Page 1

Aa Bb Cc Dd Ee Ff Gg HhliJj Kk LI Mm Nn Oo Pp UPPER AND LOWER CASE. THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF TYPOGRAPHICS

Qq Rr SsTt Uill/vWwXxYyZz12345678908t/ECE.$$(£%!?0H PUBLISHED BY INTERNATIONALTYPEFACE CORPORATION, VOLUME NINE, NUMBER FOUR, DEC 1982

Are you a Boar?... a Monkey?... a Rat?... a Happy New Year 4681— The Year of the Boar in the Chinese Zodiac. Snake? Muse upon the facts, fictions, fancies and fortunes according to the Chinese Zodiac. It's all in our eight-page color section, conceived and illustrated by the eminently scrutable Mike Quon. Design by LIC -lc. Starts on page 36.


2 EDITORIAL VOLUME NINE, NUMBER FOUR. DECEMBER, 1982 EDITOR. EDWARD GOTTSCHALL ART DIRECTOR: BOB FARBER EDITORIAL/DESIGN CONSULTANTS: LOUIS DORFSIDAN, ALAN PECKOL1CK EDITORIAL DIRECTORS: AARON BURNS. EDWARD RONDTHALER ASSOCIATE EDITOR: MARION MULLER CONTRIBUTING EDITOR: ALLAN HALEY RESEARCH DIRECTOR: RHODA SPARSER LUBALIN oUSINESS MANAGER: JOHN PRENTKI ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION MANAGER: HELENA WALLSCHLAG ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR: JULIET TRAVISON ART/PRODUCTION: ILENE MEHL, ANNA DEMCHICK. SID TIMM SUBSCRIPTIONS: ELOISE COLEMAN 0 INTERNATIONAL TYPEFACE CORPORATION 1 902 PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR IN MARCH. JUNE. SEPTEMBER AND DECEMBER BY INTERNATIONAL TYPEFACE CORPORATION HANINIARSKJOLD PLAZA. NEW YORK, NV 10017 A JOINTLY OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF LUBALIN. BURNS 6 CO.. INC. AND P1-1010-LETTERING, INC. CONTROLLED CIRCULATION POSTAGE PAID AT NEW YORK, NV AND AT FARMINGDALE. NV USTS PURL 073430 ISSN 0362-6245 PUBLISHED IN USA ITC FOUNDERS: AARON BURNS, PRESIDENT EDWARD RONDTHALER. CHAIRMAN EMERITUS HERB LUBALIN. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT 1970-1981 ITC OFFICERS 1982: GEORGE SOHN, CHAIRMAN AARON BURNS, PRESIDENT EDWARD GOTTSCHALL. EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT BOB FARBER, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT JOHN PRENTKI, VICE PRESIDENT FINANCE AND GENERAL MANAGER EDWARD BENGUIAT, VICE PRESIDENT U.S. SINGLE COPIES M. ELSEWHERE, SINGLE COPIES 52.30 TO QUALIFY FOR FREE SUBSCRIPTION COMPLETE AND RETURN THE SUBSCRIPTION FORM IN THIS ISSUE TO ITC OR WRITE TO THE ITC EXECUTIVE OFFICE, 2 HAMMARSKJOLD PLAZA. NEW YORK, NY 10017 MICROFILM COPIES OF UDLC MAY BE OBTAINED FROM MICRO PHOTO DIVISION. BELL 6 HOWELL. OLD MANSFIELD ROAD. WOOSTER. OH 44691

Migrations Computers and Graphic Designers "Migrations" is one of our new buzzwords. Who, or better, what is migrating? Why technologies, of course; computerized typesetting and non-impact printing in particular. Where are they going? To three places.

In this issue: Editorial New words, new systems, new roles for the players in the new technology. Page 2 Thoughts Sagacious sentiments from some sages—ancient and contemporary. Page 3 Ascendo to Descendo A graphics teacher motivates a history lesson with sheet music. Page 4 From Less Is More to...? The zigs and zags of esthetic movements of the 20th century as seen by the omniscient designer/author Massimo Vignelli. Page 8 Alphaband A rock-ja9m violinist-saxophonist and cartoonist put his heads together to design an alphabet. Page 13 The Old Tin Can It may be junk to others, but to one suburban family their tin canister collection is educational, recreational and rich in sentiment. Page 14 Man Bites Man Steven Heller presents another satirical cartoonist, Mark Alan Stamaty, and dissects his method and his madness. Page 18 What's New in Computer Graphics? New approaches to animation, modeling, graphing, charting, composition and pagination in the commercial world; also the revolution in communications curriculum. Page 22 Do You Know These Women? A New York artist creates some casts of characters she defines as Misses America. Page 26 River Madness Without compass or maps—just patience and a pencil — that's all it takes to reveal these remote and romantic rivers of the world. Page 29 What's New from ITC ITC Gaston No. 224'." This 250-year-old favorite is undiminished in grace, style, adaptability and legibility. Now it has been redesigned by Ed Benguiat to meet the requirements of current technology. Page 30 The Chinese Zodiac All about zodiacs in general and the ring of animals in the Chinese Zodiac in particular, interpreted in full color by designer/illustrator Mike Quon. Page 36 U&k Book Shelf A review of new publications that should pique the curiosity and satiate the appetites of communications artists. Page 46 This issue of U&lc was mailed to 198,000 readers: 163,000 in the United States and Canada, and 35,000 abroad. It will be read by over 700,000 people. TABLE OF CONTENTS AND EDITORIAL SET IN ITC CASLON. NO. 224. MASTHEAD SET IN ITC NEWTEXT. (REDUCED).

1 They are fanning out within the graphic arts. More printers are setting type. More typesetters are becoming full pre-press services and some are doing shortrun printing. And more graphic arts services are wondering whether the time is near when they should offer non-impact repro duction services.

2 To industry and business. Reports, documents, maps, plans, with text and graphics are being prepared, reproduced and distributed by internally controlled electronic computer based devices. In-office typesetting and in-office printing are creating and expanding in-office publishing departments. As David Goodstein (Inter/Consult) points out, new systems for CAD/CAM, communication graphics, and business graphics are joining with word processing, typesetting and pagination technologies to effect fully integrated systems for on demand publishing via typesetters or non-impact printers.

Into each other. Boxes are merging with boxes to create a multi-purpose device or a modular multi-purpose system. Many systems today merge text with graphics. Others handle typesetting plus word processing plus data processing. Multi-purpose devices with their ability to handle a wide variety of increasingly available software are bringing more and more functions into one system under one control.

What does all this mean to you? Of course relationships between graphic arts suppliers and buyers are being shaken. To maintain their viability suppliers will be cutting back on services (keyboarding, for example) that buyers can do better for themselves and adding new services. The outlook seems to be that more and more functions will be performed internally. Just how services can and will adapt to this trend remains to be. seen. And where does this leave graphic artists and designers? More of them will be needed either on staff or as consultants to companies stepping up internal publishing operations. Still evolving are the lines of authority between graphic designers, information system managers, reproduction center heads and top management.

Message message who's got the message? When Marshall McLuhan said the medium is the message, he was both right and wrong. Just go to a few of today's computer animated or photographically sophisticated movies and you'll see what we mean. Terrific technique. Fabulous spinning and receding colors. Eyeball-blasting scenes and ear-splitting sounds. Breathtaking. Mind boggling. And often no story. No point. No human values. There are a few exceptions, such as E.T., but many, such as Tron, are riding high on their novelty and sheer sensory impact. They are all medium and no message. As one critic said, "You could run them backwards and get the same effect." But, as computer graphics and their manipulators mature, we could experience the best of both worlds in which the truly wondrous technologies revert to being a means toward the end of propelling messages—entertainment or information. Then, once again, the message will be the message and the medium the medium.


3 THOUGHTS

"WHEN I GET A LITTLE MONEY I BUY BOOKS: AND IF ANY IS LEFT, I BUY FOOD AND CLOTHES." DESIDERIUS ERASMUS

"THE ASSISTANCE OF TECHNOLOGY WILL FREE THE DESIGNER TO DESIGN." . MASSIMO VIGNELLI

at the Stanford Conference on Design.

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"DISCIPLINE IN TYPOGRAPHY IS A PRIME VIRTUE... DISTINCTION OF MANNER NEEDS TO BE WON BY SIMPLICITY AND RESTRAINT." STANLEY MORISON

Extract from The Typographic Book, 1963.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY WALLY NEIBART

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC CASLON NO.224.


4

Ascend° to Deseentio: American Sheets Contemporary artistic movements affect typographers. Gutenberg used a gothic because that's what the scribes used. Victorian, Bauhaus, even op art —each aesthetic framework is mirrored in type design. Take American sheet music of the 19th century as an example. Changes are so distinct that it's impossible not to notice that something is going on. What is happening is a capsulized history ofAmerican typography. The record album art of their time, sheets, reflect the changes and the .

Ethiopia, Stark Music Co., New York, 1903.

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Old Folks at Home, Firth, Pond & Ca, New York, 1851.

Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay, No publisher, Bromo-Seltzer, 1891.

The Man That Broke The Bank At Monte Carlo, T.B. Harms & Co., New York, 1892.


5

reactions in American type. And it's fun. Who wants to use McGuffey's Readers as a typographic example when you have Champagne Charlie? The first factor to influence type in 19th century America is die Maschine. The Industrial Revolution created advertising. Before you had anything to sell, it wasn't very rewarding to advertise. Machines changed that: commerce with a capital K exploded after 1800. A quick move from commerce to commercials, and by 1820, magazines were booming and type designs proliferated. Before 1800, typography was book typography. The newspapers and pamphlets published were, in the artistic consciousness of typographers, small books. Attractiveness meant little. Legibility was the holy grail. Early music sheets reflect this typographic indifference. Like contemporary

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Harlem Rag, Robert De Yong & Co., St. Louis, 1898.

Oh My Darling Clementine, Oliver Ditson & Co., Boston, 1884.


6

book titles, they are informative and dull. No illustrations and no innovation in design are combined with a roman serifor an occasional blackletter: The first known showing of a sans serif typeface was in a specimen book published by the Caslon Typefoundry in 1816. By the 1830s, flourishes and swashes are in, and sans serifs are emerg-

ing. Intricate frames and borders are laced with picturesque woodcut faces, fantastic creations also used by advertising typographers, and for good reason. Advertising demanded that type bellow, shout, and bluster: Businessmen didn't care about readability or suitability, as long as their ad was loudest. Competition to produce exorbitant

faces escalated, and we've inherited wonderfully bad typography because of it. Dixie has nine faces on one page! That's no record—one 1879 billboard used 38 different typefaces to sell a patent medicine. We wouldn't grow up as designers until the 20th century. The Victorians emerged from 1840 through 1860. Old English

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Champagne Charlie, Lee & Walker, Philadelphia, 1868.

Peacherine Rag, John Stark & Son, St. Louis, 1901.


7

faces are combined with outline gothics and sickeningly "sweet" faces, as in Sweet By and By, exuding florets, flourishes, and ball finials by the score. The angels, ship of hope, and obligatory children all recall Thomas Cole's Voyage of Life. 1860 American ingenuity combined sheets and advertising. BromoSeltzer music and P.T.

Barnum giveaways resulted. The logical end to that road was In My Merry Oldsmobile, Oh, You Spearmint Kiddo with the Wrigley Eyes, and Budweiser's A Friend of Mine, all published as advertising, and all hits. The prize winner in this category is Under the Anheuser Bush. Illustration takes hold about 1870. In A Romance ofAthlone and

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There Is A Tavern In The Town, Willis Woodward & Co., New York, 1891.

Excelsior; illustrations are the sheet. Dulled by a barrage of typographic weirdness, Americans were no longer stunned by novel faces. Everything had been tried, so new techniques were required to attract attention. Baseball is an aberration. Using a series of connected baseballs, the designer creates a typeface that isn't type. It's a series of illustrations. The history of American pages went a long way in fifty years. Toward 1890, Victorian design gave way to pre-Raphaelite (A Romance ofAthlone ) and the Aubrey Beardsley avant garde (The Rosary). With ragtime, a primitive starkness reminiscent of an Henri Rousseau painting is introduced (Ethiopia). But soon after, illustration itself takes a back seat to photography. By 1910, the photograph is a major design element. There certainly weren't any sheets with type alone. Sheets are signals to buy. In 1900, type didn't work. It was augmented with borders, illustrations and photographs because people didn't respond to sheets with unaccompanied type. A new graphic tone was necessary and designers complied. In the 20th century, sheets adopted Bauhaus, art deco, and Crystal Goblet typography. But with the coming of radio and the inexpensive phonograph, sheets faded into printing ephemera. Covers for LPs and 45s filled the gap as sheet music, like the hoop skirt and collar stay, passed into historical significance. Ronald Labuz THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC TIFFANY ITALIC


FROM LESS IS MORE TO LESS IS A BORE. IS MORE THE BETTER?

H

erbert Spencer, in his book, Pioneers ofModern Typography, remarks that the origins of graphic design are rooted in the art movements that swept Europe in the first quarter of this century. Paintings, poetry and architecture established the primary force behind the innovations that characterize the beginning of modern typography. Futurism, Constructivism, De Stijl and finally the Bauhaus structured the basic elements of the typographical and graphic language as we still basically practice it today. However, that happened mostly as an immediate urge to express on paper the tremendous vitality which was pervading

word and created the image of this century's visual communications. Whatever we know today was basically established then, and never questioned thereafter, until now Probably the probing attitude that seems to characterize the new decade of the Eighties brings us to the cutting edge where issues are evaluated,not taken for granted, and where the risk of the unknown is more exciting than the certitude of the known.In the last twenty years, issues and values have changed profoundly in our profession, and in some aspects, beyond mere evolution. Quite often issues present themselves today in a diametrically opposite way than they were in the Sixties. The Sixties...less is more

that group of innovators. Names like Marinetti, Soffici, El Li ssitzky, Rodchenko, van Doesburg, Schuitema, Moholy-Nagy and Herbert Bayer,double in our minds as artists, poets, typographers, architects. For the following fifty years, the impact of their design ideology has transformed the aspect of the printed

objective representation.And in the name of objectivity, backgrounds disappeared from photographs,type-

commercial,too subjective to be even considered. Only Helvetica reduced type to its bare essence. No frills..

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faces were eliminated, color was The Sixties were, in the field of the subdued, and type sizes were reduced arts and design, a marvelous decade, to one size which would fit all. full of energy, and with a tremendous drive to express, sublimate, and In typography, Helvetica became the consolidate the entire experience of answer. We all waited a long time for the modern movement. The ideolthis type to come out as refined as it ogy that was elaborated by the found- was. When it finally happened, our ing fathers of the modern movement emotions were ready to unload on was basically undiscussed. Personal that simple typeface all the empaexcursions were allowed within the thy accumulated during its absence. compound, but very few would venObjectivity calls for a supreme type, ture beyond sight. The ideology was where all emotional and subjective one, clear and sound. There was components are eliminated in favor little room for subjectivity, but even of absolute truth to the word, to its more than that, there was very little readability. Of the serif typefaces, desire, since the Gods demanded only the very classical ones, such as only objectivity. The concept was to Bodoni and Garamond,were to surextract from the complexity of vive, for their classical references phenomena whatever could not be put them "beyond trends:' All the reduced any further—that was the other typefaces were too vulgar, too

Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity. The world was too complex, the issues too complicated, the environment a mess; the past was too cumbersome, and the future required simple lines to be piped in. Everything had to be simple, clean, uncluttered, black and white. No frills. The accent was to be on structure, the great art form of the twentieth century. The beauty of structures derived from their objective expression of forces, the simpler the better. Everything was lined up as properly, as consequentially as we could see.In typography, structure was represented by "The Grid:' There we had the superholistic entity that organized and solved any problem. The approach of the Sixties in this respect was very orthodox.Alignment and repetitions were all over the place. The messages were often fragmented by the requirc. ment of jumping the next paragraph to the next grid line. Pictures were savagely cropped to fit the grid, or confined to a consistent size, regardless of their content. From objectivity we had learned that a picture was just a picture,a rectangle with an image. Values were absolute. The absolute was the superlative value.Mies told us that God was in all the details, and that was it. The search for absolute perfection was the quest in every project. This required a great discipline, a disci-


9 It mattered very little that the world outside was a very complex one, with socioeconomical contradictions of enormous size. The designer's task was to transform that society through the use of such a pure language, a clean and clear gospel, which would redeem mankind from its contradictions, a holy crusade of beauty against greed. Oh beautiful Modern Movement where are thine ideals...?

pline which will radiate in any project from the inside out,a discipline which analyzes, bisects and organizes any problem and transforms it into a clear, simple message, easy to grasp, easy to size, easy to retrieve. In typography, this is the basic requirement for designing price lists or timetables, and it is surprising, still,how little it is used.

1 1

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BY MASSIMO VIGNELLI Massimo Vignelli, president of Vignelli Associates, a design studio working in graphics, products, furniture and interiors, and with offices in New York, Paris and Milan. He is past president of the American Institute of Graphic Arts, Vice President of the Architectural League of New York, Trustee of the Institute for Architecture and Urban Studies, and a member of the Alliance Graphique Internationale. He has taught and lectured in schools here and abroad and received numerous awards from prestigious design groups, and has pieces in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern Art.

Form follows function... Remember "form follows function"? For fifty years, we heard this dictum and wondered whatever had gone wrong with the past when that truth didn't exist. But it was absolutely logical in the Sixties, and that was it. The notion of symbolism was derided by the modern movement. Only composition had laws, reigning despotically over design. No meaning, no humor, no metaphors. God forbade such ridiculous intrusions upon design. Adolph Loos declared war on ornament, and for the following fifty years that notion pervaded design. There was no place in objective, absolute, primary design for ornament.Asymmetry became the substitute for it. The dynamic tensions of the elements of composition, and their articulated asymmetries, substituted for all other values such as hierarchy, symbolism, decoration, meaning.

This restraint gradually eliminated any form that could not be reduced to basic geometry, and its primary language. In the modern movement of architecture and design, black and white were rich enough. Red became the color "par excellence:' In the marvelous posters of Lissitzky, black and red organized the white space to a formidable extent. The German

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dill Expressionism of the Twenties used Black and Red to express the issues of social change. It is a historical irony that the same colors were used by the left, as well ashy the Nazis, for their flag. The only colors, as proclaimed by the De Stijl group, were the primary red, yellow and blue. Perhaps economy of printing suggested such a sparse use of color, but I doubt that was the reason. We grew up in a worldwide nursery, nourished by a Froebelian endeavor, in a primary environment, like retarded (or advanced?) Montessori children. The code to decipher was simple (naturally) primary shapes, primary colors.

Truth to materials has always been one of the ideologies of the modern movement. The Sixties gave us the wet look of our plastic world. Wrapped in our vinyl-age conquest, books, magazines, annual reports, packages, objects and even dresses became glossy. Glossiness was it. It is no surprise that attitude's aim was sameness, consistency, repetition, uniformity, identity. The Sixties was a high time for national corporate identities, stressing identity through repetition of basic elements such as a trademark, a logo, a color, a system. "System" was the great magic word of the time—nothing was more important. The single page was irrelevant— relevant only was its belonging to a "system:' System programs coordinated the whole output of the world of communication, so that the identity would be inescapable. Systems were omnipresent. Their presence is there to remind you of the possibility of change within, even if it rarely occurred. Everything was designed to be part of a system, the supreme controlling god. Systems were encompassing, while design was too personal, too limited. From Canada, I

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Marshall McLuhan bombasted that the medium was the message and divided the world into cold and hot communication. Systems belonged in that climate. New York Subways

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The world around us was shrinking through television, cars, airplanes, and the need for mass information required systems which could control and organize it. It was time for transportation graphics, for subways, airports, highways, campuses, hospitals."Signage," that horrible word that rhymes with "garbage;' was invented, and we all had to cope with it. The mess around us had to be simplified.Mies,we thought, was right; "less is more" was our motto more than ever. Then, all of a sudden, the world around us cracked down. In Berkeley, students revolted against the institution.In Paris, the Sorbonne became a battlefield, and in Vietnam

a senseless sacrifice was burning up young lives.And with it, the young began to question all the values of our society and our culture. No one ideology seemed to be the right one to be followed anymore. At once all the issues were open in front of us; all directions seemed to be possible, no one better than the other, but one perhaps more appropriate than the other at a given moment for a specific purpose. The '70s and appropriateness... Out of this pluralism of available methodologies, the concept of "appropriateness:' intended as the search for the specific, became the most important tool for reaching the core of a problem, and thereafter for its specific solution. Simplicity began to show its weakness, and complexity began to assert itself as something to contend with, rather than to be expelled. Complex simplicity became a way of articulating our projects within the dynamic body of a program. Obviously consistency had to be taken into serious consideration now that absolute values were no longer holding water. Consistency was a way to link, to relate expressions which could otherwise get lost as contradictory.A program had to link, to weave all those aspects of design which, however, could take different forms, and reflect the plurality of issues within the consistency of the program itself. Similarly, geometry became more articulated, less primary, more ambiguous in its relationships.


10 Humor plus...

The notion of humor had never appeared in the clean design derived from the Bauhaus. Humor was the equivalent of irresponsibility. In the Seventies we discovered that design could use not only humor but irony, metaphors or satirical allusions as well, without losing grip.

.

tell the difference between real type and typewriter type, we discovered that the real strength of typography was in the structure, and not in the typeface used. Consequently, we increased the use of structural elements in typography even further, to express and manipulate that concept. This was the time when big, thick rules began to appear consistently in our design. Structure was becoming ornament. And since we were de-emphasizing typefaces, our strong belief in absolute type began to collapse, leaving room for a new awareness of type and type sizes which would follow in the years to come.

ity of conveying several interpretations, even contradictory ones,perfectly expresses the new romance with the signification of meanings, which we were now going through with renovated passion. An emphasis on subjectivity...

A looser grid...

At about the same time,a tremenlions revolution hit the graphic arts: the advent of cold type. The impact of this technological event had so many repercussions in design that one could write a whole book about it. Perhaps one of the most significant facts at the beginning was the availability of a tremendous library .

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For example, in the Knoll exhibition at the Louvre, which we designed in 1972,a whole set of large 8'x 8'cubes were mounted on casters, so that their relationship could be adjusted at the last minute, by feeling, rather than by symmetry or other geometrical relationships. This introduction of "picturesque" imagery would have

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Within the new awareness of the expressive qualities of structure, a new freedom pervaded the printed page.A much looser use of the grid generated design more open to orthodoxy.ln the early Seventies, the color palette extended to the whole rainbow, with the desire to expand perception beyond the primary colors. Surfaces were still glossy, but later a desire for softer textures began to creep in. The Seventies were neither asymmetrical nor symmetrical—if anything they were both, in an open plan of random positions. Probably eclecticism began to show itself on the horizon, leaving all possibilities

Knoll of typefaces, which could now be reproduced easily and rather inexpensivelyThe phenomenon of piracy generated monster after monster among typefaces. The cost of the new equipment made typesetting more expensive than ever. At that point, as a protest,we abandoned typesetting for typewriting and substituted it for the former, on the same graphic structures set up for type. Since, in the final design,you couldn't

Obviously, it is not surprising that in this climate semiotics enjoyed a new cultural boom.In particular, the basic semiotic,grid searching for the semantic, syntactic and pragmatic peculiarities of any given phenomena fit perfectly to the structure of the designer's mind. The interpretation of the phenomena leads to an emphasis on subjectivity which, quite remarkably, was exactly the opposite of the Sixties' desire for objectivity. Society at large was putting the accent on "me" as a reaction to the preceding "generic" we.

Before, whenever one suppressed urges and desires of expression through forms and surfaces and contrived complexities into simplicity, now complexities were expressed, celebrated, magnified. The meaning of things, the exact meaning of anything passing through our creative hands is now investigated, exhausted, probed and stressed to its ultimate breaking point beyond which its own meaning is altered. And finally,it is expressed, transformed,and sublimated by the new perception. Obliteration,the muse of Abstraction, Goddess of the Sixties,is now resting in peace.

open. The fascination with complexity is overriding that of simplicity. No one expressed the spirit of the Seventies better than Robert Venturi, with his historical remark, "Less is a bore:' The Seventies. Ten years that turned the page of the modern movement.

been unthinkable in the Sixties, when primary forms demanded primary relationships. As you can derive from this example, the times were introducing the notion of contrasting stylistic codes (order and disorder, identity and diversity, simplicity and complexity, etc.). In that era of pluralism, form wasn't following function any longer; the new dualism was form and function.A new rising interest in semiotics emphasized the role of meaning in form, and a new attention to symbolism began to appear on the drafting tables.

The late Seventies minted a new word "POSTMODERN." To many of us it sounded like "POST MORTEM," and too many of us were frightened by its sidereal vacuum. The architects were again leading the way. Graphic designers were moderately responsive to the new issues, while product designers, no surprise, did not even know of its existence. If the Sixties stressed the concept of discipline, and the Seventies that of appropriateness,the Eighties were finally intrigued by the pleasures of ambiguity. The fascinating possibil-

No more is the absolute the final aim. On the contrary,a sense of relativity is separating issues, separat-


11 ing things, separating phenomena which now could exist in an exciting synergy of new relationships, bringing their individual liveliness into play in the "global theater"

Loaded emotions, probing attitudes-... In this theater, the primary geometries of the Sixties require a new role, where the scale is transformed by a new and more complex set of

spatial relations, where emotions are loaded with intensities unknown before, or perhaps known only before the modern movement and forgotten since then. The renewed interest in historicism is explained by the desire for recovering values,recovering knowledge interrupted by the course of events. The desire to learn the intricacies, the sequences of the plan in classic architecture,the expression of the meaning of each space,is by far more intriguing now than any open plan, unqualified space or abstract wall. Learning to transform, not to imitate,not to duplicate. Learning to replace obsolete values with new ones expressing the new desire: The probing attitude of the Eighties is extremely exciting, extremely seductive, extremely dangerous.

Colors, forms, typefaces to underscore meaning... Primary colors have saturated our perception. Now we need to investigate new ranges, new tones, new dramatic relationships. At the same time, the manipulation of color to stress, to express meanings is far more subtle now than before, and this offers designers the possibility

of involving color at a symbolic level: to establish new identities, to create intriguing chromotypes,to express new situations. Color and form could now be used to underline different meanings,brought to play simultaneously in the same theater,in a

multiplicity of coding, to add a much richer texture to the design. It is no more "form follows function;' but almost its reverse "function follows form" that is appealing to us, since the desire of recovering the value of form as evocative entity, is establishing priority on the mere handling of functional needs. Practicality, by itself, could be a failure to communicate what it serves. The necessity of providing design with a higher, more complex level of symbolism is in direct contrast with the absence of it during the Sixties and before.The necessity of creating a level of magical, almost surreal atmosphere is a much more exciting condition than that of responding.objectively to particular needs,be it a page,a poster,

to achieve a more articulated expression even within the same design.

The Teutonic notion of identity,as a norm to refer to, is alien to the American culture and spirit.Actually its opposite,"diversity," is the truly American expression. Rooted in the history of.this country, in its composition and cultural manifestations,"diversity" stands to represent the desire for innovation, competitiveness and freedom. Skyline

t kioberl'

'. idler on Jencks: Cooking up the Chunks Fiselintati and %No: louse and Bauhaus I 'merit on Frampton: Ciettion's Ghost Peter [Sri mks: Prostitution a n d Paris

an interior or an object.The opportunity of injecting contradictions into a design reflects the iconoclastic sense of humor of our time.No more sacred cows...The work of architects such as Venturi, Moore, Stern, Graves and SITES plays with double codes, irony and humor in a very serious way. The work of Milton Glaser thrives in ambiguities, and that of Chwast in desecrating ironies. Metaphors, once forbidden, are becoming essential parts of the visual language. Through metaphor we find the way of enlarging the boundaries of communication, expanding its poetic potential beyond the rhetoric of the image.

Seuth and Ibm ICI libeling Breuer Phis: Buildings. Books, Exhibits. FA ems, and ilte Insider's Guide to Architects' Office*,

Skyline 1.-4.1m,

Skyline hhs

treltiteeture 01 'mirth*

However, diversity is intended here as the opposite of sameness or chaos. The object is to - obtain identity through diversity by properly and skillfully balancing these two forces. Again contradictions. Today, system is the non-system system. Nothing could be more offensive to our sensibility today than the endless repetition of a modular system with its omnipresent grid or structure to remind us of its technological origin. The non-system system has the obvious advantage of a system without the look of it.Actually, it will go even further by hiding its properties in an attempt to give us a complete object, be it a program, a book, an interior or a design. .

Ornament, typography and moods... Ornament, thrown out the door by the modern movement, comes back through the window like a bird. The desire of restoring interest and hierarchy to the components of design is making us re-evaluate the role of ornament. No longer a bad word, we still have to understand the subtleties of its manipulation.ln typography, grids are becoming more and more complex, and the design within much looser than before, with intriguing counterpoints of symmetrical and asymmetrical compositions. Typefaces and type sizes can be manipulated to express different situations, different contexts, different meanings or moods.One kind of design can no more be better than others, it only can be more appropriate than others for that specific purpose. Complexity, again, welcomes layering of contrasting structures

The flexibility of a system today implies the perception of accidental as image, which is in total contradiction to the concept of the modern movement which wanted structure expressed. The rolling force of the "probing attitude" of the Eighties is questioning every aspect of the design environment, and this provocative atmosphere is forcing us to constantly review our creative process. However,it is comforting to know that in a time of neo-eclecticism, every source can be legitimate if transformed by an inquisitive mind. From "less is more" to "less is a bore"—is the new motto going to be: the more the better? THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC MODERN NO.216".


Presenting

Wolfgang Sperzel and his roc *jazz


13

0

.0)

Hot or cool, acid or punk, new wave or fusion, be-bop or boogie—as long as it's music, count him in. Wolfgang Sperzel is a 25-year-old wit, musician, illustrator and cartoonist. Any way you list his credentials, you can't go wrong; he's equally accomplished in all. He is currently completing his studies in graphic design at the Fachhochschule in Darmstadt, West Germany, while freelancing as an illustrator and cartoonist besides. His extracurricular activity is as combination violinist-saxophonist with a rock-jazz band, which explains the inspiration for this alphabet. Judging from the characters in his "alphaband:' his energy and exuberance are exceeded only by his skill. M.M.

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC QUORUMÂŽ


1A

THE OLD

POLICE FOOT POWDER. The cut of the policeman's uniform, the typography and the Art Nouveau flourishes are clues to the period of this can—the early 1900s.

I don't know if any other language has the idiomatic equivalent of the American "It's just an old tin can"—an expression we use to describe a worthless, junky automobile. * How this expression came to be, I cannot explain, because actually, old tin cans are far from junk and have a great deal of worth in the eyes of collectors. You have only to visit the home of Terry Ann and Jim Perine, who invited us in to view and photograph their enormous collection, to understand how valuable tin cans can be. Not in dollars-and-cents, necessarily, but in esthetic delights, in history revealed, in nostalgia and in just pure pleasure. It is also fascinating to see how old tin cans were far more than just containers for merchandise. But first, a very condensed history: MANUFACTURED b

HE PUFITY LABORATORIES. BROoKurN, N.Y.


15

SEXTON CLOTHES SPRJNKLER.Aside from its quaint function, this tin is unique because it has survived in almost perfect condition—without a sign of rust or erosion—despite its constant exposure to water. The illustration, costume and graphics label it turn-of-the-century.

lb begin with, the name tin can is not accurate. The cans are not made of tin, but of tin-plated steel, today, and originally of tin-plated iron. The process of plating iron was developed as far backas the early 14th century in Bohemia (a province of Czechoslovakia). Iron was pounded into sheets, scoured and plated by hand. The canisters were also formed and soldered by hand, and the entire process was clumsy and laborious. The cans produced were equally heavy-handed and ungainly. Through the centuries, advances in the technology of tin-plating were made in Germany and A BROOKLYN CANDY COMPANY gained immediate memorable identity by packaging its goodies in a tin which commemorated the opening of the Brooklyn Bridge in 1883. It is prized for its historic value and the excellent reproduction of the bridge and ornamental detail.

and in England. In the mid-19th century, the invention of steel and steel rolling changed the picture entirely. At the same time, there were significant changes in the labeling and decorating processes. From hand painting, they moved on to embossing, stenciling and the use of paper transfers or decals. But all these were still hand processes. With the invention of lithography in the early 19th century, it was possible to print paper labels in large quantities, which could then be affixed to cans. But even when lithography techniques made it possible to print directly on sheet metal,


16

the elaborate labels and ornamentation conceived for many of the cans required operations that were enormously time consuming. Many were painted with multiple layers of color; each color applied separately, with coats of varnish sandwiched between. Each application of paint and varnish required a day or more of drying time. Finally, in the 20th century, when the development of photolithography made it possible to print .a multitude of

colors out of four basic hues, and ovens eliminated the timeconsuming air-drying, the production of tins for packaging merchandise became a vast new industry.

DROSTE'S SAMPLER. This photo is actually an enlargement of the real thing which stands a mere one and three-quarter inches high. Although the Droste cocoa tin has been fairly popular (especially in the '30s and '40s), the tiny samplers are hard to come by as they had no secondary use and were generally discarded.

SAFETY OUTFIT A patching kit for bicycle tires was a household staple when bikes easily outnumbered motor cars. The woman's costume, the curlicue graphics and the date printed on the tin identify it as early 20th century

W. H. BAKER COCOA. This turn-of the-century tin has a paper wraparound label with a portraitofa woman in multi-toned period dress. The canister is unusual because of its oval shape.

GAIL & AX TOBACCO. This tin, with hinged top and convenient carrying handle, was also the perfect size for carrying sandwiches when the contents were used up. It was typical of tins specifically designed with a secondary use in mind.

LA JAYNEES TALC was one of a group of household products distributed door-to-door by the Raleigh Company in the early 1920s. Typical of the period, like bobbed hair and abbreviated hemlines, were the graphics of the era—a streamlined, simplistic modification of Art Nouveau.

VIN'S BISCUITS were well known for their decorative packaging with a built-in afterlife. This child's drum came with a neck strap and drumsticks, as well as the requisite cookies.


17

GILLIES COFFEE. Canisters like these were used as store dispensers generally. Typical of turn-of-the-century design, he graphics were very ornate and illuminated with gold and silver color tones to catch the eye and impart a sense of he quality of the product.

TOYLAND PEANUT BUTTER was a perfect product for a child-oriented container. The little handle made the empty tin a useful item in a sandbox or at the beach. The cartoon-style illustration was an innovation of the 1920s and '30s.

ful that they would be kept around Like most collectors, the Perines are the house for a long time—a constant focused in on tins produced between 1880 and 1940. Techniques for plating reminder of the product itself. Much attention was paid to designing the and printing had reacheda high container for secondary uses. Peanut degree of proficiency. But it is the butter was packaged in little pails design and ornamentation of the that could be used in a sand box. tins that are most engaging. ManuCooky tins were shaped in the form facturers did not yet have television of ladies' purses, spinning tops, book or other mass media devices for pushing their products. For the most ends; many tins were fitted with handles so they could be carried as part, they relied on their containers lunch boxes. But even if the manuto do the hard "selling" right at the facturer didn't suggest a secondary point of sale. As a result, manufacturers vied with each other to pro- use, purchasers had plenty of ideas of their own. Tho beautiful to disduce irresistible, colorful packages card, they became receptacles for to identify their products, to outbuttons and pins, screws and nails, shine competitive products, to provide useful information, and to make home-baked cookies, hair pins, loose change and the like. It's safe to say the containers so beautiful and use-

POPPER'S ACE CIGARS. Not only does the biplane on the tin designate the date as early '20s, the 100 price gives us a clue to the early vintage of this canister

BABY TALC. Another example of the cartoon style of illustration favored in the 1920s and '30s.

TORSCHS SUGAR CORN. One of the most unusual and prized items in the Perine collection, this early 1900s tin demonstrates a primitive canning technique. A small hole in the bottom of the can was used to vacuum out air after the cans were filled with foodstuff. This done, the hole was then plugged with solder to keep it airtight.

enchantment. To other people it's worth nothing, they admit; to them it means a lot. They find it educational, esthetically pleasing and there is constant exhilaration in searching for and acquiring new only an are The tins reproduced here pieces. Best of all, as collectibles go, infinitesimal part of the Perines' collection. They own over 600 pieces, tin cans are not an expensive habit. and it is no exaggeration to say that One might pick up a real prize for the walls of their home from kitchen as little as three dollars. And if you ever misjudge a find, you can't get to stairwells to bathrooms—are lithurt too badly," they volunteer. erally lined with cans. They are not The Perines are always anxious to alone in their passion for collecting. exchange information with other At last count there were about 900 collectors, as well as to buy and sell members in the national Tin Can pieces. Anyone interested in contactCollectors Association. The Perines are not certain of the dollar value of ing them may write, c/o U6lelc. their collection, but they are obviMARION MULLER ously not in it for investment—just

that somewhere in every basement, attic or workbench, there's an old tin can doing service beyond the original call of duty.

UPRIGHT POCKET TINS. These tobacco tins are far and away the most collectable items. They were made by countless companies and are readily found. Pocket-size, as the name implies, they eventually found their way into attics, basements and tool boxes because they were such apt containers for nails, screws, faucet washers and the like.

ROLY POLYS. Once, this portly fellow was stuffed to the ears with tobacco; now he is a much sought after collectible. "The Man From Scotland Yard" is one of six characters in a collection of roly poly containers designed for packaging tobacco. They were produced between 1912 and 1930. Unique as they were, they were not the specific property of any one tobacco company, but were used by several different distributors. A set of the six characters—in mint condition—might well be worth over a thousand dollars today.


18

M

ark Alan Stamaty spends more time on Capitol Hill these days, than at the drawing board in his Greenwich Village apartment. A cartoonist (formerly of Mac D000000dle St.), he's become a media watchdog of Congress, and regularly shuttles to Washington, D.C., where he haunts the marble corridors, absorbing and recording. With the insatiable curiosity of an investigative reporter, he talks to anyone who will tell him how government ticks. Surprisingly, doors have opened to some influential offices, affording a peek at the system's inner workings, exposing the maneuverings of its bureaucratic drones and "king" bees. All this serves as deep background for Stamaty's innovative cartoon, Washingtoon, the first weekly comic to strip this mysterious city bare.

By Steven Heller a purist instead. I was going to be Van Gogh and die of a lung disease. I didn't realize until later that when those painters talked of suffering they really meant it?'

S

tamaty's earlyexperiences, alone in New York, center around many pleasurable, long, late night-early morning walks around the city. He would sketch street folk and write down all that he heard in diaries. Not coincidentally, his favorite artist was Georg Grosz (a master recorder of, and commentator on, the comedie humaine). He was influenced by Steinberg for similar rea-

repertory company, including the hero, Malcolm Frazzle (a bearded Stamaty lookalike who returns in Washingtoon), a popular poet for Dishwasher Monthly; Helga Parsnip, a seer; Brenda Funn, Malcolm's paramour-to-be; and Hugo of Hugo's Deli, who plays Sancho to Malcolm's Quixote,are delightfully bittersweet. Stamaty is a superb draftsman whose Heironymous Bosch-like griffins, elephant-men, hippo-men, bird-men, jock-men and flying mammals slither in and out of the panels. Aside from the main story— which is much too detailed to explain here—along the strip's mar-

F

or one whose training in politics began and ended with high school Civics I, Stamaty's impact on political cartooning is startling. Washingtoon, published concurrently on the Op-Ed page of the Washington Post and in the Village Voice, has not merely eschewed the classical "editorial cartoon" format practiced by Herblock and Oliphant, but has put forth a wealth of unique, if not beguiling, graphic symbols. Akin to Walt Kelly,Jules Feiffer and Garry Trudeau, all masters of the socially conscious comic strip, Stamaty conveys his point of view through a story line peopled with a troupe of hilariously deadpan characters whose motivations are compelling and whose escapades insure rapt attention: Gerard V. Oxboggle of the Tycoon Sector; Congressman Bob Forehead, whose blind ambition alternates between wanting to become either President or a game show host; Leonard Bullion, Bob's charismatician; Arthur Giggle, professor of economics at Wheat Toast University, and creator of Giggle Wiggle, a hybrid trickle-down economic theory; and the members of the J.F.K.-Look-Alike-Conservative-Caucus, including Representatives Philip Crow, Chip Chapman, Daniel Duck and John F Kornbread, just to name a few.

F

or those of you who haven't seen it, Washingtoon is the graphic equivalent of Mort Sahl's standup comedy routines which satirically unraveled the maze of government. Here Stamaty dips his poison pen into a well of knowledge in order to simplify complex issues with insightful wit. One memorable strip, explaining the process of congressional redistricting, shows Ed Bagner, Democrat and 16-year veteran in line for a full committee chairmanship, suffering at the playful hands of a new Republican majority as they, literally, redraw the congressional map in a manner that would put abstract expreSsionists to shame. Often the strip seems like a primer in political science. Although Washingtoon is Stamaty's first overtly satiric work, cartooning has always been a part of his life. His mother, Clara Gee Kastner, did comic strips, and his father, Stanley Stamaty, did gag cartoons."My father would often take me to New York on a Wednesday which was cartoon-day at the big magazines:' recalls Stamaty."It was a terrifying business. All those men waiting to get approval for their ideas. For every twenty my father did, he may only have sold one. It was no way to live.' Stamaty didn't want to be a cartoonist."Everything revolved around the gag, there was no real content?' He had a penchant for writing and loved printmaking."I went to Cooper Union where 'cartoonist' was a tainted term. I became

Howard Simon (the executive and managing editors, respectively), to discuss the idea of doing a new Mac D000000dle St. set in D.C. He jumped at the opportunity. Tmidly, but determinedly, he entered Washington's power center. He had no preconceptions, but knew that a cartoonist's job was to expose folly while entertaining the readers. And as a regular tenant on "the most valuable piece of real estate in the Capital" (as Meg Greenfield describes her bailiwick) he felt a great responsibility to do his job fairly, to avoid triviality, and be provocative, if he could. He does so with aplomb."I have respect for people in politics:' Stamaty admits."I don't necessarily see them as good guys or bad guys. They are human, so I choose targets— people or causes— that are inhumane. My targets are those that I can genuinely feel deserve getting slammed:' While his graphic colleagues on the editoral pages often direct their comments toward major issues, Stamaty is more local in scope. He spurns the cliched cartoon symbols (eagles, Uncles, etc.) in favor of "real-life fictional creations:' Like the wily court jester of old, Stamaty lampoons the very same people who enjoy the cartoons. "In fact: he says,"I'm told there is some Kennedy look-alike Congressman in the Midwest who has been accusing his opponent of being a Bob Forehead type:" Perhaps Washingtoon is destined to become part of the political vocabulary.

A

fter a year on the job, Stamaty continually fine-tunes the strip. Since he spends so much time absorbing fuel for the fires (he is currently enrolled in a class on congressional procedure), Washingtoon does not have the same eccentric look of his presons. But his conversion to cartooning gins are included talmudic commentaries, vious works, but graphically it is very was a direct result of Jules Feiffer's Marxist critiques, existential ravings and striking. He has narrowed his target comic strips collected in Sick, Sick, Sick. inward-looking queries. Mac D000000dle sights for the time being, focusing on St. was never seen before in stripdom, what he calls the problem of "percep'hey were a revelabelieve me. tion," or pulling the wool over the tion:' Stamaty says. "His strips were public's eyes through image-makers filled with real life feelings and emoac D000000dle St. and rhetoricians. tions instead of all those inhibiting, was fun, but exhausting. The last two stupid gags:' installments brilliantly showed the is satiric analysis of oftimes anthropomorphized strip on its the problem speaks more of fact than of tamaty's possibilities last legs, searching for a viable plot, but fiction. Perhaps his most strident caras an artist were expanding. Upon finish- desperately in need of a rest. toon to date coincided with the United ing school he illustrated his first chilNations Special Session on Disarmadren's book, Yellow Yellow, in which he tamaty's father died ment, in which the President (who is drew according to his own sensibilities a week after the final episode. Stamaty usually incidental to Stamaty's basic narrather than as a slave to text or market. took a leave of absence and attempted rative) is told that he has a problem with He loved rendering details and crowds to work out his feelings of loss, and "perception?' The narration and dia(something he picked up from his decide what to do next. After months of logue read in part: Like most percepmother). He subsequently authored four page-one "teasers" declaring that tions, it was first detected as a 'sense' other books for kids and did editorial Stamaty would return, the Voice preby a perceptographer in the Senses illustration. An obsessively detailed map miered his extremely personal, psychoBureau...There is a rapidly growof Greenwich Village commissioned for logically penetrating strip entitled ing 'sense' that the President is purthe Village Voice centerfold marked a Carrrtt000nnn."I was in terrible shape suing a dangerous policy with regard turning point. It was unpredictably sucemotionally," he recalls."I wanted to to nuclear arms...Immediately cessful and earned him a loyal followwork,but didn't simply want to repeat my Perceiver General Hotwall was ing. He produced his first series of comic past successes. I decided I would put notified...Looks like trouble, we've strips for Playboy, entitled The Advenmy feelings on paper and let the strip be got to diffuse it before it becomes a tures of Herbert The Hippo. And then totally unformed. Thank God, David perception... And so, STALL, Strategic his opus, Mac D000000dle St.," the Schneiderman (executive editor of the Arms Limitation Limbo, is born in a comic strip with a mind of its own:' was Voice) encouraged me. I wasn't even speech handed to the President for a born in the Voice. sure what humor was, and so the strip nationwide broadcast: The STALL talks goes in and out of being conventionally will continue until we win the arms tamaty put more funny" This was an experiment which race, at which point we will appoint wonderful imagery and fresh ideas into lost Stamaty some followers and gained a team of interior designers to one installment— perhaps one panel— of him others."I had terrific responses to begin negotiations on the shape of Mac D000000dle St. than some artists the strip concerning the death of my the bargaining table. create in a lifetime. (Furthermore, he father, which helped me to continue:' signed his name with more graphic rhaps Stamaty is variations than appear on the Declarafter a year of purggetting closer to the truth than any politition of Independence) It ran for a year ing himself through Carrrtt000nnn, cal columnist. And so I anxiously await and a half, and was collected in book form. Stamaty decided he needed to return to his further reports from the cartoon In totality it reads like a marriage of the boundaries that a story line offered. capital. Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities and PynFortuitously, Meg Greenfield, editor of chon's V. Its plot meanders, but is govthe Washington Post's Op-Ed page, and NEXT ISSUE: erned by a logic that never allows it to avid Stamaty fan, invited him to the Post TOP HATS AND BELLIES: become incomprehensibly absurd. Its for a meeting with Ben Bradlee and CARTOONISTS AND THE RICH

M

H

S

S

S

A

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ONE DAY GERARD OX BOGGLE INTRoDUCED BOB FOREHEAD To ARTHUR GIGGLE, PROFESSOR OF ECONO MICS AT

THEY WALKED INTO PROFESSOR GIGGLE'S OFFICE. DO You KNOW WHAT THESE RE, BOB?

BoB HERE IS RUNNING FOR CONGRESS, I'D LIKE You TO GIVE HIM SOME ECONOMIC BAcKGRoUNDING.

W HE AT ToAST UNIVERSITY IN CALIFORNIA. , Z-11"*,

N.vta..:THe EARTHWORMS ON THE BoTTo•n ARe EATING The CRUMBS. •••THe. ResToF THe woRrns LooK SKINNY AND UNDERNOURISHED.

RYES, I G TY. O U S u'RTE THEY'RALSO AN ECONOMETRIC MODEL, WHICH PROVIDES ANTo THE FNiol u CR EC ONOMIC I LLS SocIETY.I'LL in SHOW YOU ...

i

AT THE BM- TOM OF THE TERRARIUM ON MY LEFT IS A LAYER OF COOKIE CRUMBS... NOW

OBSERVE CLoSELY AND TELL ME WHAT You SEE. hee kee

MEAN.

Two TERRARIUMS FILLED WITH... EARTHWORMS?

•-

alimir...g::.%

Now, THAT, you SEE,IS E XAcTvl HOW OUR ECONOMY WORKS. IF MONEY IS GIVEN ToPEOPLe AT THE BoTToM,THE REST OF SOCIETY SUFFERS. WHEREAS, IF HUGE TAX BREAKS ARE

Now, IN THIS SECOND TERRARIUM, WELL :THe WORMS oNTHe, As I POUR THE SAME AMOUNT TOP An EATING THe CRUMBS OF CRUMBS OVER THE Top OF •-.AND, ASTHEY WIGGLE AROUND,THE UNEATEN THE WORMS, WHAT Do YOU CRUMBS ARE TRICKLING NOTICE HAPPENING?•.. BE DOWN To THE OTHER PATiENTAND WATcli CLOSELY. WORMS BELOW.

GIVEN To LARGE CORPORATIONS, RATIONS, THEN EVERYBODY GETS SHARE! bee bee

O

THIS WAS Bog FORE HEAD'S FIRST

Q.

EXPOSURE To THE "GIGGLE WiGGLE;

A coNTRovERsIM-

I

1

THEORY of ECoN0 -

NOW

TO EMPHASIZE HIS PoINT,PRoFESSoiNGIGGLE Too K THE CANDIDATE OUTSIDE To A BALCONY OVERLOOKING

THE OCEAN. NOW LOOK

STAND wioilt NEEDED

IN oUR ECONOMY?

THAT'S RIGHT. BUT NOT a-usT THE BIG. BOATS.

OUT THERE, bola.- IMAGIN E

THAT HEoceAN IS THE CoRPoRATE LIBERAt.EcoNomAsTs SE cro p, AND AS"uNscistiTi r i e rcH W H AT_ wikFITEN/Aft.5or HAPPENS To Tlic EXKKIMENTS WITH BOATS WHEN THE ERIKTIMOINIAS AND TIDE CoMES IN• CooKtE CRUMBS HAD Aee e • CONVINCED ARTHUP, HE GILE.THA

4

ALL OF HE BoAlS•

Mcs,o1S puTED BY

Do•foU UNDER-

...Goski.I ALWAYS NOTAT THOUGHT ALL,B0B ECONOMICS IT'S wAs SIMPLE. CompoCAIEPERy SIMPLE

E

. 1:.Ir T

•EASY

?

WAS RIGIAT•

4A11 11117111 1 VVIC.... WE'VE GOT SOMETHING

POWERFUL HeRe, AND WE OUGHT To MAKE u5E

OF IT...

BRING THEN\ kz) CHARiSMATiC. AT LAST TOGETHER COUNT, NUMBERING NINETEEN. iN ONeA, ALL YourIG,ATTRACTivE,

REPRESENTATIVE ..7uST TO JOHN F. KORNBREAD NAME A FEIN

CoN5ERvAT1vE, AND HIGHLY

OF A GROWING NUMBER OF CONGRESSMEN KNOWN AS:

7

ROOM AND THE

EFFECT is STARTLING.

"IKENNEDYS OF THE RIGHT.'

y KNOW YOU ALL WANT TO BE PRESIDENT, So Do I. BUT p,ATHERTHAN COMPETE WAS JuSTANoTHER W ITH EACH oTHER,WHY NOT TFK-LOOK- ALIKE WORK TOGETHER FOR OUR MUTUAL BE NEFIT? MY ADRIFT I N. LEGISLATIVE CHARISMATIC IAN TELLS ME HE Lm, we slve OBSCURITY. THERE IS ENoUGH CHARISMA WIELD Deo BUT PUBLIC IN THIS ROOM RIGHT NOW TO LeveRINGE RESPONSE PROPEL A LEAR IET FROM cLosevo-reS• To HIS "BEER LOS ANGELES To BUFFALOAND TELEVISIoN TAX RELIEF BILL' (HR.B95364 9 7 1520 HAD LIFTED Him

I-41S STAFF HAD NIAPPE D OUT THE I STRATEGY. I F We CAN PUT ToGeT WITH130B AT covL D

A FEW MONTHS EARLIER BOB

ABoVE THE REST. ...WORKING TOGETHER,WE COULD HELP EACH OTHER AND BECOME PRESIDENT ONE AT A TIME,NAKING EACH OTHER OUR NICEPRESIDENTS AND APPOINTING OTHERS OF Us TO OUR CABINETS AND DOMINATE

THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH INTO THE NEXT CENTURY AND PASS THE TORCH To OUR CHILDREN AND THEIR CHILDREN AND KEEP THE WORLD SAFE FOR SUPPLY SIDE FoR CENTURIES TO COME.

THE RESPONSE WAS ovElkvivAELMiNG IN THE

AFFIRMATIVE•

THE 3'FK-LOOK-ALIKE CONSERVATIVE CAUCUS WITH BoB FOREHEAD

As ITS LEADER.

to BE coritINUED


20 Atte& Jilt ANSWER:1 C'etIZESSErsNj CONGRESSIONAL DI S TRICT , ARE YOU SURE THAT'S MY DISTRICT?! You LIVE RIGHT HERE.

ED IS A t i, , , DEMOCRAT, L' A 16-YEAR --

VETERAN, NEXT IN =_ZT•;__ LINE FOR -A FULL COMMITTEE CHAIRMANSHIP,

* (EMITTED HERE WAS A '„ DISTURBING

GROAN

BEYOND THE

GRASP OF ONOMATOPOEIA) ,

t

THE ReCENT. LOOK AT MINE! CENSUS I'VE GoT THREE REQUIRED THE VETERAN DEMOCRATS IN LEGISLATURE THE SAME OF ED'S HOME DISTRICT./ S TATE To REDRAW

Ti4 AT 'S NOTHING! I'VE GOT THE

MATORITY mop IN A DISTRICT THAT'S 80%. REPUBLICAN!

DISTRICT LINES, -•

GNITS NF,Tui BTLL CNA R EE MASORITY To A PLAYFUL SESSION OF FREEHAND,

DRAWING., ED WASN'T THE ONLY ONE. A LoT OF DEMOCRATS

I'VE GOT AN IDEA! FasitAl LET'S HAVEA POLICY BUT HOW OF BUDGET CUTS, WOULD TAX CUTS, AND THAT DIFFER

THE DiFFERENcE

IS OUR COMPASSION

WE'D FEEL GENUINELY BAD FOR THE VICTIMS OF OUR PO LICIES.

WERE RETHINKING. SOME HAD EVEN TIGHT RESTRAINTS FROM THE ORGANIZED TO ON THE MONEY REPUBLICANS? RETHINK TOGETHER • SUPPLY , THEY HELD RETHINKING PARTIES AND SHARED THEIR RETHoUGHTS, GROPING TOGETHER Folk NEW SOLUTIONS.

SO BOB FOREHEAD is A - STAR OF

eveN you SHOULDN'T TAKE IT'S oNLyA mAGNzINE meNTioNeD. ARTICLE . IN A MONTH, THIS So SeRioUSLY

„AND I'm NoT

WASHINGToW

- SAID

EH ?..

r

.\,,,,_

Li

I

d'

(pH,' SHOULDN'T f;;.:11!L.

CONGRESS”

- —

' "iliji

..

1 qi;?:'.T.

ii.....—"ft---

I'VE BEEN DENIED I,AFtER. ALL, AM THE SOMETHING HERB. someTHING I DESeRVE: MY RIGHTFUL PLACE. 7F1<- LOOK-ALIKE! THE FIRST ONE THE PROP€R ELeCTED TO CoNPe RC EPTIoN GReSS. BEFORE OF WHO BOB FOREHEAD I AM. AND ALL THOSE OTHER PHONIES

ORIG INAL

COPIED LATeR tHAi week DAN MET INFOR MALLY wit H 5eVeRAL SFRLooK-ALIKEs, e PROBING GENTL:( FOR SEEDS GP DISCORD.

Okee‘<FoLlowiNG a CAM

Ni5t

QUotED AN INSIDER'' wNo RepoRTeD

uDisseNSion'ArnoNG t he 7FK-LooKALIKe5, WHICH PRoraTe.D

SPNCKUITII@FI

t HAt BOB FOReHeAD h1IGHT Be LOSING coNtRoL OF HIS CAUCUS. AS -time PASSED,RumoR5 SPREAD.

,

-

wie.4

liti t .

4/1

,7"'/ •.

.

\

a

r- •

.

___

:1-14".. n : ' -

Do •fou KNOW WHAT IT FEELS LIKE To BE IMITATED?! TO SEE YoUR VERY IDENTITY

STOLEN?!

USURPED AND

EXPLOITED

BY oTHee!

3

, -

TR/eD To BEA GOOD SPoRT. T FoReHEAD LeAD the

1

WON'T.

-

rot ' "Aitri, WINAIt-.. --lam,',' ,w. „‘,/ p,-,m, 21&--- -! ', If i''''I mINEAPCM N e 4 1.1.3 :: ,,, ,.,,p ir2,/414 skSe l...."1 ,.. 6( laavatg I 1 kei • ,... \ ,00:01ll h . •.....411 Ian46

SUIDDeNLY BOB FOReHeAV5 ADvISeRS weRe FACE

WITH

NIL

*

----- -"-:.; Fr lt; :::::c /m

ME rr,

IT WILL BE FoRGOTTEN,

.

SHoULD I? ,,,,, .

MAN

DANIEL DUCK.

NoT By

-.0

II

I1 .

: ,.17,

BUT IT'S GONE Too FAR- Now.

FOREHeAD Is PeRceiveD As A LEAVER, RECOGNIZE ME AS THE A STAR" CAUcuS.I FIGURED,

IN Tilme, PeoPLewOUI-D WAKe UP AND

of\ILY SUBSTANTIAL JFK-LOOK - ALIKe.

I'VE GOT To

FIGHT PAC K-


21

o ouG AHLR C UR AIS.g4ESESNTDR)EEG: ITNSINUGSUT i.i lTityl:ARNIIN N r

MAYBE IN

WHAT DoY0C/Me NWe CAN'T DUMP CliPmtcAL.S IN THE RIVER?!!

RUSSIA IT Is, BUT AAIER ► cA IS A FREE COUNTRY!'

SAID GERARD oX BOGGLE,

REACHING a/rut. GRABBING IN EveRy

DIRecTIoN.

PRESIDENT OF THE GLOMINOID CORPORATION.

L ATER ,IN THe HoSPITAL WHeN the ATTAC K SUBSIDED , MR. 0><B0G GLE MADE ONE RE GUEST

MEANWHILe,IN WASHINGTON, CONGReSSMAN FOREHEAD WAS FACED WITH A CRISIS

OF HIS OWN.

THe cHALLeNGE CAUGHT BOB IN A DoUBTFUI-

mg• oXBoGGLe ► 5 IN the HOSPITAL!

MDMeNT.

DAN PUCK IS tfk`l ► NG -to uNDERmiNe `(OUR

HE'S BEEN ASKING, FOR you!

LEADeRSHIP OF the LooK-ALIKE CAUCUS. We'vE Got -to F IGHt

BOB CAUGHT the NeXT PLANe. OUTSIDE OXBoGGLE'S ROOM,DOCToRS BRIEFED BOB ON HIS CONDITIoN• He sucFeRS fikorn A oiseAse CAL eo ME.GALoGLuTTIAS IS2 IN • • IN OUR t.F.A1Ns,cERTA

THeRE is NO KNOWN cuRe,

BUT A PROGRAM

OF STEADY EXPAN SION AND AcQUIsiTioN

Is THE BEST 7 keATMENT we'vE ouND•

IF BOB HAD ANN( DOUBTS OF OPPKESSioN Ae)ouT THE BAG GoVE.RNMeNT, 1-IIS VISIT WITH ONE oF ITs VICTIMS QUICKLY DISPELLED7HEM. I T 'S

rHo 5E... (G9,0 0,) NS•

LEAVING THe

HospiTAL,BoB FELT INSIDE HIM ANEW RESOLVE FOR THE YOB AHEAD.

R-EGuLATIo

we lArs:IL cHermAt_RETsoNS, sometHING• ENOUGH OF NT mR• oxBoGGLE IS DEFIcIE TeLL US \NHeN

INItHesE cHeMtcALS:nwS, HE cAN NEVER FEELSATISFIED \MTH HIS t•AATeRIAL STA-rUS.

G. \

AFTER THEIR LUNCH, SENATOR FUMES

FOR MANY YEARS, I WAS DISTURBED

DROVE BOB FOREHEAD ACROSS TOWN.

BY THE omissoN FROM OUR CoNSTITUTIoN OF STRONG POSI TIONS ON THE CRITICAL SOCIAL iSsuEs,LiKE cREATioNISM,ToBAcco ALLOTMENTS, AND THE QUESTION OF WHEN LIFE BEGINS.

THEN ONE DAY T MET MAN WHO VERIFIED My HUNCH. LET ME INTRODUCE You...

H 1 ,sAm•THis Is CONGRESSMAN FoREHEAD• I'D LAKE YOU TO SHOVv HIM

ThE SUPR COUP- t 15 con mvn

Plot

YOUR

SIAN RUDSIE TR ieD S OUR C ON s TuTION C, RYPT0 GRAPHy , R EVEALS ITS TRUE

ME ANING.

RECENTLY DECIPHERED A SECTION THAT GIVES CoNGREss THE PowERro DISBAND THE. SUPREMECouFLT " IF IT FEELS LAKE IT:' FEc ES L1K 00 • ■.4 A 7 " -

\NE CoULD

REPLACE THEM WITH A PANEL of EVANGELISTS. SAy ) THE 301k 4 WITH THE HIGHEST NIELSEN RATINGS.

sy

SAM TOOK THEM BACK

To His CLuTjIN ST TERED Bew4R A PA RTLIES AN NA CCU ME,NT. Ru5SI An GeNt5

r

MI SINTP

R ° SC /A

To co iv

well ,:r.'vE GOT To GET BACK T O my OFFICE NOW... BUT I'LL GIvE IT SOME THoUGWt

N

AND ,CIFcouRSE,THE CoURTS WERE

GIVEN Too MUCH POWER... IT LEFT US VULNERABLE ro A

SECULAR HUMANIST TAKEOVER. ••• I USED TO READ AND REREAD THE coNsTITUrioN.I. JUST kNE vs/ THERE WAS MORE THERE THAN MEETS THE EYE.

THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

OF 1787 WAS INFILTRATED BY RUSSIAN SPIES. THE MOST IMPORTArkl PROVISIONS HAD To BE WRITTEN IN CODE.


22

THE COMPUTER, THE KING AND THE GENERAL

Old tales tell of the confused and indecisive king who got on his horse and rode off in many directions, and of the general who, on his horse, dashed to the top of a hill to see which way his troops were going so that he could dash back down to get out in front to lead them. Apocryphal or not, these legends foretell the age of the computer. With this wondrous technology and its simultaneous modes, one can truly go in many directions at once. And, without waiting for the advent of artificial intelligence, one can feed it unstructured information and be astonished at the resultant images on the CRT which can stimulate ideas one never would have developed alone. Sometimes a designer can, figuratively, go to the top of a hill to watch which way the computer is going, before coming back down to control it. This is especially true in the area of creative computer graphics. Still in its infancy, this medium and its tools are being used by artists and designers in many different ways for a myriad of purposes. Three current applications of computer creativity to communications problems are highlighted here: How The NewYork Times is using computer graphics to make its chart and map production more efficient and more effective; how Northern Illinois University is introducing computer graphics to its design students; and how solid modeling and animation are done by MAGI-Synthavision. These reports have been prepared for U&Ic by Camila Chaves Cortes. EMG

Larry. Elin of MAGI-SynthaVision, Inc, of Elmsford, N.Y., states: "MAGI can best be described as the maverick of computer animation companies. Its approach to the problem of describing three-dimensional objects to a computer and generating images of those objects evolved from the company's work in the atomic energy field in the late 1960s." While other companies and academic institutions use a polygonal approach to describe the architecture of the objects in an animated scene, MAGI uses a solid geometry method that was once used to describe the architecture of power plants and space craft in its scientific studies.

MAGISYNTHAVISION'S APPROACH TO SOLID MODELING

The thinking process involved in "modeling" an object using simple bodies as building blocks is similar to the thinking process used by design engineers and architects: think of any object as a collection of its component parts, even if some of them happen to be negative space! The solid geometry method revolves around the idea that all complex three-dimensional objects are actually collections, intersections or sculptures of a larger number of interpenetrating simple shapes. There are 25 simple geometric volumes in the SynthaVision system, ranging from a very simple-minded six sided box to a not-so-simple General Surface, which could look like a woman's torso. The simple shapes can be used individually or with others to construct a more complex shape. For instance, a volume (or "body," as MAGI calls them) can be interpenetrated with another, and only that area of space which is occupied by both volumes can be called visible. A body, or many bodies, can be "subtracted" from a body. One can imagine that subtracting many cylindrical bodies from a rectangular box would result in a form resembling a block of swiss cheese.

Once an object is modeled, and its description text-edited into the computer via terminals with keyboards, it can be animated as though it were a real object in a live situation, but without any of the physical restrictions encountered in real life. Besides the objects to be animated, the artist "inputs" a camera and light sources. Any kind of camera and any number and types of lights can be positioned in the scene with the object. Of course, the object, the camera and the lights don't actually exist except as descriptions in the computer. However, the best way to think about computer animation is to pretend that they all do exist, and to proceed to visualize these elements and what they do next.

TANK AND RECOGNIZERâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Shot of tank and recognizer which appears in the movie TRON.

Animation is achieved by using the "Director's Language," which are commands the artist gives to move, turn, scale, explode, split or otherwise bring to life the objects in the scene. The artist merely specifies over how many frames an object


23

moves, which direction it goes and how far it goes. He or she also specifies an acceleration or deceleration if desired.The computer calculates each frame based on where the camera was,

Computer Graphics at The NewYork Times

WORM WAR I TANKâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;Shot of the tank from commercial for video game called WORM WAR I. Magi-SynthaVision did both 3-D and 2-D adaptations of game.

where it was pointed, what the object did, and how it was lit. When one considers that it's legitimate (and commonplace) to have many objects moving in different directions and at different rates, including the camera and lights, the power of the computer to accurately determine the correct perspective and shading for the scene, frame after frame, is astounding!

In the past six years, the workload in the map and chart division of The New York Times editorial art department has evolved from simple map and chart making to a creative and technical force that provides an average of 298 charts and 192 maps per month. Computer graphics have been introduced in order to help eliminate deadline pressure, increase accuracy and cut technical plotting time. At the moment, the staff of The New York Times is studying the alternatives and working to achieve this not too distant goal, described by Managing Art Director, Ron Couture, at the Harvard Computer Graphics Week. According to Mr. Couture,"The ultimate objective during the next decade is to develop a computer system in the map and chart division that will have the ability to produce artwork varying in. content from simple tabular material with a photo inset to very complex artwork containing three or more styles of charts, maps, photos, logos, and a variety of type sizes from which to choose. "These varying ingredients would then be assembled electronically and output at graphic quality reproduction. Eventually this would interface with a larger computer pagination system that would assemble each page of the paper electronically"

Frame from commercial for Canadian television station owned by Pathonic Communications. The design was created to be compatible with existing logo.

DATA PRINTOUT. The final design is printed out on a matrix printer and used as a layout for a chart.

MAGI's work on the motion picture "TRON" pushed the artists and the computers to the limits of then-existing technology. But now, only months later, new and exciting advances are being made that would have seemed impossible back then. Textures can be "mapped" onto the synthesized objects; real people can be "digitized" and combined with computergenerated environments; photo-realistic clouds, mountains and terrains can be created by artists working only with a keyboard! And to think that it all began while working on atomic energy problems!

At The NewYork Times, the editorial art directors must associate themselves intimately with this technology which has also brought many benefits to other departments, such as marketing, circulation and distribution. The redesign and addition of various sections to the paper has required the preparation of larger amounts of information through the use of charts. Charts need no longer be boring tabular material or plain flat bars; they can illustrate the body of facts related to a story and enhance its news content through visuals with aesthetic appeal. Thus they can enhance the effectiveness of communication.

DATA ENTRY. Data is entered into the IBM chart utility and displayed in various ways, such as pie charts, fever lines or bar charts, to see which best exemplifies the data.

The dynamics of the complex events that take place daily around the world offer unlimited opportunities for the visual presentation of data, from charts of the bears and bulls in the stock


24

market to diagrams of the space shuttle and scientific experiments and discoveries, to maps pin-pointing the latest news events or the unpredictable conditions of the weather. Data is researched by an editor or graphics editor and obtained from various news sources, the wire services, government agencies such as the Census Bureau, along with many other sources. Using photographs, drawings and other graphic devices to enhance or articulate, the art director or editorial artist designs and plots the information.

Computer graphics have now entered the picture at The NewYork Times and an IBM Interactive Chart Utility System has proved to be rewarding and eminently satisfying. Ron Couture, who is constantly researching new avenues for the computerization of newspaper artwork, with the awareness that artists and editors are not versed in computer usage, emphasizes, "Its user friendliness allows fast training for the art staff. We are now able to plot various types of charts with the same scale, eliminating the need to plot by hand or when there are changes in size at deadline. Initial time savings have averaged approximately 15 to 20 hours per week."

NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY

SHARE CF F

RMAN,

,

EW9OPE014 CO,, M1N1 , Kports in

0! !r: IN 9001_0 TRmDE 200 ,4

FINAL PLOTS. Examples of two printouts from the printer that will be combined and used as final plots for finished art. These final plots will be overlayed with vellum and traced for use as final art.

Future Directions of Newspaper Computer Graphics In the past few years, various computer companies have developed what is called "pagination." Pagination provides the ability to assemble electronically the text and illustrations of a page as one piece. This is essentially done by using an electronic pointer and a VDT with keyboard which communicates with several systems and the host pagination computer. This allows the user to lay out each page, with the system keeping track of story lengths and jumps. The output, in most systems, is generally text and headline type, with areas left blank for photos to be pasted in. Some systems do output photos in place; however, output time is much longer, and presently these systems cannot change photo size after it has been ordered into the system, thus hindering the electronic production of a complete page.

To the designer, the mind is the greatest tool. He or she plans and organizes ideas, contemplates and visualizes alternatives, analyzes possibilities, conceives solutions and expands his/her creative knowledge. Until recently no other tool offered an extension to the mind, bringing forth new ideas, and at the same time, an operating "hand tool."

"These systems, with the ability to paginate the text of magazines and newspapers, becoming a reality, it is essential that the art director or designer associate himself intimately with the next major step of development—graphic imaging— an area where the designer will use computers as a tool for design and its implementation:says Mn Couture.

To insure quality standards in design and good newspaper reproduction, strict attention is paid to style,weight of rules, tints, screens and the overall treatment of artwork. Once the layout is completed, the finished art is begun.'INipe is set on a Harris VDT, artwork drawn, overlays cut and instructions indicated on the artwork for the engravers. The work is then photographed layer by layer and assembled in negative form; each layer is registered with the others.A screened velox paper print is made and pasted into position on the final page makeup. The page is then laser scanned and plates are made for printing on the offset or letterpress presses. Last-minute changes can be made anytime during this sequence of work. This may necessitate redoing the layout, thus creating great pressure on the artist and increasing the chance of error at deadline.

FINISHED ART. The finished art with tracings in place on

the mechanical.

Mr. Couture refers to"graphic imaging"not only in the sense of animation or simulation where imaginary new images are formed, created and assembled to produce a single image or visual product, but also in the sense that reality—photos, solid lines, typography—can be assembled to produce a single image or visual product."

These images are created by using a video digitizer that scans the subject with a video camera. Multiple figures or distorted, stretched figures can be created by changing the subject position as the video camera scans the picture. A sense of fluidity and motion is achieved by using this technique. (Paul Radtke)

The impact of computers offers a boundless world of capabilities in a graphic design system ranging from unknown alternatives in software or programming to different input and output devices like digitizers, printers, plotters, video synthe-


25

With a video digitizer images are trans ormed and output with a dot matrix printer which gives a negative and/or positive image. "Incorporating the video digitizer and printer creates irregular edges that contribute a softness to the figures:' Truckenbrod emphasizes. (Diane Inanen)

sizers, tablets and lightpens. Text generators are used to add text to any image. A seemingly unlimited color palette is available to designers as colors are specified in terms of hue, value and chroma levels. Images can be displayed on a video screen, printed or photographed in color. Motion graphics can be created with a computer graphic system and recorded on video tape. A combination of this technology is presently being used at Northern Illinois University by Professor Joan R. Truckenbrod, a graphic designer/ artist, who has developed a curriculum in computer graphics for visual communications and other design professions.

Integrating the video digitizer and the digitizing tablet, creates unusual visual effects. Initially the facial image is created with a video digitizer. Next a digitizing tablet and pen are employed, much like a pencil and paper, to add and subtract or change elements of the original face.This technique can also be used to do freehand drawings or to add text or labels to graphic images. Colors can also be modified through use of a tablet. (Philip Oster)

A video digitizer can also be used to create rich color textures for background areas or as abstract images.In this series, the direction of the light source was changed slightly to create differing areas of contrast. (Debra Gorchos)

Her goal is to explore and develop the creative potential of computer graphics systems for designers. The majority of her students have studied the fundamentals of 2D and 3D design and are enrolled in an introductory computer graphics class that explores innovative imagery and creative applications in design. These images constitute part of the work Ms. Truckenbrod presented at the Harvard Computer Graphics Week. This work embodies the uniqueness of various computer imaging devices and programs that can be used individually or in combination. New dimensions in design are inherent in these images due to complex manipulations and transformations of figures in space and time. These pictures are the result of a student project at Northern Illinois University under the direction of Professor Joan Truckenbrod.

Computer generated patterns were projected onto a model. These images contrast electronic technology with the fluid lines. The marriage of art and technology has taken place and, like any relationship that develops, it is dynamic. Progress and growth is a measure of time and work. The future use and development of our tools is in our minds. (Sara L. Wood)

This poster was designed by using pattern generation programs and a dot matrix printer. (David Philmlee) THESE PAGES WERE SET IN ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC., ITC NEW BASKERVILLE .

. ITC FENICE.. AND ITC CUSHING'


26

Do you know these women

Jacqui Morgan defines some "Misses America7 Disco Denizen. Her hair is frizzled like nerve endings, but her demeanor is cool ... laid back... stony. She is the envy of frenetic adolescents who worship her icy feats.

Here are six American female types you meet up with every day—in trains, buses, office buildings, supermarkets, shopping malls, elevators, restaurants. Each one is a mirror image of an idol who sets the mold, and the image is multiplied by millions who mimic the kinky clothes, the hairdo, the posture and strange nuances of language that are quite foreign to the rest of us. These are the clans of women Jacqui Morgan chose to define in a series of cast paper masks she calls her "Miss America" collection. She not only defines them, but with rapier wit she satirizes and immortalizes them. Though she modeled them after American characters, the world is a very small place these days. With movies and television, no fad stays local for long. Morgan's Misses America are international phenomena, and you'll spot them in cities and suburbs everywhere (in the Western world, at least). The idea of masks for immortalizing idols is actually an ancient one, but Morgan's cast paper technique is quite original and appropriately Pop for her subject. First she models the portrait in clay from which a mold is made. Next, wet paper pulp is laid into the mold to dry and harden into the basic mask. The artist then goes to work with metallic inks, pastels and watercolor, defining features and applying cosmetic detail. Finally she adds the props that epitomize the character. The finished masks are deeper than bas-relief, yet not the kind of 3-dimensional sculpture you can walk around. Probably, it's apt to call it 21/2-dimensional, because literally and figuratively they are not fully-rounded characters at all—just caricatures. It is ironic that, as they emerge, eerie and haunting, from the wall, you become acutely aware that they are just masks after all, and beneath the superficial paint and frivolous accoutrements—the hair rollers, the corn rows, the sun glasses and punk-pink hair—are real human beings with hopes, fears, aspirations and troubles like the rest of us.

Dallas Cowgirl. An all-American combo of Farah Fawcett and football's Dallas Cowboy cheerleaders, she sports a wholesome, toothy grin and endless waves of amber hair.

Jacqui Morgan lives and works in New York City, but she is known internationally. Her work has appeared in Graphis and Gebrauchsgraphik and her "Miss America" masks have been exhibited in galleries in Munich, Warsaw, New York and Florida, U.S.A. Marion Muller


27

Suburban Siren. She haunts the shopping malls of suburbia, every eyelash and jewel in place, but her hair is not unveiled and unrolled until the last moment before the evening's festivities.

African Idol. Returning to ethnic roots, the corn row craze crosses oceans and continents and racial lines; sported by blacks (Diana Ross) and whites (Bo Derek) with equal flair.

Queen of Punk. Inspired by Deborah Harry (Blondie), she sports feathers, bizarre costumes, strands of pink and/or green hair and carries herself with the cool nonchalance of a super-tough.

Silver Screen Sex Goddess. Inspired obviously by the one-and-only Marilyn Monroe, the look is pale, vulnerable, childlike, yet promising unbridled passion. THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC TIFFANY


28

A WORD SEARCH BY JULIET TRAVISON

iv

SDEAN TIDISESALIHMENXOIP SHMN I OPNDKA I ECDLOPCDNT I LSSTE MAT ER ES I ICBUGEDBHL ATOES YNATOMYVRELARUAUAC STOFE RUT UCNA I NEWMSMAAMO SSTLW ATERMROSPURUSNAKEM CKOOD I NGPUGNAAPNRGMHNSA RATSD NAOPR I RORGUMAGLOVY NOI TA L I AAEALF AL I ZPREDPO ACCAS UJNEGRORNMOXNODWI T YOIDK RDAU I T I AANPA I KNMAN TISTT ETAHNEDND I DCAMPAGN NEDRG SYOWPEACEFCRWLEDIDO CADEN ASAIELNI AR I VERS I NC TENWO RALNH I US REDRFRRGYG CSPWK FSZOEOBC SDEDRF TGAT NODEE TNTAMTE0 NQUPLOK I J U 0 LAT M AANTMROE NQWEDRFTGY M SIN Y UKVA I BE0 NFHTAET I NG L TNH A URNLDWE0 KRSUPERDUP R KCA B I ARPLRKZ DCASTBEADU F NIK S OTOA I UOL I AABTHOHTU P SLA V I PSLYEPJ NGRBWEXT 10 A TCA S EDLENDEG AAROVROELP P ARG D IMKDNNAR I AEELBTTYD E ELI HWAJO EROR HLPLLOYOKJ IRO OHOH I ANAM LSE ICRCAKR 0 UES OWHGR NTA I CI I AJBNSOB TN I APIFE I PHV AUNL I ERTER U DOR PSTDR UCT I ATDGLE IJ I N M BER DASRT RPBE I RBABGEOON L CVO LAARU BMHN CAD I RBRHOZ N UMB MWAHD URSR OGT I LOLNXE U RAP AOCZL VAMA AASEOENCP I 0 NPD I RUOS S IMM I T I SGAVMON S ADX I ICNK I LNB LZENHIQUIN C YRH I NEAE ETMA NVAS I EXTAN A ORE LOTLN C AWE ERPTEHNI LA N THE RCHAN GRKLOAB IN I TYME A TNG HOOME ECTC IONALT IONC D Al E OSONN AED I NTERCO RNAT IWW BNHICM MROSEREMKB LEAR AAR I EEESS UCROT ICALB LIEV NIL ESR I EV ECUANWHOUA I ESE

How to play: Find and encircle, in the puzzle body, the words appearing in the Puzzle Word List. They appear vertically, horizontally, diagonally and even backwards. Don't cross letters out—they may be used again as part of another name! Here is a sample to start you off. While these proper nouns may be spelled differently in other languages, please follow the versions in our Puzzle Word List.

LOsungsanweisungen: Sie mussen in dem Ratsel die in dem Warterverzeichnis angegebenen Miner finden und umkreisen. Diese kannen senkrecht, waagerecht, diagonal und sogar ruckwarts vorkommen. Streichen Sie keine Buchstaben aus—sie kannten als Teil eines anderen Wortes gebraucht werden. Das Beispiel zeigt, wie man die Lasung beginnt. Obwohl Eigennamen in anderen Sprachen unterschiedlich : eschrieben werden mogen, halten Sie sich bitte an die englische Schreibweise.

Regle du jeu: it s'agit de reperer dans le corps du puzzle et d'entourer d'un cercle les mots qui figurent dans la liste: verticalement, diagonalement, voire inversement. Ne barrez aucune lettre—elle resservira peut-etre pour un autre mot! Voici un exemple qui vous mettra sur la voie. L'orthographe des noms propres varie selon les Iangues.Tenons-

nous en a celle du Puzzle Word List.


29

C4

Answer on page 76.

AMAZON AMU AMUR ANGARA ARKANSAS BACK BRAHMAPUTRA BUG CANADIAN CHANG CHURCHILL COLORADO COLUMBIA CONGO DANUBE DNIEPER DON DRAVA DVINA EBRO

ELBE EUPHRATES FRASER GAMBIA GARONNE HSI HUANG INDUS IRRAWADDY JAPURA JORDAN KOOTENAY LENA MACKENZIE

MAGDALENA MARNE MEKONG MISSOURI MURRAY-DARLING NEGRO NIGER NILE ODER OHIO ORANGE ORINOCO OTTAWA PARAGUAY PARANA PEACE PILCOMAYO PO

PURUS RED RHINE RHONE RIO DE LA PLATA RIO GRANDE RIO ROOSEVELT ST. JOHN ST. LAWRENCE SALWEEN SAO FRANCISCO SASKATCHEWAN SEINE SHANNON

SNAKE SUNGARI SYR THAMES TIBER TIGRIS TISZA TOCANTINS URAL VOLGA YUKON ZAMBEZI

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC"

ILLUSTRATION BY LIONEL KALISH


30

TM


90 WHAT'S NEW FROM ITC ITC Caslon No.224' is available in Book, Medium, Bold, and Black weights with corresponding italics. Small caps have been designed for the two lightest weights. Oldstyle figures, shown above, have been designed for the complete family. Only licensed ITC Subscribers are authorized to reproduce, manufacture, and offer for sale these and other ITC typefaces shown in this issue. This license is your guarantee of authenticity: ENSED CLI

These new typefaces will be available to the public on or after February 14, 1983, depending on each manufacturer's release schedule. Few typefaces have enjoyed Caslon's longevity, success, and prominence. The most famous design of William Caslon, England's first great typefounder, this typeface was to British typography what the works of Shakespeare were to British theatre. Both firmly established a national tradition. Long a favorite of typographers and lovers of type, Caslon has always held a position of importance. Benjamin Franklin admired Caslon; which may account for why both the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States were first printed in this typestyle. George Bernard Shaw, another famous lover of type, insisted that all his works be typeset in Caslon. And among the not so famous, the motto "when in doubt, use Caslon" has a long-standing tradition.

Over 250 years old, Caslon is a typeface of remarkable durability. It is also the oldest typeface for which the original matrices are still available. Now, this milestone of typeface development has been successfully melded with one of ITC's most popular original display typeface releases, ITC/LSC Caslon No. 223," to create a new design for text and display usage: ITC Caslon No. 224." After exhaustive study and trial development, Ed Benguiat has created a new Caslon typestyle eminently able to meet the requirements of modern typographic usage. The result of his efforts is a highly readable typeface, alive with warmth and dignity. A large x-height, smooth weight transitions, and careful structuring of hairline strokes have made ITC Caslon No. 224TM ideally suitable to a wide variety of typographic applications. Designer Ed Benguiat is well known for his many typeface designs. More than ten typeface families in the ITC Library are thefruit of his exceptional talent. He developed the ITC Avant Garde GothicTM Condensed, ITC Bookman; ITC Lubalin Graph TM Oblique,ITCKorna;dSuvei'fmls;andw responsible for the design of ITC Barcelona; ITC Bauhaus," ITC Benguiat速 with Condensed, ITC Benguiat Gothic; ITC Modern No. 216; and ITC Tiffany families. ITC Caslon No. 224; his most recent design, is in the same tradition of excellence as Mr. Benguiat's earlier creations.


32

ITC CASLON NO.224m

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34

ITC CASLON NO.2 24m

BOOK

MEDIUM

BOLD

BLACK

Excellence in typography is the resultof nothing more than an at titude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its plann ing; the designermust care. In contemporary advertising the per feet integration of design elements often demands unorthodox t ypography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus lea ding, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improve a ppearance and impact Stating specific principles or guides on t he subject of typography is difficult because the principle applyi 6 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than a n attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in i ts planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advert ising theperfect integration of design elements often deman ds unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compac t spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whateve r is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stating speci fie principles or guides on the subject of typography is difficu

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used i n its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary adv ertising the perfect integration of design elements often de mands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of co mpaet spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; w hatever is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stati ng speeificyrinciples or guides on the subject of typography

Excellence in typography is the resultof nothing more than a n attitude. its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary adve rtising the perfect integration of design elements often dem ands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of com pact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; wh atever is needed to improve appearance and impact.Stating specific principles or guides on the subject of typography is

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understand ing used in its planning; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It m ay require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, u nusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improv e appearance and impact. Stating specific principles or

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understan ding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of d esign elements often demands unorthodox typograph y. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus lea ding, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stating specific prin

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing m ore than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the and erstanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integ ration of design elements often demands unorthod ox typography. It may require the use of compact sp acing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; wh atever is needed to improve appearance and impact

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing m ore than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the and erstanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integ ration of design elements often demands unorthod ox typography. It may require the use of compact sp acing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; w hatever is needed to improve appearance and impa

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perf ect integration of design elements often deman ds unorthodox typography. It may require the us e of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual siz es and weights; whatever is needed to improve a

Excellence in typography is the result of nothi ng more than an attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertis ing the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It ma y require the use of compact spacing, minus le ading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is n

Excellence in typography is the result of noth ing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes f rom the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary adv ertising the perfect integration of design ele ments often demands unorthodox typograph y. It may require the use of compact spacing minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; wh

Excellence in typography is the result of no thing more than an attitude. Its appeal co mes from the understanding used in its pla nning; the designer must care. In contemp orary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthod ox typography. It may require the use of co mpact spacing, minus leading, unusual siz

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appea 1 comes from the understanding used in i is planning; the designer must care. In co ntemporary advertising the perfect integ ration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require t he use of compact spacing, minus leadin

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appea I comes from the understanding used in i ts planning; the designer must care. In c ontemporary advertising the perfect int egration of design elements often dema nds unorthodox typography. It may requ ire the use of compact spacing, minus le

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its a ppeal comes from the understanding u sed in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typograph y. It may require the use of compact sp

Excellence in typography is the resul t of nothing more than an attitude. It s appeal comes from the understand ing used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertis ing the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodo x typography. It may require the use of

Excellence in typography is the resul

t of nothing more than an attitude. It s appeal comes from the understand ing used in its planning; the designe r must care. In contemporary advert ising the perfect integration of desig n elements often demands unorthod ox typography. It may require the us

Excellence in typography is the res ult of nothing more than an attitud e. Its appeal comes from the under standing used in its planning; the d esigner must care. In contempora ry advertising the perfect integrati on of design elements often dema nds unorthodox typography. It ma

Excellence in typography is the r esult of nothing more than an atti tude. Its appeal comes from the u nderstanding used in its plannin g; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements of ten demands unorthodox typogr

Excellence in typography is the r esult of nothing more than an atti tude. Its appeal comes from the u nderstanding used in its plannin g; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements of ten demands unorthodox typogr

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an a ttitude. Its appeal comes from t he understanding used in its pla nning; the designer must care. I n contemporary advertising th e perfect integration of design e lements often demands unorth

Excellence in typography is th e result of nothing more than a n attitude. Its appeal comes fr om the understanding used in its planning; the designer mus t care. In contemporary advert ising the perfect integration of design elements often deman

Excellence in typography is th

e result of nothing more than a n attitude. Its appeal comes fr om the understanding used in its planning; the designer mus t care. In contemporary adver rising the perfect integration of design elements often deman

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more t han an attitude. Its appeal c omes from the understand ing used in its planning; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the p erfect integration of design

Excellence in typography i s the result of nothing mor e than an attitude. Its appe al comes from the underst anding used in its plannin g; the designer must care. I n contemporary advertisi ng the perfect integration of

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing mo re than an attitude. Its ap peal comes from the unde rstanding used in its plan ning; the designer must c are. In contemporary adv ertising the perfect integr

7 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfe ct integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes a nd weights; whatever is needed to improve appea 8 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of not hing more than an attitude. Its appeal come s from the understanding used in its planni ng; the designer must care. In contemporar y advertising the perfect integration of desi gn elements often demands unorthodox ty pography. It may require the use of compac t spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and 9 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result o f nothing more than an attitude. Its app cal comes from the understanding use din its planning; the designer must car e. In contemporary advertising the perf ect integration of design elements ofte n demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacin 10 POINT

Excellence in typography is the res ult of nothing more than an attitud e. Its appeal comes from the unders tanding used in its planning; the de signer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands un orthodox typography. It may requir 11 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an a ttitude. Its appeal comes from th e understanding used in its plan ning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the p erfect integration of design ele ments often demands unorthod 12 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more t han an attitude. Its appeal c omes from the understandi ng used in its planning; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the p erfect integration of design 14 POINT


35

BOLD ITALIC

BOOK ITALIC

MEDIUM ITALIC

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertise ng the perfect integration of design elements often demands un orthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spaci ng, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is ne eded to improve appearance and impact. Stating specific pri

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than a n attitude. Its appeal comas): oat the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary adve rasing the perfect integration of design elements often dema ads unorthodox typography. It may require the use of comp act spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; wh atever is needed to improve appearance and impact Stalin

nciples or guides on the subject of typography is difficult beta

g specific principles or guides on the subject of typography

i

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more tha n an attitude. Its appeal comesfrom the understandingus In contemporar ed in its planning; the designer must care. y advertising the perfect integration of design elements oft en demands unorthodox typography. It may require the u se of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and i mpact. Stating specific principles or guides on the subject

BLACK ITALIC Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more th an an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemp many advertising the perfect integration of design dente nts often demands unorthodox typography. It may requi re the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual s izes and weights; whatever is needed to improve appear once and impact. Stating specific principles or guides on

6 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing mor e than an attitude. Its appeal comesfrom the under standing used in its planning; the designer must care In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typog raphy. It may require the use of compact spacing, mi nus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stating

Excellence in typography is the result ofnothing mor e than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the under standing used in its planning; the designer must car e In contemporary advertising the perfect integrati on of design elements often demands unorthodox ty pography. It may require the use of cornpa et spacing minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whateve r is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stat

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes front the u nderstanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands un orthodox typography. It may require the use of c ompact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes a nd weights; whatever is needed to improve appe

Excellence in typography is the result of nothin g more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the des igner must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements ofte n' demands unorthodox typography. It may re quire the use of compact spacing, minus lead ing unusual sizes and weights; whatever is ne

Excellence in typography is the result of noth ing more than an attitude. Its appealcomesf rom the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary ad vertising the perfect integration of design ele ments often demands unorthodox typograp by It may require the use of compact spacin g, minus leading, unusual sizes and weight

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes froth th e understanding used in its planning; the design er must care. In contemporary advertising the pe ;feet integration of design elements often demon ds unorthodox typography. It may require the us e of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual si ses and weights; whatever is needed to improve

7 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothin g more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the des igner must care. In contemporary advertising t he perfect integration of design elements often d emands unorthodox typography. It may requir e the use of compact spacing, minus leading, u nusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed t

Excellence in typography is the result of not ping more than an attitude. Its appeal coo esfrom the understanding used in its plann ing; the designer must care. In contempora ry advertising the perfect integration of des ign elements often demands unorthodox typ ography. It may require the use of compacts pacing minus leading, unusual sizes and w

8 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of n othing more than an attitude. Its appeal c omesfrom the understanding used in its p lanning; the designer must care. In conte mporary advertising the perfect integrati on of design elements often demands unor thodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unu

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the perfect integra tion of design elements often demands un northodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, u

in typography is the result of Excellence in typography is the result of Excellence nothing more than an attitude. Its app eat comes from the understanding use d in its planning; the designer must car e. In contemporary advertising the perf ect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It m ay require the use of compact spacing

nothing more than an attitude. Its app eat comesfrom the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care In contemporary advertising the perfec t integration of design elements often d emands unorthodox typography. It m ay require the use of compact spacing

Excellence in typography is the resu of nothing more than an attitude. Its It of nothing more than an attitude appeal comes from the understandin Its appeal comes from the understa g used in its planning; the designer m nding used in its planning; the desi ust care. In contemporary advertisin gner must care. In contemporary a g the perfect integration of design ele dvertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands un ments often demands unorthodox ty pography. It may require the use of co orthodox typography. It may requir

Excellence in typography is the res ult of nothing more than an attitud e. Its appeal comesfrom the unders tanding used in its planning; the de signer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may re

9 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its a ppeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer mu st care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design eleme nts often demands unorthodox typog raphy. It may require the use of comp 10 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result

Excellence in typography is the re suit of nothing more than an attit ude. Its appeal comes from the un derstanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contem porary advertising the perfect int egration of design elements often demands unorthodox typograph

Excellence in typography is the re suit of nothing more than an attit ude. Its appeal comes from the un derstanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contem porary advertising the perfect int egration of design elements often demands unorthodox typograph

Excellence in typography is the r esult of nothing more than an at titude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its plan ning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the p erfect integration of design elem eats often demands unorthodox

Excellence in typography is the r esult of nothing more than an at titude. Its appeal comes from th e understanding used in its pia nning; the designer must care. I n contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design ele ments often demands unorthod

Excellence in typography is th e result of nothing more than a n attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in it s planning; the designer must c are. In contemporary advertis ing the perfect integration of d esign elements often demands

Excellence in typography is t he result of nothing more tha n an attitude. Its appeal come s from the understanding use d in its planning; the designe r must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integr ation of design elements often

Excellence in typography is t he result of nothing more tha n an attitude. Its appeal coo esfrom the understanding us ed in its planning; the design er must care. In contemporar y advertising the perfect inte gration of design elements oft

11 POINT

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in it s planning; the designer must c are. In contemporary advertis ing the perfect integration of de sign elements often demands u 12 POINT

Excellence in typography i s the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appea I comes from the understa nding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertisin g the perfect integration of 14 POINT

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Excellence in typograph y is the result of nothing more than an attitude. It s appeal comes from the understanding used in it s planning; the designer must care. In contempor ary advertising the perfe


36

THE CHINESE ZODIAC A n ri A T EvivrAun A 1G 12 -YEAR I [arta litilaZIN van WITH 12 ANIMALS THAT REIGN IN ROTATION

Suppose you're a person who thinks that zodiacs are just so much Mickey-Mouse ...that astrology is hokum ...that you never peeked at your horoscope in the newspaper and you don't even know the sign under which you were born. Still, facts are facts. We're all much more under the influence of astrology and celestial bodies than we're willing to admit. Just listen to our talk: We say"lunatic"when we mean someone's not quite right in the head, implying that the moon's responsible. We speak of "martial law"and "martial arts"designating Mars as a bellicose planet. We call people "saturnine"when they look pale and gloomy like Saturn, and "mercurial"when they're highly changeable, like the appearance of Mercury. We talk about"star-crossed"lovers and "ill-starred" ventures. For heaven's sake, we're all wrapped up in heavenly bodies. And no matter how we try to brush them off, astrology and zodiacs have penetrated our culture. More important, they were fundamental to the highly respected science of astronomy which followed out of them. Although zodiac is a 2,000-year old Greek word, meaning ring of animals, the idea of a zodiac was conceived centuries earlier by the ancient Babylonians and Chaldeans, as a timekeeping device. They studied the path that the sun, moon and known planets appeared to travel around the Earth. They noted that the moon repeated its phases twelve times in the time it took the sun to make one trip around the path. They recorded these observations in the form of a circle which represented the paths of the heavenly bodies.The circle was then divided into twelve equal segments, each corresponding to one lunar cycle or month. Next, they made note of the relative positions of the sun, moon and planets in each of these lunar periods and correlated the arrangements in the heavens with conditions on Earth. Certain arrangements forecast a rainy season; others foretold a dry spell. Some configurations indicated it was time to plant, or to harvest, or for animals to give birth, or rivers to overflow, and so on. The heavens became such a reliable prognosticator of conditions on Earth, it was no wonder they were searched for signs and portents in all manner of activities beyond seasonal timekeeping. And that, in short, is how zodiacs and astrology came to be. From Babylonia and the Persian Gulf area, the concept of a zodiac spread westward to Greece, Rome and Egypt. In Greece, the heavens were also charted in circular form, with twelve equal divisions, called "houses," corresponding to the cycles of the moon.

Each house was named for the prominent constellation of the period, and the constellations bore the names of figures— mostly animals—discerned in them: Pisces (fish),Scorpius (scorpion),Leo (lion),Taurus (bull); also human and inanimate forms such as Gemini (twins),Aquarius (waterbearer), Sagittarius (the archer), Virgo (the virgin), and Libra (the scales). In the ancient world, and well into the Middle Ages in Europe, fortunetelling by the stars and by the"signs"or constellations under which you were born, was serious business.Astrologers flourished, forecasting and advising on all manner of ventures: the most auspicious time to wage war, conduct love affairs, plant crops, engage in business deals, take trips, etc. Today, the twelve signs of the Western zodiac are still the basis for fortunetelling by astrologers or "readers."For an orthodox horoscope, you must know the exact hour of your birth. The practitioner then recreates the arrangement of the heavens at the time,and by interpreting the influences and interactions of all the celestial bodies with your sign, determines your character traits and fortunes. Well, that's the theory, anyway. The Chinese zodiac is another story. Although some scholars claim it arrived in China via India, via Babylonia, others believe it was conceived independently in China. The Chinese zodiac, like the Western one, is also divided into twelve seg-

THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC CLEARFACE' AND ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC'

LIMITED EDITION SERIGRAPHS OF THE ILLUSTRATIONS BY MIRE QUON, WILL BE AVAILABLE IN A PORTFOLIO OF 12.0R SOLD SEPARATELY. ANYONE INTERESTED IN PURCHASING THESE SERIGRAPHS MAY SEND INQUIRIES TO HIM c/o U&LC. DRAWINGS BY MIRE QUON C 1982. CALLIGRAPHY BY JEANYEE WONG

ments. But while the Western zodiac is read from East-to-West, as the sun appears to travel,the Chinese zodiac reads from Westto-East. This clockwise arrangement suggested to some scholars that the Chinese zodiac might have been used to count hours of the day (in two-hour intervals) as well as months. In popular practice today, the Chinese zodiac is used mainly as a twelve-year calendar, with twelve designated animals that rule in rotation. In this respect, the Chinese zodiac is a true ring of animals, unadulterated by human and inanimate forms as in the Western zodiac. The cycle starts with the Rat and follows with the Ox, the Tiger, the Rabbit, the Dragon, the Snake, the Horse, the Ram, the Monkey, the Rooster, the Dog and the Boar.This is the year of the Boar. How the animals were chosen, and the significance of the order of rotation, depends on which scholar you trust. One theory holds that each animal was assigned to the month of its most notable activity. For instance,with reference to giving birth, the Monkey was assigned the tenth month, the Horse, the twelfth, and the Rabbit, March and April. Snakes were assigned to the end of winter when they came out of the ground; Tigers to April and May when they migrated. The difficulty with this explanation is that the order of rotation doesn't jibe with the zodiac as we currently read it. There are other theories. Another theory comes from an old Buddhist text which explains that the twelve sacred animals made a vow to convert all creatures to practice goodness. They traveled and preached, day and night. The Rat began on the first day of the seventh moon, followed by each of the other animals, who taught, preached and converted for one whole day. On the thirteenth day, the Rat begins again. In this way, they maintain constant vigilance over the doctrine of goodness according to Buddha. Still another legend attributes the sequence to the order in which the animals of the world came to pay their respects to the dying Buddha. Whatever the origin, according to the Chinese zodiac, a new year starts midway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, corresponding to mid-February in the Western calendar. As in the Western zodiac, each animal sign in the Chinese zodiac has special attributes which supposedly influence all people born under that sign. Fortunately, every sign is endowed with admirable character traits and a promise of success, so you need have no apprehension about consulting your forecast. However, since the interpretations are of questionable origin (Chinese restaurant menus and place mats), we cannot vouch for the authenticity or guarantee results.

Marion Muller

Mike Quon's father, an agency art director, wanted his E on to have a "real career," so Mike spent his high school and early college years preparing to become a doctor or a dentist. But after a brief wrestling match with college chemistry, his professor whispered three magic words in his ear: "Get out quick!"The advice turned his whole life around. He headed straight for the Art Department, where he was properly received and appreciated.The only problem he encountered there was trying to decide whether Design or Illustration was his true calling. Fortunately, he never had to make a choice, because he is equally adept and fulfilled in both areas. His illustrations are overflowing with goodhumored wit and originality.ln his design projects, he is terse and elegantly economical. His own logo,the Q with a pencil for the tail, sums up his pithy sensibility. The idea for this story was Mike's, and, of course, the illustrations are his. Quon was born and raised in Los Angeles. He graduated from UCLA with a degree in Design and Illustration, attended the Art Center College of Design in Los Angeles, and furthered his studies in Europe. Before going on his own, he was art director for a number of advertising agencies, including J.Walter Thompson in Los Angeles and Young & Rubicam in New York. In 1972, he opened his own shop, Mike Quon Design Office,where he attracted clients like Western Airlines,Atlantic Richfield Cornpany,Technicolor, Host International and the Los Angeles International Airport.ln 1976, he moved to New York and immersed himself in the graphic scene, professionally and esthetically. In his six years in New York he has made a name for himself in professional circles and has produced the whole gamut of print graphics—corporate identity programs,annual reports, album covers, brochures,editorial and advertising illustrations—for a host of impressive clients: American Express, Merrill Lynch, Mobil,Time Inc., Playboy, ITT, 20th Century Fox, NBC,and CBS.Quon's illustrations have been shown in galleries and exhibitions in the United States, and in 1979 his drawings were part of an exhibit at the Centre Georges Pompidou in Paris. He has collected numerous awards from the Art Directors Clubs of NQW York and Los Angeles,AIGA,Art Direction Magazine and Idea Magazine of Japan. He is a member of AIGA,The Art Directors Club and Graphic Artists Guild of New York,the Society of Illustrai ors,and also a member of the faculty of Parsons School of Design in New York City.


37

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Famous Boars: Ernest Hemingway Albert Schweitzer

Boor Happy New YearThis is the Year of the Boar. It is also the beginning of the end of the twelve-year cycle of the Chinese zodiac. According to the Chinese calendar, we are in the year 4681,and the Boar will return to reign again in 4693 or 1995 by the Western calendar. When we read the Chinese zodiac as a clock, counting the day in double hours, the Boar dominates the hours at the close of day-9 to 11 PM.—which is known as the "Hour of Rest' If you were born in the year of the Boar,you are

1911 1923 1935 1947 1959 1971 1983 1995

quiet, sincere, studious and thorough. You set difficult goals for yourself and carry them out, expending much energy and time in the pursuit of knowledge. Although you do not gad about nor make many friends, your relationships are very deep, devoted and honest. Your quest for material possessions may be a source of trouble. You are likely to do well in the arts as an entertainer, but you might also consider the field of law. You get along very well with the Hare and the Goat THIS PAGE \ACAS SET IN ITC BENGUIATS CONDENSED AND ITC GORILLA.


38

1901 1913 1925 1949 .1961 1973 1997

1900 1912 1924 1936 1948 1960 1972 1984

As the name implies, you are sometimes as stubborn as your sign. However, the sign of the Ox, corresponding to the hours 1 A.M.to 3 A.M., popularly known as the "Hour of the Crowing Rooster," holds promise of success. You are patient, quiet, methodical, trusting and often easy-going. But you must guard against being intensely chauvinistic and demanding your own way. You are alert in mind and body and determined to be successful. You might do well as a surgeon, a general or a hairdresser. You get along best with the Snake, the Rooster and the Rat. The Rat is the official starting point of the circle of animals in the Chinese zodiac. It is also the sign for the start of the day—the hours from 11 P.M. to 1 A.M. — more accurately "Midnight:' In the Chinese zodiac the Rat always faces North. If you were born in the Year of the Rat, you are charming, imaginative, generous to those you love and attractive to the opposite sex. You are also thrifty, honest, highly organized and want everything to be lust so." Though you tend to be critical, quicktempered and easily angered, you manage to maintain a calm appearance. You are inclined to be an opportunist, but work hard to achieve your goals and possessions. You would be happy in a career in sales, or as a writer, critic or publicist. You get along best with the Snake and the Monkey, as well as the Ox. Famous Oxen: Napoleon Bonaparte Vincent Van Gogh Walt Disney Clark Gable Richard Nixon

Famous Rats: William Shakespeare Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Winston Churchill George Washington Truman Capote

THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC AMERICAN TYPEWRITER. CONDENSED AND ITC BARCELONA ,' THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC GALLIARD.


39

TIGER

Associated with the hours 3 A.M. to 5 A.M., "Dawn," the Tiger, is the sign of a sensitive, kind, emotional person capable of deep love. You are also a deep thinker, respected for your bravery and always get the credit due you. You tend to be short-tempered and may be considered a rebel. You have excellent qualifications for being an administrator, an explorer, a race car driver or a matador. You get along best with the Horse, the Dragon and the Dog. Famous 7141 Marco Polo Mazy, Queen of Scots Dwight D. Eisenhowe arilyn Monro

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DRAGON

In the Chinese zodiac, the Rabbit faces East and is associated with "Sunrise," the hours from 5 A.M. to 7 A.M. Rabbits are generally affectionate, obliging people, pleasant to have around. But you have a tendency to be too sentimental and to gossip somewhat. You are cautious and conservative, but also smart, talented and have a good head for business. You might also be successful as a lawyer, a diplomat or an actor. You get along best with the Goat, the Boar and the Dog.

RABBIT in the hourly zodiac, the Dragon corresponds to "Breakfast Time," 7 A.M. to 9 A.M. You are vivacious, full of energy and good spirits. You are easily excited, but people trust you because you are honest and soft-hearted. You are also intelligent, gifted and a perfectionist, but these qualities often make you unduly demanding and critical of others. You are well equipped to be an artist, a priest or a politician. You get along best with the Rat, the Snake, the Monkey and the Rooster. Famous Rabbits:

Rudolph Nureyev Confucius Orson Welles Albert Einstein

Famous Dragons: Joan of Arc Pearl Buck Sigmund Freud

THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC TIFFANY AND ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC.


S\A THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC AVANT GARDE GOTHIC'

The hours of the Snake are from 9 to 11 A. V., popularly known as the "Forenoon:' The Snake person is a deep, cuiet thinker, also wise, charming and romantic.You are lucky in money matters, out not too generous in sharing it with others. You are a cetermined person who hates to fail. You must try to keep your sense of humor about life. The Snake would oe most content as a teacher, philosopher, writer, psychiatrist or fortuneteller, and gets along best with the Ox and the Rooster

Famous Snakes:

Charles Darwin Edgar Allan Poe Abraham Lincoln 1905 1917 1929 1941 1953 1965 1977 1989


1906 1918 1930 1942 1954 1966 1978 1990 Famous Horses: Rembrandt Frederic Chopin Davy Crockett Teddy Roosevelt

HORSE

The Horse is equated with "Midday' the hours from 11 A.M. to 1 P. M. The Horse is in peak condition â&#x20AC;&#x201D; cheerful, talkative, with an amazing capacity for hard work. But you tend to be "showy." Guard against your egotistical nature. You are wise, talented, skilled with your hands, smart with money and fun loving. You would be happiest as an adventurer, a scientist, a poet or a politician. You get along best with the Tiger, the Dog and the Goat.

THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC ZAPF INTERNATIONALS THIS PAGE WAS SET IN ITC LUBALIN GRAPH. AND II. ITC MODERN NO. 216.


1908 1920 1932 1944 1956 1968 1980 1992 Famous Monkeys: Julius Caesar Leonardo da Vinci Harry Truman Elizabeth Taylor

The late afternoon is the time of the Monkey, from 3 to 5 P M. If you are a Monkey, you are endowed with wit, intelligence, possibly genius. You have a magnetic personality; you are an inventive problem solver and would do well in almost any field. You must guard against your tendency to be an opportunist and distrustful of other people.You have the potential of becoming famous. You get along best with the Rat and the Dragon.

Famous Rams: Michelangelo Rudolph Valentino Mark Twain Orville Wright 1907 1919 1931 1943 1955 1967 1979 1991

The hours of the Ram are 1 to 3 P.M. in the Chinese zodiac,

and the Ram and the Horse face South. The Ram is charming, elegant and artistic, but you have a tendency to alienate people at first. Try to be less pessimistic, less dependent on material things and less of a complainer. You have very strong beliefs and the ability to make money. You would do well as an actor, a gardener or a beachcomber. You get along well with the Rabbit, the Boar and the Horse.


44

Famous Roosters: Rudyord Kipling Enrico Caruso Groucho Mon( Peter Usrinov

1909 1921 1933 1945 1957 1969 1981 1993

1910 1922 1934 1946 1958 1970 1982 1994

Famous Dogs:

Socrates George Gershwin Benjamin Franklin Herbert Hoover David Niven

DOG

The time of day assigned to the Dog is "Thrilight," from 7 to 9 P. M. Born under the sign of the Dog, you are a person of strong principles. You are loyal, faithful, trusted. You are able to keep secrets, but you are plagued by a sharp tongue. You must curb your tendency to be a faultfinder and a worrier. You should make an excellent businessman, activist, teacher or secret agent. You ought to get along best with the Horse, the Tiger and the Rabbit.

Contrary to the common association of a Rooster with dawn, in the Chinese .zodiac the Rooster is consigned to the hours of "Sunset," from 5 to 7 PA' 1. and faces West in the zodiac circle. If you are a Rooster you have a r(?putation for being a hard worker, a talented, deep thinker who is h( appier working alone than with others. You are also extravagant in d ress with a tendency to be flashy. Nevertheless, you are shrewd, perseveri ng and definitive. You should be happy as a restaurant owner, a publici sr, a soldier or a world traveler. You get along best with the Ox, the Sr )ake and the Dragon. -

THIS PAGE WAS SE T IN ITC SERIF GOTHICO AND ITC ISBELL.


45

Computer Tools for Graphic Artists n intense week of tutorials, seminars, video/festivals, and an outstanding computer art show revealed the immense potential available to graphic artists through computer technology at SIGGRAPH, the state of the art computer graphics conference held in Boston this year.

A

he conference floor, offering educationalquality vendor exhibits, tantalized artists with systems offering up to 16 million colors, two dimensional animation and three dimensional modeling, expanding

T

An interview with

Thomas A. DeFanti President, Real Time Design, Inc.

by Camila Cortes Chaves

he most distinct advantage of the UV-1 is that you don't have to be a programmer to interactively create and control different and interesting visual s In its simplest mode, you use an electric paint program (comparable to conventional sketch-pad and pencil drawing techniques) which allows you to choose options from a menu (paint menu, chart menu, etc.) displayed on the TV screen to create drawings, charts, graphs, text and titles and simple animations. On the other hand, the power of programming and the creation of sophisticated animations is also avail-

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able. Learning to program in Zgrass, the powerful high level language (a friendly one, which is most like natural language) which runs the UV-1, is relatively simple and can be accomplished in record time by using the lessons provided with the system. egardless of the interactive mode you

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choose, the UV-1 features 256 colors and more than 200 different display modes. In addition to the graphics commands inherent in the system - point, line, box, circle, ellipse snap, pattern fill, you can create and store your own images, logos, symbols and

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HOME IMPROUEMBIT?

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71

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creativity and the ability to produce images never before dreamed possible. ne of the most unique systems demonstrated at the vendor showcase was created specifically as a tool to be used by graphic and package designers, video producers, broadcasters and visual communicators: the DATAMAX UV-1 Zgrass GRAPHICS SYSTEM. This system's ease of operation, relative low-cost compared to other comparable systems availability ($11,000 is the basic price for the system, including several programs), and ability to interface with both data and video input is the result of more than ten years of research and development.

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CD SERVICES

characters for later use. There are twelve character-fonts (upper and lower case characters, symbols and numerals) currently available for the UV-1; however, the number of fonts you can design for your personal use with this system is limitless. he Zgrass Chart Package allows you to rapidly produce powerful bar, pie, or line charts so essential in today's business

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graphics. he ability to input video images directly into the system allows you to combine that image with other graphic elements and manipulate images to generate unique designs, patterns and images in motion before your own eyes in real time. nimation and images created on the UV-1 may be displayed or output in a variety of ways, the most exciting and being output as standard NTSC video unique which can be broadcast or stored on video tape. Images can also be transferred to paper by plotter or printer and to film by camera. he accompanying illustrations were created on the UV-1 System by Real Time Design, using Zgrass software. or information about the UV-1 System, contact Datamax, Inc., at 2252-B Landmeir Road, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007. (312) 981-8288. For information about Zgrass software, contact Real Time Design, Inc., 531 S. Plymouth Ct., Suite 102, Chicago, IL 60605. (312) 663-0584.

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Š 1982 - Mark Pierce

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC AMERICAN TYPEWRITER,.


46 The Professional Photographer's Handbook

The U&Ic Book Shelf reviews new books believed to be of interest to U&Ic readers and lists the publisher, with address, and the price of the book so that the books may be ordered directly. All prices are for delivery within the U.S.A. or Canada. Prices listed are based on payment accompanying order. If payment is not included, you will be billed for handling and shipping charges. Please add your local and state sales tax wherever applicable. For books to be delivered outside the U.S.A. or Canada, please request the price and shipping charges from the publisher. Please note: U&Ic does not sell books. All orders should be placed directly with the publisher(s) concerned.

UGLC IXIDK Pasteup for Graphic Arts Reproduction by Kenneth F Hird The title of this book is deceptive.The book is written for the pasteup artist but is much more than a pasteup how-to.lt tells the artist all one needs to know about the printing processes, typesetting and typography, camera and darkroom operations, printing papers,impositions,binding and finishing. Prentice-Hall, Inc., Englewood Cliffs, NJ 07632.403 pages.8% x 11.Paper.$15.95. The Dictionary of Publishing by David M.Brownstone and Irene M.Franck New technologies have brought a new language to publishing, hence this book that clarifies the terminology of publishing in this computer age.Covers a variety of related fields,too: printing,journalism,art photography,computer science,sales, marketing, and bookselling. More than 2,400 words. Van Nostrand Reinhold.135 West 50th Street, New York, NY 10020.302 pages. 61/2 x 91/2.$18.95. The One Show: Volume 3 What's different and valuable about The One Show annual? It focuses on the creative team,the copy/art team, not just on art/design.lt selects the best creative work of the year inâ&#x20AC;˘print, radio,TV.Like some of our other wonderful idea stimulators,this one too is beautifully printed and thoroughly indexed.465 creative works are included. Robert Silver Associates.95 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016.9 1A x 12Y4. $35.00. N v()()I)141,()FK. r()Ii ,-;

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nâ&#x20AC;˘

Arthur Ba copybook of Renaissance callwa Oviatator's !tab( H2nd)

Cc ((eft, Arthur Baker's Copybook of Renaissance Calligraphy Geographer Gerhardus Mercator (15121594) was also a fine calligrapher. The Flemish peer of Arrighi,Palatino et al.Arthur Baker has projected enlargements of Mercator's original small letterforms,giving them his interpretation of this classic style. Dover Publications,Inc.,180 Varick Street, New York, NY 10014.32 pages.8 1/4 x 11 1/4. Paper. $1.75.

A huge resource for illustration and photography throughout the United States.A beautifully printed full-color display of the work of 324 illustrators and photographers with a special reference section for addresses and phone numbers organized by region and specialty. American Showcase,724 Fifth Avenue, 10th Floor, New York, NY 10019.400+ pages. 94gx 11N.Cloth,$49.95.Spiral,$42.00.

How to create a successful book store. McGraw-Hill Book Company.1221 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10020.181 pages.8N x 111/4.$39.50.

Traces the craft of engraving and focuses on the period of Thomas Bewick and the relationship of the engravers of the period to such victorian artists as Dore,Cruikshank, Rossetti. Describing working conditions and the work of such dedicated artists and engravers as the Dalziels,Swain, Linton, and Vizetelly.Covers the work of William Morris at the Kelmscott Press as well as the book illustrators of the period and the successful illustrated magazines, such as Punch and The Illustrated London News. The Sandstone Press,321 East 43rd Street, New York, NY 10017.200 pages. 10 x 91/2.Heavily illustrated including eight pages in full color.$54.95.

The Workbook

Photographis 82 More than 635 illustrations by over 500 photographers from all over the world.132 pictures in full color. Detailed captions. Indexes to photographers, designers, art directors,agencies,publishers,advertisers. Hastings House Publishers, Inc.,10 East 40th Street, New York, NY 10016.248 pages.12 x 91/2.$59.50.(In Canada, Hurtig Publishers, Edmonton, Alberta.$69.50.) Pricing & Ethical Guidelines,4th Edition The Graphic Artists Guild offers this unique compilation of current going rates for all kinds of art and design and for data on budgeting, rights, business standards and the law. Valuable to buyers and vendors. Robert Silver Associates.95 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10016.128 pages. 7 x 11N.Paper,$12.95. Seven +7 Ohio Arts Council This is a limited edition (350 copies) presentation of the work of seven Ohio poets and designer/illustrators. Ohio Arts Council, 727 E. Main Street, Columbus,OH 43205.24 pages.11 x 17. Acid-free paper.$20.Signed and numbered copies,$75.00.

SOCIETY OF ILLUSTRATORS

ILLUSTRATORS 23 THE TWENTY THIRD ANNUAL OE AMERICAN ILLUSTRATION

American Showcase of Illustration and Photography 5

Book Store Planning & Design by Ken White

The Victorian Woodblock Illustrators by Eric de Mare

A complete, compact photo-reference for the serious (though not necessarily professional) photographer. Fits into a camera bag.Covers data for exposure,focal length, filters, for a wide range of applications including electronic flash work, close-ups, infrared photography, celestial and underwater shooting, television screen photography, capturing subjects in motion, and viewing masks. Logan Design Group,PO.Box 997, North Hollywood, CA 91603,3 3 x 7.$14.95.

Epoque Epique by TIM TIM is a political cartoonist extraordinaire for a major French weekly,L'Express. His caricatures tackle issues and people in the news around the world.Outside of France you may have seen his work in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times, Der Spiegel, Die Weltwoche,and Sankei Shimbun.Art Buchwald writes of him,"TIM is personally a gentle soul who looks as if he would harm no one.lt is only when he takes his drawing pen in hand that he wreaks havoc on all the pompous people who seem to be in charge of our lives:' Albin Miche1.22 rue Huyghens,75014 Paris, France. 230 pages. 91/2 x 11N. $35.00.

A two-volume boxed directory/portfolio serving California's print and film advertising industries. Has in-depth listings of graphic resources in all major metropolitan areas of California. The Workbook,1545 Wilcox Avenue #204, Hollywood, CA 90028.700+ pages. 81/2 x 11.$35.00.

visual transforrnatior

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Visual Transformation by Walter Diethelm New ways of visualization are required of today's graphic designers as a result of new and emerging technologies and current trends in fine art and in information techniques.This book addresses this problem on a graphic design level.lt is heavily illustrated in full color, beautifully printed, and includes contributions by experts in publicity, research and technology, and covers new concepts for exhibition design, decoration of public places, experimental photography, digital picture processing, video and computer techniques in art, stochastics and laser-holography. Hastings House Publishers,Inc.,10 East 40th Street, New York, NY 10016. (Europe, ABC-Verlag,Zurich.) 180 pages.101/2 x 10. $67.50. International Calligraphy Exhibit

Illustrators 23

A catalog, not illustrated, of a January 1982 exhibition of calligraphy held at Wofford College. Includes notes about the calligraphers and a list of useful calligraphy instruction books. The Sandor Teszler Library. Wofford College,Spartanburg,SC 29301.$3.50.

The fattest and possibly the most beautiful and useful volume in this series, this volume was edited by Howard Munce and designed by Robert Hallock.lt beautifully reproduces 591 examples of contemporary illustration in a wide variety of categories. Fully captioned and indexed. Hastings House Publishers,Inc.,10 East 40th Street, New York, NY 10016.91/2 x 12. $39.95. Pasteups & Mechanicals by Jerry Demoney and Susan E.Meyer A step-by-step guide to preparing art for reproduction. Especially good for office people newly given responsibilities in printing production. Covers the stages of a printed piece,tools, kinds of artwork,working with art (retouching, cropping, scaling, etc.), pasteup materials and procedures, complex mechanicals and overlays,correcting type proofs,and achieving special effects. Watson-Guptill Publications, 1515 Broadway, New York, NY 10036.176 pages. 81/2 x 11M.$22.50.

A Picture History of Chess Edited by Fred Wilson In pictures (295 of them) and words this is the story of the game from ancient Egypt to today. Emphasis is on the great masters of the 19th and 20th centuries. Dover Publications, Inc.,180 Varick Street, New York, NY 10014.182 pages. 84gx 111/2. Paper. $8.95. THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC,.


47

ou

have it(c) • You can have it(c) all! ronis RI ■111.

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Mot: NOVAK%

can have iT(c) all from Compugraphic. Besides our ever-expanding library of ftandard typefaces, we) have virtually every design from the International Typeface Corporation as well—from American Typewriter to Zapf International. Compugraphic is continuously supplied with contemporary, exciting designs that are created for ITC by typeface designers

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HAT'S RIGHT. You

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BEN,

Cg Typeset in ITC Galliard.

around the world. And our brand new ITC typeface poster shown.) here will make it simple to specify your type—so both you and your clients will have the dynamic look of today's typography. Write us today to get your free, copy of our ITC poster. All of these trendsetting designs plus hundreds more are immediately available from your local Compugraphic typographer:

cornpugraphic ® Compugraphic Corporation, Type Division, 66 Concord Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887


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Varityper

Comp/Edit and Varityper are registered trademarks, and Spirascan and "type" are trademarks of AM International, Inc. 'g) 1982 AM International, Inc.


49

Think Varityper digital. 11010101001 010101010101010101 • 10110101001101010101 • 00110100110011001100101010 • 10101100110101010011010101 01010100101010101010101011001010 1100101011010100110101010101010 1•1100110011010011001100110010101010110 • 1010101100110101010011010101100 10101010101001010101010101010110010101101 10 10 10011001100110100110011001100101010101100110 1 • 0101010110011010101001101010110010 101101010101010010101010101010101100101011010100 10 10 • 01010011001100110100110011001100101010101100110101 0101010110011010101001101010110010101 • 1010110101010101001010101010101010110010101101010011 11001010110101001101010101010101001101 010101001100110011010011001100110010101010110011010101 00110101011001010101 0101011001010110 101001101 0 1 0101 0010101101010101010010101 110010101101010011010101010101010011010 010101010110011010 10100 0101010110011010101001101010110010101010 11010101001100110011010 101 10 1010011010101010101010011010101001010110101010101001 100110 110010 —1010101100101010100110101010011001100110 ^0101011010100110 1010 010 n10101001101010100101011010101010'1 "10 0 1 " 011001 '100101010100110101010 '101010011010101 '10011010101001010110 1 C' `11010101001101 '01010100110101010 (' `100110101010 11010101001010 1 '0101001101 110100110101r '1101010101 1101010010 110011010 11001101 11010101 01010C 101 10101 001 1101010 101 110101 100 1 4 1 100 .• 0 01010 1 0 10 01 J1 01 01 01 0101 10011001100110 01

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Varityper's new digital type is a designer's dream come true. It's quite possibly the highest quality type image in the world. And it offers you almost unlimited design versatility. New standard of quality.

Varityper's digital type embodies a totally new technological breakthrough that produces type completely free of the jagged, sawtoothed edges that have so often characterized other digital systems. When applying this new technology, our type designers bring all their artistic skill and experience to the process. And because they're designers, they're just as sensitive to type as you are. Utilizing precise computer controls, each character is recreated in digital form, capturing in minute detail the most subtle nuances of the original design. At the heart of this system is the unique Spirascan digitizing and imaging process which is based on the advanced, patented technology developed by Purdy and McIntosh. This invention

assures the creation of the high-precision outlines essential to perfectly formed characters in every type size and style. New horizons in design versatility.

With Varityper digital type, you can also take a big step forward in design versatility. You can expand and condense type, and slant it to the left or right in one degree increments up to 45 degrees. The alphabet just below the headline was created from a single typeface: Megaron Medium. All the modified shapes were created by simple, easy-touse commands. It's safe to say that with this powerful system, the design possibilities are limited only by your creative imagination. You can achieve these effects, and many more, with all of the hundreds of type faces in our growing digital type library. The latest addition to the library is the ITC Caslon No. 224 family; the Bold version is illustrated above. We invite you to inspect an actual sample of our digital type. We think you'll agree it's the sharpest type you've ever seen. You'll also see dramatic

examples of its creative design potential. More to the story.

Super quality and design versatility are essential. But there's more to the Varityper digital type story that's just as important to you. To find out more just turn the page. Mail this coupon to

Varityper, 11 Mount Pleasant Avenue, East Hanover, NJ 07936. ❑ Please send me a copy of your Type Wall Chart. ❑ Please send me more information on Varityper

Composition Systems. ❑ Please have a sales representative call on me. Name Company Address City/State/Zip

Phone

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Comp/Edit goes digital• Introducing the most advanced, productive , and easiest-to-use digital typesetter. On the preceding pages, you've seen how Varityper digital type opens tremendous new design possibilities for you. Now, we'd like to tell you about the system that makes it all happen: the brand new Comp/Edit 6400 digital typesetter. The Comp/Edit 6400 produces the highest type quality available. Because our Spirascan imaging system, based on the Purdy and McIntosh invention, generates 1301 x 2602 elements per inch, and assures excellent edge resolution in every size from 4 to 85 point. It's a true multi-mode typesetter. Use it as a self-contained direct entry system, or as a powerful slave for a front-end system. With an output speed of 150 lines per minute, it delivers the outstanding price/performance ratio

demanded by today's market. It has the powerful user-proven composition software that has made our Comp/Edit systems so easy to learn and easy to use. In addition, it's compatible with all existing Comp/Edit systems, to fulfill our ongoing commitment to current customers. To show you how good the Comp/Edit 6400's type quality really is, we'd like to give you an actual sample. Call today toll-free 800-631-8134, except from Alaska and Hawaii. From New Jersey call 201-887-8000, extension 999. If you have been waiting to invest in a digital typesetting system, your patience has now been rewarded.

Presenting the Comp/Edit MOO digital phototypesetter Don

Now the best buy in phototypesetters has become even better

Actual, unretouched photo of Comp/Edit screen in Image Previewer mode. Comp/Edit and Varityper are registered trademarks, and Spirascan and Image Previewer are trademarks of AM International, Inc. ©1982 AM International, Inc.

Varityper


51

ASSI STANT ART DIRECTOR

When you're up to your neck in artwork, there's nothing like a versatile Pos One R camera/processor to lend you a helping hand. Pos One cameras will produce over 50 different kinds of useful reproductions on paper or film — in normal room light. Sized line or screened halftone prints, film overlays, dropouts, reverse stats, line conversions, special effects, and more. All delivered quickly, easily, and at low cost. And there's a whole family of Pos One camera/ processors — each one remarkable in its own way: The Pos One 320. Autofocus daylight camera/ processor with a unique built-in lighting system. Makes one-step black & white stats and other reproductions on film or paper in sizes up to 12" x 18". The Pos One 520. All the features of the "320" — plus it's a dual purpose unit that also processes the RC film and paper output of text phototypesetters. The Pos One 720 Color. Our "Top of the Line" camera. Produces full color prints and transparencies from a variety of originals, including slides. Also makes black & white stats and other reproductions.

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52

"I miss ordering pizza from Uno's and type from Ryder:' Dave Kennedy worked in Chicago for 10 years. During that time, he won every award an art director would want to win. "Ifs been three years since I moved from Chicago, and I'm sfill not used to the pace "There isrit the same call for rush jobs here But I guess that's why I moved out here in the first place "I enjoyed the - personal contact. "I remember Tom Gray and Al Garzofto.They'd stop by and pick up jobs at the end of the day. If anything required an explanation, they'd be there to hear it and tell the night crew "Every art director has a style preference' I he salesman got to know your style and know how you wanted the job done "Give my best to those guys.Tell them I really miss their faces': RyderTypes Inc., 500 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610 Telephone (312) 467-7117 Exclusive Chicago area agents for Headliners速 and Identicolor速 processes Member Advertising Typographers Association


53

The greatest typefaces in the world are produced in their mostlbeifectfonn by Berthold.

a" NW' "

DEN 1

)1.

FOItYt NIT \ 4,

NEW FROM BERTHOLD

E 3, Headlines 1400 Display faces grouped according to typographical similarities and displayed in a quality hardback, cloth bound book, containing 540 pages ..-

NEW EDITION

E 2, Body Types 827 text typefaces displayed in a full range of sizes. , A quality hardback, cloth bound book, containing 1204 pages

Alphatype Corporation 7711 N Merrimac Avenue, Niles, Ill. 60648 I would like to buy the type books indicated below: - copy(s) E 2, Body Types at 40 each - copy(s) E 3, Headlines at 30 each - copy(s) E 2/E 3 brochures, at no charge. All books are shipped E0.B. Niles, Illinois

Thousands of colorful flowers blossom in Berthold 's wide ranged typeface garden. Pick yourself a fresh bouquet.

SET IN CASLON BUCH


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VERYBODY IN THIS BUSINESS PLAYS FAVORITES. AND LETRASET DOES IT AS WELL AS ANYONE. SO WE ASKED SOME OF OUR FAVORITE DESIGNERS TO CHOOSE THEIR FAVORITE INSTANT LETTERING® TYPEFACE AND HAVE SOME FUN WITH IT.

CHRISTOPHER AUSTOPCHUK, OF CBS RECORDS,

CHOSE COPPERPLATE GOTHIC HEAVY FOR THIS CONTEMPORARY WORDSET. HE ENHANCED THE LEAN SHAPE OF THE ,

/riagswearte

, LETTERS BY SIMPLY SEPARATING THE SERIFS FROM THE

MAIN BODY OF THE CHARACTERS. THEN HE ADDED ARROWS FROM LETRASET SYMBOL SHEETS, TO FURTHER MODIFY THE SETTING. ■

THIS SIMPLY PROVES THAT AN INSTANT LETTERING SHEET IN THE

HANDS OF A CREATIVE DESIGNER IS A POWERFUL COMBINATION. AND IF YOU'RE THINKING ABOUT COSTS, THINK ABOUT HOW MUCH THIS HEADLINE WOULD COST TO PRODUCE ANY OTHER WAY. ■

SO ASK FOR A COPY OF THE

NEW LETRASET REFERENCE MANUAL AT YOUR ART MATERIALS DEALER. IT'S PACKED WITH PROD-

— Graphic Art Materials Reference Manual 5295

UCTS THAT WILL MAKE YOUR JOB EASIER AND THE RESULTS MORE CREATIVE. AND WITH ALMOST 500 TYPEFACES TO CHOOSE FROM, YOU COULD HAVE A HARD TIME PLAYING FAVORITES.

© LETRASET USA INC. 1982

:8). ESSELTE LETRASET

4

40 EISENHOWER DRIVE

PARAMUS, NJ 07652

201-845 6100

Letraset SOME OF CHRIS' OTHER FAVORITES FROM LETRASET.

Cheltenham

Franklin Gothic

News Gothic

Clarendon Clearface

Futura

Mahn°

Modern

Times


55

The greatest typefaces in the world are produced in their most petfictfirm by Berthold.

le NEW FR ayed in Eight exclusiv nt applications. more than 100 di e for Text sheets of "Greek preparing layout comps are available for each Berthold exclusive typeface.

berthold fototype

Alphatype Corporation 7711 N Merrimac Avenue, Niles, Ill. 60648 Please send me at no charge the typeface booklets checked below. Please ❑ include/0 exclude the "Greek Type" sheets. ❑ Quadrzga ❑ Caslon ❑ Comenius ❑ Poppi-Pontifex ❑ Lo-Type ❑ Walbaum ❑ Seneca ❑ Baskerville

Thousands of colorful flowers blossom in Berthold's wide ranged typeface garden. Pick yourselfa fresh bouquet.

SET IN CASTON BUCH


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61

Fortunately... we're introducing only 18 new Letragraphica typefaces! I.T.C. Benguiat Gothic Medium

After all, your job is tough enough. You definitely don't need the "team" pushing their favorites. You already appreciate the fact that many of= these styles are brand new— not available anywhere except on Letragraphica sheets, or that many are additions to already popular families. So its our fond hope that only you see this ad and ask for Letrasers new "art•i•facts" brochure. You should be in charge 012, ;42

not beoctoches.

M.O. D. PATRICIAN

Schneidler Old Style

Squire Bold Shelley New Jenson Old Style Letraset Bold Condensed art-i-facts Brochure

Van DA

*YhiJiJ

AM 26,414

("91bid

Crillee Light Italk This full color brochure features all the new Letragraphica Typefaces. new Architectural Symbol Sheets and new PANTONE ® * ---N, Colors Graduated on Papers and Overlay. You can pick one up at any Letraset Art Materials Dealer.

cftura script Italian Old Sty

lit

Letraset

Pantone, Inc.'s check-standard trademark for color eproduction and color reproduction materials.


62

MAKING ART DIRECTORS HAPPY ISN'T SO HARD. THEY ONLY WANT TWO THINGS.

You think you've got a roster full of tough clients? Look in a mirror and get a peek at one of ours. Advertising people can be some of the most demanding, exacting, pickiest, critical, stubborn types in the world.That's why we like working for them. They set their standards high, and so do we. We are the Advertising Typographers Association.The ATA,

for short. Last minute rush jobs, hardto-find type faces and "it's not right until I like it" production managers do not faze us. Additionally, all ATA members must pass an exceptionally tough set of standards that include typesetting technology, quality of work and business ethics. You can't please all the people all the time. But, if you expect to work

for our customers, you damn well better try.

ADVERTISING TYPOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION 461 Eighth Avenue, New York, New York 10001. Walter A. Dew, Jr., Executive Secretary.

ADVERTISING MEMBERS: Atlanta, Georgia Action Graphics, Inc. Bloomfield, Connecticut New England Typographic Service, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts Berkeley Typographers, Inc.; Composing Room of SPOKEN HERE ATA New England; Typographic House, Inc. Cedar Rapids, Iowa Type 2, Inc. Chicago, Illinois J. M. Bundscho, Inc.; RyderTypes, Inc.; Total Typography, Inc. Cincinnati, Ohio Typo-Set, Inc. Cleveland, Ohio Bohme & Blinkmann, Inc. Columbus, Ohio Dwight Yaeger Typographer Dallas, Texas Jaggars-Chiles-Stovall, Inc.; Southwestern Typographics, Inc.; Typography Plus, Inc. Dayton, Ohio Craftsman Type Incorporated Detroit, Michigan The Thos. P Henry Company; Willens+ Miclugan Corp. Grand Rapids, Michigan Acraforms, Inc. Houston, Texas Typografiks, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana Typoservice Corporation Kansas City, Missouri Western Typesetting Company Los Angeles, California Andresen Typographics; Typographic Service Co., Inc. Memphis, Tennessee Graphic Arts, Inc. Miami, Florida Wrightson Typesetting, Inc. Curry, Inc.; Type House + Duragraph, Inc. Newark, Minneapolis, Minnesota Dahl & New Jersey Arrow Typographers, Inc. New Orleans, Louisiana Martin/Greater Film Graphics, Inc. New York, New York Advertising Agencies/Headliners; Royal Composing Room, Inc.; Tri-Arts Press, Inc. Norwalk, Connecticut Norwalk Typographers, Inc. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Armstrong, Inc.; Typographic Service, Inc. Phoenix, Arizona Momeau Typographers, Inc. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Davis & Warde, Inc.; Headliners of Pittsburgh, Inc. Portland, Oregon Paul 0. Giesey/Adcrafters, Inc. Rochester, New Headliners/Identicolor, Inc. Seattle, Washington Thomas & Kennedy Typographers, Inc.; The Type Gallery, Inc. St. York Rochester Mono/Headliners San Diego, California Central Typesetting, Inc. San Francisco, California Joseph, Michigan Type House, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri Master Typographers, Inc. Syracuse, New Typesetting Co., Inc. Tampa, Florida Century Typographers Montreal, Canada McLean Brothers, Ltd. Toronto, Canada York Dix Cooper & Beatty, Ltd. Winnipeg, Canada B/W Type Service, Ltd. Victoria, Australia Davey Litho Graphics Pty. Ltd. Brussels, Belgium Graphiservice London, England Brisbane, Australia Savage & Co. Filmcomposition Gothenburg, Sweden FototextJTypografen AB Stockholm, Sweden Typografen AB Frankfurt, West Germany Layoutsetzerei Typo-Gartner GmbH Stuttgart,West Germany Layout-Setzerei Stulle GmbH


THE ALPHATYPE CRS TYPE MASTERS GUILD— a group truly concerned about providing you with the finest typographic quality. To back their commitment, they use the Alphatype CRS... the digital phototypesetter with resolution of 5,300 lines to the inch for razor-sharp characters. Unprecedented control over letterspacing and kerning in !A unit increments. And size for size type design for the highest quality in terms of letterform and maximum legibility. All of which gives them virtually unlimited

flexibility to aesthetically solve any typographic challenge. You can select from their extensive type font library—with the newest faces being added daily. The CRS brings a new standard of quality to your advertisements, annual reports, books, forms and publications. The Type Masters Guild—able to handle all of your requirements with true typeartistry. Call a Type Master for your next job and see for yourself. You'll never again settle for less!

THE ALPHATYPE CRS

WE DON'T JUST SET TYPE. WE SET NEW STANDARDS. In the United States Arizona

New York

Phototype Atlanta (404) 873-1209

Arizona Typographers, Inc. Phoenix (602) 263-1166

Swift Tom Type Shop Ltd. (404) 874-1634

Morneau Typographers Phoenix (602) 258-5741

The Atlanta (404) 233-8973

Progress Litho Service Phoenix (602) 258-6001

Illinois

Arkansas

A-1 Composition Co., Inc. Chicago (312) 236-8733

Prestige Composition Inc. Little Rock (501) 375-5395

Decatur Typesetting Decatur (217 429-9740

California

House of Typography Chicago (312) 263-1532

Aldus Type Studio Ltd. Los Angeles (213) 933-7371

Master Typographers, Inc. Chicago (312) 661-1733

Arrowgraphics Inc. San Francisco (415) 543-5700

Publishers Typesetters Inc. Chicago (312) 283-3340

A.T. Composition Berkeley (415) 548-3192

Rydeffypes, Inc. Chicago (312) 467-7117

D &J Typographers, Inc. Santa Clara (408) 727-0991

Shore Typographers, Inc. Chicago (312) 676-3600

Future Studio Los Angeles (213) 660-0620

The Typesmiths Chicago (312) 787-8200

Armstrong Inc. Able Phototype Systems Philadelphia (215) 574-8600 & His Electric De Sa Yonkers (914) 476-3336 Estelle Bair M. J. Baumwell Typography, Inc. Blue Bell (215) 542-7790 New York (212) 868-0515

Cresset Baxter & Spencer, Inc. New York (212) 766-9432

Leon Segal Typesetting Philadelphia (215) 236-5585

Alpha Graphics Ltd. Toronto (416) 961-5600

Euramerica New York (212) 921-4390

Stallone Typography Service Inc. Philadelphia (215) 568-6310

Canadian Composition Toronto (416) 863-0742

Farrington & Favia, Inc. New York (212) 431-9700

South Carolina

Eastem Typographers Inc. Toronto (416) 465-7541

D G & F Typography Columbia (803) 799-9140

Fleet Typographers Ltd. Toronto (416) 532-2818

Tennessee

Linotext Toronto (416) 274-6395

Fototype Factory, Inc. New York (212) 889-7995 Lincoln Typographers New York (212) 679-7933 Line & Tone Associates, Inc. New York (212) 921-8333 Marvin Kommel Productions, Inc. New York (212) 682-3498

Graphic Arts Associates, Inc. Memphis (901) 345-8973 House of Typography, Inc. Memphis (901) 726-6961 Lettergraphics Memphis Memphis (901) 458-4584

Linda Graphics Santa Barbara (805) 962-2142

Forstall Typographers New Orleans (504) 524-0822

Cass Montgomery Typography San Francisco (415) 398-2395

Martin/Greater Film Graphics, Inc. New Orleans (504) 524-1741

Sheridan Associates/ The Slide Center Ossining (914) 941-4981

Maryland

Thomer-Sidney Press, Inc. Buffalo (716) 856-4500

Piz Graphic Arts Beaumont (713) 842-2122

Harlowe Typography, Inc. Brentwood (301) 277-8311

Total Typographers Inc. Mamaroneck (914) 381-2659

Virginia

Hodges Typographers, Inc. Silver Springs (301) 585-3601

Trtbeca Typographers, Inc. New York (212) 925-8080

Michigan

Type/Graphics Syracuse (315) 437-1101

Taurus Phototypography Los Angeles (213) 382-8244 TypoGraphic Innovations Beverly Hills (213) 657-6030

Colorado Photocomp Phototypographers Colorado Springs (303) 475-1122

A-Type, Inc. Dearborn (313) 336-2466 Acra Forms, Inc. Grand Rapids (616) 458-1161 Alpha 21 Detroit (313) 532-9114 Rudy Carr Co. Detroit (313) 535-2960

Connecticut

The Thos. P. Henry Co. Detroit (313) 875-1950

Fairfield County Typographers Inc. Westport (203) 226-9338

Minnesota

Graphics Unlimited Danbury (203) 792-0351 Production Typographers Inc. (Pro Type) Greenwich (203) 531-4600

District of Columbia Graftec Corporation D.C. (202) 337-1555

Florida Typographical Service Ft Lauderdale (305) 772-4710

Georgia Action Graphics, Inc. Atlanta (404) 351-1753

Graph-Tronics Minneapolis (612) 338-7171 Great Faces, Inc. Minneapolis (612) 339-2933 P & H Photo Composition Minneapolis (612) 374-3213 Type Tronics, Inc. Minneapolis (612) 339-5563

Missouri Master Typographers, Inc. St Louis (314) 645-2878 National Typographers, Inc. St Louis (314) 241-8297 Type House, Inc. St Louis (314) 644-1404

Nevada Alpha Typographers Reno (702) 825-8677

New Hampshire Phototype N.E. Pelham (603) 898-7440

Manitoba

Adtype Toronto Ltd. Toronto (416) 968-6778

Louisiana

Repro Typographers San Francisco (415) 362-3971

Headliners of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh (412) 391-3778

Koala-T Typesetting Lafayette (415) 283-5360

Rapid Typographers San Francisco (415) 982-6071

Domino Link Graphic Communication Ltd. London 01-639-2828 Graphics, Nunhead Vancouver (604) 688-2281 Em Photosetting

Composition Corporation Albany (518)465-7575

The Typographers Chicago (312) 644-7768

PM Graphics Costa Mesa (714) 556-2890

Composite Graphics Ltd. London 01-242-9586

Kent 01-658-7336 Typegroup Composing RoomBeckenham Inc. Boro Typographers, Inc. B/W Type Service Ltd. Philadelphia (215) 563-3440 Film Fount Services Ltd. New York (212) 475-7850 Winnipeg (204) 947-0538 Southampton 0703-332686 Davis & Warde City Typographic Service, Inc. Ontario Pittsburgh (412) 261-1904 Focus Photoset Ltd. New York (212) 686-2760

Headliners/Identicolor San Francisco (415) 781-0463

Omnicomp San Francisco (415) 398-3377

British Columbia

Pennsylvania

Primar Typographers, Inc. New York (212) 269-7916 Real Type Systems, Inc. New York (212) 687-0870

Typographix Albany (518) 462-2923 Word Management Corp./ Typography Services Albany (518) 482-8650

Texas Candlelight Type Print Corp. Austin (512) 476-0732 RobertJ. Hilton Dallas (214) 669-1149

Riddick Advertising Art Richmond (804) 270-1811

iikshington Art-foto Typography Seattle (206) 622-0218 rkstem Typographers Inc. Seattle (206) 624-3642

Wisconsin

Ohio

Peter A Altenhofen Typographers Milwaukee (414) 352-3590

Advertype Inc. Cleveland (216) 241-2274

Graphic Composition, Inc. Menasha (414) 739-3152

Bohme & Blinkmann, Inc. Cleveland (216) 621-5388

Zahn-Klicka-H ill Typographers Inc. Milwaukee (414) 276-0136

Typo-Set Cincinnati (513) 751-5116

...Canada

Oklahoma

Alberta

Alphasource, Inc. Oklahoma City (405) 521-0310

Duffoto Process Co. Ltd. Calgary (403) 263-7160

ED-BE Incorporated Oklahoma City (405) 943-2391

London 01-251-4911 Headliners (UK) Ltd. London 01-580-7045 Heavyweight Graphics London 01-388-5451 Image Communications Ltd. London 01-580-7017 Image Services (Edinburgh) Ltd. Edinburgh 031-229-6345 Inline Graphics Ltd. London 01-251-4341

MB Ltd. M & H Typography Ltd. (Tor.) London 01-600-4391 Toronto (416) 922-3194 Letterform Ltd. MonoLino Typesetting Co Ltd. Toronto (416) 537-2401 Protype Toronto (416) 482-2599

London 01-437-3912 Libra Press London 01-928-7081

Techni-Process Ltd. Toronto (416) 363-2493

Modem Text Typesetting Prittlewell Essex 0702-45195

Word for Word in Colour Toronto (416) 960-5050

Montage Filmsetting Co. London 01-251-3771

Quebec

Nova Graphics Ltd. London 01-251-3591

Gravel Photograveur Inc. Quebec (418) 683-1501

J.T. Orange London 01-253-6415

M & H Typography Ltd. (Mont.) Montreal (514) 866-6736

Premlux Reproductions Ltd. London 01-236-6991

TypoGraphica 2000 Inc. Montreal (514) 933-3315

Pressdata Ltd. London 01-251-6562

...

Europe

Austria Grafostil GesmbH Wien 222-55-4628

Belgium Belgium Production + Brussels 640-80-80 Graphiproduction Brussels 640-25-53 Graphiservice SPRL Brussels 538-02-21

Denmark Everts Alfabet Copenhagen 1-116320

France Typogabor Paris 229-19-90

Netherlands Ploeger Lettering BV Amsterdam 020-276451

Sweden Typografen AB Malmoe 040-112650 Typografen 2 Stockholm 08-349255

United Kingdom Apex Photosetting Ltd. London 01-837-9369

Progress Filmsetting Ltd. London 01-729-5000 PRT Offset London 01-607-7535 Sabrebrook Ltd. London 01-658-7336 Sans Serif Ltd., Deritend Birmingham 021-773-8466 Sellars Phototype Macclesfield 0625-612075 The Setting Room Tunbridge Wells Kent 0892-39625 Studio Press (Birmingham) Ltd. Birmingham 021-359-3151 Text Typographics Ltd. London 01-251-3771 Verbatim London 01-837-2176 Word Machine Ltd. London 01-609-1140

Wtst Germany Kreuzer Munich 089-6372771 Schmidt & Klaunig Kiel 0431-62095

...Orient Japan Typro Inc. Tokyo (03) 716-0131

And more to come!

Art PhotoSet London 01-701-0477

New Jersey

Baird Harris Ltd. London 01-437-6373

Computype Co. Garfield (201) 546-9267

Billington Press Ltd. London 01-987-8118

Alphatype Corporation — a member of the Berthold group — 7711 N. Merrimac Ave. Niles, Illinois (3U) 965-8800

©Alphatype Corporation 1982


64

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Universal The Universal Quadrifore sets

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ITEK language applications for the Quadritek"' phototypesetter systems are available in over 75 type families and over 356 type face styles. Ask for our current type style listing.

Itek Composition Systems A Division of Itek Corporation 34 Cellu Drive Nashua, New Hampshire 03063


•• • •

1111 along with a twelve-month subscription to America's top art service. We'll give you your choice of any twelve bonus books from the order form below if you'll give us a chance to show what time and money-saving Volk Art is all about. Each monthly issue contains between 80 and 100 illustrations in a creative 9x12 inch format which includes: art in different sizes, numbered indexes, newsletter, specially die-cut art carrier, and production notes. Subscribe for 12 months for only $199.95 and you'll save yourself untold hours and expense in art production. Use the art effectively in many visual forms.

Anything from ads to billboards to television will use Volk Art to communicate with impact. Offset and screen printers, editors and designers alike will be delighted at the professional quality we bring you. Why us more than them? Because only Volk Art offers you the best of both worlds: QUALITY and PRICE. The art is faithfully reproduced on Kromekote repro stock with the book dividers and art carrier displaying different papers and printing techniques in each issue. Great art, great delivery —all this for only $199.95 (S55 quarterly). So act now. Select the bonus books and start saving yourself valuable time and dollars with

THE FABULOUS 1977 LIBRARY $69.95 FIFTY- $49.95 ONLY Final closeout with the original Fifty fabulous books of fantastic camera-ready art at a phenomenal price for the budget-minded shop. A tremendous value at a fraction of their former price. A hard working collection of more than 1000 illustrations in fifty 5x8 inch books—all ready to clip and paste at less than 6 cents each. The fifty books and titles are from recent libraries and this art offer is hard to resist. You'll use the art effectively in ads, booklets, bulletins, newspapers, magazines, circulars, catalogs, posters, direct mail, PO.P., 1V, AV, etc. It's all black and white line art — no halftones — and guaranteed quality art and reproduction. Our supply is limited so order early. Use the order form at right and save even more by enclosing a check with order and we'll absorb all UPS shipping charges. Or better yet, buy the 1977 library and the Fabulous Fifty— both for only $100.

65

IT

SPECIAL BONUS BOOKS! SUBSCRIBE NOW AND RECEIVE TWO ADDITIONAL BOOKS FREE 1. King-size Christmas book — 175 great pieces on the busy Christmas season. $16.50 value. 2. Good old days— over 100 classics of the gaslight era —beautiful scratchboards and more, $16.50 value.

IMMENIMMINNMOINENUOMMONMENNII P.O. Box 72A, Pleasantville, NJ 08232 • Please send items checked below. CIRCLE BONUS BOOK NUMBERS BELOW

My check is enclosed - you absorb shipping. (Checks drawn on US bank only - N.J. add 5% Sales Tax) ❑ Charge my active, established account, plus shipping. Call toll free - C.O.D. - 800-257-5377.

Communications #340 Circus-Fair #770 price cut to less than half to Farm #772 Villains #342 move out quickly. All remaining Summer #774 Symbols #344 1977 libraries of "Clip Books of Groups #776 Switches #346 Line Art!" Complete sets of 48 Medicine #778 Hands #348 different books along with illus❑ 12 MONTHS PLUS BONUSES... Autumn #780 trated miniature indexes on many, I Ad Starters #350 55.00 ❑ QUARTERLY but not all. A hard-working col- in Design Devices #352 Homemaker #782 199.95 ❑ ANNUALLY Christmas #784 lection of vibrant Volk Art-many • Little Guy #354 49.95 Executives #786 ❑ FABULOUS FIFTY . . . The Year #356 of the 48 titles shown at right. Handyperson #788 69.95 Little Gal #358 About 1000 all different illus❑ 1977 LIBRARY Family #790 trations—all ready to clip and • Drop-Ins #360 ❑ BOTH FABULOUS FIFTY Autos #792 paste—at less than eight cents In Borders #362 AND 1977 LIBRARY. . . 100.00 Sports #771 each. About $1.55 for an entire ma Spring #339 Outdoor #773 Wedding #341 book! Handsome ready-to-use Firm Name Tourism #775 art crams each of the 480 pages II Holidays #343 Law & Order #777 Telephones #345 with each 5x8-inch page impecYesterday #779 Office #347 Authorized by cably lithographed on one side Industry #781 Service #349 of glossy "Kromekote" repro stock. Sports #783 Mail #351 If you're in a budget bind (and Street Address for UPS Food #785 Hobbies #353 who isn't'?) you find instant relief Science #787 with Volk art—with better looking 111 Winter #355 Thrift #789 City, State, Zip Code me Teens #357 graphics in the bargain. Education #791 Holidays #359 Our supply is limited so please Sales #793 111 Type of Business Tel. No. order now while you're thinking 111 Graphic Arts #361 about it. Please use order at right. .111.11.111.11.111111.11 1 .01101 .110110.110.M..11.11.11


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67

HOW TO TURN A RUN-OF-THE-MILL TYPESETTER INTO A PROFESSIONAL TYPOGRAPHER The difference between a typesetter and a professional typographer is about the same as the difference between a beginning piano player and a concert pianist. It's the level of skill that makes the difference.

That is not to say that a typesetter can't become a typographer. There are actually some fairly simple rules to follow:

1. Purchase the latest equipment. Then purchase it again. And again. Typesetting equipment is constantly changing. The professional typographer insures his customers get the benefit of the latest technologies by purchasing state - of- the - art equipment. Then replacing it when it becomes outdated three years later.

2. Dedicate years to learning the craft of typesetting. In a few weeks you can learn the rudiments of typesetting on today's computerized systems. But that is not to say you can create quality type. It takes years to learn the craft of typography. To learn how to kern,

where to break lines, to character fit, to create color on the page, and avoid rivers. Learning how to do it yourself isn't enough. You have to be willing to train your employees to do it as well.

10.Invest constantly in new type faces for your library. One sure fire way to tell a typographer from a typesetter is by the size of his library. A typographer has an extensive selection of type available. And he's always investing in more.

The next time you order type, go with the pros. Call your local TIA member. For more information about TIA, phone or write: â&#x20AC;˘

Typographers International Association 2262 Hall Place Northwest Washington, D.C. 20007 Phone (202) 965-3400

3. Hire extra people to insure you can deliver when the client needs it â&#x20AC;&#x201D;even if you're up to your earlobes in work. It's expensive to offer superior service. To have enough people on hand to handle the customer's crash project. But that's a price you pay when you become a professional typographer. After all, what good is the great type if it's delivered too late?

4. Exchange ideas and expertise with other typographers by joining TIA. The mark of a true typographer is a TIA membership. The Typographers International Association is committed to professional, quality typesetting. Our member typographers work together to insure that you get the best possible service. At the lowest possible price.


68

Fust wins suit. Gutenberg loses shirt.

I

t's an old story. The businessman versus the artisan. Progress versus the almighty buck. In this case our story starts in 1450. Gutenberg is working day and night, going without food and sleep. He's obsessed, driven, and totally na誰ve about money. His only concern: getting a couple of hundred Bibles printed. Enter the unscrupulous banker The unprincipled villain, John Fust.

Fust offers to loan Gutenberg 800 So Fust ends up with Gutenberg's guilders. All he wants for collateral is type, his press, and 200 printed Bibles. Gutenberg's press, the type, and what- Schoeffer ends up with Fust's daughter ever Bibles have been produced. and a new boss. Gutenberg goes for the deal hook, Gutenberg ends up on the street. line, and proverbial sinker 13 years later he dies in abject poverty. 1455. Gutenberg finds himself in So what's the point of all this? court. And guess who the judge? Simply this. If you can't take advanAnother Fust. If that's not bad enough, tage of your typesetter who can you take Gutenberg's foreman, Peter Schoeffer is advantage of? in love with John Fust's daughter AldusType Studio, Los Angeles.


69

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Citizens tithe United States: In compliance with a custom as old as the government itself, I appear before you to address you briefly, and to take in your presence the oath prescribed by the Constitution of the United States to be taken by the President "before he enters on the execution of his office: 111 take the official oath today with no mental reservations, and with no purpose to construe the Constitution or laws by any hypercritical rules. And while I do not choose now to specify particular acts of Congress as proper to be enforced, I do suggest that it will be much safer for all, both in official and private stations. to conform to and abide by all those acts which stand unrepealed, than to violate any ofthem, trusting to find impunity in having them held to be unconstitutional. lilt is seventy-two years since the first inauguration of a President under our National Constitution. During that period fifteen different and greatly distinguished citizens have, in succession, administered the executive branch of the governm ent. They have conducted it through many perils, and generally with great success. Yet, with all this scope of precedent, I now enter upon the same task for the brief constitutional term of fouryears under great and peculiar difficulty A disruption of the Federal Union, heretofore only menaced, is now formidably attempted. Ill hold that, in contemplation of universal law and of the Constitution, the Union of these States is perpetual. Perpetuity is implied, if not expressed, in the fundamental law of all national governments. It is safe to assert that no government proper ever had a provision in its organic law for its own termination. 1113ut if the destruction of the Union by one or by a party only of the States be lawfully possible, the Union is less perfect than before the Constitution, having lost the vital element of perpetuity. I am loathe to close. We are nol enemies, but friends. We must not be enemies. Though passion may have strained, it must not break our bonds of affection. The _mystic chords of memory, stretching from every b attlefield and patriot grave to every living heart and hearthstone all over this broad land, will yet swell the chorus of the Union when again touched, as surely

they will be, by the better angels of our nature.111863: Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty,

and dedicated to the proposition that all men are

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created equal. ilNow we are engaged in a great civil war, testing whether that nation, or any nation so conceived and so dedicated, can long endure. We are met on a great battlefield of that war. We have come to dedicate a portion of that field as a final resting-place for those who here gave their lives that that nation might live. It is altogether fitting and proper that we should do this. Taut, in a larger sense, we cannot dedicate — we cannot consecrate—we cannot hallow—this ground. The brave men, living and dead, who struggled here, have consecrated it far above our poor power to add or detract. The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather, to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the

great task remaining before us—that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people. by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth.

430/435/440/480

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114 Beach Street, Rockaway, New Jersey 07866 (201) 625-4400 "Trademark of ITEK Corp

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Having a complete library of type designs is not as important as knowing how to use it.

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TYPOGRAPHY

331 EAS- 38 SI \ E\A/ YORK NY M/6 (212) 661-8787


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COLOR I SEPARATIONS MAKE THE DIFFERENCE

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Typeset ' g) ft S.) Z • gi I S) /1, ° 171 g) in Japanese "C' 4; to j..". ' 9 i L. J.. 2 ' ' At * 75, by A kt2 i 12 , < ' I 1- 17' L 2. 9 A- tz. V] 0) z ra tz *King 9 Gr: 41. S.7 PAZ L t 1=) 11 m Typographic 0 75 1 ' 12 9 /) 1 6 .2 L 1 h tt. L j.. '#.1 ' iJ. 6 1 h Service g) 'N*1111 tz a1) a)

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The Foreign Language Division of TGC.

305 E. 46th St., New York, N.Y.10017

14300" 327-9786

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Yes...you are only a phone call away from greater savings, better quality, and faster service buying color separations than you have ever known before. one of the finest teams of We have created at color separation craftsmen ever assembled, cameramen, strippers, dot etchers, and pressmen that are all dedicated to producing high-quality color separations, trueprofessionals producing Tr.t:G.c..: separations. To augment their fine technical ability, we have the most advanced photographic systems and our in-house press proofing staff is second to none. offers you fast, reliable service nationwide with door to door service! But best of all, we offer this fine color separation service at a very reasonable cost... including press proofs with minor corrections. Call toll free -1 800 327-9786 and start saving today - we are only a phone call away!

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74

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75

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We have 16 people like Jim throughout the United States who provide service and expertise like the above every day. If we can be of help to you on any of your problems or projects please contact us. 216 EAST 45 STREET • NEW YORK CITY 10017 • 212-490-2345

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THIS AD WAS SET IN OLIVE GRAPHIC BOLD 9736 AND OLIVE GRAPHIC 8737, EXCLUSIVE PHOTO-LETTERING FACES.

ARTHOUSE COMPANY NEW YORK :

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NEW YORK CITY , NEW YORK 10150 : ARTHOUSECMPNYBTO T P.OBX329 , M•I BRANCH POS 39 021 OFICE,AMBRDG MASS.

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Contains 4 complete pens, 00.0.1.2 ,one cone extractor a bottle of ink. a hinged box & instruction manual . List Price $36 00 Now, $18.00 per set

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Contains 7 pens one each of 030 thru 100. plus one bottle of ink. _ List Price $65.00 Now, $32.9u per set

(5 x 7 x 4") Solid Maple $30.00 ppd. with clamp $27.00 ppd. without clamp Make checks payable to TOOLDECKS Mail orders to:

New 3165 SP•7 Technical Pen Set

Contents: Seven complete pens with stainless steel points: 3 x 0, 00, 0, 1, 2, 3 and 4, nib keys; 3/. oz. bottle of water-proof black ink, in a hinged case with a pushbutton release.

Suggested List Price: $71.50

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Contains 9 complete pens 000.00.0.1.2,2.5.3.4.5, a bottle of ink.a cone extractor, hinged box & instruction manual, List Price $75.00 Now $37.50 per set

Contains 7complete pens

ocnoa 0.1.2.2.5.3 a bottle of

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76 Solution to puzzle on page 29.

Only the following Subscriber Companies are licensed to manufacture and sell ITC typefaces: AM International. Inc. Varityper Division 11 Mt. Pleasant Avenue East Hanover, N.J. 07936 (201) 887-8000 Phototypesetters and Photolettering Systems

Fundician Tipogrifica Neuiville, S.A. Puigmarti, 22 Barcelona-12 Spain 219 50 00 Poster Types

The Monotype Corporation Ltd. Salfords, Redhill, Surrey England Redhill 6 5959 Visual Communications Equipment

Alphatype Corporation 7711 N. Merrimac Avenue Niles, Illinois 60648 (312) 965-8800 AlphaSette and AlphaComp Phototypesetting Systems CRS Digital Phototypesetter

Geographies, Inc. P.O. Box R-1 Blaine. WA 98230 (206) 332-6711 Dry Transfer Letters

Officine Simoncini s.p.a. Casella Postale 776 40100 Bologna Italy (051) 744246 Hot Metal Composing Matrices and Phototypesetting Systems

Artype. Inc. 3530 Work Drive P.O. Box 7151 Fort Myers, Fla. 33901 (813) 332-1174 800-237-4474 Dry Transfer Letters Cut Out Letters Autologic, Inc. 1050 Rancho Conejo Blvd. Newbury Park, Calif. 91320 (213) 889-7400 APS-4/APS-5 CRT Phototypesetter Composition and Typesetting Systems Autologic SA 1030 Bussigny Pres Lausanne Switzerland 021/89.29.71 Bobst Graphic Products and Phototypesetting Systems H. Berthold AG Tyltowkanalstrasse 1-4 D-1000 Berlin 46 West Germany (030) 7795-1 Diatronic, ADS 3000, Diatext, Diatype, Staromatic, Staromat, Starograph Berthold of North America 610 Winters Avenue Paramus, NJ. 07652 (201) 262-8700 Diatronic, ADS, Diatype, Staromat, Diasetter, Repromatic Dr. Boger Photosatz GmbH 2 Wedel in Holstein Rissener Strasse 94 West Germany (04103) 6021-25 Manufacturers of Copytronic Phototext Composing Machines, Film Fonts, and Copytype Photolettering Systems and Fonts Cello-'Dtk Mfg., Inc. 35 Alabama Avenue Island Park, L.I., N.Y. 11558 (516) 431-7733 Dry Transfer Letters

Graphic Products Corporation 3601 Edison Place Rolling Meadows. 111. 60008 (312) 392-1476 Fbrmatt cut-out acetate letters and graphic art aids Graphics. Inc. 16001 Industrial Drive Gaithersburg, Maryland 20877 (301) 948-7790 Manufacturer of Dry Transfer Systems Harris Corporation Harris Composition Systems Division P.O. Box 2080 Melbourne. Florida 32901 (305) 259-2900 Fbtotronic 4000, TXT, 1200. 600 CRT 7400. 7450

Dr.-Lug Rudolf Hell GmbH Grenzstrasse 1-5 D2300 Kiel 14 West Germany (0431) 2001-1 Digiset Phototypesetting Equipments and Systems, Digtset-Fonts Information International 5933 Slauson Avenue Culver City Calif. 90230 (213) 390-8611 Phototypesetting Systems International Graphic Marketing 21B Quai Perdonnet P.O. Box 58 CH-1800 Vevey Switzerland (021) 51 85 56 Font Manufacturer International Type Fonts ApS c/o Cooper & Beatty Limited 401 Wellington Street West lbronto M5V 1E8 (416) 364-7272 Type Discs for Harris 600, 1200, 4000, TXT Typesetters Itek Composition Systems Division 34 Cellu Drive Nashua, N.H. 03060 (603) 889-1400 Phototypesetting Systems and Equipment, Film Strips, Standard and Segmented Discs, and Digitized Fonts

Chartpak One River Road Leeds, Mass. 01053 (413) 584-5446 Dry llansfer Letters Compugraphics Corporation 200 Ballardvale Street Wilmington, Mass. 01887 (617) 944-6555 EditWriters, CompuWriters, Rxt Editing Systems, MCS' 8200, 8400, 8600, Accessories and Supplies

Digital Visions. Inc. 454 West 46 St. NewYork, N.Y. 10036 (212) 581-7760 Interactive Computer Graphics Software Film Fonts International, Inc. 330 Phillips Ave. South Hackensack, N.J. 07606 (201) 440-9366 Manufacturers of fonts for: 2" Display Film Fonts Filmotype 7711 N. Merrimac Avenue Niles. Illinois 60648

(312) 965-8800 Film Fonts Fonts Hardy/Williams (Design) Ltd. 73 Newman St. London WI England 01-636-0474 Font Manufacturer

Letraset International Ltd. St. Georges House 195/203 Waterloo Road London SE1 84J England (01) 930-8161 Dry Transfer Letters L,etraset USA Inc. 40 Eisenhower Drive Paramus, NJ. 07652 (201) 845-6100 Dry Transfer Letters Linographics 770 N. Main Street Orange, California 92668 (714) 639-0511 Display Typesetters, 2" Film Fonts Mecanorma 78610 LePerray-en-Yvelines Paris. France 483.90.90 Dry Transfer Letters Mergenthaler Linotype Company 201 Old Country Road Melville, N.Y. 11747 (516) 673-4197 Linoterm, V-I-P Linotron, Omnitech CRTronic, Phototypesetting Equipment and Systems

SDEANTIDISESAL IHMEN SHMN I OPNDKA I ECDLOPC LSSTEMATERESI IC ATOESYNATOMYV STOFERUTUCN SSTLWATERM CKOODINGP RATSDNAO NOI TAL I Ad ACCASU NODWI T YOIDK AIKNMAN T 1ST T DIDCAMPAGN NEDR FCRWLEDPO CADE ARIVERSINC TENW REDRFRRGYG CSPW SDEDRFTGAT NODE QUPLOKIJU

/ f i prAZ

Optronics International, Inc. 7 Stuart Road Chelmsford, Mass. 01824 (617) 256-4511 Phototypesetting Systems

OLAT QWEDR FTGY MSIN . HTAET ING LTNHA SUPERDUP RKCAB I F STBEADU FNIKSO THOHTU PSLAV IP EXT 10 A TCASEDL V ROELP PARGD IMK TYD EEL I HWAJ OKJ G I ROOHOH A KR OUESOWHG OB I TNIAPIF UDORPSTD MBERDASR B ARG GE EEl LCVOLAARU AD IRBR

PhotoVision Of California, Inc. P.O. Box 552 Culver City Calif. 90230 (213) 870-4828 'NI Free: 800-421-4106 Spectra Setter 1200. Visual Display Setter, and 2" Film Fonts

:i**. # It 1 ik bk4/

Pressure Graphics, Inc. 1725 Armitage Court Addison, Illinois 60101 (312) 620-6900 Dry Transfer Letters

:

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Prestype, Inc. 194 Veterans Blvd. Carlstadt, N.J. 07072 (201) 933-6011 Dry Transfer Letters

.

NUMBMWAHDURSROGT I LOLNXE URA .0, P 4fr• CZ LVAMAAASEOENCP1 ONP V OOSS IMM I T I SGAVMON SADX I I CNK I LNBLZENHI QUIN CYRH IN EA E E TMANVASI EXTAN AORE L 0 TLNCAWEERPTEHN1LA NINE R C HANGRKLOABINI TYME A TNG HO OMEECTC IONALT IONC DAZE OS ONNAEDINTERCORNAT IWWB NHIC MMROSEREMKBLEAR RIESSUCROT ICALBLIEV 11111UNVOIEVECUANWH0UA 1 ESE

Ryobi Limited 762 Mesaki-Cho Fuchu-Shi Hiroshima-Ken 726 Japan Text/Display Phototypesetters Simulation Excel A.S. Sinsenveien 51 Oslo 5 Norway Tel: 47 - 2 - 15 66 90 PAGEscan Digital Typesetter PAGEcomp Interactive Ad and Page Make-up Terminal

U.S. POSTAL SERVICE

STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT AND CIRCULATION (Required by 39 U. S. C. 3689)

1. TITLE OF PUBLICATION U&lc (Upper and lower case)

A. PUBLICATION NO.

2. DATE OF FILING

ISSN 03626245

3. FREQUENCY OF ISSUE

A. NO. OF ISSUES PUBLISHED ANNUALLY.

Quarterly

9/17/82 B. ANNUAL SUBSCRIPTION PRICE

4

$10.00

lketype, Inc. 12 West 26th Street New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 924-1800 Dry Transfer Letters

4. COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS OF KNOWN OFFICE OF PUBLICATION

Itchnographics/Film Fonts P.O. Box 552 Culver City Calif. 90230 (213) 870-4828 Toll Free: 800-421-4106 Film Fonts, Studio Film Kits, and Alphabet Designers

6. FULL NAMES AND COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS OF PUBLISHER, EDITOR, AND

Visi-Graphics 8119 Central Avenue Washington, D.C. 20027 (301) 366-1144 Dry Transfer Letters Visual Graphics Corporation 5701 N.W. 94th Avenue Tamarac, Florida 33321 (305) 722-3000 Manufacturer of Photo Typositor and Original Typositor Film Fonts Xerox Corporation Digital Graphics Center 701 South Aviation Blvd. El Segundo, Calif. 90278 Mail Stop-A3-39 (213) 536-5926 Electronic Printing Systems Zipatone, Inc. 150 Fend Lane Hillside, Illinois 60162 (312) 449-5500 Dry Transfer Letters

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same as above MANAGING EDITOR

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International Typeface Corp., 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017 EDITOR (Name and Complete Mailing Address)

Edward Gottschall — International lypeface Corp., 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017 MANAGING EDITOR (Name and Complete Mailing Address)

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FULL NAME International lypeface Corporation Stockholders Lubahn, Burns & Co., Inc. Electrographic Corp.

COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017 50% 50%

2 Harnrnarskjold Plaza, New York, NY 10017 20 North Wacker Dr.,

Chicago, IL 60606 8. KNOWN BONDHOLDERS, MORTGAGEES, AND OTHER SECURITY HOLDERS OWNING OR HOLDING 1 PERCENT OR MORE OF TOTAL AMOUNT OF BONDS, MORTGAGES OR OTHER SECURITIES (If there are none, so state)

FULL NAME

COMPLETE MAILING ADDRESS

None

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Non-applicable

(I) (2) r—i HAS NOT CHANGED DURING 1 —i HAS CHANGED DURING L_J PRECEDING 12 MONTHS L-J PRECEDING 12 MONTHS

AVERAGE NO. COPIES EACH ISSUE DURING PRECEDING

10. EXTENT AND NATURE OF CIRCULATION A. B.

(If changed, publisher must submit explanation of change with this statement.)

TOTAL NO. COPIES (Net Press Run) PAID CIRCULATION 1. SALES THROUGH DEALERS AND CARRIERS,

12 MONTHS 183,000 none

STREET VENDORS AND COUNTER SALES

2. MAIL SUBSCRIPTION

Metagraphics Division of Intran Corp. 4555 W 77th St. Edina, Minn. 55435 (612) 835-5422 Digital Fonts for Xerox 9700

For further information, write or call:

TO FILING DATE 190,000 none 1,350

1,350

1,350

MENTARY AND OTHER FREE COPIES

175,600

186,413

E. TOTAL DISTRIBUTION (Sum of C and D) F. COPIES NOT DISTRIBUTED 1. OFFICE US_ LEFT OVER UN

178,200

187,763

C.

TOTAL PAID CIRCULATION (Sum of 1087

D.

FREE DISTRIBUTION BY MAIL, CARRIER OR OTHER MEANS. SAMPLES,COMPLI-

4,800

UNTED, SPOILED AFTEli PRINTING

2. RETURN FROM NEWS AGENTS

INTERNATIONAL TYPEFACE CORPORATION 2 HAMMARSKJOLD PLAZA NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10017 (212) 371-0699 TELEX: 125788

ACTUAL NO. COPIES OF SINGLE ISSUE PUBLISHED NEAREST

1,350

and 1082)

LICENSED

E

;

Purup Electronics 28 Jens Juuls Vej DK 8260 VIBYJ Denmark 456-28 22 11 I aver Forms Printer

D. Stempel AG Hedderichstrasse 106-114 Frankfurt am Main-70 West Germany (0611) 6068-1 Dry Transfer Letters

Or

4

2,237

none

none

183,000

190,000

G. TOTAL

(Sum of 9, Fl and 2—should equal net press run shown in A)

11. I certify that the statements made by me above are correct and complete PS Form June 1980

3526 (Page 1)

SIGNATURE AND TITLE OF ED/TOR, PUBLISHER, BUSINESS MANAGER, OR OWNER.

John Prentki, V.P.

(See instruction on reverse)


77

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MY PRIMARY JOB FUNCTION IS: (Check One Only) (k) (I) (m) (n) (a) (p)

(q) (r) (s) (t) (u) (v) (w) (x)

Artist, Illustrator. Graphic Artist, Art Director Creative Director Display and Package Design. Pasteup Artist,Typographer, Keyboarder. Type Director, Type Buyer Advertising Manager Sales Promotion Manager Production Manager Office Manager. Printing Buyer Purchasing Agent. Editor Writer. Teacher, Instructor Audio Visual. Principal Officer Secretary, Typist, etc. Other.

NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED IN YOUR ORGANIZATION 1-9 (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)

10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 250 and over

POSTLEITZAHL UND ORT

UNTERSCHRIFT

DATUM

Je su is etudiant

oui

non.

CLASSIFICATION PAR PROFESSIONS (Ne cocher qu'une seule fonction)

Meine Firma und/oder ich sind auf dem Gebiet der visuellen nein. ja Kommunikation tdtig Ich bin student

(f) (g) (h) (i) (j)

Autres.

(i) (j)

(Ne cocher qu'une seule fonction) (k) (I) (m) (n) (o) (p) (q) (r) (s) (t) (u) (v) (w) (x)

Artiste, Illustrateur Artiste graphique, Directeur artistique, Directeur de creation. Conception de ('exposition et de I'empaquetage. Metteur on pages,Typographe, Claviste. Directeur de composition, Acquereur de caracteres d'imprimerie. Directeur de publicite, Directeur de la promotion des ventes. Directeur de production, Directeur de bureau. __Acquereur de produits d'imprimerie, Agent prepose 6 I'achat. Reclacteur, Auteur Professeur, Instructeur Agent principal. Secretaire, Dactylographe, etc. Autres.

NOMBRE DE PERSONNES EMPLOYEES DANS VOTRE FIRME (1) (2)

(5) (6)

li131e142EB2

1-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 250 et plus

nein.

(Bitte eine ankreuzen) (a) (b) (c)

MON ACTIVITE PRINCIPALE EST:

ja

FIRMENKLASSIFIZIERUNG

Impression (Commerciale, Instantanee, etc.). Composition (Commerciale). Agence de publicite, Studio d'art, Conception, Independant. Journal, Revue, Edition de livres. Composition faite sur place ou par une societe et autres services de reproduction. Enseignement et/ou bibliotheques. Governement. Publicite de societe, Conception, Promotion. Traitement de communications et d'informations.

(d) (e)

PRI VAT

LAND

Mon organization et/ou je fais partit de communications visuelles non. oui

(3) (4)

Ulatc1122,812

CODE POSTAL

PAYS

(a) (b) (c)

FIRMA

LIEFERUNG AN

STRASSE

DATE

DATE

(i) (j)

RESIDENCE PRIVEE

SIGNATURE

SIGNATURE

(f) (g) (h)

TRAVAIL

DELIVREZ A

VILLE

CITY

(e)

FIRMA

ADDRESSE

ADDRESS

VORNAME

ZUNAME

BERUE

FIRME

COMPANY

(a) (b) (c) (d)

PRENOM

NOM

FONCTION

TITLE

I am a student

Bitte In Druckschrift Schreiben

(d) (e) (f) (g) (h)

Druckerei (Alaidenzdruck, Schnelldruck, usw). Schriffsetzerei (Werk—oder Layoutsatz). Werbeagentur, Grafikdesignatelier, Freischaffender 7eitungs-, Zeitschriften- oder Buchverlag. Firmeneigene Schriffsetzerei, Reproduktion oder Druckerei. Bildungsanstalt oder Bibliothek. BehOrde. Werbe-,VerkaufsfOrderungs- oder Designabteilung von Industrie- oder Handelsfirma. Kommunikation und Datenverarbeitung. Sonstiges.

MEINE HAUPTBERUFSTATIGKEIT: (Bitte eine ankreuzen) (k) (I) (m) (n) (o) (p) (d) (r) (s) (t) (u) (v) (w) (x)

KOnstler, Illustrator Grafiker, Art-Direktor, Kreativ-Direktor Entwurf von Verpackungen oder Auslagen. Reinzeichner, Schriftsetzer TypogratType-Direktor, Einkaufer von Schriffsatz. Werbe- oder VerkaufsfOrderungsleiter. Produktionsleiter, Burovorsteher Drucksacheneinkdufer Redakteur, Texter. Lehrer, Ausbilder Audio-visuell. FirmeneigentOmer, leitender Angestellter Sekretdrin, Stenolypistin, usw. Sonstiges.

ZAHL DER BESCHAFTIGTEN MEINER FIRMA ODER BEHORDE: (1) (2) (3) (4) (5) (6)

Neettaffl2

1-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 Ober 250


78

Now You can order these lit Type Specimen Booklets

Name Nom

Company

Title

Firme

Fonction

Street Address

City

Mlle

Country

To obtain these handsomely designed, colorful ITC type specimen booklets, just complete this order form and mail it to us. All orders must be accompanied by a remittance. Please make checks payable, in U.S. funds, to ITC at: 2 Hammarskjold Plaza,NewYork,NY.10017,USA

Firma

Beruf

Rue et n°

Strasse

En vente Ces brochures-specimens lit sent Iivrables de stock

Postleitzahl und Orf

Pays

Land

Code Postal

Quantity Quantite Anzahl

Zip Code

Unit Price Total Prix unitaire Total Einzelpreis Gesamtpreis

Nunmehr kennen Sie tiles* 11C-Schriftmusterhefte besteikan

FIE IIKKIKIETS: ITC American Typewriter" ITC Avant Garde Gothic' with Oblique ITC Avant Garde Gothic' Condensed ITC Barcelona' _ITC Bauhaus' _ITC Benguiat ® • ITC Benguiat® Condensed _ITC Benguiat Gothic" ITC Bookman' ITC Caslon No.224" ITC Century' with Condensed ITC Cheltenham' with Condensed ITC Clearface® _ITC Cushing' ITC Eras® ITC Fenice ITC Franklin Gothic' Friz Quadrata ITC Gaillard' _ITC Garamond" with Condensed _ITC Isbell' Italia ITC Kabel" ITC Korinne with Kursiv ITC Lubalin Graph''" with Oblique ITC Modern No. 216''" ITC New Baskerville" ITC Newtext" ITC Novarese _ITC Quorum® ITC Serif Gothic® ITC Souvenir® ITC Tiffany with Italic ITC Zapf Book' ITC Zapf Chancery" _ITC Zapf Dingbats ® . ITC Zapf Internationale

U&Ic BACK COPIES: U&Ic, Vol. 3, No.4 U&Ic, Vol. 4, No.1 U&Ic, Vol. 4, No. 2 U&Ic, Vol. 4, No.4 U&Ic, Vol. 5, No. 4 U&Ic, Vol. 6, No. 1 U&Ic, Vol. 6, No.2 U&Ic, Vol. 6, No. 3 U&Ic, Vol. 6, No.4 U&Ic, Vol. 7, No. 2 U&Ic, Vol. 7, No.3 U&Ic, Vol.8, No. 1 U&Ic, Vol.8, No. 3 U&Ic, Vol. 8, No.4 U&Ic, Vol. 9, No. 1 U&Ic, Vol. 9, No.2 U&Ic, Vol. 9, No. 3 U&Ic, Vol. 9, No.4

Pour obtenir ces jolies brochures-specimens ITC, it suffit de remplir ce bon de commande et de nous le retourner.Toute commande doit etre accompagnee d'un avis de paiement acquitte. Priere de payer en $ americains au nom de ITC: 2 Hammarskjold Plaza,NewYork,NY.10017,USA

Wenn Sie diese attraktiv entworfenen, farbvollen ITC-Schriftmusterhefte erhalten mOchten,ffillen Sie bitte den Bestellschein aus.Alle Bestellungen mussen vorbezahit werden. Senden Sie Ihre Zahlanweisung (in U.S. Waitrung und zahlbar an ITC) zusammen mit dem Bestellschein an: 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, NewYork, N.Y. 10017, USA

$1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 1.00 100 100 100 1.00 100 1.00 100 100 1.00 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 1.00 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100 100

Foreign U.S. Price $2.50 $1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 4.00 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 5.00 2.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 150 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50 2.50 1.50

Total Order, in U.S. funds $ Add postage for booklets $ N.Y. Residents add state sales tax $ Remittance in U.S. funds enclosed $

.50

Montant de la commande $ Affranchissement des brochures, en $ americains $ Paiement ci-joint (en $ americains), total $

.50

Gesamtprels (in U.S.-Wahrung) $ Zuz(iglich Porto $ Belgefugte Zahlanweisung (in U.S.-Wahrung) $

.50 Notice to typographers: for purchases of 50 or more ITC specimen booklets,contact Mr. John Prentki for special typographer's price.

-


79

THE ITC TYPEFACE COLLECTION IS DESIGNED TO MAKE SPECIFYING TYPEFACES EASIER ITC Century ITC Cheltenham ITC Clearface ITC Eras ITC Fenice ITC Franklin Gothic Ft iz Quadrata ITC Garamond ITC AmericanTA,:pewriter Italia ITC Kabel ITC Avant Garde Gothic ITC Korinna ITC Bauhaus ITC Lubalin Graph ITC Benguiat ITC Newtext ITC Benguiat Gothic ITC Novarese ITC Bookman

The ITC Collection includes all ITC typeface faurnilies issued through 1980

ITC Quorum ITC Serif Gothic ITC Souvenir ITC Tiffany ITC Zapf Book ITC Zapf Chancery ITC Zapf International PLUS The ITC Display Typeface Collection AND . The ITC ZapfDingbat Series

ITC Benguiat hook

,rixdeighijkirnrwpQrstinu RSTUvu 01'Q Irt10 .SRLPIN me in typography is the result of wining vieite an attitude. Rs appeal comes an the t re than rstandinq used in its planning: the designer must co lc. In contemporaiy advertising the perfect Integrati

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26 good reasons to use Benguiat Book

Please print/Bitte im Druckschrift/Ecrivez en caracteres d'imprimerie

1. rIbxt blocks plus alphabet showings for sizes 6,7,8,9,10,11, 12,14,16,18,20 and 24 points.

International Typeface Corporationt 2 Hammarskjold Plaza New York, New York 10017

2. Alphabet lengths in points for each text point size shown. These relate to an easy-to-use copyfitting chart at the back of the book

Please send me The ITC Typeface Collection:' Enclosed is my payment of $49.95* Ship my book postpaid.

3. Alphabet display showings in sizes 30,36,48,60 and 72 points plus 1" caps. 4. Complete character showing of each ITC display font.

tubrary and bookstore orders should be sent to Robert Silver Associates, 95 Madison Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10016 *New York State residents add applicable sales tax. For shipments outside the United States, please remit $51.45. (All orders must be accompanied by a remittance payable in U.S. funds. No C.O.D.s.) NAME/NAME./NOM

STREET ADDRESS/STRASSE/RUE ET N°

5. Headline presentation in display size range. CITY/POSTLEIZAHL UND ORT/VILLE

Basic facts about "The ITC Typeface Collection": 572 pages. 121/2 ,,x121/2." Hardbound. Smyth sewn for easy opening.

STATE AND ZIP CODE/LAND/PAYS, CODE POSTAL U&Ic 12/82


80

ITC CENTER

TYPOGRAPHIC 'TREASURES: PROFESSOR Fli.ERNST SCHnEIDLEK SELECTIONS FROM THE WORK OF

April 4-Play 13 Japan Typography Exhibition 300 examples of current and traditional applications of Japanese typography are included in this exhibition, organized by the Japan Typography Assoc iation. A Buddhist Bible, kites, bags, Sumo signs, Kabuki letters and stamp letters will illustrate traditional uses of typography. Fosters, packages, calendars, brochures and corporate identity programs represent the best typographic work done in Japan in the last ten years.A third section of the exhibition will include selections of current work of Japan's foremost typographic designers. Originally held in Tokyo and Osaka in 1982, this exhibition is sponsored by the New York Type Directors Club in association with the Japan lypography Association.

Future Exhibitions TDC 29: the Annual Type Directors Club Exhibition fifth Annual Design Competition of the Broadcast Designers Association An exhibition of Soviet typographic design "Typo &"— an exhibition of Czechoslovakian typographic design

Professor E IL. Ernst Schneidler is considered to be one of the foremost type designers, calligraphers and typographic designers of the first half of this century. In 1920 Professor Schneidler started teaching at the Stuttgart Kunstgewerbeschule where his tenure was to last almost thirty years. In 1921 he founded his private press, 'Juniperus-Presse." A collection of his work, "Der Wassermann," was begun in 1925, hidden due to political circumstances in 1933, and finally published in 1945 in a limited edition of only 70 sets. "Der Wassermann," a much treasured work, is one of the outstanding rarities in the graphic arts today. The exhibition, which is selected from a folio of 700 sheets, includes a wide variety of typographic and calligraphic prints, illustrations, book titles, bible and text pages.

ITC Center 2 Hammarskjold Plaza (866 Second Avenue between 46th and 47th Streets), 3rd Moor, New York, New York 10017 Hours: 12 noon-5:00 p.m.Admission: Free Open Monday— Friday (Closed February 21st) For more information call (212) 371-0699.

CONTROLLED CIRCULATION POSTAGE PAID AT FARMINGDALE, N.Y. 11735 AND NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017 USTS PURL 073430

MOVING? CHANGE OF ADDRESS: SEND THIS LABEL (OR A COPY) WITH YOUR CORRECTIONS TO: U&LC SUBSCRIPTION DEPT., 2 HAMMARSVOLD PLAZA NEWYORK, NY 10017

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