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FA L L 2 0 0 6 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Paul Province Ministries Foundation 1884 Randolph Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55105

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID St. Paul, MN Permit No.1990

POSSUMUS Joseph Of Dreams…

We Can

Stir our dreams into being. Birth in this generation hope for justice – in our homes in our cities in our world in our Church in us. Inspire us to do all we can for the great love of God and of our neighbors. Together with the whole earth community we ask for this dream to sustain us now, as it did in our beginning. This is our prayer of Jubilee. Amen.

This should not be happening here. Raped, beaten and brutalized; stripped of identity, rights or recourse; afraid to speak up and afraid to walk out; people are being bought and sold as slaves. Today. In Minnesota. {page 3}

It is not always easy for an idealistic young woman to focus her dreams for a better world, or channel her energy into action. The Sisters’ St. Joseph Worker program reaches out to these women at this crucial point in their lives, with an opportunity to live simply, explore their values and develop their leadership abilities for spiritual and social transformation. {page 8}

Please tear off and use this bookmark as a companion in your reading and prayers.

How three women of influence are addressing the issue of human trafficking in our region. {page 12}

A Publication of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Ministries Foundation


WE CAN... Move toward a world of hope, reconciliation, and justice for all people. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. Achieve universal primary education.

ou have the power to make it better. Not somewhere, sometime - but here and now. If you believe it is wrong to exploit the innocent and betray the vulnerable, you can do something about it. If you think it is intolerable for people to be sold into slavery anywhere in the world, and especially in our own backyard, you can help put an end to it. If you feel angry and helpless knowing one person’s misery is another’s source of profit, take heart. And take action. The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet work with minimal fanfare and exceptional effectiveness to end injustice - in our community and around the world. Operating without the overhead and red tape that can encumber other charitable organizations, the Sisters achieve remarkable results with the most modest resources.

to defending human rights, including Senator Dave Durenburger, Senator Paul Wellstone, and Sheila Wellstone. Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery. According to the State Department, between 600,000 and 800,000 people - mostly women and children - are trafficked annually across borders worldwide, including as many as 50,000 into the United States. I am a cosponsor of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act, which passed unanimously in the House in December 2005. The legislation is vital because it reauthorizes several programs within the federal government that combat human trafficking and expands

To make a donation to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, please visit www.csjministriesfoundation.org

the federal prohibitions against trafficking. In addition, it begins to provide hope by providing a safe haven - making more trafficking

Or send your check to: Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Paul Province Ministries Foundation, 1884 Randolph Ave., St. Paul, MN 55105

victims and their families eligible to enter and remain in the United States. Possumus is Latin for we can. It sums up the drive and willpower that identifies the Sisters of St. Joseph as one of the most influential organizations in Minnesota in the past 150 years.

Promote gender equality and empower women.

Y

As a member of the House International Re l a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e , a s w e l l a s t h e congressional Human Rights Caucus, I follow the issue of human trafficking closely. Minnesotans have long committed themselves

Betty McCullum U.S. Congresswoman

Remember, you don’t have to be a saint, or a hero, or rich to do enormous good. You just have to be willing. Thank you.

13

Reduce child mortality. Improve maternal health. Combat HIV/AIDS malaria and other diseases. Ensure environmental sustainability. Develop a global partnership for development.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, Ministries Foundation www.csjministriesfoundation.org


PERSPECTIVES Traffickers buy children from poor families and sell them into prostitution or into various types of forced labor.

H

ow three women of influence are addressing the issue of human trafficking in our region. Why are the Sisters of St. Joseph involved in fighting human trafficking? It clearly fits our mission, as an issue of poverty and violence against women and children. It is also in line with a tradition of ministry that goes straight to the Sisters’ roots in 17th century France. At that time, the Sisters of St. Joseph worked with prostitutes in

Becoming a grandmother has changed the way I see myself in the world, and my role as a leader in the business community. Like many people, I always felt compassion for people in need - in an abstract way. But when I held my first grandchild in my arms, I experienced a new sense of compassion and connection with children who were not as fortunate.

France, who were - much as they are today - victims of poverty and an unjust society that gave them no other options for survival. In 2003, when the Center for Excellence held its first conference on human trafficking, the issue was not well known. There is still a need for increased awareness that this is tak-

in the business community was for Carlson Companies to collaborate with the North American launch of a global code of conduct

ing place right here, in our state. At the same

aimed at protecting children against sexual

time, we need to move forward and take the next steps. One thing that seems obvious is that women who are trafficked need places to

exploitation in the travel and tourism industries. Hotels and travel companies can be unwittingly involved in the sexual trafficking

go where they can be safe, and these places don’t exist yet. Another approach we’re taking is to work with people from source countries to raise awareness among potential victims, so they won’t be lured into sexual trafficking.

of children. So I think it’s important for us to train our hospitality personnel to watch for signs of child trafficking and know how to report it.

And I realized I did not want to leave my grandchildren with the kind of world where children their age were at terrible risk. One way I felt I could use my influence

This initiative supports the work of The World Childhood Foundation, an organization founded “to defend the rights of the child to a secure childhood, and to work for better living conditions for children at risk all over the world.”

Ann Redmond, CSJ Center for Women, Economic Justice and Public Policy The College of St. Catherine

Marilyn Carlson Nelson Chairman and CEO, Carlson Companies

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POSSUMUS

W

e can.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Paul Province (CSJ), are linked to more than 14,000 other Sisters of St. Joseph, lay members, and thousands of other religious women as well. Serving since 1650, today the Sisters span the globe. Possumus energy gives us the boldness and courage to work for right relationships, not just for our generation but for generations to come. It spins networks of help and hope that pull together communities of people who care for their neighbors, strangers, and the earth. Possumus unites the Sisters of St. Joseph with a community of readers choosing to be informed and engaged in the issues facing our world. For example, beginning on page 3, read how Sister Ann Redmond reaches out and pulls us in to the issue of worldwide trafficking of women. On pages 8 and 9, read why the Sisters of St. Joseph think it’s so important to have a voice at the United Nations. Have you heard about the UN’s Millennium Development Goals, which seek to cut poverty in half by 2015? Read about them on page 7 and then help us get the word out. We are pleased to have you engaged in these great conversations. Your participation allows us to cast the network of help and hope into your world. Let’s make a difference. We can. Sister Irene O’Neill, CSJ Executive Director Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Ministries Foundation

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F E AT U R E Approximately 50,000 women and children are trafficked into the United States each year.

RIGHT IN OUR BACKYARD This should not be happening here. Raped, beaten and brutalized; stripped of identity, rights or recourse; afraid to speak up and afraid to walk out; people are being bought and sold as slaves. Today. In Minnesota. dollar a year industry, with an estimated 800,000 men, women and children transported and traded as property annually. And it’s getting bigger all the time. In fact, according to the U.S. State Department, commerce in humans is second only to drug smuggling, and is tied with illegal weapons trafficking as the fastest-growing criminal industry in the world. As a business enterprise, the economics have a chilling efficiency. You can only sell drugs once. But a woman’s or child’s body can be sold over and over again. How is it possible that slavery is alive and well at a time when the practice is abhorred by the entire civilized world? Ironically, part of the problem may grow out of the very opportunities globalization creates. An article in National Geographic (September 2003) suggests that “while globalization has made it easier to move goods and services around the world, people who want to move to where jobs are face ever more stringent restrictions on legal migration. Almost invariably those who cannot migrate legally or pay fees up front to be smuggled across borders end up in the hands of trafficking mafias.”

Although few see them, recognize them or even know they exist, they are right here among us, in our cities, suburbs and rural communities - products of a booming business in human trafficking. And while we might not want to think the home of Minnesota Nice would be a hospitable environment for modern day slavery, the fact is that our state ranks among the thirteen most trafficked in America. “I’m surprised people think Minnesota is immune.” Diane Cushman, Director State of Minnesota Office on the Economic Status of Women

True, the trafficking situation is not as severe here as it is in some other areas of the country coastal states, for instance. But “It’s a bigger issue than people think,” says St. Paul Police Sgt. Steve Bandemer, who heads a regional task force on human trafficking. After all, we are a border state with an international airport, and that expedites global commerce. Besides, as Diane Cushman points out, Minnesota is well established as a source state for prostitution. Perhaps the real question is whether any place is immune, given the money involved. Human trafficking is big business - a billion

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F E AT U R E Although much of the focus is on women and girls, men and boys also are trafficked into the United States.

Combine crushing poverty and lack of opportunity with enterprising and ruthless international criminal organizations and you have a recipe for countless appalling scenarios. Desperate parents sell a child into slavery in order for the rest of the family not to starve. A teenage girl is lured into leaving her home with the promise of a job as a waitress or dancer, only to be stranded far away and forced into prostitution. Generation after generation a family is trapped in a hopeless cycle of indentured servitude to pay off a debt. Homeless children are drugged, kidnapped, smuggled across borders and sold to pedophiles. A young woman goes overseas thinking she’ll find a secure future as a mail order bride, and ending up used, abused and discarded in a foreign land. Since trafficking in people is widely recognized as horrifying and illegal, why don’t victims simply walk out the door and leave? The one-word answer is fear. Trafficked people are frequently beaten and abused. Traffickers keep a close watch on their “property,” restricting victims’ movements and threatening them, their children or families back home with harm. Traffickers take away victim’s immigration papers and ID’s and lie about the consequences of reporting their plight to authorities. Compounding the problem and making escape even more difficult, many trafficked people are isolated by language

barriers, cultural differences, poverty and a deep sense of hopelessness and shame. The good news is, awareness of human trafficking is rising - and people are starting to do something about it. “Trafficking is a transnational criminal enterprise. It recognizes neither boundaries nor borders. Profits from trafficking feed into the coffers of organized crime. Trafficking is fueled by other criminal activities such as document fraud, money laundering and migrant smuggling. Because trafficking cases are expansive in reach, they are among the most important matters - as well as the most time-intensive matters - undertaken by the Department of Justice.” Former Attorney General John Ashcroft

In response to growing concern among law enforcement officials and policymakers in our state, the St. Paul Police received a $450,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to launch a regional task force to combat human trafficking. The Minnesota Statistical Analysis Center is preparing a comprehensive report on the subject, to be completed this September. And smaller organizations are playing a vital role in raising public awareness, conducting training, and providing services for victims. The nonprofit Civil Society has rescued dozens of victims in Minnesota in the past year alone - people brought here for forced sex, labor, indentured servitude or mail-order marriage.

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F E AT U R E Human trafficking is the fastest growing source of profits for organized crime worldwide.

The Sisters’ Commitment

Legislature passed laws making labor trafficking a felony, expanding the definition of prostitution to include sex trafficking, protecting victims’ rights to press civil lawsuits, and making it a felony to destroy passport, government ID or immigration documentation in order to commit trafficking crimes. What is next? The need for awareness-raising and tougher laws continues. Meanwhile, as Sister Ann points out, there is an urgent need for safe places for victims of trafficking to escape. “It’s much like domestic abuse used to be - a huge, but ‘secret’ problem, where the Sisters sheltered battered women around the Twin Cities. Now sexual abuse does not need to be hidden. But trafficking does. Traffickers want these people back, so they can sell them again.” Acting locally and wielding global influence through the worldwide network of nuns devoted to social justice, the Sisters are committed to raising awareness, helping victims, advocating for policy change and ultimately attacking the crime of trafficking at its roots. With the help of others who share that determination not to let this outrage continue, the scourge of slavery can be ended - here, and everywhere, once and for all. ✝

“Ultimately, this will be defeated by addressing the issue of poverty.” Sister Ann Redmond, CSJ Center for Women, Economic Justice and Public Policy College of St. Catherine, St. Paul

As the Sisters of St. Joseph pursue the United Nations Millenium Development Goals aimed at eradicating poverty worldwide by the year 2015, eliminating human trafficking - which grows out of and perpetuates poverty and injustice - has become an increasingly important focus. The Sisters first became involved with the issue of trafficking in 2003, when the Center for Women’s Policy Studies in Washington asked them to sponsor an awareness-raising workshop through the College of St. Catherine’s Center for Women, Economic Justice and Public Policy. “At that time, people didn’t really know what human trafficking was all about. As a Sister of St. Joseph, I felt it clearly fit our mission to address that,” says Sister Ann Redmond, of the College of St. Catherine. “It goes back to the roots of the Sisters, who worked with prostitutes - victims of poverty and prejudice - in 17th century France.” Not only did the session raise awareness, it helped move policymakers into action. A post-workshop task force devoted to combating trafficking succeeded in getting Minnesota’s first anti-trafficking laws on the books. Thanks to work of the taskforce - and that of other concerned citizens throughout the state - the Minnesota

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M I LLE N N I U M G OALS Existing laws often fail to protect victims of trafficking.

T

he United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

“With eyes wide open, The Sisters seek out and respond to unmet needs. That is their unique gift to the world ... to us. I have witnessed the respect the Sisters have for people, no matter how marginalized or traumatized.” Martha Nemesi, Sisters of St. Joseph Ministries Foundation

1.Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger.

2. Achieve universal primary education.

3. Promote gender equality and empower women.

4. Reduce child mortality.

5. Improve maternal health.

6. Combat HIV/AIDS malaria and other diseases.

7. Ensure environmental sustainability.

8. Develop a global partnership for development.

Toward a vision of unity worldwide

Photos courtesy of UN/DPI Photo

The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet are an entrepreneurial organization with a mission to serve God and neighbor alike. And like all entrepreneurs, the CSJs think big. Tirelessly ministering to those most in need in their local communities, the Sisters’ definition of “neighbors” extends to people everywhere in the world. Accredited at the United Nations as an NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) the Congregations of St. Joseph bring a collective voice to the UN on issues of importance to the Sisters at the grassroots level worldwide. Those issues align perfectly with the United Nations initiative known as the Eight Millennium Development Goals. As an NGO at the United Nations, the Sisters are committed to helping achieve these Goals - a blueprint for moving toward a world of hope, reconciliation and justice for all people. ✝

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PURPOSE The low status of women in many parts of the world contributes to the growing trafficking industry.

I

t is not always easy for an idealistic young woman to focus her dreams for a better world, or channel her energy into action.

with an opportunity to live simply, explore their values

Q Why are the CSJs at the UN? A The Sisters’ NGO at the United Nations is

and develop their leadership abilities for spiritual and social transformation. During the one-year volunteer program, women

doing the work of the UN in three important areas - human rights, eradication of poverty and the empowerment of women.

live and work together in a St. Joseph Workers House. Those who would like to delve deeper can take part in a second year residency, where they apply their new skills at Sisters of St. Joseph programs around the United States. Emily Maher is a St. Joseph Worker who has

Because there are so many Sisters of St. Joseph positioned in third world countries around the globe, they have first-hand understanding of the issues that affect the poor and the marginalized. This enables them to offer insight, and advocate for action with local experience and a global mind.

spent her residency working with the Sisters’ NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) at the United Nations and the Sisters of St. Joseph of Lyons in

Q What are the United Nations

The Sisters’ St. Joseph Worker program reaches out to these women at this crucial point in their lives,

Millennium Development Goals? And why have the Sisters made the Millennium Goals a key objective in their ministry?

India. In the course of her residency, Emily has experienced the power of transformation to move from the personal to the global - in herself, and in the Sisters’ network of hope and healing. We spoke to Emily about the Sisters’ work in

A The essence of the Millennium Goals is to eradicate poverty worldwide through global participation. The Sisters have been working to accomplish this in countries throughout the world for over a hundred years - much longer than the United Nations has been in existence. Because they work so closely with those in need, they understand the importance of reaching the Millennium Goals quickly.

the world and her own journey of purpose as a St. Joseph Worker.

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PURPOSE Victims of trafficking are often punished more harshly than the traffickers themselves.

Q How are the St. Paul CSJs involved with

Q What experiences in India helped you

the Millennium Development Goals?

focus your outlook both intellectually and spiritually?

A When the St. Paul Sisters teach

A I found that in India spiritu-

English to immigrants so they can get jobs and work their way out of poverty, that advances the goals. When they help heal and empower abused women, they are addressing the goals at a local level. By thinking globally and developing partnerships through networking, the St. Paul CSJs move forward with these very large scale objectives in their everyday work.

ality has a cultural place in life - which is different from the West. My exploration of a deeper spiritual life has been central to discovering where I fit and the role God wants me to play in the world. In India I met Sister Fatima, who said something I’ll always remember. “When you’re faced with a big problem you should not go to God and say, ‘I have a huge problem.’ You should say ‘Problem, I have a huge God.’” In other words, the world’s problems are on God’s shoulders and God is asking us to address them. It entails deep spirituality and the notion that through God, you are one with the entire world. ✝

Q What did you learn at the UN that changed your life?

A At a conference on social development I found out that 80 percent of 18- 25-year olds in the world have no opportunity to get an economic foothold. I identified with these young people. To make the world sustainable for the next century, we need to incorporate them into the economies of their countries and make them a bigger part of the world.

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I L L U M I N AT I O N

J

esus insists we cannot love God without loving our neighbors as ourselves. brothers and sisters’ keepers and challenge us to prefer the needs of the poor to our own wants. The Millennium Development Goals help us see how local and global issues interconnect. In Minneapolis at Learning In Style, Sisters of St. Joseph and Consociates huddle intently with hundreds of adult students from more than 70 countries that have come to learn English. In the same building at INSTEP, Sisters and St. Joseph Workers care for the children of these immigrants while they study. The Sisters’ NGO (Non-Governmental Organization) at the United Nations, which represents 14,000 Sisters of St. Joseph in 51 countries, helps the Sisters of St. Joseph and Consociates develop a global consciousness. This growing global consciousness calls us to actualize the oneness of the human race and sustain earth, our home. The Millennium Development Goals call us to conscious solidarity with our global neighbors. War, disaster, and famine bring them to our doorsteps. Our charism as Sisters of St. Joseph challenges us to roll up our sleeves and ask, “What more can we do?” The world needs all our talents —— educators, engineers, business investors, marketers, health providers. Ours is the continuing work, locally and globally, of sharing their joys and cultures, responding to their grief, and assuring their rights. ✝

Catholic social teaching understands the human person as sacred and social, sacred because we are made in God’s image and likeness and social because we thrive only through relationships. From infancy we thrive because others feed and bathe us, and play peek-a-boo until we recognize their faces. Teenagers discover who they are in making and keeping friends. Adults find abiding and affirming companionship in their marriages and friendships. The bishops of the Second Vatican Council remind us in their Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World that God wills “to make people holy and save them, not as individuals without any bond or link between them, but rather to make them into a people who might acknowledge God and serve God in holiness (#32). In this document the council calls Catholics into solidarity with all the people of Earth. Solidarity is a principle of Catholic social teaching. The word derives from the Latin word sol, which means whole. Solidarity assumes the human race is one human family, whatever our national, ethnic, racial, economic, or political differences. The work of solidarity is making sure that our neighbors have food, clothing, shelter, education, and health care. These are basic human rights. In 2000, the United Nations established eight Millennium Development Goals. An unprecedented 189 nations signed on to make these goals the world’s agenda for the human family. Like Catholic social teaching, which holds the dignity of every person, the goals call us to be our

Joan Mitchell, CSJ This is an abbreviated version of Illuminations. For the full version, please visit our website at www.csjministriesfoundation.org/possumus

10


TURNING POINT

W

hen people have a traumatizing experience they are driven to make sense of it. “My approach was to collaborate with therapists who were experiencing similar patient stories. It became an open consulting group. We have approached insurance companies and have been somewhat successful in getting extensions of mental health benefits for people who have been victims of this kind of abuse.” Above all, Sister Karen has been transformed by the insights these women have given her into the nature of healing and forgiveness. “They tell me ‘Holding on doesn’t help me. I want to put energy into my life and the world so I can restore balance in life and the universe.’” Forgiveness, she has learned, is a multi-step process. “You realize you can’t hold onto anger. You can then say the words ‘I hand over to God this person who has harmed me.’ And finally, you are able to view the perpetrator with a sense of compassion.” ✝

For 14 years, Sister Karen Hilgers CSJ, was a counselor at St. Mary’s Junior College in Minneapolis, where she worked with students who were academically and emotionally unprepared for the higher education environment. These students, most of whom were over 25 years old, generally fell into three categories battered relationships, abusive families of origin, or problems with chemical dependency. Sister Karen’s job was to help prepare these women to learn. But she often found it was she who learned from them. “I’ve been surprised to realize the level of brutality that humans can perpetrate on others, but also their capacity to make meaning out of horrible situations, and become spiritually whole,” she says. “The questions that come from those experiences help define a direction - questions like ‘What am I called to do?’ and ‘What does this tell me about the kind of person I want to be as a caregiver in my family?” Her work at St. Mary’s opened Sister Karen’s eyes to the degree and pervasiveness of violence toward youngsters. She also came to realize she couldn’t solve these problems on her own.

Sister Karen Hilgers, CSJ is a private practitioner focusing on disorders of extreme stress, and health psychology.

11


WE CAN... Move toward a world of hope, reconciliation, and justice for all people. Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger. Achieve universal primary education.

ou have the power to make it better. Not somewhere, sometime - but here and now. If you believe it is wrong to exploit the innocent and betray the vulnerable, you can do something about it. If you think it is intolerable for people to be sold into slavery anywhere in the world, and especially in our own backyard, you can help put an end to it. If you feel angry and helpless knowing one person’s misery is another’s source of profit, take heart. And take action. The Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet work with minimal fanfare and exceptional effectiveness to end injustice - in our community and around the world. Operating without the overhead and red tape that can encumber other charitable organizations, the Sisters achieve remarkable results with the most modest resources.

to defending human rights, including Senator Dave Durenburger, Senator Paul Wellstone, and Sheila Wellstone. Human trafficking is a form of modern-day slavery. According to the State Department, between 600,000 and 800,000 people - mostly women and children - are trafficked annually across borders worldwide, including as many as 50,000 into the United States. I am a cosponsor of the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act, which passed unanimously in the House in December 2005. The legislation is vital because it reauthorizes several programs within the federal government that combat human trafficking and expands

To make a donation to the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, please visit www.csjministriesfoundation.org

the federal prohibitions against trafficking. In addition, it begins to provide hope by providing a safe haven - making more trafficking

Or send your check to: Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Paul Province Ministries Foundation, 1884 Randolph Ave., St. Paul, MN 55105

victims and their families eligible to enter and remain in the United States. Possumus is Latin for we can. It sums up the drive and willpower that identifies the Sisters of St. Joseph as one of the most influential organizations in Minnesota in the past 150 years.

Promote gender equality and empower women.

Y

As a member of the House International Re l a t i o n s C o m m i t t e e , a s w e l l a s t h e congressional Human Rights Caucus, I follow the issue of human trafficking closely. Minnesotans have long committed themselves

Betty McCullum U.S. Congresswoman

Remember, you don’t have to be a saint, or a hero, or rich to do enormous good. You just have to be willing. Thank you.

13

Reduce child mortality. Improve maternal health. Combat HIV/AIDS malaria and other diseases. Ensure environmental sustainability. Develop a global partnership for development.

Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, Ministries Foundation www.csjministriesfoundation.org


FA L L 2 0 0 6 Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet, St. Paul Province Ministries Foundation 1884 Randolph Ave. Saint Paul, MN 55105

Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage PAID St. Paul, MN Permit No.1990

POSSUMUS Joseph Of Dreams…

We Can

Stir our dreams into being. Birth in this generation hope for justice – in our homes in our cities in our world in our Church in us. Inspire us to do all we can for the great love of God and of our neighbors. Together with the whole earth community we ask for this dream to sustain us now, as it did in our beginning. This is our prayer of Jubilee. Amen.

This should not be happening here. Raped, beaten and brutalized; stripped of identity, rights or recourse; afraid to speak up and afraid to walk out; people are being bought and sold as slaves. Today. In Minnesota. {page 3}

It is not always easy for an idealistic young woman to focus her dreams for a better world, or channel her energy into action. The Sisters’ St. Joseph Worker program reaches out to these women at this crucial point in their lives, with an opportunity to live simply, explore their values and develop their leadership abilities for spiritual and social transformation. {page 8}

Please tear off and use this bookmark as a companion in your reading and prayers.

How three women of influence are addressing the issue of human trafficking in our region. {page 12}

A Publication of the Sisters of St. Joseph of Carondelet Ministries Foundation

Possumus - Fall 2006  

Fall 2006 - We Can

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