ SPR001 page 50

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Large Asian Fan FAN page 55

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Large Asian Fan FAN page 55

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Jeweled Base-6˝ Base02 page 47

708.660.9707

127


Chef’s Ga 1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Custom Mold page 94

Zebra Leaves Showpeels™ ST009 page 60

128 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Created by pastry chef Laure ent nt Bran nlard


Created by pastry chef Sttéphane Tréand

s Gallery

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

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Created by pastry chef Stéphan ne Tr Tréa éand nd

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Wine Bottle VINO page 54

Tapered Spire-27˝ SPR001 page 50

Maple Leaf Mold-4½˝ Bot102 page 76

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Maple Leaf Mold-6˝ Bot103 page 76

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

130 ww www w.C Ch hicagoM MoldS Schooll.com


Crea e ted by p pa astrry ch astr chef eff Stéphane Tréand

Fan Elm Leaf Mold Bot105 page 77

Jungle Rhubarb™ Bot112 page 78

Arrow Tip Leaf Mold Bot109 page 78

Maple Leaf Mold-10˝ Bot104 page 76

Silver Oak Leaf Mold Bot108 page 77

Botsil Leaf Mold Bot110 page 78

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Chef’s G

Created by pastry chef Stéph hane Tréand

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Catalpa Leaf Mold-13˝ BOT101 page 69

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Maple Leaf Mold-10˝ BOT104 page 76

132 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Cre eated by pastry chef David Ramirez

Chef’s Gallery Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

½˝ Sphere Mold GS05 page 68

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Catalpa Leaf Mold-13˝ Botsil Leaf Mold-8˝

BOT101 page 76

BOT110 page 78

Fan Elm Leaf Mold BOT105 page 77

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Arrow Tip Leaf-10˝ BOT109 page 76

Tapered Spire-27˝ SPR001 page 50

708.660.9707

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Frederic Loraschi

Fan Elm Leaf Mold BOT105 page 77

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Custom Mold page 94

Fan Elm Leaf Mold BOT105 page 77

Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 71

134 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Frederic Loraschi

Chef’s Gallery

Custom Mold page 94

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

708.660.9707

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Ch

Created by pastry chef Ebow Dadzie

Arrow Tip Leaf-10˝ BOT109 page 78

Arrow Tip Leaf-10˝ BOT109 page 78

Custom “Tree” Mold page 94

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

136 www.ChicagoMoldSch MoldScho ho h o ool ol.c ol com


Created by pastry chef Susan Notter

ef’s Gallery

Silicone Half Rounds™ SilHalf Page 71

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Custom Mold page 94

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

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Chef’s Crea ated by pastry chef Anthony Chavez

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

Sugar Showpiece Vinyl V24 page 102

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Crouching Jaguar TEGA1 page 55

Sugar Showpiece Vinyl V24 page 102

138 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Crreated by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

hef’s Gallery Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Jungle Rhubarb-18˝ BOT112 page 78

Silicone Half-Rounds SilHalf page 72

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Hollyhock Leaf-9½˝ BOT106 page 77

Zebra Leaves Showpeels™ ST009 page 60

Arrow Tip Leaf-10˝ BOT109 page 78

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page59

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Half-Round Spire-24˝ SPR002 page 50

Jeweled Base-6˝ Base02 page 47

708.660.9707 139


Ch

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Nouveau Butterfly Showpeel™ ST001 page 58

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 69

Zebra Leaves Showpeels™ ST009 page 60

7˝ EcoDome™

EcoDome page 72

140 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


ery

Created by pastrry chef Stéphane Tréand

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE page 70

Custom Mold page 94

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Catalpa Leaf Mold 13˝ BOT101 page 76

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

708.66 60.9707

141


Chef’s Gallery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 32

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ Spring Leaves Showpeels™

ST002 page 58

ST010 page 60

2˝ Sphere Mold Maple Leaf Mold-10˝

GS2 page 69

BOT104 page 76

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

142 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69


Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Chef’s Gallery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

Dragonfly Showpeels™ ST003 page 58

Maple Leaf Mold-10˝ Spring Leaves Showpeels

BOT104 page 76

ST010 page 60

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Maple Leaf Mold-10˝ BOT104 page 76

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

708.660.9707

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Created by passtr tryy chef S Stéph han ane e Tré Tréand Tr

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Mini Leaves Showpeels™ ST011 page 60

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Mini Bug Collection Showpeels™ ST004 page 58

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

Botsil Leaf Mold-8˝ BOT110 page 78

Mini Leaves Showpeels™ ST011 page ge 60 Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

144 ww ww.Ch hic icag ago oMoldSch hoo ool.l.com com co


Crea Cr eated by pas astry chef Sté téph ph han ane Tr Tréa and d

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Big Dolphin Showpeels™ ST027 page 63

Dolphin Pod Showpeels™ ST027 page 63

Big Bali Showpeels™ ST018 page 62

Ocean Play Showpeels™ ST028 page 64

Large Faceted Base 6˝

Scallop Shells Showpeels™ ST029 page 64

Base06 page 48

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145


C eated Crea Cr t d by b pastr try ch chef heff Sté Stéphan han ane e Tréa T éand d

Laguna Cove Showpeels™ ST028 page 64

Big Dolphin Showpeels™ ST027 page 63

Laguna Cove Showpeels™ ST028 page 64

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Angel Fish Aquarium Showpeels™ ST028 page 64

Ocean Play Showpeels™ 4˝ Sphere Mold

ST028 page 64

GS4 page 69

Large Faceted Base-6˝ Base06 page 48

146 ww ww.Chic icag agoMoldSch hoo ool.l.co com m


Created eated by b passtry tr ch che hef Stép té éphan phane eT Tréa Tr é nd éa

Big Dolphin Showpeels™ ST027 page 63

Silicone Half-Rounds SilHalf page 72

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Ocean Play Showpeels™ ST028 page 64

Large Faceted Base-6˝ Base06 page 48

7 8.660.9707 70

147


Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Sugar Loop Hand pulled

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Showpiece Swirl EMSwirl page 52

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Maple Leaf Mold-4½˝ BOT102 page 76

148 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

PHOTO:ABOUTFACEPORTRAIT


Ce Cr ea ate t db byy pas astrry cch he hef eff Stté éph han a e Tr T éa éan nd d

Dragonfly Showpeels™ ST003 page 58

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Tapered Spire-27˝ SPR001 page 50

Maple Leaf Mold-6˝ BOT103 page 76

Botsil Leaf Mold-8˝ BOT110 page 73

Arrow Tip Leaf Mold-10˝ BOT109 page 78

Maple Leaf Mold-10˝ BOT104 page 76

PHOTO:ABOUTFACEPORTRAIT

708. 8 66 6 0.97 9 07

149


Crreated by b passtry ch hef e Fre ed Mo ont nti

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

150 ww ww. w Ch Chicag iccag goM oMo olld dS Scch Sch ho oo ol.l.co com om


Created by pastry chef James Gallo

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ST002 page 58

allery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Showpiece Dice-1 Dice-1˝˝ D-SHW page 53

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Silicone Half-Rounds™ SilHalf Page 71

Flight Showpeels™ ST005 page 59

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ PST008 page 59

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

708.660.9707

151


Chef’s Gallery Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Cube Mold 1˝ CUBE1 page 70

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 69

Large Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

152 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Created by pastry chef Randy Sebastian


Crea atte ed by by passttrry chef Randy Sebastian

Gallery

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Stepped Base Base04 page 47

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Large Heart Gem GEM01 page 53

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

708.660.9707

153


Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Dragonfly Showpeels™ ST003 page 58

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Maple Leaf Mold-10˝ BOT104 page 76

Silicone Half Rounds SilHalf page 72

1˝ PopUpSphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Zebra Leaves Showpeels™ ST009 page 60 Mini Leaves Showpeels™ ST011 page 60 Spiral Base Mold Base03 page 47

2˝ Sphere Mold

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

GS2 page 69

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

154 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


C ea Cr eate ted te d by pas astr tryy ch tr hef Ani n l Ro Rohi h ra hi

Hollyhock Leaf Mold-6½˝ BOT107 page 77

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Confectionery Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 71

© 2008 Albert Uster Imports

708. 708 70 8.6 66 60. 60. 0.97 97 9 70 07 7

155


Crea Cr eate ted d byy ba akkerr & pas astr tryy ch chef ef Cirill H Hittz

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Nautilus Showpeels™ ST030 page 64

Spring Leaves Showpeels™ ST010 page 60

156 ww www. w.C w .C Ch hiccag agoM oMol oM Mol oldS d choo ch hoo ool. oll.l.co .co ccom co m


Crea Cr eate ea ted te d byy pas astr tryy ch tr hef Jef eff Sm Smit m th

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1½˝Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Custom Mold page 94

Jeweled Base-5˝ Base01 page 47

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Dewdrop Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

2˝ Sphere Mold GS2 page 68

708. 70 8.66 660. 0.9707

157


C ea Cr eate ted d by p pas astr tryy ch chef ef S Sté téph phan ph ane an e Tréand d

Daisy Wheel GEAR03 page 54

Clock Gear GEAR02 page 54

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Spiral Base Base03 page 47

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold™ PopUp1 page 70

Mini Leaves Showpeel™ ST011 page 60

Small Tapered Spire SPR003 page 50

Note: Horizontal lines were pressed into sugar while warm. Texture lines are not part of mold detail. Confectionery Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

158 www.ChicagoMolldS dSch chool.com


Crea Cr ea ate t d by pastr tryy studentt Sh S awn n Mc McGe Gerr rr

Mini Bug Collection Showpeel™ ST004 page 58

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold™ PopUp1 page 70

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Mini Leaves Showpeel™ ST011 page 60

Spiral Base Base03 page 47

708.660.97 9 07 97

159


C ea Cr e te ted d by pas asstr tryy ch c ef Ral a ph p Dixxon

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 36

Jumble Box™-6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

Confectionary Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

160 www.ChicagoMoldS dS Sch choo oo ol.l.co com m

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70


Crrea Crea ate ted d by pas asttr tr y ch try chef e And ef ndreas rre eas as Sch hwa warz rrzzer er

Jasmine Butterfly Showpeel™ Base01 page 47

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Jasmine Butterfly Showpeel™ Base01 page 47

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

70 7 08. 8.6 66 60 0..9707 9707 97 07

161


Chef’s Gallery

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Bhutan Dragon DRGN page 55

Confectionery Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

Jeweled Base-5˝ Base01 page 47

162 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand


Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Chef’s Gallery

Bali Aquarium Showpeel™ ST019 page 62

King Seahorse Showpeel™ ST016 page 61

Anglefish Aquarium Showpeel™ ST023 page 63

Seychelles Showpeel™ ST013 page 60

Nautilus Showpeel™ ST030 page 64

Large Faceted Base Base06 page 48

708.660.9707

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Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Jasmine Butterfly Showpeel™ ST002 page 58

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Mini Leaf Showpeel™ ST011 page 60

Ocean Play Showpeel™ ST028 page 64

Small Faceted Base Base05 page 48

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

Spiral Base Base03 page 47

164 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Chef’s Gallery Created by pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Big Angelfish Showpeel™ ST022 page 63

Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Big Dolphin Showpeel™ ST026 page 63

Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp page 70

Spiral Base Base03 page 47

708.660.9707

165


Chef’s Gallery

Created by b pastry chef Stéphane Tréand

Big Laguna Showpeel™ ST020 page 62

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Baby Blue Marlin Showpeel™ ST015 page 61 ™

Jetty Press

PM004 page 49

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Small Tapered Spire SPR003 page 50

Nautilus Showpeel™ ST030 page 64

Seychelles Showpeel™ ST013 page 60

Angle Fish Aquarium Showpeel™ ST023 page 63

Spiral Base™ Base03 page 47

166 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Vincent Pilon

Chef’s Gallery

Golf Ball Mold GLF1 page 53

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

EcoDome™ 7˝ EcoDome page 72

Confectionary Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

708.660.9707

167


Chef’s Gallery

Showpiece Dice-1˝ D-SHW page 53

Beveled Icicles™ SPR005 page 51

Petit Fours Platter PLT001 page 52

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

168 www.ChiccagoMoldSchool.com

Created byy pastry p y chef Julian Rose


Created by pastry chef Julian Rose

Chef’s Gallery

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Showpiece Swirl ™ EMSwirl page 52

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Fancy Large Frame Mold F001 page 80

Note: Texture is not part of Showpiece Swirl mold design. Surface pattern was made by casting the mold on top of textured wall paper. 708.660.9707

169


Chef’s Gallery

Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

Jumble Box™-6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

Confectionary Casting Frames ™ CCF10 page 70

170 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Created by pastry chef Julian Rose


Created by pastry chef Julian Rose

Chef’s Gallery

Small Tapered Spire Mold-12˝ SPR003 page 50

Apex SPR004 page 50

Small Classic Frame Mold F005 page 81

Knox Bars™ Base08 page 48

708.660.9707

171


Chef’s

Created by pastry chef James MacMillan

Silver Oak Leaf Mold-8˝ BOT108 page 77

Petit Fours Platter PLT001 page 52

Small Classic Frame Mold F005 page 81

Jumble Box™-6˝ (center insert) JUMBL6 page 71

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

172 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef James MacMillan

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Martha´s Vineyard Frame Mold F003 page 80

Created by pastry chef Julian Rose

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Knox Bars™ Base08 page 48

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

708.660.9707

173


Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Ahmed Abdelsalam

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Sante Fe Frame Mold F002 page 80

Easel Mold for Large Frames FEL page 81

Small Classic Frame Mold F005 page 81

174 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Ahmed Abdelsalam

Chef’s Gallery Bhutan Dragon™ DRGN page 55

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Nouveau Butterfly Showpeel™ ST001 page 58

Jeweled Base-6˝ Base02 page 47

Showpiece Dice-1˝ D-SHW page 53

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Fancy Large Frame Mold F001 page 80

Regulation Dice D-REG page 53

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Randy Sebastian

Nouveau Butterfly Showpeels™ ST001 page 58

¾˝ Sphere Mold GS075 page 68

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Mercury Ripple™ PM002 page 49

176 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Randy Sebastian

Chef’s Gallery

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Silicone Half Rounds SilHalf page 72

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Randy Sebastian

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

Jumble Box™-6˝ JUMBL6 page 71

Mercury Ripple PM002 page 49

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

178 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Randy Sebastian

Chef’s Gallery

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Jeweled Base-6˝ Base02 page 47

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Chef’s Gallery

Created C ea ed by pas pastry y cchef e Susa Susan Notter o e

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Swirl Chop Inserts CHOPS page 52

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Swirl Chop Inserts CHOPS page 52

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

180 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry ch hef Paul Bodrogi

Ch f’ G ll

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Mercury Ripple PM002 page 49

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Created byy pastry p y chef hef James Satterwhite Custom Mold Lollipops page 94

Silver Oak Leaf Mold BOT108 page 77

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Frania Mendivil

Mercury Ripple™ PM002 page 49

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Created by pastry chef Susan Notter

Blown Sugar

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Botsil Leaf Mold-5˝ BOT111 page 78

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Ring GeoMat GeoMat01 page 72

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Half-Rounds SilHalf page 72

182 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Paul Bodrogi

Chef’s Gallery

Ring GeoMat GeoMat01 page 72

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Swirl Chop Inserts CHOPS page 52

Blown Sugar

Silicone Half-Rounds SilHalf page 72

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

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Chef’s G 1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Silicone Half-Rounds™ SilHalf page 72

Spanky Half-Rounds™ Base07 page 48

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Created by pa astry chef Paul Bodrogi

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Botsil Leaf Mold-5˝ BOT111 page 78

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

184 www.ChiicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Paul Bodrogi

Chef’s Gallery

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Silicone Half-Rounds™ SilHalf page 72

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Apex SPR004 page 50

Maple Leaf Mold-4½˝ BOT102 page 76

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

70 7 708 08 8..66 .66 660. 0.97 .9 97 707 07

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Paul Bodrogi

Beveled Icicles™ SPR005 page 51

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Jeweled Base-5˝ Base01 page 47

186 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry chef Paul Bodrogi

Chef’s Gallery

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Beveled Icicles™ SPR005 page 51

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUP1-5 page 70

Mercury Ripple PM002 page 49

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUP1-5 page 70

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

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C 1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Created by pastry chef Robert Epskamp

Beveled Icicles™ SPR005 page 51

Silicone Half Rounds

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold

SilHalf page 72

PopUp1 page 70

Knox Bars™ Base08 page 48

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold

Silicone Half-Rounds

PopUp1-5 page 70

SilHalf page 72

Beveled Icicles™ SPR005 page 51

Small Tapered Spire-12˝ SPR003 page 50

Jumble Box™-10˝ (Cylinder Inserts) JUMBL10 page 71

188 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Gallery

stry chef David Ramirez

Custom Mold page 94

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Custom Mold page 94

Desserts were made by placing Showpeels™ into silicone baking pans.

Bornea Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Mini Leaves Showpeels™ ST011 page 60

Mini Leaves Showpeels™ ST011 page 60

Mini Leaves Showpeels™ ST011 page 60

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Chef’s Gallery Created by pastry chef Vincent Pilon

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Created byy pastry chef David D Ramirez

½˝ Sphere Mold GS05 page 68 Arrow Tip Leaf Mold BOT109 page 78

190 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Chef’s Gallery

Nouveau Dessert Tray Mold F006 page 81

Spanky Half-Rounds™ Base07 page 48

1½˝ Sphere Mold GS1-5 page 68

Custom Mold page 94

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

1˝ Sphere Mold GS1 page 68

Knox Bar™ Base08 page 48

Clockwise: Created by pastry chefs Mellisa Root, Dean Gibson and Fred Moreau 708.660.9707

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by pastry chef Omar Martinez

Petits Fours Platter PLT001 page 52

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Custom Mold page 94

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Created by pastry chef Fran nia Mendivil

Dessert Tray Mold F006 Page 81

Ring GeoMat™ GeoMat01 page 72

Regulation Dice D-REG page 53

Dice 1˝ D-SHW page 53

1922 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com C S


Created by pastry chef

Chef’s Gallery

Ciirriill Hitz

Flight Showpeels™

1˝ Sphere Mold

ST008 page 59

GS1 page 68

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

Created by pastry chef EnMing Hsu

Hollyhock Leaf-8˝ BOT107 page 77

Created by pastry chef Robert Goshe

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Chef’s Gallery C eated Created ea ed by by pastry past y chef chef David Dav d Ramirez Ramire a z

Borneo Leaves Showpeels™ ST007 page 59

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Catalpa Leaf Mold-13˝ BOT101 page 76

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Nouveau Butterfly Showpeels™ ST001 page 58

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

Created by pastry chef Dimitri Fayard Tapered Spire-27˝ SPR001 page 50

Confectionary Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

194 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Jasmine Butterfly Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Created by pastrr y student Irene Buntar

Botsil Leaf Mold-5˝ BOT111 page 78

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Maple Leaf Mold-4˝ BOT102 page 76

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

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Chef’s Gallery

Created byy pastry p y student Irene Buntar

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Botsil Leaf Mold-8˝ BOT110 page 78

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Maple Leaf Mold-6˝ BOT103 page 76

Silicone Noodle™-18˝ N018 page 51

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

196 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by pastry student Scott Millspaugh

Chef’s Gallery

Flight Showpeels™ ST005 page 59

Confectionary Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE1 page 70

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

Candy Caviar™ PM003 page 49

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold™ PopUp1 page 70

Showpiece Swirl™ EMSwirl page 52

Cube Mold-1˝ CUBE page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Flight Showpeels™ ST005 page 59

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Maple Leaf Mold-4½˝ BOT102 page 76

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

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Chef’s Gallery

Silicone Noodle™-18˝ N018 page 51

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Mercury Ripple PM002 page 49

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

198 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Created by pastry student Brandon Neisler


Created by pastry student Shawn McGerr

Chef’s Gallery

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold™ PopUp1 page 70

Mini Bug Collection Showpeels™ ST004 page 58

Jetty Press™ PM004 page 49

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

4˝ Sphere Mold GS4 page 69

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by Maui Community C mmunity College sugar Co s class

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58 Jasmine Butterflies Showpeels™ ST002 page 58

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ Amazon Leaves Showpeels™ ST006 page 59

ST008 page 59

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1½˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

200 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by Maui Commun nitty Coll Colleg Co l ge sugar class

Chef’s Gallery

Jungle Rhubarb-18˝ BOT112 page 78

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

Jumble Box™-10˝ JUMBL10 page 71

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Confectionary Casting Frames™ CCF10 page 70

Hollyhock Leaf-9½˝ BOT106 page 77

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

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Chef’s Gallery

Created by Maui Community College sugar class

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Floral Press Mold PM001 page49

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Petit Fours Platter PLT001 page 52

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

Floral Press Mold PM001 page 49

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

1˝ PopUp Sphere Mold PopUp1 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

202 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Created by Maui Community College g sugar class

Chef’s Gallery

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Dewdrop Leaves Showpeels™ ST008 page 59

1½˝ Pop Up Sphere Mold PopUp1-5 page 70

Silicone Noodle™-5´ N005 page 51

Jungle Rhubarb-18˝ BOT112 page 78

2½˝ Sphere Mold GS2-5 page 69

Platter Ellipse Base09 page 47

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Chef’s Gallery the contributors

A winning combination

Paul Bodrogi CEPC, Pastry Educator The Intl. Culinary School at the Art Institute of Atlanta, Altanta, GA

Laurent Branlard Executive Pastry Chef Walt Disney World Swan & Dolphin, Lake Burna Vista, FL

Anthony Chavez Executive Pastry Chef 2941 Restaurant Falls Church, VA

Ebow Dadzie Pastry Chef Marriott Marquis New York, NY

Ralph Dixon Executive Pastry Chef Wolfgang Puck Catering Chicago, IL

Robert Epskamp Associate Instructor Johnson & Wales University Charlotte, NC

Dimitri Fayard Pastry Chef & Co-owner Vanille Patisserie Chicago, IL

James Gallo Executive Pastry Chef The Brown Palace Denver, CO

Dean Gibson Teacher Baking Trades Hunter Institute of TAFE New South Wales, Australia

Robert Goshe Pastry Chef Hyatt Regency Chesapeake Bay Cambridge, Maryland

photo by Ricardo D’angelo

Ahmed Abdelsalam Executive Pastry Chef The Madina Oberoi Hotel Medina, Saudi Arabia

Flavio Federico Pastry Chef/Owner Sódoces São Paulo, Brazil

204 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Chef’s Gallery the contributors

Ciril Hitz Department Chair Johnson & Wales University/ Owner of Breadhitz, Inc. Providence, RI

Norman Love Chocolatier/Owner Norman Love Confections Fort Myers, FL

Jimmy MacMillan Executive Pastry Chef/ Consultant Chicago, IL

Omar Martinez Frania Mendivil Executive Pastry Chef Executive Pastry Chef Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers Harrah’s Rincon Chicago, IL Valley Center, CA

Meredith Miller Lead Cook St. Regis Monarch Beach Dana Point, CA

Fred Monti Executive Pastry Chef Greenbrier Resort Sulfer Springs, WV

Fred Moreau Pastry Chef Occitanial Tokyo, Japan

Susan Notter Pastry Chef Instructor Baltimore International College Baltimore, MD

Vincent Pilon Executive Pastry Chef Mandalay Bay Resort & Casino Las Vegas NV

Frederic Loraschi Pastry Chef/ Owner Chocolat Hummelstown, PA

Jim Mullaney Executive Pastry Chef The Cloisters Sea Island, GA

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Chef’s Gallery the contributors

David Ramirez Executive Pastry Chef Rosen Shingle Creek Orlando, FL

Nathaniel Reid Assistant Pastry Chef St. Regis Monarch Beach Dana Point, CA

Anil Rohira Corporate Pastry Chef Albert Uster Imports Gaithersburg, MD

Mellisa Root Assistant Pastry Chef Caesars Palace Las Vegas, NV

Julian Rose R&D Director /Master Chocolatier Moonstruck Chocolate Portland, OR

James Satterwhite Executive Pastry Chef Ritz-Carlton Buckhead Atlanta, GA

Andreas Schwarzer Baking & Pastry Arts Instructor SAIT Polytechnic Calgary, Canada

Randy Sebastian Executive Pastry Chef Rio Suite Hotel & Casino Las Vegas, NV

Jeff Smith Executive Pastry Chef The Coeur d’ Alene Resort Coeur d’ Alene, Idaho

Stéphane Tréand MOF Executive Pastry Chef St. Regis Monarch Beach Dana Point, CA

Maui Community College Class-left to right-Audrey Wilson, Patrick Brault, Zayda Balkus, Jeff Cabiles, Nicole Koga, Christophe Feyt, Harvey Andy, Jeffrey Walters, Hervel Neto, Debra Baldwin, Rhonda Ashton, Teresa Shurilla, Stéphane Tréand, and Tania Goosby.

206 www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Appendix

Ideas to get you started

Working with Confectionery Casting Frames™ Confectionery Casting Frames are extremely versatile tools for both kitchen and classroom. Casting Frames can be arranged in a multitude of configurations in order to create a variety of shapes. Simply arrange the frames on a piece of vinyl or acetate and pour sugar or chocolate inside the frames to make your shapes. The possibilities are endless! Please visit our web site, Tips & Tools to see more configurations.

How to use a Jumble Box™ The Jumble Box is one of the most unique molds we manufacture. Consisting of three moveable sections, you can arrange them into numerous shapes. In fact, the two moveable sections serve double duty as small rectangular molds. Slide the sections left to right or top to bottom to reduce or enlarge your casting area. There are so many variations possible, we couldn’t fit them all in our catalog! Visit our web site, Tips & Tools for more information.

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Appendix Make hundreds of shapes with just a few molds. Our Jumble Boxes and Casting Frames are designed to work together. You can count on these molds to help your creativity and artistic vision flourish. Here are a few of the possibilities.

208

The interior space of the moveable sections in the 10˝ Jumble Box are actually molds of 1˝ and 1½˝ diameter cylinders.

You can use the moveable sections to create a variety of triangular shapes.

Position the small Jumble Box inside of the large Jumble Box to make four triangles and a square all at the same time!

Make a hollow square frame by pouring material around the outer walls of the small Jumble Box.

Create different size triangles or arrows by using both moveable sections at the same time.

Combine the small Jumble Box and large Jumble Box to make unusual building blocks for your next showpiece.

The Casting Frames can be double stacked to make extra thick shapes inside of the large Jumble Box. www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com

This arrangement makes four triangles, a large rectangle and two small rectangular strips all at once!

Don’t forget, the casting frames are flexible and can be used to make curved shapes.


Index

Introduction, 2 Table of Contents, 3 Ordering Information, 4

The Book

Confectionery Art CastingSilicone Mold Making for Pastry Chefs, 5

Articles

Amenity On Demand, 6 Calligraphy Transformation I, 30 Calligraphy Composition II, 33 Casting To Win, 37 Dive Into Chocolate, 40 Rolling With Success, 20 Showpieces On The Fly, 10 Silicone Simplicity, 26 Sweet Fusion, 12 Textured Mats Made Easy, 14 Versatile Artistry, 23 Vinyl Clarity, 16

Artisan Molds

Artist Palette, 52 Bases 47-48 Faceted, 48 Jeweled, 47 Knox Bar, 48 Platter Ellipse, 47 Spanky Half Round, 48 Spiral, 47 Stepped, 47 Dice-Regulation, 53 Showpiece, 53 Dragon-Bhutan, 55 Elephant-Zanzibar, 55 Fan-Asian, 55 Gears-54 Clock Gear, 54 Daisy Wheel, 54 Star Gear, 54 Gem-Large Heart, 53 Golf Ball, 53 Jaguar-Crouching, 55 Noodles™, 51 5 foot long, 51 18 inch long, 51 Noodle™ Set, 51 Platter-Ellipse, 47 Platter-Petits Fours, 52 Press Molds, 49 Candy Caviar, 49 Floral, 49 Jetty Press, 49 Mercury Ripple, 49 Showpiece Swirl, 52 Spire Molds, 50-51 12˝ Tapered, 50 24˝ Half Round, 50 27˝ Tapered, 50

Find it fast Apex, 50 Beveled Icicle, 51 Twisted, 51 Swirl Chops, 52 Wine Bottle, 54

Heron Song, 81 Martha’s Vineyard, 80 Nouveau Dessert Tray, 81 Santa Fe Frame, 80 Small Family Classic Frame, 81

Geometric Molds

Make Your Own Mold

Casting Frames, 70 Cube, 70 EcoDome™, 72 Flavor Drops™, 71 GeoMat™-Oval, 72 GeoMat™-Ring, 72 GeoMat™-Square, 73 Jumble Box™-Large, 71 Jumble Box™-Small, 71 Silicone Half Rounds, 72 SliverMat™-Circle, 73 SliverMat™-Oval, 73 SliverMat™-Square, 73 Spheres-PopUp™, 70 Spheres-Two Part, 68, 69

Showpeels™ Leaves & Insects Amazon Leaves, 59 Borneo Leaves, 59 Dewdrop Leaves, 59 Dragonfly, 58 Flight, 59 Jasmine Butterflies, 58 Mini Bugs, 58 Mini Leaves, 60 Nouveau Butterfly, 58 Spring Leaves, 60 Zebra Leaves, 60 Ocean Themes Angel Fish, 63 Bali Fish, 62 Blue Marlins, 61 Dolphins, 63 Laguna Fish, 62 Ocean Play, 64 Seahorses, 61 Seychelles, 60 Shells, 64

Leaf Molds

Arrow Tip Leaf, 78 Botsil Leaves, 78 Catalpa Leaf, 76 Fan Elm Leaf, 77 Hollyhock Leaves, 77 Jungle Rhubarb, 78 Maple Leaves, 76 Silver Oak Leaf, 77

Frame Molds

Easel, 81 Fancy Large Frame, 80 Family Classic Frame, 80

Book-Confectionery Art Casting, 5, 98 Clink Boards, 98 Mold Knife, 98 Mold-Making Clay, 99 Mold-Making Tool Kit, 98 Mold Rubber Bands, 99 Online Tips & Tools, 97 Work Boards, 99

Silicone

Flex & Bake™-Flexible, 101 GeoPress™-Firm, 101

Pastry Impressions™ Molds

Aragon Amulet™, 83 Bejeweled™, 86 Cabochon Crest™, 84 Classic Cameo™, 84 Classic Leaf™, 83 Coastal Twist™, 84 Deco Snaps™, 83 Dragon Eyes™, 85 Floral Pull™, 87 Floral York™, 85 Harem Pillow™, 86 Infinite Knot™, 83 Mime Swirl & Koi Dots™, 86 Ninja Blossom™, 87 Ostrich Plume™, 86 Poodle Ties™, 86 Quilted Hearts™, 85 Raspberry Caps™, 87 Sea Dragon™, 87 Sterling Burst™, 84 Trinity™, 85 Tudor Rose™, 85 Twisted Knots™, 84 Urchin Bloom™, 87 Yang Ripple™, 83 Pastry Impressions™ Gallery, 88-93

Chef’s Gallery

Chef Contributors, 204 Showpieces, 104 Centerpieces, 158

Appendix

Casting Frames, 207 Jumble Box™, 208

Vinyl

Sugar Showpiece Vinyl, 102, 103

Web site Info

Library, 44 Tips & Tools, 45, 211

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Encore

join the fun Ahmed Abdelsalam

Ciril Hitz & Mitch Stamm

Stéphane Tréand

210 w ww ww. w.Ch w.Ch Chic icag ago oM Mo olldS dSch chool. oo o ol.l.co l.co om

Beatrice Schneider


Online demos Tips & Tools

Click to success, any time

We recognize continuing education is very important for chefs who want to be at the forefront of industry development. For this reason, we have assembled a large group of on-line tutorials, which we call Tips & Tools to demonstrate new materials and techniques. They are posted on our Web site at www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com . We hope they will inspire you to try new things as well as share the information with your colleagues.

Watch New Videos If your schedule doesn’t allow enough time for travel or classes, take a short break from your busy schedule to watch top chefs in action on-line. The short demonstrations are an excellent way to see hands-on casting techniques. They are the next best thing to attending a class in person!

If you are happy with what you see in this catalog, please send us your e-mail address, and we will add you to our e-newsletter list. It’s a great way for us to stay connected. Also, feel free to share your ideas and suggestions and let us know what you like and what you want us to improve upon. We promise to listen. -Your Mold Making Team 708.660.9707

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Chicago School of Mold Making ™

46 Lake St Oak Park, IL 60301 tel 708.660.9707 fax 708.660.9161 Joy@ChicagoMoldSchool.com

Welcome

Dream

Imagine

Education

Silicone Molds

Materials & Supplies

www.ChicagoMoldSchool.com


Artisan Pastry-Silicone Molds