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(1981)


VOLUME SEVEN, NUMBER FOUR, DECEMBER. 1980 HERB Lt./SALIN, EDITORIAL Sr DESIGN DIRECTOR AARON BURNS. EDITORIAL DIRECTOR EDWARD RON DTHALER. EDITORIAL DIRECTOR EDWARD GOTTSCHALL. EDITORIAL DIRECTOR MARION MULLER. ASSOCIATE EDITOR JASON CALM. JUREK WAJDOWICZ, DESIGN IS PRODUCTION EDITORS MICHAEL ARON. CLAUDIA CLAY. TONY DISPIGNA. JOE FEIGENBAUM. ART AND PRODUCTION R HODA SPARSER. RESEARCH DIRECTOR JOHN PRENTKI, BUSINESS MANAGER NANCY PORTER. EDITORIAL TRAFFIC COORDINATOR HELENA WALLSCH LAG. ADVERTISING/PRODUCTION MANAGER 0 INTERNATIONAL TYPEFACE CORPORATION 1980 PUBLISHED FOUR TIMES A YEAR IN MARCH, JUNE, SEPTEMBER AND DECEMBER BY INTERNATIONAL TYPEFACE CORPORATION 2 HAMMARSKJOLD PLAZA. NEW YORK. N.Y.10017 A JOINTLY OWNED SUBSIDIARY OF PHOTO-LETTERING. INC. AND LUBALIN. BURNS & CO., INC. CONTROLLED CIRCULATION POSTAGE PAID AT NEW YORK. N.Y. AND AT FARMINGDALE. N.Y. USTS PURL 073990 PUBLISHED IN U.S.A. ITC OFFICERS EDWARD RONDTHALER,CHAIRMAN AARON BURNS. PRESIDENT HERB LUSALIN, EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT JOHN PRENTKI.VICE PRESIDENT, GENERAL MANAGER BOB FARBER, SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT ED BENGUIAT,VICE PRESIDENT STEPHEN KOPEC. VICE PRESIDENT U.S. SINGLE COPIES $1.50 ELSEWHERE. SINGLE COPIES 52.50 TO QUALIFY FOR FREE SUBSCRIPTION COMPLETE AND RETURN THE SUBSCRIPTION FORM IN THIS ISSUE TO ITC OR WRITE TO THE ITC EXECUTIVE OFFICE. 2 HAMMARSKJOLD PLAZA. NEW YORK. N.Y. 10017

In this issue: Editorial

New career directions

challenge everyone involved with graphic communications, including students and educators. The old cliche,"It's back to the drawing

board again'may have its 1980s counterpart in,"It's back to school again: The need is there. New kinds of typesetters and electronic page makeup devices, graphic creation stations and display terminals, even the electronic/ digital typesetting of color halftones, are commercial realities. International Calligraphy Today Most of us now, and certainly everyone by 1985, will need to know what In the face of electronic and mechanical "marvels," these devices can and cannot do, and some of us may even have to operate calligraphers thrive! Eight pages of their art culled from the juried exhibition sponsored by the ITC some of them and be involved in purchase decisions concerning them. Center. Page 3. The steady stream of new capabilities becoming commercial is accelerLou Myers ating. If you read U&lc's Vision '80s report you got the broad, basic picture. His observations on "family affairs" will make you laugh or cry, depending on how you respond to the But that picture will fade into obsolescence unless you keep up with the developments reported in U&lc's Vision '80s Updates and in the trade press, truth. Page 12. and in the special newsletters and conferences serving our field. Consider just Ms. Sandra Morrow two of the many items that reached our desk the day we wrote this editorial: A"born" talent, plus a little training, plus a huge passion. See how it adds up. Page 14. 1. A report on Monotype's new Lasercomp's graphics capabilities.To summarize: This

What students, teachers and professionals in Graphic Communications must know about vocational opportunities, skills and educational requirements for the new technology. Page 2.

Carol Wald's Nostalgic Fun & Games

A backwards glance at the graphic plots, ploys and schemes devised by advertisers of yesteryear to snare readers. Page 16. Hebrew NewYear Cards

Stan Brod joins us in wishing you a happy 1981 or 5741,whichever you subscribe to. Page 20. Kirk's Work

laser typesetter can generate halftones, create white on black reversals, output patterns and tints, ovals and curves and potentially can interface to an electronic page makeup system. 2. The new Metroset 40o digital typesetter (Information International, Inc.) can set halftones digitized on the 3600 illustration scanner. Triple-I devices are also capable of producing fine-screen, commercially acceptable color halftones and typesetting them and outputting them in position on a fully madeup page.

Technologies such as these continue to rain down on us and to become

A junior high school teacher gets a new perspective less costly and thus penetrate a wider market, a market that may increasingly on perspective. Page 22. call upon everyone at some point in the creative-production process to exercise Oswaldo Miranda of Brazil

Some extraordinary graphics from a Brazilian,with a crazy handwriting. Page 24. Best Face Forward

A Baltimore graphics group combines a famous literary face with two handsome ITC faces for the benefit of their native city. Page 28. Crossword Puzzle

In their newest puzzle for U&lc Al McGinley and Lee Gardner rivet your attention on robots. Page 30. Vision '80s Update

A roundup of what's new in reproduction processes, electronic mail and word processing. Page 32.

the taste and judgment needed to use the new technologies most effectively. What's a person to do? Go back to school? But how when, where? In fact, the bigger question is what are the schools to do? At the very least the schools will need industry cooperation regarding equipment, speakers, and teaching aids to do the job. They face a multiple challenge to: Graduate students at least well alerted to the new technologies and their significance. Offer post-graduate crash courses to professionals on leave. Find the teachers, speakers, equipment to really do these things. Fit such new programs into their curriculum and facilities.

Perhaps, to cope with these challenges, the schools may have to work together to set up a pool of speakers, perhaps run a program (several days) Alan Cober's Anatomical Notebook where senior students of several schools can attend.This may make it easier Lou Myers puts down his own pencil and makes some perceptive comments on the art of his friend, to attract speakers from industry and to finance such a special "course:' PerAlan Cober. Page 34. haps the schools should consider a central, or regional"laboratory"with various kinds of new equipment available for a hands-on familiarization course. And What's New from ITC (ITC Isbell) maybe a short intensive updating course is needed for teachers as well as for Our newest offering was designed by two distinguished Detroit talents, Dick Isbell and Jerry students; and this, too, might best be done with groups of schools cooperating. Campbell. It is a classic face that lends itself to This is a tremendous problem.Yet the schools must face it if they are to relaxed contemporary moods and formal statements with equal aplomb. Page 39. make a meaningful contribution in training students and retraining professionals for the new real world in which art/design careers must function. Ritratti Degli Artisti Plu Celebri While some schoolboys worshiped sports figures The need is great. The demands of the graphic communications industry and rock stars, Stephen Alcorn created his own are urgent.There is no time to spare.And there has never been a better time galaxy of super stars. Page 44. for schools, individually or collectively, to develop their own crash programs, Something from Everybody right now to understand what needs to be done, what their roles should be, and Including a portrait of the ITC family, featuring how best to adjust to these new educational demands in real time. Jason Calfo s foot. Page 53. THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC NOVARESE


3 1. Alice, NewYork, IV.Y , U.S. A. 2.John S. Allen, New York, NY , U.S.A. 3. Curtis Anderson, New York, NY , U.S.A. 4. Elizabeth Anderson ( 5), Portland, Oregon, U.S.A. 5. Georgina Artigas, Miami, Florida, U.S.A. 6. Kay Atkins, Middletown, Rhode Island, U. S.A. 7. Christel Aumann (2), Munich, West Germany 8. Guillerrna Rodriguez Benitez, SanJuan, Puerto Rico, U.& A. 9. Adolf Bernd, Bad Munder, West Germany 10. Raphael Boguslav (3), Newport, Rhode Island, U. S.A. 11. Ivan Bold 'tzar (2), Novi Sad, Yugoslavia 12. Carla Boma, New York, NY , U.S.A. 13. Czeslaw Borowczyk, Warsaw Poland 14. Robert Boyajian, New York, NY , U.S.A. 15. Lawrence Brady, Los Alamitos, California, U.S.A. 16. Marsha Brady Los Alamitos, California, U.S.A. 17. Chris Brand (3), Breda, Netherlands 18. Volkmar Brandt, Leipzig', East Germany 19. Stan Brod (2), Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. 20. Walter C. Brzoza, Schenectady New York, U. S. A. 21. Hans.Joachim Burgert (2); West Berlin, West Germany 22. Dot Caputi, Centerport, New York, USA. 23. Crous-lhdal, Boulogne-Billancourt, France 24. Raymond fronklin DaBoll (2), Woolwich, Maine, U. SA. 25. Ismar David (4), New York, NY , U.S.A. 26. Sidney Days Welwyn, Hertfordshire, England 27. Dorothy Dehn, Portland, Oregon, U.S. A 28. Claude Dieterich (2), Lima, Peru 29. Sandra Kay Dixon, Mayfield Heights, Ohio, U.S. A. 30. Fritz Eberhardt, Harleysville, Pennsylvania, U. S A. 31. Kevin Elston, Oakland, California, U.S.A. 32.Jean Evans, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U. S. A 33. Gail M. Everett, Exmouth, Devon, England 34. Hal Fiedler, New York, N.Y, U.S. A. 35. Paul Freeman (2), Newyork, IV.Y , U. S A. 36. Henri Friedlaender, Motza Illit NearJerusalem, Israel 37. 7bshio Fukuyama (2), Kyoto, Japan 38. Jim Gemmill (3), Salt Lake City, Utah, US. A 39. Barbara Getty Portland, Oregon, U.S.A. 40. 71m Girvin (2), Seattle, Washington, U.S. A 41. Kazuo Hashimoto ( 2),7bkyo, Japan 42. Karlgeorg Hoefer (2),Weilburger, West Germany 43. Lothar Hoffmann (2), Harper Woods, Michigan, U. S.A. 44. Victoria Hoke, Oakland, California, U. S.A. 45. Lorenzo Homar (2), Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, U. SA 46. Otto Hurm,14enna, Austria 47. Thomas Ingmire, San froncisco, California, U.S. A. 48. DonaldJackson (2), Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico, U.S.A. 49. R. K Joshi, Bombay; India 50. kri Kahan, Newport Beach, California, U.S.A. 51. Osamu Kataoka (2), Tbkyo,Japan 52.Jerry Kelly (2), NewYork, IV.Y , US A. 53. Hermann Kilian (2), fronkfurt,West Germany 54. S. R Knight (4), Solihull, West Midlands, United Kingdom 55. Karen Kocon-Gowan, Cambridge, Massachusetts, U.S.A. 56. Rachid M. Koraichi ( 2 ), La Marsa,7Unisia 57. Wieslaw Kasinski, Warsaw Poland 58. Lubomir KratIcy Bratislava, Czechoslovakia 59. Eva Ursula Lange, Bautzen, East Germany 60. Gun Larson (2), Klagstorp, Sweden 61. Olivia L. Lin, Thipei,kriwan, Republic ofChina 62. Alfred Linz (2), Nuremberg, West Germany 63. Denis Paul Lund, NewYork, IV.Y , U. S A. 64. Karin Meister, Amsterdam, Netherlands 65. Lawrence V Mikol (2), Lisle, Illinois, U. S. A 66. Ahmed Moustafa, London, England 67. Maury Nemoy (2), North Hollywood, California, USA. 68. Friedrich Neugebauer (14), Bad Goisern, Austria 69. Motoaki Okuizurni,7bkyo,Japan 70. Fred PaulcenJerusalem, Israel 71. Darlene Pekul, Lake Geneva, Wisconsin, U.S. A 72. Friedrich Peter, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada 73. Michael lbdesta, Carrollton, Virginia, U.S. A 74. Friedrich Poppl,Mesbaden, West Germany 75. Gottfried Pott, Wiesbaden, West Germany 76. Leonid Pronenko (3), Krasnodar; U. S S. R. 77. Heinz Benz, Stuttgart, West Germany 78. Marcy Robinson (2), Nutley; NewJersey U.S. A. 79. Erkki Ruuhinen (12 ), Helsinki, Finland 80. Herbert Sahliger (11), Munich, West Germany 81. Ina Saltz, New York, N.Y , USA. 82. Robert Saunders ( 2 ), Squantum, Massachusetts, U.S.A. 83. Werner Schneider ( 3), Wiesbaden; West Germany 84. Heinz Schumann (2), Karl Marx Stadt, East Germany 85. Yoko Shindoh (2), Tbkyo,Japan 86. Eita Shinohara ( 5),7bkyo, Japan 87. Steven Skaggs, Lawrence, Kansas, U. S. A 88. Kennedy Smith, Salisbury; Wilts, England 89. Paul Standard, Newyork, NY , U. SA. 90.Jacqueline Svaren, Portland, Oregon, U. S A 91. Ikko kinaka,7bkyo, Japan 92. Bill Taylor, Dallas, kxas, U.S. A 93. Alvin Y. Tsao, Republic of Chin 94.Julio Vega ( 3), New York, N.Y. , U.S. A 95.Jovica Veljovic (4), Suvi Do, Yugoslavia 96. Sheila Waters, Gaithersburg, Maryland, U. SA 97. George Watson, Coalville, Leicester, England 98.John Weber (2), Northfield, Illinois, U. S A. 99. Patricia Weisberg (2), New York, NY, USA. 100. Martin Wilke, West Berlin, West Germany 101.John Woodcock, Tadworth, Surrey England 102. Margaret E. Young, Wembley, Middlesex, England 103. Gudrun Zapf von Hesse, Darmstadt, West Germany 104. Morris Zaslaysky Los Angeles, California, U.S. A 105. Edit Ziga'ny (2), Budapest, Hungary

A report on ITC's exhibition of International Calligraphy Today worked with non-Roman alphabets,i.e., It is always invigorating to do better than Chinese, Hebrew and Old German script, you expected.That's how words like "underhad a decided advantage because of innate estimated" and "overwhelmed" crept into the rhythms of the characters. language. In general the jurors reported they were hard When we conceived of sponsoring an exhibiput to limit their selections, and were thanktion of contemporary calligraphy,we predicted ful that they could list the names strictly in that "this ancient art should be enjoying a alphabetical order, as they appear on this page. renaissance in the age of the computer."And that is exactly the situation. The cold, imperAfew words from Hermann Zapf sonal climate of our high-technology world on the kinship ofealligraphers has perversely warmed up the fingers of an amazing number of calligraphers. We frankly There is something unique about calligraphers.We are the last remaining "individuunderestimated, and were overwhelmed,by als" in the realms of art. Calligraphy is the the response. We received 2,400 entries! It was most intimate,personal,spontaneous form of not just the quantity of mail that piled up on expression. Like a fingerprint, or a voice print, our desks,but the postmarks on the packages it is unique for each person. Calligraphers that astonished us.We received entries from can't be compared. We can't be grouped into Austria, China, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, England,Finland,France,Hungary,India,Israel, "schools" or "styles" or "traditions." It is our respect for our differences that unites us and Japan, The Netherlands, Peru, Poland, Sweden, keeps us free of the competitiveness that eats Taiwan,limisia,United States,USSR,West up so much energy in other areas of graphic Germany and Yugoslavia. Because of the limitations of hanging space, design. The feelings of friendship reach across national borders and whole continents. our jury selected only 197 pieces for exhibition.And because of the limitations ofprinting We're involved in an art form that is timeless space,we can reproduce only a fraction of and boundless. Calligraphy has an ancient histhose selected in this issue oflUeAc.The choices tory,but it is still the source of contemporary you'll see on the next few pages reflect a repreletter forms that express the spirit and tastes sentative cross-section of the variety of work, of our times.There are no language or cultural not any order of preference. roadblocks,either. Our new forms have come from the vigorous calligraphy of old Japanese Afew words about the judging masters as well as from contemporary Western scribes. It's never easy to be a juror. No matter how much experience you have in graphic design, But beyond its utilitarian service, callig-no matter how assuredly you make decisions raphy is a form ofintense personal expression. on a day-to-day basis,when you are confronted Ray DaBoll says that spontaneity is the lifewith hundreds upon hundreds of choices, blood of it. But the lifelong satisfaction is in normal rational criteria fizzle away, and certhe discipline, the constant practice, the repetitain gut reactions take over. Fortunately, the tion of exercises, the perfection of a skill and in gut reactions of certain highly sensitized the challenge of measuring one's work against graphic designers are very trustworthy. So the great historic forms.Anyone who is fasciwhen our judges, Hermann Zapf; Ed Benguiat, nated by and practices calligraphy will never Philip Grushkin, Herb Lubalin and Jeanyee be bored with life. Wong handed down their decisions,we felt Our feeling for calligraphy, and our future confident of their choices.We also are quite in it, has nothing to do with the nature of the confident that every one of the entries would jobs we do, nor with how history treats our art have been worthy of exhibition space, if we form. Whether it is a museum treasure, a had enough ofit. piece of printed ephemera, an informal note No attempt was made to give prizes or list or a single, beautifully written character, it is work in order of preference. The variety of all the same to us.We celebrate and appreciwork, tastes and functions precluded any • ate each other for what we do with such comparisons or one-two-three listing. Neither humble tools as pens...brushes...and a few would our judges venture to make pronouncedrops of heartblood in our ink ments or generalizations about skill or competency based on geographic considerations. International Calligraphy lbday Returns to the ITC Center August 3-September 25. Because of its great But they did make some observations which popularity and the large number of people who came to see they are willing to share. In general, the work it- riot once but several times- International Calligraphy from the United States was the most rational, 7bday will have a return engagement at the ITC Center, functional, minimal and controlled. The Euro- 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, New York City, August 3-September 25. The show consists of197 examples of contemporary calligpean entries showed the most abandon, most raphy from all over the world as well as slides and a film willingness to take risks, and were most exof Hermann Zapf show chairman and world renowned calligrapher, explaining and demonstrating how he works. pressionistic. Finally, calligraphers who THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC ZAPF INTERNATIONAL


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rn 6 rucl) ju Worts jtvingt

fru h m or ens (rigen allsdam cricleftWalicrn hullos dieNebet and mittags le9t fish ein Gittcr von Weller] iiDer die FUChe do wdhers, 3bCI1CiS CU tin runt er itn -DunkCi' fric9elt die Sterne-

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INCUNABULA NARRAT anivinilich du rdi fdicinen midi Inch tende l'a [ten Lind rine und Bilcler: clic Piffle der (Doric, Pinier.micn Papier einer red lichen Sorte nuralliiirdirzugclan ,allzufair dienend dem Zweck u nd den 4citenRmier,PergailleMIK10 clas (fold and den Puniur , and keiner , der acinet iliewirMichen Linen? Verfrinannuift $fjrkeunclMacht in das 11,0gen• mid ich foil das WI in licncrerBilile , icipweirscr El pieritoff ?

filIcr Om mil otogrtilortniniOnionni

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Dns l°''''Schr'ft

"‘ 1".4"."61

The Selovebenbecn felon ”Lot c, h,,,,,,,,o,”.m•

HERBERT SAHLIGER,WEST GERMANY

:19 * ifict_c

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11

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Atfrot 99CIPAGitgAt

HERMANN KILIAN, WEST GERMANY


Lo u Mtierr


13

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC KABEL


14

Ms. Sandra Mormw The lettering and logos on these pages show the hand of an elegant, sophisticated artist with tremendous flair. But in the face of such work, we were frankly stunned by the meagre resume that came with it Age: 33; Education: 1 yr. Kansas State University; Experience: 9 years with well-known card company; currently free-lance hand-letterer and logo designer. Maybe Sandra Morrow is an intuitive designer... or she was born gifted. How she has nurtured her talent can probably be described best by duplicating part of the letter she submitted with her work

"i had the desire to be 'best' at something. the best of my talent blessings was to be able to design 'personal' logo designs using the receiver's name and personality. almost all of my work samples were 'gifts' done freely with the inspiration of love. as i did 'hours' of labor i prayed to the father to bless the receiver of each one to prosper. i do this with all my lettering—both personal and professional... now— at 33—i'm reborn and filled with the holy spirit and have returned my 'talent' back to god and am in total service to him in the name ofjesus. as he choose_ s i will both teach the 'word' and/or hand-letter it. AMEN"


15

V'

ckilithvivi THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC TIFFANY


16

America loves pictures— and what could be more fun than a picture which is also a puzzle? In the years before television when most people lived in relative isolation in their rural communities, puzzles and games were quite the rage.A game might be an evening's occupation. After all, there was not a lot in the way of entertainment. One could not dash off to the movies, flick on Nor radio, or settle down in comfort in front of the electronic "homeentertainment center," so, people with leisure improvised their own "home-entertainment." Friends, neighbors, might be invited over to play charades or parlor games, to take part in readings, dramatizations and skits; perhaps even a home-bred version of I, Claudius performed in the parlor: Visual entertainments proliferated, probably filling whatever need tele-

PICTURE PUZZLES &PARLOR

message. The attraction of an illus- game:' "One, after which her stomtrated game or puzzle guaranteed ach isn't empty:' "When Eve prethat the advertiser's message sented Adam with a little Cain:' would be kept in the house for Surprisingly, as many as nine :D BY OFVAS quite some time. words were crammed into the one-inch area. Other optical illuvision does today. For a viewer's Newspapers and magazines also delight were stereopticon slides, regularly featured illustrated puz- sions include the "topsy-turvies," peep-shows, magic lantern shows zles, but their fragility makes them those drawings which appear to be one subject when viewed upright and cast-shadow plays on the wall. rare items for collectors. Among and another when turned upsidePeople amassed trade cards, post- examples shown here, the "Ten down. cards and clippings and put them Presidents" folding paper puzzle in scrapbooks. These pictorial enter- was cut from a pre-1900 news"Mechanical" gamecards depend tainments seemed especially impaper. Trade cards and postal for effect upon a fold or a moving portant to a population which was cards, which have survived better, part. The mechanical advertising just barely literate. Word games make up the rest of the examples. cards illustrated here are called and puzzles of today, such as The 1906 Dederick postcards are "metamorphics:' They transform a Scrabble or crosswords, would optical illusions, images which "before" situation to "after" when hardly have interested us then. alter according to how they are unfolded.As examples, the instant Rather; it was picture puzzles viewed. To read the following cure effected by Tarrant's Seltzer; or which interested audiences. Both sentences, hold the cards a short acne miraculously cured, or hair postcard manufacturers and addistance in front of one eye, and restored! Just as in 10-second televertisers were quick to see the tilt obliquely until the condensed vision"spot" commercials drab advantage of producing puzzle words come into view: "Being hair achieves instant "bounce:' TV cards bearing an advertiser's only skin deep it is only a skin commercials, it seems, are heirs ap-

WHAT SENATOR JONES SAID A t.

dV

ABOL

0/X

de

HOME MADE HAPPY

C000

' tT' e C AI OM ST111::TSGI ' US U3g2ID:Or klallfIg849240/ WHAT WAS

'1741.1.7.1"4.U.S

141? 1 "S CC O*.r/tr YNA"AILVOOS

MANI JOSIS:MEOSIXSEMIENSASIDEOZuvuf.a.Ars or, 5/.0 MrHAL NESSUS it/ASSET PRICES* ET 1011 SEM I rev' PAM ME SMARSENASARTNIRIE Ply IA THE REST WALL

THERE WAS A MAN WHO USED TO SC IN AGONY MOST OF HIS TIME AND ALL THE JOYS OF LIFE WERE MARRED BY PAIN FROM CORNS BOTH SOFT AND HARD ALL REMEDIES INCREASED MIS PAIN CHIROPODISTS HE TRIED IN VAIN HE MET A GERMAN FRIEND uNT IL TORTURES END' wHo SAID

A

BEHOLD! HOME UNNAPPYj HUSBAND SUFFERING

THE PANGS OF INDIGESTION. AND THE WIFE, Y HEADACHE RACKED. AND S/CKLY CHILDRESS VRIES ALAS' NO MOMENT KNOWS OF PEACEFUL LIFE .

IMNSIMAT IMINsw X14tra TAISOUS SOMME COED.

HOME MADE. HAPPY

WHAT SENATOR JONES SAID ABOUT '

A(.0 ./X Cie

1311 WARRANT'S, ELTZER AFERIEI1/411

COCO.

THOSE WORDS Or WISDOM WIPE NOT LOST,AND MRS JONES NOW OUTS THE FAMOUS NOM DE COCO AID HEN PUDDIASS CARE AMA PISS THE SENATOR DECLARES TO SE A I: MOOT EXCELLENT WITH MUCH LESS MONLYTHAN BEFORE FORTIS, MATERIAL SPENT 'MK OCAR THE SENATOR OFT SAM' I TOLD Mu THAT IT WAS SO, ALL THE WORLD /MOWS TOE DIRT BESTS THE FAMOUS Nets UE COCO.

1v1 OFACT R ED BY

WARN ER

AFRAN T'S I:TZER APERIE 1

13

MERRJTT PHILADELPHIA.

BY APPLICATIONS ONLY FOUR THIS GENTS LONG AGONY WAS OE'R THE GERMAN CORN REMOVER HE FOUND SAFE AND SPEEDY CURE TO BE HIS GERMAN FRIENDS WELL TIMED ADVICE HIM A PARADISE MADE LIFE TO

OLD

HAPPY HOME, THE HUSBAND IAUGHS AGAIN,

THE WIFE'S FEATURES PLAYS A PLEASANT SMILE. HE CHILDREN TOO IN ROSY HEALTH ARE SEEN. THAT MODEL HOME IS HAPPY ALL THE WHILE

Those She desnr to change thr color of their heard and mustatlie to a heat:11M .imotry or

ili,:ictr thal 11711 1101 W118/1 oil will find our

-THOUSAND FHOUSELDKNOWTHISONDER STRANGE

BY

ALL DRUGGISTS

S.F. ARTHUR

BEHOLD! A

O ER

& CO. PROPR'S. 84 FRONT ST. N.Y. RNA, ,,, ,WDRIe

"MECHANICAL" GAMECARDS: BEFORE AND AFTER.

Tti

TARRARTS SELTZER OWE THIS MIGHTY CHANGE.

N. B. NO HOME SAFE WITHOUT IT.

-

BUCKINGHAM'S DYE" last the thing and

rely handy beiny in one inrpanaion. his ea• olapplieation„vae and (Ret•nal and is ntinglit . own!" in pubite throe Full directions cat every

bell& PREPARED BY

R R HALL

a

CO.. Nashua. N. H

Sold hr all Otaggists

PESTS -


17

parent to this advertising gimmick. So here we account for some history of the advertising industry. An attractive picture captures our

attention and engrosses us for an instant while, almost inadvertently, we become aware of the short blurb advocating a particular product.

We are stung. But meanwhile we enjoyed ourselves...The pleasant image was our reward. Forjust an instant methought /saw in nearly

imperceptible print on the nineteenth century puzzle card, above, the message "and now a word from our sponsor .

S/ UO^I -111119 166-1L11419

1110AVIC AIWA AllIVENV

BEM A tUlliCHAIST

1i1t15:111•Y LORI) MATOlt

"TOPSY-TURVIES:" DUAL IDENTITY CARDS. Copyright, 1906, by Dederick

-

How may plates of ice cream can a pretty 11.-1 eat on an empty .5tarnach? (find the answer

When. Were walkuv sticks first introduce( 2 tfind the answer)

Copyright, 1906, by Dederick 13ros.--301.

"DEDERICK" OPTICAL ILLUSIONS: SEE DIRECTIONS IN COPY.


18


TOLL GATE NO. 3.— THIS PICTURE CONTAINS A BEAR,

BUFFALO, CAMEL, GIRAFFE, SEAL, SWAN, SQUIRREL, CAT, FOX, PIG, RABBIT, PARROT, 2 ALLIGATORS, 4 BIRDS, 2 BEAVERS, 2 BABIES, 2 BOYS, 5 COWS, 2 CHICKENS, 2 DEER, 12 DOGS, 3 ELEPHANTS, 3 FROGS, 3 FISH, 7 FACES, 2 GOATS, 7 HORSES, 10 LETTERS, 2 MICE, 4 MEN, 2 MONKEYS, 2 OWLS, 3 RATS, 3 SHEEP, 2 TURTLES, 2 LADIES. When in Its rl furl ilairt fail to visit

T. H. SMITH'S

DINING Rooms. 173 1.73 ..A..zylurn. OPP. A1.1.1'\ HALL.

Breakfast, 20e Dinner, 25e siappeN1.3c A separate Dining' Rama far ladies.

"TOLL GATE" PUZZLES: FIND THE HIDDEN OBJECTS.

When in Hartford

111111"1 I.lil I. ViSil

T. H. SMITH'S

DINING ROOMS 173 as 173 Azylum 3t. OPIL A LINN II A Li.. Breakfast, 20e Dinner, 25e !Sapper, 15e A separate I ininrr

Room

for Ladies.

TOLL GATE NO.4. —SHOO! FLY! THIS PICTURE

Boston Branch, 261 Cliarel St-

Pcgi,ter

Is the MOST RELIABLE PLACE to BUY Your

3.3LITti3 2T1:D AT THE LOWEST PRICES,

D. M. CORTHELL, "SILHOUETTES."

c,: I .

CONTAINS AN ELK, PEACOCK, SHARK, BUTTERFLY, LION, TIGER, RABBIT, BOOK, COAT, BOOT, HARE, RAKE, BARREL, CATERPILLAR, PIGEON, YARD STICK, SNAIL, MATCH, TURTLE, OWL, RHINOCEROS, ANTELOPE, WATCH, SKULL, CAT, COW, GIRAFFE, PRIEST, MUMMY, HUMPTY DUMPTY, SQUIRREL, 5. FISHES, 2 INDIANS, 12 FACES, 3 MICE, 11 DOGS, 3 EAGLES, 5 LETTERS, 5 DUCKS, 2 CAMELS, 8 ELEPHANTS, 7 MEN, 2 MONKEYS, 2 CYMBALS, 4 BIRDS, 4 BEARS, 4 GOATS, 8 FROGS, 2 SEALS, 3 BEAVERS, 9 SHEEP, 3 LADIES, 5 HORSES, 5 PIGS, 2 CHICKENS, 4 ALLIGATORS, 2 BOYS, 2 BABIES, 2 COMBS. Copyright by Carol Wald, 1980

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC KORINNA


to

HAVEA HAPPY 5741 (1981)

Stan Brod has been designing New Year and Hanukkah cards since 5715.That was the year, according to the Hebrew calendar, that he and Ruth were married and decided to send out their own hand-crafted greeting cards. With only thirty to fifty people on their list, it was not too taxing to block print and decorate their cards by hand. But as their list grew to over a hundred names, they had to go semi-commercial. They now print mechanically, and add the decorative touches—doilies, tissue streamers and legal seals by hand. Ruth is the conceptualist; Stan does the graphics. The whole family licks the stamps. Since graven images are taboo (see Commandment#1), Hebrew greeting cards present .a special challenge to designers. But they also have the singular advantage of working with letter forms that have an innate unity and rhythm. There is potential for dynamic contrasts ... for creating a squared-off, bold modern look, or a voluptuous, undulating exotic flavor. Mr. Brod has enjoyed experimenting with different proportions of line, weight and mood, as is obvious from the work

reproduced on this double-spread. Between holiday seasons, Stan has tackled graphic problems in academic and commercial circles. He has taught Experimental typography at the Art Academy of Cincinnati, Graphic Design at the University of Cincinnati, and is currently with the firm of Lipson Assoc., Inc. Then it was that a miracle was wrought. The oil in the cruse burned eight day

MtGhaeL eToci

$ta

Greetings from the Stan Brods

atiaaaaaa 111'11 111111I I pirtintommil

ailaila

Grant Peace

oak °6 oetoe. D a*

/ Babylonian Talmud, Shabbat 21 b.

Ruth, Stan, Deb, Dan and Mike Brod

1 LI 1111111


New Year Greetings

Stan, Ruth, Deb, Dan and Mike Brod Hanukkah Greetings

Stan, Ruth, Debbie, Daniel, and Michael Brod

P'ClOP

57017 â–ş 0

tti

Stan, Ruth, Deb, Dan and Mike Brod

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC FENICE


22

KIRK'S WORKS

Not every schoolboy in America comes home at 3 o'clock, drops his books and picks up a football. Here's one kid who came home with a few chosen buddies to draw pictures, instead. So it was no surprise to his family when Kirk Monson, of Salt Lake City, elected to study Fine Arts at the University of Utah, and then went on to teach it. He is an instructor and Chairman of the Art Department of Centerville Junior High School, Utah. As you may gather from his work here, Monson is not your run-of-the-mill junior high school art teacher. Aside from the requirements of the syllabus, Kirk spends a good part of his time creating challenging projects to augment the concepts he teaches. After school, he works on freelance illustration and design jobs in his private studio, Kirk's Work. He is not snobbish; good graphics are good graphics, and Kirk will tackle anything from industrial logos to T-shirt art.

ALPHABET CITY

When his own junior high school students showed promise of matching his own skill in perspective drawing, Monson decided he needed a challenge. He started by cutting into

boxes and cubes to create more complex drawing problems.A cut here, a slice there — and soon some of the rectangular blocks started to look like letter forms, 12s,Ts,Ks.He drew them and stacked them in arbitrary relationships, and the image that emerged suggested a surrealist habitat — an Alphabet City in some never-never land. He liked the idea so much, he carried it to its logical conclusion, painting in bricks, stone facades, clotheslines, bicycles, telephones and all the accoutrements of civilization.


23

NUMBERED RUINS What works with letters should also work with numbers. But Kirk saw no point in repeating the idea of an apartment compound. Fresh in his mind was a lecture he had delivered to a local art guild on the art of Central America, and images of preColumbian ruins still danced in his head. He decided to assemble his 3-dimensional numbers into a hypothetical ruin.This time he painted stones and bricks in faded colors, with well-worn edges. He incised facades with Indian patterns and planted a few trees and decaying vegetation to reinforce the illusion of a ruin.Where does he go from here? How about mathematical symbols, hieroglyphics, computer characters ...onward and upward, Kirk Monson! THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITALIA


24

I have a little story to tell about my communication concerning the Brazilian designer Oswaldo Miranda (Miran for short) that is as bewildering as his signature, which is reproduced above. Some months ago, I came across his work, for the first time, at the annual awards presentation of the Society of Publication Designers,and later again at the Type Directors' Annual Show. Out of a wealth of excellent graphics, his work struck me as extraordinary. I copied his address from the back of one of his entries and promptly wrote to him in Brazil, requesting some samples of his work for a feature article in U8tIc. I also asked for a brief biography. By return mail, I received a stamp-laden, corrugated package, with enough material for a dozen articles, plus, in English, "a warm greeting to herb Lu ba lin" —but no biography! S TARDES mats tristes da minha inland& foram proporcionadas por ease triste personagem de bigodinho e bengala que, segundo os historladores do cinema, "fez as delicias de milhOes de criancas e comoveu a outran tantos adultos". Nit° mintam ma's. 0 que hula Carillon s6 nos produzia melancoll. quando eramos pequenos, e os Unlcos adultos que se comoveram, foram, precisamente, os historiadores do cinema, porque o esquerdlsta Chaplin tocava urn. certa vela "social" corn sexes personagens de claase balsa. Estes coisas str acontecem, [Wye. porque alguEm tot urna carioca rare aos dez nos, tatvez porque se empenha em navegar contra a corrente, ou porque a Klpersensivel ou um pouco idlota. VG voce saber porque eu n6o gostava dos filmes de Carillon, man o certo 6 que, na salda do cinema paroqulal, nos sabados is sete horn da tarde, alguma cols. incerta me apertava a alma e eu nib sabla o que era. Agora JO set. Porque converse! e travel ideim com outros • homens de minha idade e me confessaram, com urn pouco de vergonha ou confusho, que tambem eles, sentados no colo de sexes pals, se entristeciam ao ver as listras brancas que, como uma chuva Inclemente marcavam a calca de Chaplin. 0 culto da pobreza. As cariocas nAO podem gostar e nem os adultos, por certo. Quo tristeza nos invadia • alma quando, nos filmes de Carlitos, apareciam essay cantinas escuras, eases andarilhos miserivels, eases ',migrantes gigantescos e egoistas engoUndo sexes sanduiches, eases coanheiros cruets que expulsavam os pobres • pontapes.

A

Clara, algutm podera taxer que Chaplin retratav• "um ambiente social". E eu respondo: um ambiente social mal retratado. Nos nunca haviamos Ago algutm expulsar pessoas • pontapes, nem dole homens brigar por um cachorro quente: essa miserla horrtvel nio mien& em noasos simples balrros de Buenos Aires onde a Ada era simples mas pr6spera. E se estate alguma colsa de que nib necessitamos 6 saber que • tome esti marcando sun preSenca em goalquer parte, detghe que o brdido Carat°. k encarregou de nos comunicar. Para que quella nos mostrar las° o sr. Chaplin? Para que nos tombs-

"0 neg6clo de Chaplin e velho como o mundo: crlticar an ricos com o am oculto de ficg o male milionarlo possivel"


25

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26

Gamma. mbent, o Guineas Moordea -o o do era ...au maim.. ao mr• qua be male OawO Eu dmainha parra,

J. 1.fintim, apoa

Duas OuTres Coisas Que Nao Esfao No Guiness.

" gartaMd= °"' lOr ro. da dual

inortaum hipartintamsantx quo ago es.. G.. astao .4 a Undo de M.o.,. a au famoso Eno,. Pal pr...

0 record. M ualam rues. rant, fot got. vs El.. do monpmato muudial do Mabol entaa Bras. MM. Em

Nada MOW, um. pa 111. out. ME A., o Taco.. corm, do.° maio de duas Emw ..lartura quarto oara alp. da pavor, mukura of wa mama. o ay. matrubrard.mmf b da co... Mg.. moo alarla M 'Mu dm. mar,

inooskitutioMmauta aantin. rondo. Walaa ,011111.26.. am bora ...do a de maior rtima ro da lams. • 0 moor. de Id... bad. pato malor ppm..

::,17111.°==.7 alriara ernala de Mem.

0 record...0i aeon recidor num ord. do Ms laud., creorm num suplentanto. joraal Ma do die 11/1 /75. am ram do colaborador JP.. ANd.. do palm parataalo, codeaaiu "onds reatu o dnm na cot. da suillora", ou tor da. ercrito mviolatu I 1 noraem do eelunclop...fo, code o "a.. • team.... "E rn rum.,Mate. *pada.. do quarto

Rea, cao Mauxurplia Intaa ...o moor.. Mo.. depots. Pr mord.. do. pas omM dop. rata, Ira pavaludotrur.“o nut do don, arturroaura dvm too.. MO 11. Man do . Tato mem tomb.. de davidas. Emuntado o quo ad. dm tmo,o dodo remorriau,0401. amen .16 coal.. a rombrit Joie .Sea r teas.ro, 29 a. op.., Itut. o tobmiramda room. mm Mkeoramrod, dia ados. putro ado r duranta 24 aUam mruuntartm tudo, Job mmaadatE. Mgr. Ka ol.., nanoarla. a lea. Mao Ma. um.. a catuwase a M ao ra.. empo. Per...a Par Etr....... to 0. . e mor.,....

s. .dou

max pan,

logo. Matuntado coma foi poss.. Ma

M Mrro re., mu. natural", o aurae ..produrolaruto maiadal, at ea Mae& la do Ea Mau . 111mM «Up do o auror ersedto aor ad...do and, Permatado so. o qua ruck ivo o autor .. respond.: asamr 'pro.ammo da .moor, emu...0 rate mtu Np o ara,

'Mk

ub de 1.0o,

bo - - ricon- 71rICItiti P

•ai

filitb

As pessoas sempre dizem "tango argentino," o que e urn pleonasm°. Como se pudesse existir urn tango que ndo fosse argentino! 0 que existe em °afros poises sdo adaptacOes, debeis tentativas de simular o tango abtentico. Por exempto:

LUIS FERNANDO VER &IMO

Tango Uruguaio - O mats parecido corn o tango argentin°. s6 que o parcriro, como o rio da Pmta, fica do outro lado. Tango Chileno - 0 homem enlaea a mu/her pela cintum e a levy pam urn canto escuro, onde doffs agentes da secreta a seqtiestram. Quando a ONU ameasw investigar o dono manda fechar a cops. Danca-se com o toque de recolher.


27

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I wrote again, not once, not twice, but five or six times, with the same result: more work... more warm greetings...but no biography. (5o much for my 40 years of expertise in the communications field!) NOW the only information I am able to pass along to you about Miran is what I have deduced by my own private eye. From his stationery, which bears a silhouette

profile of himself, I guess he is quite a young man; this makes his superb and prodigious output even more amazing.(I've received reams of work from him, all of the same high caliber.) his calligraphic scribble of a signature was analyzed by a friend— an amateur graphologist —as fol lows: it expresses daring, wild abandon,a creative personality who loves his work—as one can

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certainly tell from these samples. To my mind, Miranda's special gifts are his inventive mind, his willingness to take risks and his masterful graphic skills. But it is especially rare to find someone who can dazzle you with design without obfuscating meaning. The way he manipulates his use of space, his sense of scale, his black-and-white patterning—all contrive to stop you dead in your

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tracks ; then, his absolutely-ontarget imagery telegraphs the message. It's all visual. As far as I'm concerned, Miranda's work needs no translation,although it's obvious that my letters to him do. Besides this feature in U&Ic, Miranda's work has appeared in Communication Arts and will be featured in a forthcoming issue of Graphis Magazine. 11. L. THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC bENGUIAT GOTHIC


28

PUT YOUR BEST FACE FORWARD

For the past few years, the city of Baltimore has been working on a major project: Operation Image-Lift. Aside from the actual physical rehabilitation of its waterfront and other historic areas, certain civic-minded organizations have been counting up and celebrating Baltimore's cultural contributions. In that connection, the University of Maryland recently sponsored an Edgar Allan Poe Festival, to rediscover his work

Edgar Allan Poe was a poet, writer of short stories, and a literary critic His father, David Poe, Jr was the son of Major Dw.rid Poe, a Revolutionmy patriot Young David Fte became an actor at nineteen, and married Elizabeth Arnold, a young talented, English actress. Edgar Poe was born in Boston onJanuary 19, 1809 His parents died of tuberculosis in Richmond, probably within two days of each other, shortty be ore Poe's third bin

He welled in his classes but accumulated some debts over which he and Mr. Allan quarreled, as a result, Poe left Virginia penniless and enlisted in *Army. In May, 1829, after his discharge, Poe arrived M Baltimore to make his home with his widowed aunt, Maria Poe Clemm. Here he waited for news of an appointment to West Point. In the meantime, he hoped to earn a living by writing. In December, he published Al Aaraaf, Tamerlane and Minor Poems

Though not legally adopted Edgar became a member of the childless family ofJohn and Frances Allan. He was given the name Edgar Allan and was treated as the son of the family. Although his relationship with his foster mother was a good one, apparently there developed between "Eddy" and his foster father an incompatibility: many of the details are no longer possible to reconstruct Poe was given a good education, both in England and in Richmond, and entered The University of Virginia in 1826

After a brief and luckless career at West Pont, Poe returned to his aunt's home in Baltimore where he spent the naIfour years in poverty and ill-health He continued to write, and in 1833 had his first success. An entry of .six stories, Tales of The Fblio Club, won a prize of fifty dollars. In the same year, Mrs. Clemm moved to what is now 203 North Amity Street, where Poe continued to make his home with her. In 1836 he married his cousin Virginia and moved to Richmond to begin the first of many editorial positions


29

and to honor Baltimore where his writing talent was first recognized and nurtured. Poe also died in Baltimore, and is buried on what-is-now University grounds. The Eucalyptus Tree Studio sent us a copy of the brochure they contributed to the Festival. Each of the studio artists created and rendered his own graphic interpretation of Poe. They put their faces together with our faces* and turned out a jewel of a book. It is neat, compact— a scant 5"x 5"— but

what it lacks in physical dimensions, it makes up for in imagination and style. Designed by Jerry Dadds; illustrated by Jerry Dadds, Gary Yealdhall, Richard Waldrep, Nancy Urbanski and Cameron Gerlach. Typesetting by The Composing Room, Inc.; Printing by Collins Lithographing and Printing Company, all of Baltimore, Md.

They subsequently lived in Philadelphia and New York where Virginia died in 1847 Poe was inconsolable. In September. 1849, Poe nift Richmond for Baltimore by steamer on his way to Philadelphia He was at the height of his fame and ennkring what for him was prosperity. Despite investigation by Avhokir• covering nearly a century, the circumstances of Poe last days are still a mystery.

*The ITC typefaces chosen for the brochure are ITC Garamond Condensed and ITC Benguiat.

He was discovered semiconscious outside a polling place on East Lombard Street and taken to what is now Church Home and Hospital There he died on October 7 1849 without recovering sufficiently to explain w4t, had happened to him. There is no evidence to indicate that One was a drug addict, but apparently he had little tolerance for alcohol. This weakness may have contributed to . his death.

At the time of his death, Poe was best known in America as a critic. He defined the short story and invented the detective story. His poems are remarkable for their beauty and melody, his tales for the intensity with which he brings us under his *ell With his understanding of compulsiorm phobias, and other drives, Poe is cleark, aforeun f modern writers who concern themselves with the tortured mind We honor him as one who depicts the dark mysteries of complex humanny.

In 1831 Baltimore was the third largest city in the country, having a population of 80,000 The port was flourishing The Barnum Hotel was the largest in the United States, having 200 rooms and thefirst mail chute. The first passenger train kJ! Mount Clare Station in 1830 It was horse drawn, but a year later the trains were steam drawn. Davidge Hall was a Major building in the city of Baltimore, and in 1833 the School of Medicine became the, first school to make dissection of cadavers a compulsory part of the curriculum.

TO HELEN

HELEN, thy beauty is to me

Like those Nicean barks of yore. That gentry o'er a perfumed sea The weary', uay-uern wanderer bore 7b his oun native shore. On desperate seas long wont to roam. 7hy hytuinth hair. thy claniface. Thy Naiad airs have brought me home To the glory that was Greece And the grandeur that was Rome Lo! in yon brilliant aindousnithe How galuelike l see thee stand' The agate lamp within thy hand Ah! Psyche fmm the regions uhkh Are Holy Land!

The Westminster Church was built in 1852 by The Presbytery of Baltimore on a cemetery known as The Western Burial Ground. The catacombs created by the construction are now thought to hold as many as two thousand tombs. The graveyard,

founded in 1792, is perhaps best known as the burial place of Edgar Allan Poe. The church housed an active eontregaton will 1977. A committee of interested Marylanders has been formed in conjunction with TheUniversity of Maryland School of case to guide the efforts to restore and preserve this important landmark. The committee, The Westminster Preservation Trust, is a private non-profit corporation brinng gi together individuals willing to work toward the restoration and adaptive use of the building.

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC BENGIJIAT ITALIC


NUTS BOLTS

Aristotle dreamed of mechanical machines in the 4th century B.C. Only a hundred years later Archimedes thought that steam could be used to power them. And in the first century B.C., Hero of Alexandria wrote about the basics of machinery. But theory and technology didn't get together until the Middle Ages. During the next 500 years automatons were the same on the outside, but new and improved on the inside. As our knowledge of technology grew, so did they. And they became more lifelike. Then in 1921, they became better than human. At least they did in Karel Capek's play R.U.R. As a literary masterpiece it was a minor piece. But if all else was forgotten about the play, one word wasn't. Robot. apek took the name he gave his mechanical men from the Czech word "robota:' Or drudgery The robots were to do all the menial tasks humans dislike. Unfortunately, the robots didn't like doing them anymore than we did. And, since they could do them better, they decided they'd be better off without us. From then on robots became our foes as well as friends. Only five years later, in 1926, Fritz Lang's movie "Metropolis created another evil robot. Maria. Star Wars fans might remember her as C-3P0's evil grandmother. In this case, bad blood (or bolts) didn't run in the family. Today we're surrounded by robots. But we don't always see the forest for the transistors. Because today's robots don't look like us anymore.Yet they help build our cars. And they've been to Mars. They're as much a part of our lives as our pocket calculator. (Which, by today's definition, is a robot.) The word "robot" may have meant drudgery. But we think you'll find our puzzle no great chore. So turn on your memory bank and program yourself for fun.

Man vs. robot. It was the early 1930's. And Jack Dempsey was sure of the outcome. "I wouldn't be afraid of any robot or mechanical man. I could tear it to pieces, bolt by bolt, and scatter its brain wheels and cogs all over the canvas:' But alas, as fate would have it,the fight never came a bout.

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31

ACROSS 1. Air gun pellet. 3. Basketball maneuvers. 11. Framework. 13. "Leave no stone 16. Half of a Star Wars robot. 17. Squared block of building stone. 19. Karel Capek's play. 20. Part of 19 Across. 23. Flynn. 24. Breaks open. 26. Pucci. 29. Proofreader's term. 31. Grain bristle. 32. TV show with Jim Lang. 34. Poker term. 35 " song of sixpence..:' 36. de Leon. 38. Immerse. 39. Words for a working day with overtime. 40. Ivan the 42. Small insect. 43. Theologian's degree. 44. Rose of baseball. 45. One on the move. 46. Surgical treatment. (Abbr.) 48. Titanium symbol. 49. Boring. 50. Broadway play. 52. Suicide. Japanese style. 55. Elevator man. 58. " conclusion: 59. Part of the Bible. (Abbr.) 60. bucco. 61. Initials of the 10th U.S. president. 62. Attention-getting expression. 63. Two-way radio. 64. Morning hours. 65. Chinese weight. 66. Leftovers. 68. " and the Forty Thieves:' 71. Salvador. 72. Laurel and Hardy film.

DOWN 1. Before A.D. 2. storming. 3. Drooling. 4. Prefix for capture or unite. 5. Kind of operatic singer. 6. Inactive period. 7. Prefix for throsis. (Anat.) 8. lights. (Photographer's need) 9. Mistake. 10. After B.C. 12. Part of 16 across. 14. What holds most robots together. 15. Former. 17. Overbearingly haughty. 18. Computer in "2001:' 20. Not new. 21. St. Patrick's Day cry. 22. Bread and 25. Concealed rifleman. 27. Type of jar. 28. "Bring focus: (Make clear) 29. Hit hard. 30. Doctrine. 33 & supermarket. 37. Word with card or union. 39. What most graduates hope to do. 41. Eskimo homebuilder. 44. Walleyed 47. Part of a sentence. 48. Oz character who wanted a heart. 51. Theatrical alliance. 53. Caviar. 54. Robot from film The Invisible Boy:' 56. Capri or Manhattan. 57. Dirties. 63. AFL64. Hoop group. 67. Lung ailment. 69. "1 bdrm, hsekpng:' 70. Smith.

A . One of the most sophisticated automatons of the early 1800's, this beautiful doll could write any message. As long as it had less than 40 letters. It was never late. Never sick. And never needed a coffee break. Just a little machine oil now and then. And, best of all, it never asked for a raise.

g Many artists and art movements

This is Number 13 in a series of Very Graphic Crossword Puzzles by Al McGinley and Lee Gardner.

have been attracted to the robot. This endeavor, known as Mr. Sport,was featured at Expo '67. It's uncertain whether its function was to cheer the home team or frighten the opponents. But it probably didn't matter too much; the game was called because of rain.

C. One of the first automatons (as they were called then) was designed in 1350. It was a magnificent bird that crowned the top of the Strasbourg Cathedral. And every day at noon he spread his wings, thrust out his tongue and squawked the houc A bit of technology that was really something to crow about.


32

REPRODUCTION PROCESSES There are fabulous developments in

color scanning,platemaking,and printing technologies. It is beyond the scope of this Update to detail them, but interested readers should pursue them as follows: The Linoscan 3040 is a push-button microcomputer color scanner that is "simple and affordable:' (Linotype-Paul,Inc.)...Newsweek and Information International, Inc.are cooperating to develop a system to computer-capture,store, and transmit Newsweek's editorial color photographs...The Newscolour System 3000 is a color separation computer with keyboard, CRT, storage, and editing power.(Opti-Copy,Inc.)... From Coulter Systems Corporation comes a series of systems, including a camera platemaking system using the KC-Crystalplate.These are smooth, stainless steel plates; the crystalline photoconductive layer is a thin surface with exceptional resolution and highspeed exposure.After imaging,KC plates are treated in a plate converter to fuse printing areas for long press Iife.Plates use minimum of fountain solution.The KC Digital Litho System is an all-digital page composition and platemaking system that can convert publisher's copy into a multipage lithographic press plate without silver film or other intermediate materials.

Screening Scanner is an electronic color separation system.The Combiskop is a page-makeup station that takes disc packs from the Chromagraph and is also a color correction station with a color monitor. Colors can be corrected; pictures can be cropped; borders and frames can be dropped in,silhouetted,vignetted,and positioned; and multicolor backgrounds can be created and dropped in. Headlines and type can be reversed, color changed,dropped out into panels,etc.The two devices acting together comprise the Chromacom Four-Color Page Makeup System ... The PDI Color Scanner System does scanning, separating, correcting and various forms of enhancement.(Printing Developments, Inc.)...Zelacolor International offers a system that makes color separations from threedimensional objects or scenes as well as from transparencies and reflection copy.(Zelacolor International S.A., Luxembourg)...

The ST525-MKII and the CP525-MKII are computer-controlled, have CRT displays,and perform a variety of color scanning,separation,and correction functions...Color scanners and fourcolor electronic page-makeup systems are also offered by HCM Graphic Systems,Inc.The Chromagraph DC300B Laser Exposing Electronic

Cameras are getting smarter and more communicative, too. AM ECRM's 8400 Autokon II halftone camera can now interface with computer-based pagination systems. This easily operated dial-controlled camera, more fully described in U&Ic's Vision '80s report, can now scan continuous-tone copy and output it in digital form to an on-line storage unit...A new electronically controlled vertical camera is offered by Berthold of North America. The Hohlux RC 1070 is suited to *le or halftone work and color separating.... At the office market level,Visual

The Response 300 pre-press system detours pictures from a color scanner into a computer programmed for the full range of color-correction and stripping operations. On the large-model

system shown here three images can be processed at once. Signatures are automatically imposed .prior to exposure on the Sci-Tex Laser Plotter.

-

updated. DiskSort enables the CPT 8000 word processor to select and order information from a disc file. *"Forms Mode" enables the operator of several models of Burroughs Word Graphics Corporation has introduced Processors to design a form for data an automatic horizontal roll-fed camentry in a few simple steps.The forms era platemaker that produces highcan be recorded on a diskette or quality direct positive photo plates from line and/or prescreened originals printed on blank or preprinted forms. Once a form has been created,it can in a single step.The VGC PlatemakerÂŽ be called to the screen and filled in as 200 delivers Rapilith (Agfa Gevaert) many times as needed. plates at a rate of three per minute. Developed plates can be stored indefi- *A "String Command" feature (Burroughs) reduces the number of keynitely.... Itek Graphic Products offers strokes required for repetitive editing electrostatic platemaking systems. operations. An eight-page,full-color brochure describes them as being for short to medium runs of commercial and quick Built-in interface. The '80s may see printers, as well as in-office operations more interface capabilities built into text editors.One such,announced recently, is the Inter/text System. Office presses (a term once considered an anachronism) have been aug- Offered by Info/graphics, Inc., it does away with the separate "black box" mented by AM Multigraphic's autointerface device.The system claims to mated TCS/System 4,which features coordinate the technologies of word electronic copy quality control and and data processing,typesetting,and multiple reduction capability,and the TCS/System 5,which can print on both telecommunications. sides of the sheet in one pass at up to Ergonomics (human engineering, 17,000 impressions per hour. designing machines with people in mind) is playing a larger role in the WP Looking ahead into the '80s,one must watch for alternatives to silver imaging market. Hazeltine's "OPUS 80" shared resource system not only features in such areas as laser exposing,the audiovisual prompts to aid the operacrystalline KC plates,electrostatic tor but offers an anti-glare CRT screen plates,and diazo imaging (slow and that can be tilted, has contrast adjustnot too promising right now). Rising able to any room lighting,and a colorcosts of silver will make such alternacoded keyboard.Burroughs' RIII equiptives increasingly attractive. Kodak's ment permits the operator to adjust it Extavolt is a nonsilver photographic to a comfortable viewing position to process in which positively charged eliminate overhead glare. It also has a toner particles are attracted by the filter that enhances screen brightness electric fields of the latent image and in sunny or brightly lit rooms. repelled by the positive charge of the unexposed areas. Extavolt employs That "Double Pigeon" Chinese Typephotoconductive polymer film.These writer described in Vision '80s (U&IC light-sensitive plastics, when massVol.7 No.2) is distributed in the United produced,could be less expensive States by Globus Brothers,c.o.Media than silver:At present the system is Factory,Inc.,NYC. not suited for graphic arts work.

WORD PROCESSING

High-speed quality printing. WP printers in the '80s will be seeking the best of both worlds—productivity and quality.General Electric's TermiNet 510 Corresponder claims to be both a correspondence printer and a line printer.lt produces 510 characters per second compared to the 50-55 cps of daisy wheel printers. It also offers a wide variety of fonts and handles most letterhead stocks and pin-feed forms from 3" to 14 A7 3:'

Software enhancements in the '80s will make word processors more useful and easier to use.Some,recently announced,are: *DiskSort (CPT),a fast,easy method for sorting names,addresses, personnel and financial information and other data that must be continuously

Word processing/electronic printer/ page-makeup connection. The '80s will see a linkage between WPS and electronic printers to combine the best features of each: text editing power, quality output,a variety of type styles and graphics,output in page form at high speeds and on both sides

Possibly the best prospect for a replacement for silver is the ICP technologyWithin a few years the intelligent copier/printer field expects to have improved the quality of its toners and photoreceptors to attain graphic arts quality.,Combined with computer controls,these systems will be able to store fonts and output in madeup page form.


of the paper. Software to facilitate this connection is on the horizon.Already announced is the Scribe system developed by Brian Reed at CarnegieMellon University.Scribe aims to be easy for the non-expert to use and allows small changes to its prescribed formats.Scribe is not linked to any output device and can format a variety of documents for a daisy-wheel printer, a laser printer,or a phototypesetter. Before entering a job,the user tells the system the kind of document it is and the device it will be output on. Bravo, designed at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (PARC),runs on the Alto computer that displays actual typefaces.Bravo,an interactive editing/formatting terminal, haS a keyboard and a "mouse!' The mouse can be used to direct the CRT screen's cursor. The system can insert, position, edit, and format text.The Tex computerized typesetting and makeup system and the DPI system,both described in the Vision '80s report in U&Ic,Vol.7 No.2,are other software approaches to formatting. Multifunction terminals. Soon it may be hard to tell a data processing terminal from a word processor: Buzz words for the early '80s are "dual function" and "multifunction!' DP companies already offering dual function DP/WP include Artsci,Inc., Hewlett Packard, Megadata Corp.These are in addition to the dual-function devices reported in previous Vision '80s reports. Datapoint's 3800 workstation is a multifunction system with one keyboard. It is a word processor, data processor,electronic message terminal and manages data and voice communications,all from a common data base. Ideographic WPs. Wang's Ideographic Word Processing System simplifies Chinese and Japanese keyboarding. It can create, edit, and print documents in conventional or simplified

Prime Computer also has a multifunction package called The Office Automation System. It offers word processing,electronic mail,correspondence management,administrative support anti text management services along with time-sharing data processing. Asynchronous + synchronous. There seems to be a trend toward terminals that can communicate in both synchronous and asynchronous modes and thus be interactively compatible with IBM and other word or data processing systems.IBM's Displaywriter is one such system and it can also verify spelling of about 50,000 words.Wang's PCS (programmable computer system) also features asynchronous plus synchronous (also called bisynchronous) communications capability. WP is still in its infancy Despite its remarkable technological progress,WP is far from its market potential.Estimates are that as of now it has reached only 10 per cent of its ultimate market.

ELECTRONIC MAIL

Smart phones. We should soon see on the market faster long-distance connections (two seconds instead of ten), automatic redialing of busy lines, storing and recording of messages, searching for a customer at alternate numbers,screening out certain callers, and improved conference call services.And mobile phones, as those in vehicles,may become more common. A portable phone will be carried like a pocket.calculator and will use a new technology called cellular radio. Motorola,Inc.and Bell Telephone Laboratories, Inc. proposed such a technology almost ten years ago.The FCC is encouraging it and watching field tests. If successful,cellular radio will make it possible to offer portable phones and services to a much wider market and to complete calls more efficiently than is presently possible.

FCC frees Bell. AT&T has been seeking The finite sky. Would you believe a deregulation so it could offer home traffic jam in outer space? Well,it's time.The choice orbits for communica- and office computers,computerized school instruction and assorted other tions satellites are few.There's a services and devices.The FCC has narrow region some 22,300 miles freed Bell to operate in these areas as above the equator where satellites well as to supply computer-to-computer can "park:' There's a limit to how many link ups for data transmission. FCC can operate effectively.No number retains regulatory control over home has been established yet but you can't telephone service.The FCC decision will just jam them in like you do cars in a be phased in for the next two years. shopping center.They have to be spaced apart to prevent signal interference.There are now about 80 satellites Communicating copiers. AM's Elecin orbit and some 800 more may be vying tronic Document Communications System (EDCS) is a high-speed,highfor space by the end of the century. quality digital-fatsimile copier.lt can Chinese, Japanese or English.A standard 10-key copy 70 pages a minute on plain pad can produce some 10,000 characters, paper at local or remote sites.lt is 100 which formerly required thousands of keys. times faster than present conventional facsimile devices.EDCS is designed to work with satellite and other communications networks.lt has been co-developed by AM International and Satellite Business Systems.lt is scheduled for commercial introduction in early 1981. EDCS uses a highresolution (300 lines per inch) laser system and scans text or graphics at the rate of two seconds per page.The combined EDCS-SBS service is aimed at Fortune 500 companies. EDCS laser-scans documents, sends electronic signals to an earth station which relays them to a satellite for remote site transmission.Then another earth station receives the signals and sends them to a printer for plain paper output. ILLUSTRATION BYJUREK WAJDOWICZ

Videotext. Some people think that by the end of the '80s all kinds of-information will be distributed to homes and businesses by either a TV set augmented by an adapter and a simple keypad or a TV set linked to a phone,plus a keypad. Both systems are rather advanced in England.The former is known generally as Teletext and in England as CEEFAX.The latter is known as Viewdata and in England as Prestel.Teletext is inexpensive for the user:there's no charge after installation of the adapter and keypad. It is passive, universally available via TV networks,backed by BBC and ITV in England.Prestel is not as advanced in the market, will reach a smaller audience at first, charges for each use, but is interactive—the user can dial up a central computer and request particular kinds of information. The British Post Office is behind Prestel. To become fully accepted in the market, here or abroad, videotext services have to become more economically attractive and probably need to be able to produce hard copies and handle photographs more efficiently. The Canadian Telidon system is presently the best at handling pictures. Meanwhile the systems are being pushed in a number of other countries too. Newspaper publishers in the United States as well as broadcasters and companies such as GT&E (Prestel's U.S. representative) are investigating ways to distribute information electronically.When that day arrives—perhaps by the end of the decade,the roles of many in the communications businesses may change; information providers, editors, art directors and others would do well to watch videotext developments to anticipate how their jobs, careers, roles might be affected if and when videotext is a commercial reality. Right now the obstacles to any form of videotextteletext or viewdata, becoming commercially significant are very large.ln the book "Videotext' Efrem Sigel lists obstacles to home teletext as: people are used to watching TV primarily for entertainment; reading text on a TV screen is tiring; the information offered is the kind people are accustomed to absorbing at the breakfast table or on the train, not in the living room,and newspapers and magazines presently fill the information needs better and at less cost.The same obstacles exist for viewdata services. Businesses rather than homes may be the first supporters of electronic information services since they will pay the cost if they get valuable services in return.

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC


34


35

SKULL AND CROSSBONES: A HUMAN & ANIMAL PARTS CATALOGUE BY ALAN COBER Alan E.Cober is an artist whose work appears in leading national magazines and major newspapers. His unique talent enhances the pages of the huge array of books he illustrates ' for both children and adults. His drawings are regularly on exhibit nationally and internationally and he has received ) over 200 awards.

;--`1`'

I first became familiar with Cober's pen and ink drawings in a varied number of portfolios featured in Lithopinion and then, particularly in his book The Forgotten Society, a marvelous collection of drawings published by Dover Publications. It is devoted to the elderly in nursing homes, the mentally retarded and the claustrophobic prisoner's world of Sing Sing. There are those who see in Alan Cober's drawings a `people's' content and speak of George Grosz and the social art of caricature; but where Grosz pillories the bourgeoisie and the military, Cober is closer to Kathe Kollwitz and social consciousness, a sense of the suffering of the victimized poor. For others he is a surrealist and brings to mind Salvador Dali and his"spontaneous assimilation of irrational knowledge:'


36

Some of Cober's iconography deals with the strange and abnormal in a vocabulary that reflects not only an inventory of his own dream imagery but a familiarity with the writings of Kafka as well as of Dostoyevsky. In this portfolio there are a number of studies and exercises —a way of thinking. I am reminded of the pronouncement of Darer that "If an artist wants to create the stuff that dreams are made of, let him freely mix all sorts of creatures:' To recover from tions of comthe frustraadvertising art, mercial Cober enters Alan his own 'dream' through the jaws of a ram skull...an ink inferno taking on all manner of appearances: those menacing humanoid piranhas and splintered eyesockets (Ring around the collar! Ring around the collar!) A self portrait with stitches on the lip...a scribbled fly passing by... hands and feet turning... (Winston tastes good like a cigarette should.) A lobster head... tongues as rough as mats of hair ...broken noses...a portrait of Ellen...some with no ears at all, skin, flesh and blood all dried up


37


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and their noses, hands and feet, eyes and heads all lopped off... (Ladies, please don't squeeze the Charmin.) A self portrait with half (/ the face cut away...worms...owls... ravens...( Preparation H soothes as it heals.) A demon...a warlock... a self portrait with a memento mori visit from a cadaver...hobgoblins ... incubi ... (Plop, plop, phiz, phiz...) Out damned ad... It is the remarkable drawing and the ink itself which confounds the LOU MYERS senses.

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC FRANKLIN GOTHIC


39

What's New from ITC? ITC Isbell Book, Medium, Bold, and Heavy with corresponding italics are new typefaces from ITC. Only licensed ITC Subscribers are authorized to reproduce, manufacture, and offer for sale these and other ITC typefaces shown in this issue. This license mark is your guarantee of authenticity. ICENSED

These new typefaces will be available to the public on or after January 15, 1981, depending on each manufacturer'• release schedule.

ITC ISBELL BOOK

ITC ISBELL BOOK ITALIC

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Dick Isbell

ITC ISBELL MEDIUM

Jerry Campbell

ITC ISBELL MEDIUM ITALIC

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41

ITC Isbell is a highly stylized new roman typeface designed by Dick Isbell and Jerry Campbell of Detroit, Michigan. With the unusual arches and curves of several lowercase characters, ITC Isbell is an exceptionally legible typeface that fits the need for a modern roman typeface that can be used for a wide range of advertising and publication purposes. It is offered in Book, Medium, Bold, and Heavy with corresponding italics. The letters ITC ISBELL BOLD

ITC ISBELL BOLD ITALIC

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fit neatly in text size and add grace and charm to a graphic piece when used for display. Designers Dick Isbell and Jerry Campbell established Campbell-Isbell Alphabets in 1975 to service advertising agencies and studios in the Detroit area and have worked on most of the automotive accounts in that city. Dick Isbell is best known for his Americana"typeface, which he designed for ATF in 1965. Both men have designed a number of headline typefaces. ITC ISBELL HEAVY

ITC ISBELL HEAVY ITALIC

ABCDEFGHI ABCDEFGHI JKLLMNOPQ JKLLMNOPQ RSTUVWXY R STUVWXY Z8212345678 Z&I2345678 90abcdefghi 90abcdefghij jklmnopqrst klmnopqrstu uvwxyz$VE vwxyz$VC.E# %OcDLLOIE %0CDLLOIE CE11010&tkfi CEBCdloitYkfi 1234567890 123456r:790 *-47A 42/1 [tt§tim=7 890] t‘ W002345678901

t

aeilmorst


43

ITC ISBELL BOOK Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitu de. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; th e designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integr ation of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual size s and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and impac t. Stating specific principles or guides on the subject of typography

Excellence in typography is the result of not hing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning ; the designer must care. In contemporary adv ertising the perfect integration of design ele ments often demands unorthodox typograp

ITC ISBELL MEDIUM ITALIC Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understand ing used in its planning ; the designer must care. In con temporary advertising the perfect integration of desig n elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to impr

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitu de. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; th e designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integr ation of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual siz es and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and imp act. Stating specific principles or guides on the subject of typograph

Excellence in typography is the result of nothi ng more than an attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertisi ng the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It ma

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understan ding used in its planning; the designer must care. In co ntemporary advertising the perfect integration of desi gn elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compactspacing, minus lead ing, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to

ITC ISBELL BOOK ITALIC Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitu de. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect inte gration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual siz es and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and imp act. Stating specific principles or guides on the subject of typography

Excellence in typography is the result of nothi ng more than an attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertis ing the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It ma ITC ISBELL BOLD

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understand ing used in its planning; the designer must care. In cont emporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to impr

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its pl arming the designer must care. In contemporary advertising th e perfect integration of design elements often demands unorth odox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, mi nus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stating specific principles or

Excellence in typography is the result of nothi ng more than an attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertisi ng the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It ma

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands uno rthodox typography. It may require the use of corn pact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and we

ITC ISBELL MEDIUM Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an atti tude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leadi ng, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to improve appe arance and impact. Stating specific principles or guides on the subj

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing mor e than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the underst anding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typog raphy. It may require the use of compact spacing, min us leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is ne

;

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In conte mporary advertising the perfect integratio n of design elements often demands unort ITC ISBELL BOLD ITALIC Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its pl anning ; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising th e perfect integration of design elements often demands unortho dox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, min us leading, unusual sizes and weights; whatever is needed to im prove appearance and impact. Stating specific principles or gui

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfec t integration of design elements often demands un orthodox typography. It may require the use of co mpact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and

Excellence in typography is the result of no thing more than an attitude. Its appeal co mes from the understanding used in its pla nning ; the designer must care. In contemp orary advertising the perfect integration of design elements often demands unortho

ITC ISBELL HEAVY Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more tha n an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding use d in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect integration of design elements ofte n demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weig hts; whatever is needed to improve appearance and impact.

Excellence in typography is the result of nothi ng more than an attitude. Its appeal comes fro m the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertisi ng the perfect integration of design elements often demands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus lead

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its ap peal comes from the understanding use d in its planning; the designer must car e. In contemporary advertising the perf ect integration of design elements ofte

ITC ISBELL HEAVY ITALIC Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer mustcare. In contemporary advert ising the perfect integration of design elements often deman ds unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compac t spacing, minus leading, unusual sizes and weights; whateve r is needed to improve appearance and impact. Stating specif

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appeal comes from the understanding used in its planning; the desi gner must care. In contemporary advertising th e perfect integration of design elements often de mands unorthodox typography. It may require the use of compact spacing, minus leading, unus

Excellence in typography is the result of nothing more than an attitude. Its appea 1 comes from the understanding used in its planning; the designer must care. In contemporary advertising the perfect int egration of design elements often dema


44

STEPHEN AlEORNS RITRATTI DEGLI ARTISTI PIU CELEBRI

e recently became intrigued with a portfolio of prints31 portraits of famous artists. There was something about these prints—not just the archaic look of them—but the sentimental idea of them, like somebody's collection of rock stars or sports heroes, that completely disarmed us. In this day and age of sophisticated technology, of cleverness, of oblique references and obscure meanings in art, what prompts a contemporary printmaker to get wrapped up in such a quaint idea as a portrait gallery of great artists? To begin with, if you are Stephen Alcorn, son of the illustrator John Alcorn, you were born into an art-conscious, art-appreciating home. Then if you were carted off to live in Florence during your impressionable years, if you went to school there and absorbed the Renaissance right through your American jeans and T-shirts, you would understand the impetus for this project.As Steve puts it,"going to school in Florence, you couldn't help but feel that the Renaissance was still part of everyday life:' The architecture of the school reminded you; it had arched ceilings like the cathedral. Instead of Palmer-method alphabet placards around the schoolrooms, he stared at marble blocks incised with the names of the great Renaissance poets, artists and writers. In the very rooms of the school building, workers were pouring plaster casts of Renaissance sculpture. The Renaissance was still alive in Florence, and going strong. Back home in the United States, Steve is now a Fine Arts Major in Printmaking and Painting at SUNY at Purchase, New York. Partly out of nostalgia, partly in homage to the memory of Florence, he conceived of rendering a series of portraits of the Italian Renaissance masters. His inspiration for the • series came, surprisingly, not from the high art of the Uffizi and the Pitti Palace, but from the little known Italian Folk Art of the Renaissance and the two centuries following. The work, turned out by local artisans, took the form of woodcuts illustrating proverbs, fables and religious themes, for the most part. Like most folk art, they were straightforward, ingenuous and full of inventive decorative motifs. It was the spirit of these woodcuts that Steve tried to absorb and translate into his own linoleum cuts. Actually, portraits were rarely done in that period of Italian Folk Art, so he had to imagine how the local artisans of Umbria or Campania might have rendered them. Once he completed the Italian masters, there was no stopping him. He went on to include the Renaissance Masters of the North...thegreats" of the Middle Ages...and all his favorites from Cimabue to Picasso. For his references, he had to rely on already existing portraits of the older artists, and photographs of more recent ones. So far, there are 31 portraits in his gallery. The original blocks are 10" x 13:' printed on 15"x 22" sheets of "Goyulapanese rice paper, in black ink. The name block beneath each portrait is printed in red. We are reproducing 16 of Steve's prints, because we not only admire his unabashed hero-worship and the deep sentiment behind the project, but we are completely bowled over by his artistry. We also recognized that this feature was a perfect foil for demonstrating our new Roman typeface designed by Dick Isbell and Jerry Campbell. This is an elegant, sophisticated face, but you can see how well it complements the straightforward, unaffected character of the artwork. ITC Isbell has grace. It's spirited. It has beautiful forms. It is classic and contemporary at the same time. Like all great art forms, it will stand up to the whims of fashion, in the same way that the works of master artists never look"dated:' MARION MULLER


THERE SEEMS TO BE NO ARGUMENT ABOUT IT: THIS MAN WAS THE MOST BELOVED PAINTER OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE. IN A TIME WHEN COMPETITION FOR COMMISSIONS AND PROFESSIONAL JEALOUSIES WERE PLENTY FIERCE, THE DOMINICAN MONK FRA GIOVANNI DA FIESOLE HAD NOT A SINGLE ENEMY OR DETRACTOR. IN FACT, HE WAS AFFECTIONATELY CALLED "ANGELICO" FOR THE SWEETNESS AND TENDERNESS THAT EXUDED FROM HIS WORK. HOW COME HIS SAINTS SEEMED SAINTLIER, HIS VIRGINS MORE VIRGINAL, HIS HEAVENS EXTRA-HOLY? HIS ASSOCIATES ATTRIBUTED IT TO THE FACT THAT HE ACTUALLY WEPT COPIOUS TEARS WHENEVER HE PAINTED A CRUCIFIXION, AND THAT HE NEVER TOOK A BRUSH IN HIS HAND WITHOUT A PRAYER ON HIS LIPS. HISTORIANS ARE NOT SO ROMANTIC. THEY EXPLAIN THE SPECIAL RADIANCE IN HIS WORK, THE SATURATED COLOR AND THE EXQUISITELY DETAILED BACKGROUNDS AS THE RESULT OF HIS EARLY TRAINING AS AN ILLUMINATOR OF MANUSCRIPTS. ea IN ANY CASE, THE UNIQUE LIGHT AND OTHERWORLDLINESS OF FRA ANGELICO'S WORK ARE SOMETHING TO EXPERIENCE NOT IN REPRODUCTION BUT IN THE FLESH. ANYONE WHO VISITS FLORENCE SHOULD SEEK OUT THE MUSED DE S. MARCO, FORMERLY THE DOMINICAN CONVENT WHERE FRA ANGELICO SERVED AS PRIOR, AND WHERE HE ALSO DECORATED EACH OF THE CELLS AND CORRIDORS WITH FRESCOES. THESE PARTICULAR FRESCOES, INCLUDING A SUBLIME ANNUNCIATION, ARE ESPECIALLY DELICATE AND MUTED, IN TUNE WITH DOMINICAN RESTRAINT. AFTER YOU GORGE ON THE FEAST OF INLAID MARBLES, STAINED-GLASS, GOLD-BRONZE-AND-GEM-ENCRUSTED-EVERYTHING IN THE MEDICI CHAPELS AND PALACES, THIS LITTLE RETREAT, A SHORT DISTANCE OFF THE MAIN SQUARE, IS GUARANTEED TO CLEANSE YOUR PALATE.

13874455

ANGELICO

45

It's time to put an end to the notion that Leonardo daVinci was the quintessential Renaissance Man. In the sense that he loved beautiful things and was skilled in a number of disciplines, he fit the definition. But his real genius was his insatiable curiosity about the universe, and that was decidedly not the spirit of the Renaissance! w Every question that occurred to him was investigated and recorded in his notebooks. How does the heart pump blood? Why do people die of old age? What are the laws of color? How do we hear? Can rivers be controlled? How do birds fly? If you imagine that all these questions were dealt with in an orderly fashion, be advised they were not. The notes were spread over some 5,000 loose pages, with no numbers, no beginning and no end.To make matters worse, he was a left-handed mirror writer; he used no punctuation, devised his own orthography—running short words together and dividing long ones arbitrarily—and wrote without regard for sequence. It was not unusual for translators to find, on one page, some principle of astronomy, analytical anatomical drawings, theories about the motion of the Earth, the laws of sound and a discourse on the principles of color. Another page might explore the structure of the intestines alongside philosophical remarks about poetry and painting.a For centuries scholars labored to organize his notes. There are critics who have accused Leonardo of dissipating his energy by jumping from study to study. But we should humbly keep in mind that, in four centuries, we haven't yet answered all the questions that crossed his mind. No, he was not a Renaissance Man; Leonardo's place is in the 20th century.

114524519

LEONARDO.


1475-1564

1485-1576

Any artist who has suffered rejection at the hands of a client should take comfort from the fact that Michelangelo was not always an instant hit with his patrons either. His David, onefthmsrevdculptres in all the world, got a thumbs-down review from the general public when it was first unveiled. ?s, In 1501, the citizens of Florence decided to erect a monument to commemorate the ousting of the tyrannical Medicis from power, and the establishment of a benevolent republic. Michelangelo won the commission with his plan to create an image of the shepherd David. It would be a symbol of the small and meek triumphing over the ignoble giant. He went to work on a piece of marble that was abandoned 40 years earlier by a sculptor who found it too long and narrow for his purposes. Michelangelo chipped away at the awkward, skinny block for about 3 years. What emerged was not the locals' vision of the little shepherd boy they knew from their bibles. For starters, they couldn't deal with a 13-year-old boy that was 13 feet tall.And instead of their image of an innocent youth, still damp behind the ears, they were faced with the formidable physique of a Greek warrior. They quibbled that the right hand was too large... the nose too long. But worst of all, this not-so-little David stood stark naked! ?s, Nevertheless, cool heads prevailed over the objections of the townspeople. A committee of artists and citizens, including Botticelli and Leonardo voted unanimously to accept the sculpture, and it was erected in the Piazza della Signoria, the political heart of Florence.

TITIAN! WHAT ROMANTIC IMAGES THE NAME CONJURES UP...PEACHYSKINNED BEAUTIES LOLLING ABOUT, WITH HAIR THAT ALL THE GENIUS OF ALL OUR LEADING COIFFEURS COMBINED CAN'T MATCH. IT MAY SEEM HARD TO IMAGINE, BUT THIS SENSUOUS PAINTER, WHO TOOK GREAT PLEASURE IN RENDERING FLESH BY THE POUND, HAIR BY THE STRAND AND 'VELVET BY THE YARD, WAS AS ASSIDUOUS ABOUT BOOKKEEPING AS HE WAS ABOUT HIS AESTHETICS. SHE PAINTED HIS WAY ACROSS EUROPE, LEAVING PORTRAITS IN EVERY NOOK AND CRANNY OF EVERY CASTLE THAT COUNTED. HE ALSO KEPT A VERY SHARP EYE ON HIS ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE, NEVER MAKING CONCESSIONS TO DEFAULTING CLIENTS, AND EVEN DUNNING ROYALTY WHEN THEY FELL BEHIND IN THEIR PAYMENTS. IN ADDITION, HE CULTIVATED POTENTIAL CUSTOMERS BY ENTERTAINING A STEADY STREAM OF GUESTS AT HIS HOME, WHEELING AND DEALING ALONG WITH MANY OF THE BEST MERCHANTS IN VENICE. ASIDE FROM HIS INCOME FROM PAINTING, TITIAN MADE A LITTLE EXTRA ON THE SIDE AS AN ART DEALER, AND FROM A SAWMILL HE OWNED IN THE HINTERLANDS. HE WAS ALSO FINANCIALLY ASTUTE ENOUGH TO KNOW HOW TO FALSIFY HIS INCOME TAX, TAKE ADVANTAGE OF TAX SHELTERS AND LOOPHOLES IN THE LAW AND TO INCLUDE, IN CONTRACTS WITH HIS CLIENTS, SUCH LITTLE EXTRAS AS PENSIONS AND ANNUITIES FOR HIMSELF AND HIS CHILDREN. ?a, BUT THIS EXTREMELY VERSATILE MAN WAS, ABOVE ALL, A FABULOUS PAINTER WHO MANIPULATED OIL PAINTS— WITH GLAZES, TEXTURES AND A NEW STYLE OF BRUSHWORK THAT STARTED A UNIQUE FORM AND STYLE OF EXPRESSION IN PAINTING.

MICHELANGELO

TIZIANO


47

JACOPO ROBUSTI WAS HIS REAL Dt4Atil'ilik<04+)X0 40444Y7044)WITIVPITSIFY NAME, BUT THIS GIANT OF A PAINTER, WHO DREW LIKE MICHELANGELO AND USED COLOR LIKE TITIAN, WAS STUCK WITH THE DEMEANING LABEL "TINTORETTO" BECAUSE HIS FATHER WAS A DYER. a-a , STILL, THE NAME WAS NO HANDICAP. HE WAS HIGHLY SUCCESSFUL IN WINNING COMMISSIONS, NOT ONLY BECAUSE HE WAS SO GOOD, BUT HE WAS FAST—PROBABLY THE FASTEST BRUSH IN VENICE AT THE TIME—AND A GREAT PAIN TO HIS COMPETITORS BECAUSE HE SWALLOWED UP ALL THE WORK IN TOWN. HIS APPETITE AND HIS ENERGY IN THAT RESPECT WERE ENORMOUS. HE DIDN'T MAKE THINGS EASY FOR HIMSELF EITHER. HE COMPOSED PICTURES WITH fi MULTITUDES OF CHARACTERS IN THE FOREGROUND, SO NOTHING COULD BE FUDGED. HE THRUST HIS FIGURES INTO OBLIQUE POSTURES, CREATING MIND-BOGGLING FORESHORTENINGS. AND HE WORKED TO ENORMOUS SCALE. HIS LARGEST WORKS ARE LOCATED IN THE DOGE'S PALACE IN VENICE, WHERE TINTORETTO HAD A HAND IN DECORATING THE CEILINGS AND WALLS. IN THE TRIBUNAL ROOM, THE LARGEST ROOM IN THE PALACE, WHERE A THOUSAND MEN SAT TO APPROVE LAWS AND ELECT THE DOGE, (ir.f1(, )( Y()(44 , ) 'Ai )4 afi)41) TINTORETTO'S PAINTING OF PARADISE FILLS THE ENTIRE WALL BEHIND THE THRONES. IT IS REPUTED TO BE THE LARGEST PAINTING (FRESCOES ASIDE) IN THE WORLD, 7 X 22 METERS. WIT MUST BE MENTIONED THAT, IN SPITE OF HIS FINANCIALLY SUCCESSFUL CAREER, TINTORETTO LIVED MODESTLY, WAS A GOOD HUSBAND AND FATHER, AND, TO HIS EVERLASTING CREDIT, INVITED HIS DAUGHTERS AS WELL AS THE BOYS TO ASSIST HIM IN HIS SUCCESSFUL STUDIO. TINTORETTO. A NICE MAN!

11518A-1594

ri■Z`

t).(,)

TINTORETTO

1

B RV t GE I

On the surface, the paintings of Pieter Brueghel, The Elder, look a lot like charming bucolic landscapes. But in es15254569 sence they are really symbolic, moralizing religious pictures in a "pop" setting. Although, like every other serious painter of his time, Brueghel made the obligatory trip to Italy to see the masters of the Renaissance, he rejected their heroics —their grandiose religious and historic themes in Roman settings. The people of Brueghel's Lowlands were in a Protestant rebellion against Spanish and High Church domination at that time. Though Brueghel himself was not a member of any radical religious sect, he was a religious painter in another sense. He identified man with nature, and nature with God. Instead of pictures of the Holy Family, he painted whole communities of village people. Instead of a Last Supper, he painted a peasant Wedding Feast. He painted people at work, in towns and in the fields. He painted God at work, in a series depicting the seasons of the year. He illustrated proverbs and adages to underscore moral lessons. He was a constant observer and commentator on the human condition, though it was obvious that his point of view changed with time. In his youth, he was disparaging about the stupidity of human beings. In his later works he showed empathy for their folly and their irremediable poverty and misery. ?a. His voyage to Italy did influence his point of view in the literal sense of the word. Coming from the Lowlands, where every road shoots straight as an arrow toward the horizon, the trip over the Alps was an eye-opener for Brueghel. The panoramic vistas he experienced were incorporated into his paintings. His birds-eye view of village scenes and landscapes gave his paintings a spaciousness and spiritual grandeur that lifted them above their mundane subject matter.


48

SITTING IN A LOCAL VENETIAN PALAZZO? OR FOR A STARK NAKED CHRIST ON THE CROSS? ?a, IN SPAIN, HE DEVELOPED A STYLE OF HIS OWN, WHICH WAS HIGHLY SPIRITUAL AND CLOSER TO THE BYZANTINE AND MEDIEVAL FORMS. IN SPITE BY NOW EVERYONE KNOWS THAT DOMENOF HIS OWN VOCIFEROUS OBJECTION TO IKOS THEOTOKOPOULOS WAS BORN GREEK (IN CRETE TO BE EXACT), WORKED NATURALISM IN SPIRITUAL THEMES, HE CONSISTENTLY USED HIS WIFE'S FACE MOSTLY IN SPAIN AND WENT THROUGH FOR THE VIRGIN MARY AND POSED HIS LIFE WITH THE ITALIAN NICKNAME EL GRECO. BUT WHY AFTER STUDYING WITH BROTHER AND SON AS SAINTS AND HOLY SEVERAL GREAT ITALIAN MASTERS (HE MEN HE, HIMSELF CAME IN FOR TONGUELEARNED TO WIELD A BRUSH FROM TI- LASHINGS FOR OTHER LIBERTIES THAT TIAN AND HOW TO PAINT CROWD SCENES HE TOOK. IN A WORK FOR THE TOLEDO FROM TINTORETTO) DID HE ABANDON CATHEDRAL, HE PAINTED A CHRIST IN A "TOO-RED"TUNIC, AND SURROUNDED HIM ITALY AND EMIGRATE TO SPAIN?THE TRUTH IS HE RUINED HIMSELF PROFES- WITH HOLY WOMEN WHO LOOKED "PROFANE"TO THE CRITICS. THEY CALLED HIS SIONALLY IN ITALY BY MAKING DISPARAGING REMARKS ABOUT MICHELANGELO'S ELONGATED FIGURES "INACCURATE" AND PAINTINGS. BUT HE ALSO OBJECTED TO WROTE HIM OFF AS A KOOK WITH DEFECTIVE VISION FORTUNATELY A SMALL ELITE CERTAIN FASHIONS IN ITALIAN RENAISGROUP OF CONNOISSEURS ASSURED HIS SANCE PAINTING—THE MINGLING OF CHRISTIAN AND CLASSIC IMAGES, AND SUCCESS THEN AND TODAY WE KNOW OF THE "NATURALISM"THAT WAS CREEPING COURSE, HOW MUCH HIS DISTORTIONS AND LIGHT-AND-SPACE PYROTECHNICS INTO SUPERNATURAL THEMES. AFTER ALL, WHAT KIND OF MYSTICAL FEELINGS INFLUENCED THE MODERNS—ESPECIALLY THE EXPRESSIONIST MOVEMENT COULD ONE HAVE FOR A HOLY VIRGIN

15411614

a GRECO

RVP)t- NS

15771640

In the 17th century, painters were not generally counted among the cultured elite. But with Peter Paul Rubens, they had to change the rules. Rubens was a cultivated man in every sense of the word. He had grace, intellect, was a linguist, an archeologist of sorts, respected for his knowledge of the classics and antiquities, a giant of a painter, and very rich. His house was the showplace of Antwerp, and still is. Dukes, duchesses, queens and marquises encouraged his friendship, just to get an invitation to his magnificent estate, and they weren't shortchanged. The baroque portico, the classic statuary, the formal gardens, the gold-embossed tooled leather walls, his studio, his paintings and his collection of antique art objects were eye-poppers, even to royalty. 4, The grand house was also the scene of his greatest pleasures and sorrows. His first son was born there, and his first wife died there. But after a few disconsolate years, at the age of 53, he took a beautiful 16-year-old girl for a bride. It naturally turned his life around. He painted with renewed vigor, using his child-bride in almost every picture. She was his model in religious paintings and in Dionysian scenes of goddesses and nymphs. He posed her in costume, and painted her in the natural setting of their garden, too, sometimes alone, sometimes with their children. He simply couldn't get enough of her ?&Although Rubens was a bit fuddy-duddy in his personal habits—he ate very little meat because the cooking smells upset his painting appetite, and he rationed his painting hours so as not to "tire his spirit"—he was voracious in his appetite for painting women. And how he painted them! Voluptuous...exuberant...Titian-inspired figures. To this day, women who fit the description are called Rubenesque.


49

16064669

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UNLIKE SOME OTHER GREAT ARTISTS WHO LEFT NOTES, JOURNALS AND LETTERS BEHIND, REMBRANDT LEFT VERY FEW MESSAGES ABOUT HIMSELF...ONLY HIS WORK. BUT IF YOU HOPE TO CONSTRUCT A REASONABLE PSYCHOLOGICAL PORTRAIT OF THE MAN. BASED ON HIS PAINTINGS AND ETCHINGS, YOU'LL SOON COME TO A SCREECHING HALT. THERE ARE TOO MANY CONFLICTING FACTS. HIS MOTHER, THREE INFANT CHILDREN AND HIS BELOVED WIFE SASKIA ALL DIED WITHIN A FEW YEARS OF EACH OTHER. HE WAS IN A FINANCIAL MESS. HE HAD PURCHASED A HUGE HOUSE, ON WHICH HE NEGLECTED TO KEEP UP THE PAYMENTS. HE HAD WILLYNILLY SPENT LARGE SUMS OF MONEY ON HIS PRIVATE ART COLLECTION. AT THE TIME OF DEEP PERSONAL TRAGEDY, HE WAS ALSO FINANCIALLY BANKRUPT. DID THESE CIRCUMSTANCES INHIBIT HIM? FOLLOWING HIS FAMILY'S TRAGIC DEMISE, HE PAINTED HIS MOST GRANDIOSE PICTURES. (THE FAMOUS NIGHT WATCH WAS COMPLETED THE YEAR SASKIA DIED.) A PRODIGIOUS NUMBER OF RELIGIOUS WORKS FLOWED FROM HIS STUDIO, TOO. IF YOU IMAGINE THE SPIRITUAL THEMES POURED FORTH FROM SOMEONE AFFLICTED BY GRIEF, In any popularity contest among YOU MUST ACCOUNT FOR THE FACT painters of his day, Francisco de THAT HE WAS ALSO TURNING OUT HUGE Goya y Lucientes would have won the QUANTITIES OF ETCHINGS AND PAINTtitle "Mr. Spain:' He was in constant INGS WITH CLASSICAL AND PAGAN demand for religious paintings, tapIMAGES, AS WELL AS LANDSCAPES, estry designs and portraits by the PORTRAITS, NUDES AND STUDIES OF dozen. His portraits, especially of OLD MEN AND WILD BEASTS. IF YOU THINK HE WAS A DEVOUT CHRISTIAN, royalty, were painted with a brutal AND INTERPRET HIS ETCHINGS OF THE eye, and were less than flattering. CHRIST LEGEND AS SPIRITUALLY INBut there was never a murmur of disSPIRED, YOU SHOULD KNOW THAT THE sent. Either his royal patrons were INSPIRATION FOR THE COMPOSITION too dense to perceive the truth, or too CAME STRAIGHT OUT OF RAPHAEL, THE intimidated by his stature to protest. HOLY FIGURES FROM HIS OBSERVAAside from a hectic career as a paintTIONS OF POOR OLD JEWS OF AMSTER- er, Goya found time for traveling, DAM, AND THAT RELIGIOUS PICTURES hunting, bullfighting and a little hanWERE VERY BIG SELLERS IN THE MARky-panky with the Duchess of Alba. KETPLACE. at, FINALLY, WHAT KIND OF MAN BUSIES HIMSELF ETCHING A POR- 4 But in his mid-forties, his expanTRAIT OF THE AUCTIONEER, WHILE HIS sive life style ended. He fell gravely ill from a"mysterious" disease. (It might HOME AND HIS TREASURED ART COLhave been lead poisoning brought on LECTION ARE BEING SOLD OUT FROM by his habit of working in haste and UNDER HIM? ONLY A MAN WHO IS AN using his fingers to push the paint ARTIST TO HIS BONES.

REM BRA. DT

1746-1828

GOYA around.) Whateter the cause, he was left almost totally deaf, and his work took on a decidedly morbid note. He painted in somnolent gray tones, with only a few strokes of clear feverish color. Within that period, a savage war between France and Spain intensified his personal trauma. He created a series of tragic etchings depicting th( horrors of war and the sufferings of mankind. In his own home, he covered the walls with frescoes of nightmarish fantasies, as black in mood as they were in color. Eventually, he exiled himself to France in protest against the oppressive regime of Ferdinand II. uk, In his 82 years, he produced a phenomenal quantity of work. There was hardly a subject or technique he didn't explore, and all his admirers claim to be his direct descendants. Romantics claim him for his expressiveness; social realists for his revelations; surrealists for his phantasmagorical outpourings. Could it be he was also the inspiration for Picasso's and CasaLs' selfexile from Spain?


50

WHEN WE THINK OF DEGAS, WE THINK BEAUTIFUL THOUGHTS: BEAUTIFUL BALLERINAS WHO NEVER SWEAT...BEAUTIFUL MOTHERS WITH BEAUTIFUL CHILDREN WHO ONLY SMILE AND WHISPER... FASHIONABLE GENTLEMEN ON SPLENDID HORSES THAT NEVER "MISBEHAVE" ...EVEN THE LAUNDRESSES AND MILLINERS IN HIS PAINTINGS PERFORM THEIR CHORES WITH GRACE AND DIGNITY DEGAS HAD CLASS. ?a , THOUGH HE CAME FROM A WELL-TO-DO FAMILY WITH EVERY ADVANTAGE, HE NEVER FLAUNTED HIS PATRICIAN BACKGROUND. IN FACT THE FAMILY NAME WAS ACTUALLY DE GAS, BUT HE DISMISSED THAT AFFECTATION AND CALLED HIMSELF, SIMPLY, DEGAS. THAT'S NOT TO SAY HE BEHAVED LIKE ONE OF THE BOYS. DEGAS WAS A LONER. HE NEVER MARRIED AND NEVER FORMED ANY CLOSE RELATIONSHIPS. EVEN WHEN HE PARTICIPATED ACTIVELY IN IMPRESSIONIST AFFAIRS, HE WAS ALWAYS SO OPINIONATED AND UNYIELDING, HE ALIENATED THE OTHERS. TO MAKE MATTERS WORSE, LIFE PLAYED SOME SHABBY TRICKS ON HIM. PHIS FATHER DIED, LEAVING HIS BUSINESS AFFAIRS IN SHAMBLES. DEGAS HAD TO PAY UP HUGE AMOUNTS OF OUTSTANDING DEBTS TO SAVE THE FAMILY FROM BANKRUPTCY AND DISGRACE. ALTHOUGH HIS WORK HAD ALWAYS BEEN HIGHLY SALABLE, IT WAS NO SMALL EMBARRASSMENT FOR HIM TO HAVE TO ASK HIS DEALER FOR AN ADVANCE. IN ADDITION, HIS SIGHT, WHICH HAD BEEN FAILING, WAS NOW ALL BUT GONE. HE HAD TO GIVE UP PAINTING IN OILS, WHICH WAS NOT AN UNMIXED BLESSING. HE CHOSE TO USE PASTELS, BECAUSE HE FELT MORE INTIMATELY RELATED TO HIS WORK WITH A CHALK STICK IN HIS HAND THAN WITH A BRUSH. AND HE WORKED IN PASTELS AS NO ONE BEFORE—TRAPPING LIGHT AND AIR BY HATCHING COLOR OVER COLOR IN THE IMPRESSIONIST MANNER. THE WORSE HIS SIGHT GOT, THE MORE VIBRANT HIS COLORS AND THE BOLDER HIS FORMS BECAME. IRONICALLY, THOUGH HIS WORK WAS WIDELY KNOWN AND APPRECIATED IN HIS LIFETIME, WHEN HE WALKED THE STREETS OF PARIS, A SHRUNKEN, GRAY-HAIRED OLD MAN, NOBODY RECOGNIZED HIM.

18344917

In the mid-I800's, even as now, it was the custom for middle-class young men, zi*uel r catzw*on," without any 18394906 respectable ctableu cairee"dr That's what Cezanne's father wanted for him. But after a brief stint at law school, Cezanne had enough. He had more aesthetic leanings, so he and his boyhood chum, Emile Zola, left their home in Aix for Paris. Zola was immediately at home in the circle of Parisian intelligentsia, but Cezanne felt out of step. He enrolled in drawing classes and there too he felt awkward and alienated.While others drew With traditional classic lines, he chopped and blocked his figures as if hacked out of wood. Discouraged, he returned home to work on his own. But he was a constant embarrassment to his father for the way he hulked around the countryside, in baggy clothes, unkempt, behaving like a mad artist, but never seriously participating in the art world. He never exhibited with the academicians, because they barred his work from their salons.And he in turn rejected the avant-garde Impressionists. He could not settle for their infatuation with insignificant,fleeting atmospheric effects. If he painted an apple, he couldn't care less if it was morning, noon or a snowy day. He cared only how solidly round it was. When he painted an arm or a leg, it became a cylinder. A mountain was a pyramid; a little house, a cube.Even the air itself became a series of geometric planes to him. ?s , Most of his life he lived and worked alone, away from the distractions and arguments of the marketplace. In his later years, when his ideas about form and structure were finally understood, they sparked a revolution in painting—“Cubism.”And if Picasso and Braque are the fathers of that movement, then Cezanne is certainly the grandfather.

DEGAS

C E/AN N E


51

His whole life story is one of clashes—with parents, employers, neighbors—and of unrequited love affairs and unsuccessful /85341890 jobs. He couldn't please his parents, so he tried fanatically to please God. His services as a lay minister to a flock of Belgian miners were just another disaster. He never felt saintly enough, and his overzealous behavior, his fasting, his self-deprivations, made him sick and everyone else, tired. 4 , Fortunately, in Millet's paintings and Rembrandt's etchings, he finally discovered the empathy for poor, wretched little people that he craved to express himself. It gave him license to pursue his religious fervor through art instead of the pulpit. He started to draw and paint peasants in the fields, in their thatched huts, at their meals. He made studies of their muddy boots, their looms and their farm tools—all in suitable dark and somber tones. But on a visit to France, he discovered the Impressionists. The ascetic demons in him gave way to the aesthetic ones. His new paintings blazed with color—emerald green, vermilion, Prussian blue and dazzling yellow. Instead of dreary peasant pictures, he painted rolling verdant farmlands, orchards in bloom, voluptuous flower bouquets, still life objects and portraits. That his frenzy transferred from religion to art was obvious from his output: in 15 months, he xfisisoNoNoi ,i,exexesolvaxemsoNeomium , ' turned out over 200 canvases. It was also at this time, in an argument with Gauguin over form— not faith—that Van Gogh cut off his ear. ?a, A hundred years earlier, he might have been"exor1 .,0 ,=* cised" of his demons. A hundred .i.. .0., years later, he would have been 6J. psychoanalyzed. But Van Gogh .1 .%'. . 0, 4 solved his anguish by putting a , A ,,,,, I _, d bullet in his head when he real..;:! _ , . i . , ized that his pathological per\ ;Y sonality had been interfering 1• .-(

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5 •.„ , WHEN WE HEAR THE NAME SEURAT, Avogdvaox,"vg.ogioxwoovolvvivo WE SEE SPOTS BEFORE OUR EYES. IT'S THE NAME WE MOST CLOSELY ASSOCIATE WITH THE TECHNIQUE OF PAINTING IN TINY DOTS OF COLOR. 4, IN THE LATE I800's, SEVERAL NEW SCIENTIFIC TREATISES SURFACED DEALING WITH THE OPTICS AND PHYSICS OF COLOR. GEORGES SEURAT WAS FASCINATED. MANY OF THE OBSERVATIONS, OLD-HAT TO US NOW, WERE REVELATIONS THEN. FOR INSTANCE: DOTS OF DIFFERENT COLOR, MIXED OPTICALLY, LOOK BRIGHTER THAN THE SAME COLORS MIXED ON A PALETTE! COLORS APPEAR BRIGHTEST NEXT TO THEIR COMPLEMENTS! COLORS REFLECT EACH OTHER! (RED APPLES ON AYELLOW CLOTH THROW TINGES OF RED ON THE CLOTH AND PICK UP TINGES OF YELLOW, IN TURN. AND SO ON.) 4-, SEURAT, AND A FEW OTHERS, COMBINED ALL THE NEW COLOR IDEAS WITH CLASSIC CONVICTIONS ABOUT STRUCTURE, LINE AND POSITION. THEIR NEW STYLE OF PAINTING WAS CALLED POINTILLISM... SOMETIMES, DIVISIONISM. IT IS MOST COMMONLY KNOWN AS NEO-IMPRESSIONISM BECAUSE OF THEIR SIMILAR DABS OF COLOR. BUT IT WAS AS DIFFERENT FROM IMPRESSIONISM AS NIGHT FROM DAY. THE IMPRESSIONISTS WORKED OUTDOORS, IN THE BLAZING SUN OR A BLINDING SNOWSTORM, IN A FRENZY TO FINISH THEIR PICTURES BEFORE THE LIGHT CHANGED. COMPOSITION DID NOT MATTER; FORMS DIDN'T MATTER EITHER. REMEMBER, THEIR CHAOTIC DABS OF COLOR WERE STRICTLY USED FOR ACHIEVING ATMOSPHERIC EFFECTS. SEURAT'S DOTS, ON THE OTHER HAND, WERE ALL SCIENTIFIC AND CONTROLLED. HE ALSO SKETCHED OUTSIDE, BUT THE MAJOR WORK WAS DONE IN HIS STUDIO, WHERE HE SPENT MONTHS ANALYZING THE ARRANGEMENT OF COLORS, SO THAT EVERY FORM EMERGED SOLIDLY...NOT A LEAF STIRRED OUT OF LINE...AND THE COLORS INTEGRATED AND VIBRATED ACCORDING TO HIS SCHEME, NOT NATURE'S WHIMS.

VAN GOGH

SEVR AT


52

AND TRUSTING EXCHANGES WITH OTHER ARTISTS. AS A MAN, HE WAS EBULLIENT, OVER-COMPENSATING HIS HUMILITY, PERHAPS, WITH WIT AND WISECRACKS. ?a , THE NOTION THAT HE WAS UGLY CAME FROM HIS THERE ARE THREE POPULAR MISOWN SELF-DEPRECATING CARICACONCEPTIONS ABOUT HENRI DE TURES. HE DREW HIMSELF WITH TOULOUSE-LAUTREC, AND THE STUBBY LEGS, TINY EYES, HEAVY MOVIE WAS NO HELP IN SETTING US STRAIGHT. ONE, THAT HE WAS MEAN- BLACK BEARD AND LASCIVIOUS LIPS. HIS PHOTOGRAPHS, ON THE SPIRITED. TWO, THAT HE WAS UGLY. OTHER HAND, SHOW HIM TO HAVE A THREE, THAT HIS DEFORMITY DREW RATHER PLEASANT FACE WITH HIM TO HIS "DEPRAVED?' SUBJECT STRONG BONES, A COMELY BEARD MATTER. ta , THE FACT IS, LAUTREC WAS BORN TO A WELL-HEELED FAM- AND, WHAT SOME MIGHT CALL, SEXY LIPS. AL , IT MAY BE PARTLY TRUE ILY WITH NOBLE CREDENTIALS. HE THAT HIS OWN ABNORMALITY DREW WAS A WARM AND LOVING CHILD, HIM TO THE DEMI-MONDE. BUT IT'S THE APPLE OF HIS MOTHER'S EYE, AND BELOVED BY A HOST OF AUNTS, ALSO KNOWN THAT, EARLY ON, HE WAS TURNED OFF BY CLASSIC SUBUNCLES AND COUSINS. THERE'S NO JECT MATTER AND BOURGEOIS POREVIDENCE THAT THE BONE DISEASE TRAIT PAINTING. HE PRESENTED AND CRIPPLING ACCIDENTS, WHICH HIS DANCE HALL GIRLS, CABARET STUNTED HIS GROWTH, CHANGED SINGERS AND PROSTITUTES—NOT HIS PERSONALITY DRAMATICALLY. AS FREAKS—BUT AS FACTS OF LIFE. FROM HIS SICKBED, HE WROTE LAUTREC DIDN'T VULGARIZE THEM CHEERFUL, ILLUSTRATED LETTERS, OR CRY FOR THEM. JUST AS GOYA FULL OF LOVE AND KISSES TO HIS RELATED THE HORRORS OF WAR, RELATIVES.AS A YOUNG ART STULAUTREC TOLD THE TRUTH ABOUT DENT, HE WAS ENTHUSIASTIC AND MONTMARTRE. ASSIDUOUS,AND SHARED WARM

1864-1901

LAVTREC

MAGRITTE

1898.4967 What did he mean by a picture of a locomotive emerging from a fireplace? What are we to make of a water glass resting on an open umbrella? Of a nighttime street with a daytime sky? According to this artist, we are to make nothing...absolutely nothing ! ta , The Belgian painter Rene Magritte has been called a Surrealist. But Surrealism is all about dreams, fantasies and subconscious meanings. Magritte is not. He painted common objects, but he's not a"Pop"artist. He painted with photographic fidelity, but he's not a Realist. Neither is he an art-for-art's sake, Non-Objective painter, because he did have an object: it was to tantalize, provoke, delight, surprise and sensitize our vision—to make us look without thinking. And in order to make sure we didn't make sense out of his pictures, he used the most familiar objects in the most irrational settings and juxtapositions. To frustrate us further, he gave us titles that are absolute nonsense. No amount of pushing or verbal gymnastics will help us fit Rene Magritte into a ready-made category. He is a oneof-a-kind painter. But what kind of man was he to delight in frustrating others? Strange as it may seem, Magritte was a shy, solitary man, not at all bold, pushy or self-assured. He was orderly, disciplined, intensely neat and intensely private. Though he spoke freely on impersonal topics like philosophy, politics and art, nobody could ever crawl inside his mind to understand such personal matters as his affinity for Edgar Allan Poe...why he wept when he visited Poe's cottage in New York...why he never discussed his mother's drowning. He wanted nothing to do with psychoanalytic probings of art and artists. In his own words, he"despised his past"and wanted his life to be as unexplained as his work was unpredictable.


53

AD D NUB! NUMB! M 0001 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX DOC NAME RANSOM 41

Something from Everybody for U&lc

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To TELI-YoU I PAWNER CITY WOULD LIKE T. RECENING PUBLICATION, lower Case,

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55

AS ONE or COLORADO'S FINEST COLLEGES WE OFFER GOAT' ROPING AND GRAPHICS

You help me unleash my creative energies.

Dear I was Receiving' Your Jo againe

For a number L Of Years. I Find it FASCINATING, ,/,i3O01Ariva, And the best thi/gr That used ro come to niV Cupnie off your trailing List!

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I wandered weak and weary, Through the Hallmark halls so cheery, I quite suddenly was stricken by a longing strong and pure. Quick I recognized this craving, This familiar inner raving, It was tivie. publications that my mind was screaming for, Just a year or two of monthlies that my mind was screaming for. Only this and nothing more.

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Please help me tap my reserves. Yours Tru LY

Yours truly, Nancy Martin Box 189 Shaw Hall, 775 Comstock Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210

Another creative contribution from John

Langdon. This time for a worthy cause: law and order.


56

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ERRATUM In our June 1980 issue, on page 24, we were guilty of an unpardonable error and we wish to make amends. Our thanks go to those enlightened readers who straightened us out about the two Samuel Butlers: Samuel, the poet, 1612-1680, and Samuel, the essayist, 1835-1902. Although we correctly attributed the quote to Samuel the latter, we illustrated it with a 17th-century engraved portrait of Samuel the former. Reproduced, above, is a picture of the correct Samuel Butler. We suggest that you cut it out in an oval shape and paste it over the wrong Samuel Butler. It will give us considerable peace of mind.


57

PHOTOG RAPHY BYROBERTMOORE ANDNANCY PORTER

CAST OF

CHARACTERS

Because Jason Calfo, our art and production editor, had an operation on his ankle...Because his leg was subsequently encased in a cast ...Because a plaster cast makes an irresistible surface to write on... Because Jason dreamed up an irre sistible pun, Cast of Characters (get it?), and thought it was a neat way to show you some of the people behind the scenes at U&lc...We all assembled one evening to sign our names, pose for pictures and let him tell us all about his surgery. Here we are, in case anyone cares.

THIS ARTICLE WAS SET IN ITC SOUVENIR


58

You don't want your jobs to be any less than the very best. We feel the same way. That's why we tell you not to compromise when it comes to type. Don't settle for Chelmsford Medium when what you really want is Chelmsford Demi Bold. Don't settle for 60 point when what you really want is 601/2 point. Don't settle for 45 pica line length when you really want 70 picas. To make sure you don't have to settle for less, we've put together a combination of type styles and typesetters that give you exactly what you want: great type. First, take a look at our library. Chances are, we have the exact type you need. Because we make over 500 type styles, including most ITC faces. And we're continually adding more. For instance, we just added 8 ITC Isbell faces to our ITC selection. (You can see one example in the center column of this ad.) So now you can get the complete set of faces in the ITC Isbell family. All of our type is great looking, too. Each and every character prints with perfect clarity and sharpness in our full range of sizes, from 51/2 point to 74 point. And to make your typesetting easy, we put four different faces with a total of 448 characters on every type disc.

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59

AO Varityper the Informationists.

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For example, with our Comp/Edit system, you get 16 styles on-line. And you can set them in 138 sizes, from 5 1/2 to 74 point, in 1/2 point increments. That's a combination of 2,208 different fonts, all available at the push of a button. And you can mix all the styles and sizes you need within a single line. The Comp/Edit system also has a 70 pica line length and 16 inch automatic reverse leading. So you can do most of your big jobs without any paste-up. So, why compromise when you don't have to? Return the coupon today and we'll send you a copy of our "type one-liner," showing all the faces currently available. If you really want great type in a hurry, call tollfree (800) 631-8134, except in Alaska and Hawaii. From New Jersey (201) 887-8000, extension 666. Or write AM Varityper, Dept. F-2, 11 Mount Pleasant Avenue, East Hanover; NJ 07936. In Europe: AM International Information Services Ltd., Varityper Division, 44 Church Street, Luton Beds, England. Call 44-582-416837. Comp/Set, AM and Varityper are registered trademarks and Comp/Edit, The Informationists and Type Express are trademarks of AM International, Inc. ©1980 AM International, Inc.

Give us a shout. Yes,lwarit greattype. ❑ Send me a copy of the "Type one-liner." ❑ Send me information on your phototypesetting systems.

F-2

Name Company Address City, State Phone ( )

Zip


60 •11■1111111b.

.11111111111

Demos

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz&fiffflg 123456789012345678901234567890

When Dutch graphic designer Gerard Unger began the design of Demos, he wanted a "type for everyone". As a typographer and art director, Gerard saw the need for a "really new, workable design" suited to modern technology.

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Demos Bold

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ& abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890

Demos Bold Oblique

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ& abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz1234567890

Demos (de'rni5s) n. 1. The people of an ancient Greek state, considered as a social class or as a political entity. 2. The common people; populace. [Greek demos, district, people.]

He wanted a digital type that would print faithfully by offset, gravure, or letterpress on any grade of paper; an economical type that would read easily even in the smallest sizes; a clear type for reproduction on office copiers; and a contemporary type that continued the classical canons of good letterforms. Demos is such a face — a type that lets everyone speak easily in every kind of print. And so it was named with the Greek word for "the people", to honor those who gave us the alphabet and democracy. Large x-height, horizontal stress, open counters, sturdy serifs, precision letterfitting and pre-rounding of corners give Demos its fidelity and legibility for photomechanical reproduction. In cooperation with Digiset's computerized letterdrawing office, Gerard designed, tested, and corrected each character directly on the digital grid. The result is exactly what the designer intended — neither a "similar-to" nor a "re-drawing", but the real thing.

Praxis is a sans-serif which harmonizes with Demos in form, weight, and proportion. Praxis (prak'sis) n. 1. Practical

application or exercise of a branch of learning 2. Habitual or established practice; custom. [Medieval Latin, from Greek, doing, action, from prattein, prassein, to do.]

Praxis For more information on Demos, see "The Design of a Typeface" by Gerard Unger in Visible Language Volume XIII, Number 2, pp. 134-149; and "Gerard Unger: Type Design and Lettering" in Fine Print Volume VI, Number 3, pp. 102-103.

Together, Demos and Praxis form a "super-family" of serif and sans, with italic, oblique, & weights, for the foundation of a new era in typographic design.

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ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ& abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890

Complete this form for free type chart/poster

Digiset/HCM Graphic Systems

Name

115 Cutter Mill Road

Address

Great Neck, New York 11021

City/State

Unlike traditional sans-serifs (Swiss grotesques or American gothics) Praxis presents an original letter-texture adapted, like Demos, to modern technology. Designed to maximize legibility, Praxis draws upon Gerard's experience designing sans-serif signage for the Amsterdam subway.

Zip

(516) 466-0710

Praxis Bold

Praxis Oblique

Praxis Bold Oblique


61

NEWSLETTER

Skills for Hire* Grad Handles Graphics for Television News PITTSBURGH — The award-winning television station KDKA-TV is the work world of talented Theresa Zamborsky, Art Institute of Pittsburgh Visual Communication graduate. Theresa does local ads for TV Guide; billboards; bus cards, and graphics for news

programs. As television art must be horizontal, she has a special challenge, which she recently met in creating graphics for the set's weather map. "This station knows all about the Art Institute," Theresa says, "and they often recruit from the school. Five out of six of the artists here are Art Institute grads!"

Brad Holland (c) and J.-C. Suares (1) listen as Jim McMullan responds to a question from the standing-room-only audience.

Big Names Bring Visual Ideas to Colorado Conference poster of Liv Ullmann as O'Neill's Anna Christie. Suares provided a perfect complement as he presented the art director's angle on visual ideas, based on his experience as the original art director of The New York Times Op-Ed page. The conference was typical of The Design Schools' continuing activity in the profes-

DENVER —A capacity crowd came from all across eastern Colorado to experience one of the season's major graphic events when famous illustrators Brad Holland and Jim McMullan joined noted art director/cartoonist J.-C. Suares for a conference on "Visual Ideas" at the Colorado Heritage Center. Co-sponsoring the event were the Art Directors Club of Denver and The Design Schools. It was another in the series presented by the schools to bring important graphic ideas to all parts of the country, while making prospective employers aware of the impressive skills and abilities of The Design Schools graduates. During the two-hour session, the three panelists described their personal creative processes. Holland kept the audience amused as he spoke of his formative years and his difficulty in breaking into commercial art — then he amazed them with his startling work. McMullan gave the group an in-depth look at his "socio-journalism" and discussed an early sketch for his famous

sional world of design. In addition to this series of programs, the schools are among the sponsors of the International Design Conference in Aspen; provide a yearly scholarship to the International Center of Photography in New York, and individually grant scholarships to the winners of Scholastic's high school art competition.

Advertising Design student Cindy Williams of the Art Institute of Houston designed this graphic oceanside signage in her class on logos, symbols and corporate identity.

Art directors, designers and illustrators hear celebrated panelists in Denver.

Graduates of The Design Schools have had 24 months of intensive, specialized preparation in a variety of skills, including: advertising design, typography, photography, illustration, drawing, perspective, lettering, airbrush, package design, multimedia, animation, mechanicals, pre-separation and many others. They are prepared to work productively for you.

*The e

Art Institute of Atlanta Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale Art Institute of Houston Art Institute of Philadelphia Art Institute of Pittsburgh Colorado Institute of Art

14

Edward A. Hamilton, Design Director The Design Schools Pan Am Building, Suite 256, East Mezzanine 200 Park Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10166 I would like to know more about The Design Schools graduates. ❑ I don't have immediate need, but please keep me advised. Include me on your invitation list for seminars and programs. I am a graduate of ❑

Special note to alumni: If you are one of the several thousand Design Schools graduates who are living and working in the U.S., we'd like to know where you are, what you're doing, and any special achievements. If you'd like your name added to our growing list of employers who from time to time need well-trained staff members, just complete the coupon at right and mail it to us today.

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BERTHOLD OF NORTH AMERICA USA: p. o. box 624, 610 Winters Avenue, Paramus, N.J. 07652 Illinois: 4415 Hillside Street, Hillside, Illinois 60162 California: 5860 Uplander Way, suite 103, Culver City, California 90 230 Canada: 157 Bentworth Avenue, Toronto, Ontario m6a 1p6

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64

If you have an appetite for the

i0B HANDLING K) KEYBOARD A NEW JOB (E) EDIT A JOB tD) DELETE JOB (S) MERGE 'O) PROOFREAD PAGINATION

DICTIONARY (A) ALTER DICTIONARY (P) PRINT DICTIONARY

INPUT/OUTPUT (V) VIEW JOBS IN -CO) OCR (B) DATA PHONE (R) PAPER TAPE (I) MAG TAPE (T) TYPESETTER (H) HIGH SPEED PRTR (F) FLOPPY DISK

OTHER OPTIONS BASIC INTERPRETER DATA EASE MANAGEME T BUSINESS PACKAGES


65

ultimate in typesetting control... Start by reading our menu: MultiSet III's menu lists an impressive array of functions designed for productivity and typesetting control never before possible. It's everything you'd expect from a front end system and more! Begin with our Input/Output functions. MultiSet III accepts mag or paper tape, OCR, floppy disks and data phone communications. We can output to all the popular 2nd and 3rd generation phototypesetters, including the Alphatype CRS, and a choice of hard copy printers. The menu allows access to extensive editing and typographic capabilities such as multi-level search and substitute, character pair kerning, white space reduction, tabbing, indents, formats, area make-up, and automatic justified or ragged setting. Our H&J program is one of the finest, using either rules of logic or our 160,000 word capacity dictionary or both. And automatic letterspacing or kerning, in increments as small as 1/8 of a unit, solves those short measure problems. Another section on the menu is File Management. The MultiSet III, using directories and job files, keeps track of all work in the system including the time spent keyboarding and editing.

And as the menu enables single key access to all major functions, there are no complex codes or mnemonics to remember. The simplicity of our system allows your operators to spend their time setting type, not programming. But the menu is only the beginning. The basic MultiSet III, consisting of a minicomputer with 96K of memory, 80 megabyte hard disk, floppy disk drive and two 32K intelligent terminals is uniquely expandable. As your business grows, the system can grow with it. Have up to ten 32K terminals, up to four 80 or 300 megabyte disk drives and connect multiple typesetters to each CPU. Double your capacity by linking two MultiSet Ill's together. And the system is being updated continually with new typesetting, business and data base software such as pagination, proofreading, inventory control and a directory management program. All this plus AlphaKey's commitment to total system support will insure that the MultiSet III will be the most productive, versatile and cost efficient front end system on the market tomorrow as well as today. For information on how the MultiSet III gives you the ultimate in typesetting productivity and control, send the coupon below. Find out how the AlphaKey advantage works to YOURS!

The MultiSet III by Alphatype AlphaKey Systems A Division Of Alphatype Corporation 7711 N. Merrimac Ave. Niles, Illinois 60648 312-965-8800 In Canada Alphatype Canada Inc. 105 Scarsdale Rd. Don Mills, Ontario M3I3 2R5 416-449-6132

Dear AlphaKey: Tell me how the MultiSet III will satisfy my appetite. â?&#x2018; Send me a descriptive brochure. â?&#x2018; Call me for an appointment for a demonstration. U&Ic12/80 Name Company Name Address City Phone

Title

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Send coupon to AlphaKey Systems/7711 N. Merrimac Ave./Niles, IL 60648 Alphatype Corporation 19


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An excellent value and a magnificent collet• you save $26.00. You'll tion! Usually $305.95 get the complete 1980 library, shown on this page, and you'll get all of it immediately. You'll also get a subscription to the forthcoming 1981 books and you'll receive four every month as soon as published. Any 1981 books published by the time your order arrives will be included in your immediate 1980 shipment. Remaining

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These 48 brand new "Clip Books of Line Art" are advertised here for the first time. The complete collection of all 1980 books Is shown on this page in the miniature reproduction of their covers. All these plus 48 miniature index folders with each illustration in half size, which you'll use for quick look-up or as a source for smaller reproduction art.

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67

"I found away to beat the high cost of stats "We create on-air graphics for several TV networks. Time is of the essence in our business, and we've also got to keep a sharp eye on production costs. "Our Pos One® camera/processor helps us beat those tight deadlines and stay within budget, something that would be virtually impossible to do if we had to send out for stats and other reproductions. "The Pos One camera is a great creative tool. It's simple to use and delivers an amazing variety of reproductions in normal room light. "With this versatile machine on the premises we get all the stats, enlargements, reductions, positives, reverses, special effects, screened halftones and film transparencies we need— in a matter of minutes and at exceptionally low cost?' Peter Diaferia Partner, The Studios of

Diamond and Diaferia New York, N.Y.

NEW LOW- COST RENTAL PLAN AVAILABLE

r

1 VISUAL GRAPHICS CORPORATION VGC Park, 5701 N.W. 94th Ave. Tamarac, FL 33321

Call Us Toll Free 800-327-1813

— Please send more information on the

Pos One cameras.

IN FLORIDA (305) 722-3000 IN CANADA (416) 533-2305

Tell me about your low-cost rental plan.

—Please arrange a demonstration. Title

Name Company Address State

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Phone U&Ic12/80


For over a decade, Rydeffjpes had set much of the type for one of the Midwest's largest corporations. But then, not long ago, this corporation installed an in-house computer typesetting system and trained one of their best secretaries to operate it. For the first few months, the secretary-turned-typesetter slowly learned the new equipment. She even produced the type for a series of brochures, sales sheets, and manuals.

But as she began to turn out galley proofs for the corporation's prestigious annual report, it became obvious that this year it wasn't going to look like it had in the past. Her boss noticed it. She noticed it. And it seemed as if stockholders would notice it too. It wasn't that she was using a different typeface. What was missing was the typographic style. The kind of style that gives people like stockholders

the right impression of a company. What was missing was the experienced eye that instinctively takes out unnecessary bits of air, hangs punctuation, and kerns letters when necessary. And what was also missing was economy, because after numerous revisions, the type set in-house was thrown out and Ryder7jpes once again set the annual report. The corporation learned something from this experience.

We think we did too. As the need for printed communication grows each day, typographers can't expect to set every word for a corporation. But what we'd like to think is that the words we do set are the ones that make the best impressions. Rydeerypes, Inc. 500 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610 Telephone (312)467-7117


69

New! LetratextTM Dry Transfer Body Copy Sheets.

Block Schwer

Brighton Brighton

MEDIUM

Discover for yourself, Letraset's Graphic Treasures, in our 32 page new products supplement. Not only are there a wealth of new typefaces in the Instant Lettering and Letragraphica ranges, there are also new Letratone Sheets, Graphic Symbols, Color Lettering, Point Size additions and Letratextm" dry transfer body copy. Ask your Letraset Dealer for a copy or send us the coupon.

BOLD

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BOLD CONDENSED BOLD CONDENSED ITALIC

MEDIUM

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SALLOW

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Please send me a Graphic Treasures new products supplement. Name

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Letraset USA Inc. 40 Eisenhower Drive Paramus, NJ 07652

©Letraset USA Inc. 1981

U&LC


70

THEY DON'T LIKE H OTHERS TYPE.

Not everybody sees things eye-to-eye. A typestyle that's right for the guy on the left might scare hell out of the other fella. As for him, his idea of tight spacing could be the kind somebody else would drive a truck through. What's a type house to do? What you, only you, and nobody else tells us to do, of course. At Bundscho, it's your ballgame. There's six decades of typesetting, four complete type systems, and 99 pairs of practiced hands waiting to help you win it. Our customers might never get to like each others type, but they all admire each others type house.

BUNDSCHO. IF In NOT RIGHT WITH YOU, IT'S NOT RIGHT. J. M. Bundscho, Inc., 180 North Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Illinois 60601 â&#x20AC;˘ (312) 726-7292


71

Who does an Art Director call when all he can shoot is himself? His ATA typographer. That's what I did when I found myself on a New York set with ruined logo art and 25 people standing around at $1,000 an hour. When I finally found a New York shop with my typeface, they were overloaded. And I got, ". . . sorry, bud, maybe tomorrow:' Fighting down panic, I dialed my typographer back home and told him to set new art, buy it a plane ticket, and put it on the next flight out. He said no need for all that â&#x20AC;&#x201D; he'd just call his ATA affiliate in

New York and tell him what I needed. He called the same guy I had just talked to. And even though the fellow still didn't know me from Adam, he knew my

typographer back home. So he dropped everything, set the type, silkscreened it, and cabbed it to me in an hour. That's the way ATA typographers help each other out. And save Art Directors' necks in the process. There's an ATA type house near you. And you'll find it's the best in the area, because ATA lets only the cream of the crop join. So call your ATA typographer. He can fix you up in more ways and sizes than you can imagine. He can even open doors over the phone . . . and make you as important in a big city as you are at home.

The ATA

ADVERTISING TYPOGRAPHERS ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA, INC. 461 EIGHTH AVENUE, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10001 WALTER A. DEW, JR., EXECUTIVE SECRETARY

A

ATA MEMBERS, Atlanta, Georgia Action Graphics, Inc. Bloomfield, Connecticut New England Typographic Service, Inc. Boston, Massachusetts Berkeley Typographers, Inc.; Composing Room of New England; Typographic House, Inc. Cedar , Rapids, Iowa Type 2, Inc. Chicago, Illinois J. M. Bundscho, Inc.; Rydertypes, Inc.; Total Typography, Inc. Cincinnati, Ohio Typo-Set, Inc. Cleveland, Ohio Bohme & Blinkmann, Inc. Columbus, Ohio Dwight Yaeger Typographers Dallas, Texas Jaggars-Chiles-Stovall, Inc. ; Southwestern Typographics, Inc. ; Typography Plus Dayton, Ohio Craftsman Type Incorporated Detroit, Michigan The Thos. P. Henry Company ; Willens+Michigan Corp. Grand Rapids, Michigan Central Trade Plant of Grand Rapids Houston, Texas Typografiks, Inc. Indianapolis, Indiana Typosenrice Corporation Los Angeles, California Andresen Typographics; Typographic Service Co., Inc. Memphis, Tennessee Graphic Arts, Inc. Miami, Florida Wrightson Typesetting, Inc. Minneapolis, Minnesota Dahl & Cony, Inc. ; Type House+ Duragraph, Inc. Newark, New Jersey Arrow Typographers New Orleans, Louisiana Film-A-Graphics, Inc. New York, New York Advertising Agencies/Headliners ; Franklin Typographers, Inc.; Royal Composing Room, inc.; Tri-Arts Press, Inc.; Typographics Communications, Inc.; Volk & Huxley, Inc. Norwalk, Connecticut Norwalk Typographers, Inc. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Armstrong, Inc. ; Typographic Service, Inc. Phoenix, Arizona Momeau Typographers, Inc. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Davis & Warde, Inc. ; Headliners of Pittsburgh, Inc. Portland, Oregon Paul 0. Giesey/Adcrafters, Inc. Rochester, New York Rochester Mono/Headliners San Diego, California Central Typesetting, Inc. San Francisco, California Headliners/Identicolor, Inc. Seattle, Washington Thomas & Kennedy Typographers, Inc. St. Joseph, Michigan Type House, Inc. St. Louis, Missouri Master Typographers, Inc, Syracuse, New York Dix Typesetting Co., Inc. Tampa, Florida Century Typographers Montreal, Canada McLean Brothers, Ltd. Toronto, Canada Cooper & Beatty, Ltd. Winnipeg, Canada B/W Type Service, Ltd. Brisbane, Australia Savage & Co. Stockholm, Sweden Typografen AB Stuttgart, West Germany Layout-Setzerei Stulle GmbH


72

C PS0130 PS10 COW' P,SY , CiztESCEN


73 1

t

Li

M ood Makers

Romantic or dignifie • .. jovial or harsh. . . frivolous• or solemn . . . gentle or loud . . . old-fashioned or futuristic, Itek type lets you set the mood. For two decades, designers have relied on Itek type to enhance every graphic, to enrich every message. But we're not simply basking in our heritage. Today Itek offers a remarkably large selection of faces in our type gallery, TI including many entire families, text and display faces, PI characters, ITC faces and several hundred foreign faces. And our selection keeps on growing.

...

What's more, Itek helps Quadritek", Pacesetter" and Mark VIII Phototypesetter users economically build type libraries. You purchase only the fonts you need, when you need them. Itek has type for every mood and design you can imagine. For a free, four-color poster of the graphic in this ad, write us on your official company letterhead or staple your business card to this ad and send to:

Itek Composition Systems Advertising Department 355 Middlesex Ave. Wilmington, MA 01887

Itek

Itek Photocomposition equipment composed all type in this ad. Itek®, Quadritele and Pacesetter" are trademarks of Itek Corporation, Lexington, Mass. ULC/T12-1


74 In Congress, July 4, 1776, The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America,

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When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the Powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive to these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shown, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security.—Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world. He has refused his Assent to Laws, the most wholesome and necessary for the public good. He has forbidden his Governors to pass Laws of immediate and pressing importance, unless suspended in their operation til his Assent should be obtained; and when so suspended, he has utterly neglected to attend to them. He has refused to pass other Laws for the accommodation of large districts of people, unless those people would relinquish the right of Representation in the Legislature, a right inestimable to them and formidable to tyrants only. He has called together legislative bodies at places unusual, uncomfortable, and distant from the depository of their Public Records, for the sole purpose of fatiguing them into compliance with his measures. He has dissolved Representative Houses repeatedly, for opposing with manly firmness his invasions on the rights of the people. He has refused for a long time, after such dissolutions, to cause others to be elected; whereby the Legislative Powers, incapable of Annihilation, have returned to the People at large for their exercise; the State remaining in the mean time exposed to all the dangers of invasion from without, and convulsions within. He has endeavoured to prevent the population of these States; for that purpose obstructing the Laws of Naturalization of Foreigners; refusing to pass others to encourage their migration hither, and raising the conditions of new Appropriations of Lands. He has obstructed the Administration of Justice, by refusing his Assent to Laws for establishing Judiciary Powers.


75

He has made Judges dependent on his Will alone, for the tenure of their offices, and the amount and payment of their salaries. He has erected a multitude of New Offices, and sent hither swarms of Officers to harass our People, and eat out their substance. He has kept among us, in times of peace, Standing Armies without the Consent of our legislature. He has affected to render the Military independent of and superior to the Civil Power. He has combined with others to subject us to a jurisdiction foreign to our constitution, and unacknowledged by our laws; giving his Assent to their acts of pretended legislation: Forquartering large bodies of armed troops among us: Forprotecting them, by a mock Trial, from Punishment for any Murders which they should commit on the Inhabitants of these States: For cutting off our Trade with all parts of the world: Forimposing taxes on us without our Consent: Fordepriving us in many cases, of the benefits of Trial by Jury: Fortransporting us beyond Seas to be tried for pretended offences: For abolishing the free System of English Laws in a neighbouring Province, establishing therein an Arbitrary government, and enlarging its Boundaries so as to render it at once an example and fit instrument for introducing the same absolute rule into these Colonies: Fortaking away our Charters, abolishing our most valuable Laws and altering fundamentally the Forms of our Governments: Forsuspending our own Legislature, and declaring themselves invested with Power to legislate for us in all cases whatsoever. He has abdicated Government here, by declaring us out of his Protection and waging War against us. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He has plundered our seas, ravaged our Coasts, burnt our towns, and destroyed the lives of our people. He is at this time transporting large armies of foreign mercenaries to compleat the works of death, desolation and tyranny, already begun with circumstances of Cruelty and perfidy scarcely paralleled in the most barbarous ages, and totally unworthy the Head of a civilized nation. He has constrained our fellow Citizens taken Captive on the high Seas to bear Arms against their Country, to become the executioners of their friends and Brethren, or to fall themselves by their Hands. He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions. In every stage of these Oppressions We have Petitioned for Redress in the most humble terms: Our repeated Petitions have been answered only by repeated injury. A Prince, whose character is thus marked by every act which may define a Tyrant, is unfit to be the ruler of a free People. Nor have We been wanting in attention to our British brethren. We have warned them from time to time of attempts by their legislature to extend an unwarrantable jurisdiction over us. We have reminded them of the circumstances of our emigration .

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and settlement here. We have appealed to their native justice and magnanimity, and we have conjured them by the ties of our common kindred to disavow these usurpations, which, would inevitably interrupt our connections and correspondence. They too have been deaf to the voice of justice and of consanguinity. We must, therefore, acquiesce in the necessity, which denounces our Separation, and hold them, as we hold the rest of mankind, Enemies in War in Peace Friends. We, therefore, the Representatives of the united States of America, in General Congress, assembled, appealing to the Supreme Judge of the world for the rectitude of our intentions, do, in the Name, and by Authority of the good People of these Colonies, solemnly publish and declare, That These United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States: that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved; and that as Free and Independent States, they have full Power to levy War, conclude Peace, contract Alliances, establish Commerce, and to do all other Acts and Things which Independent States may of right do. And for the support of the Declaration, with a firm reliance on the Protection of Divine Providence we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.

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duoprint® 1400

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AUTOMATIC PROCESSOR FOR R.C. PAPER & FILM

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The DuoPrint 1400 is an automated processing system with big processor capability. Its unique compact design requires just a minimum of floor space whether used as a table top unit or equipped with the optional cabinet and recirculating pumps. The DuoPrint 1400 is the ultimate in Rapid Access processing.

DAYLIGHT OR DARKROOM

TOTAL VERSATILITY: The variable speed motor plus adjustable temperature controls for developer and fixer insure your abiity to utilize any combination of chemicals and photographic papers and films. Automatic replenishment of developer and fixer insures proper fluid level at all times through a simple, no maintenance gravity feed system; no sophisticated electronics to go wrong; no expensive parts to replace!

The 14" entrance chute makes the DuoPrint 1400 ideal in a darkroom environment for processing line and half tone films or paper prints from your "stat" or "process" camera. The standard Daylight Cassette Cover permits the 1400 to also be used under normal room light conditions for processing any length RC photo typesetting paper or film. The automatic dryer section is standard on all units and helps get you ready for paste-up in a hurry!

Sales and Service Nationwide

duostat corporation 114 Beach St. Rockaway, N.J. 07866

114 Beach St. Rockaway, N.J. 07866 201-625-4400 • Telex: 136-387

❑ Please send more information on the duostat 1400 automatic processor ❑ Please arrange a demonstration

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81

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edge You are looking at actual unretouched enlargements of characters set by two digital CRT phototypesetters. Examine the edge of the Autologic character. It's clean. Crisp. Now look at the character from our competitor's machine. Why is there such a difference? In digitized CRT typesetting, each character in a font is stored as computer information. To make sure that output is sharp as well as fast, Autologic breaks the entire character down into overlapping vertical strokes. Up to 2880 lines per inch. In contrast, our competitor only represents the character in vectored outline form, filling it in during character generation. The result is a loss of sharpness, easily visible to the naked eye. High resolution and quality type at astronomical output speeds are just two advantages you get with Autologic's APS family of digital phototypesetters. You

Unretouched enlargements of characters by Autologic (left) and a competitor

have greater reliability because electronic circuitry replaces moving parts. No time spent changing grids. No fonts on film to get damaged or lost. All Autologic fonts are on-line. Autologic, always at the forefront of typesetting technology, gives you the production advantages of the latest generation computerized typesetters, with the highest quality output. Autologic, Incorporated 1050 Rancho Conejo Boulevard Newbury Park, CA (213) 889-7400. A subsidiary of Volt Information Sciences, Inc.

tologic

Leader in Digitized Typesetting


82

Give your pasteup Mergenthaler Linotype's new electronic composer does more than merely cut composing costs. In addition, it cuts editing and layout costs. That's the reason why our Linoscreen Composer makes the most of electronic composing's vast cost-cutting potential.


83

costs a real pasting!

Electronic composers are one of the most exciting equipment developments for the '80's. But don't get so excited about cutting composing costs that you forget copy still has to be edited and pages laid out. Linoscreen Composer remembers. Its unique trio of operating modes—Edit, Compose, Layout— delivers more of the kindest cuts of all: cost cuts. Edit Mode cuts costly errors. Linoscreen Composer's Edit Mode speeds up editing throughput in two ways. First, it makes any text easy to see on the screen. All type is displayed in 14 point, 51 lines at a time, each line 46 picas wide. Second, all commands are suppressed. That means no cluttering symbols on the screen to confuse editing and invite errors. And you know how costly those errors can be if you've ever heard an advertiser scream about a wrong phone number or, worse yet, a wrong price. Compose Mode cuts total pasteup costs including markup, drafting and art materials. Compose Mode displays everything in actual size and exact position. You can change sizes, delete and insert at will; move elements around until you see exactly what you want. It's so flexible you can even create on screen. And what you create

is, for all practical purposes, limitless: Handle jobs with as many as 16,000 characters. (No other composer handles as many.) Create horizontal, vertical and box rules in 10 weights from 1/2 to 24 points. Choose from among 96 on-line fonts selected from the world's most comprehensive type library. Do standard and/or reverse settings on screen in roman, italic, bold and bold italic. Select or alter justification ragged right or left, centered or fully justified. Scroll vertically and/or horizontally to make composing easy from any direction And to make repeat jobs go faster, there are 99 formats that you may store on each program disk. When you want to set or update a repeat job again, recall it to the screen at the stroke of a key. Layout Mode eliminates costly trial-and-error typesetting. Our unique Layout Mode lays out and displays complete pages as large as 100 x 158 picas. And does it without markup, pasteup or experimental settings. All page components, defined on screen as outlines, can be positioned wherever you like. Four scales (1:1, 2:1, .7:1, .5:1) make it easy to work with any size field, including the broadsheet. You can even insert all horizontal, vertical and box rules in actual weights. Then the completed page is output to the typesetter or stored on disk for later recall. Customized cost cutting. Linoscreen Composer is so versatile that, working with our Linotron 202, or V-I-P typesetter, it is all you need to give productivity one of its biggest boosts in years. But if your typography department has special requirements, Linoscreen Composer offers options that tailor a system to your precise needs. For instance, an electronic drawing board that traces art outlines and fits

copy; a hard-copy plotter for offmachine proofing and approvals; the Linokey 2 low cost auxiliary input terminal and a mini-floppy reader. Whatever Linoscreen Composer system you put together, you know it's going to work—because we know how you work. We've had nearly a century of experience with graphic arts people and equipment. Call us at (516) 673-4197. Or write Mergenthaler Linotype, 201 Old Country Road, Melville, New York 11747.

Mergenthaler Linotype

• •

111 Please call me to arrange for a demonstration. Have a sales representative contact me. ❑ Send additional information.

Name Title

• •

Company Street

City

• • • • •

Zip

__ State

Phone

Mergenthaler Linotype Company 201 Old Country Road, Melville, New York 11747 Phone (516) 673-4197

• • • •


84

ARE YOU A POIEN1111 SUMMAR Isn't it about time you found out? Syracuse University's Independent Study Degree Program gives you an opportunity to work toward your MFA in Advertising Design or Illustration while you're working full time. And you study face-toface with the top designers and illustrators in the industry. For two weeks each summer (for three summers) you study with superstars like the former faculty listed below. The rest of the year you're working on independent study assignments

Birmy can help your word processor print money.

and making a few long-weekend field trips to study with the top communicators right where they live and work. Places like New York, Toronto, Chicago and London. You'll find out more about how the pros work, you'll make more connections and you'll learn morethan you can possibly imagine. For complete information, write or call: Director, Syracuse University ISDP, Room 6, 610 E. Fayette Street, Syracuse, N.Y. 13202 / (315) 423-3269.

Study with the pros ALLAN BEAVER, JOE BOWLER, TOM CARNASE, MILTON CHARLES, STEVE COSMOPULOS, PAUL DAVIS, LOU DORFSMAN, GENE FEDERICO, DICK GANGEL, AMIL GARGANO, BOB GROSSMAN, DICK HARVEY, BOB HEINDEL, DOUG JOHNSON, DICK HESS, HELMUT KRONE, HERB LUBALIN, WILSON McCLEAN, JIM McMULLAN, JACQUI MORGAN, DAVE PASSALACQUA, ARTHUR PAUL, LARRY PLAPLER, SHIRLEY POLYKOFF, HEIDI RICKABAUGH, SAM SCALI, EILEEN HEDY SCHULTZ, ISADORE SELTZER BERT STEINHAUSER, MURRAY TINKELMAN, DON TROUSDELL, ROBERT WEAVER AND OTHERS.

"Advertising Is the cave art of the twentieth century." Marshall !Act-Litton

Rejected by a trade publication as "insulting to art directors," this literal interpretation of Marshall McLuhan's phrase, "Advertising is the cave art of the twentieth century," has been privately printed for aficionados. In sepia color, 18 x 21 inches, it was conceived by art director Bernie Zlotnick, photographed by his friend Carl Fischer. The Poster Company, 121 East 83 Street, New York 10028. $10 postpaid.

In two simple steps we can show you how your communicating word processor can become more than afancy typewriter. We'll show you how you can use it to save a lot of money. One. After copy is typed on your word processor, call us on our special phone line and transmit your copy to us over the phone. Two. We go directly from your word processor in your copywriter's office, if that's where you keep it, through your modem over the phone to our modem— then to our translation device, which can recode all communications—then into our central computer facility. Our operators put in the additional typesetting codes that are needed, if any, and your job is printed out on our typesetting machines in whatever typefaces or sizes you want. It's that simple. The end result is that you save about 1/3 of what it would costfor us to key the job completely. So give us a call and we'll help you get a lot more return on your investment. At Birmy, we're not outjust to make you look good. We want to help you make more money.

2244 N.W. 21 Terrace Miami, Florida 33142 (305) 633-5241 635-0482


85

for your (typographic) information .•

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A device that reads, records or erases data on a storage medium e.g., 1. A small electromagnet used to read, write or erase data on a magnetic medium: drum, tape, card or disc. 2. The set of perforating, reading or marking devices used for punching, reading or printing on paper tape.

SUPER PRESE \TATIO\S • SUPER GRAPHICS • SUPER A 910 • SUPER SLDES & V„CH, VUC- YORE

Header 1. A file record containing common, constant or identifying information for a group of records that follow 2. The first part of a message, containing all necessary information for directing the message to its destination.

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SPINDLER SLIDES, INC • 1501 BROADWAY • AT 44TH - NEW YORK, • NY 10036 • (212) 730-1255

Hyphenation The syllabic division of a word that would otherwise overrun the right-hand limit of a line. In phototypesetting, end-of-line hyphenation can be inserted by the keyboard operator or automatically generated by the computer. There are three systems of automatic hyphenation: 1. Discretionary— Inserted by the operator when keyboarding. Operator inserts hyphens in hyphenation positions of every word of three syllables or more. Computer, when justifying a line, uses its discretion to choose only the hyphen needed. All other operator-inserted hyphens are dropped. 2. Logic—The computer is programmed to follow certain logical rules for hyphenating words at ends of lines. Extensive rules prolong processing time. Due to great inconsistencies in the English language, no program of rules will give 100% correct hyphenation. If rules cannot be applied, word will not be hyphenated and line will be justified by adding word space and/or letter space. 3. Exception "Dictionary"—An exception list can be used to augment the logic hyphenation program. A collection of words often incorrectly hyphenated by the logic program are held in the computer's memory. The "dictionary" may also include words which should not be hyphenated. When a hyphenation situation arises, many machines automatically search their logic programs and exception dictionaries and, if the word cannot be handled, alert the operator. 4. Hyphenless— No words are hyphenated. Lines are justified by increasing or decreasing the word spacing and, on some machines, the letterspacing. Can result in excessive word and letterspacing. Some keyboards and other input devices do not perform hyphenation or justification. These devices can be operated more rapidly and hyphenation and justification are taken care of at a later stage, as at an editing terminal or in the typesetter. Idiot Tape Paper or magnetic tape intended to operate a metal or phototypesetter via a computer. More appropriately termed unhyphenated tape, unjustified tape or simple tape.

people

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Others might even call it a warehouse. Either way, we'd call it the

and General Drawing Supplies. We even have that whatcha-macall-it you've been looking for. So, why not visit your favorite art supply dealer and look over the ALVIN line of art materials. Or send for your free copy of this big 212-page catalog today, and see what "complete" really means. Chances are "we've got it!"

most extensive selection of graphic arts products ever assembled. We, at Alvin, understand your needs. That's why you'll find a wide, wide range of quality art materials to choose from .. . Instruments, Scales, Drawing Room Equipment, Pencils, , Pens, Markers, Transfer Type and Films.

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T-- --ALVIN and COMPANY INC.

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Importers. Manufacturers, & Distributors

P.O. Box 188C, Windsor, Conn. 06095 I'd like to get a look at your warehouse. Send me your free catalog today.

Inferior Letter or Figure

NAME

Undersized characters set at the bottom of the typeline.

COMPANY

TITLE

I ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

Quality at the Right Price for over 25 years


86

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Neenah Paper

See the whole picture. There's more to NEENAH than you may see at first glance.

A Division of Kimberly-Clark Neenah. Wisconsin 54956 ©

The "Graphics Modifier 3000" could be called an "Artdroid" . . . . A "Robot Designer"! It still takes a human designer to do the thinking But the "Graphics Modifier" does all the work. The idea, of course, is creative freedom. Freedom to do more and better designs. Freedom to take on new accounts.

1980 K.C.C.

Our Robot Designer . . . . "The Graphics Modifier 3000" Does inlines, outlines, dropshadows, special drop shadows, and a myriad of unique countour designs. It also produces special half-tone effects such as a 3-D moulded look, a series of elegant shaded airbrush designs and much much more . . . The little Artdroid * even produces its own color separations. All in a fraction of hand rendered time!

New Book Shows You How To Create Graphics That Work With Editorial Content!

The "Graphics Modifier 3000" does regular modifications as well as all of the speciality designs right in your own darkroom. The "3000" is shipped complete . . . . just install and put it to work for you.

GRAPHIC IDEA NOTEBOOK BY ,.. JAN WHITE The GRAPHIC IDEA NOTEBOOK is an endlessly valuable problem-solving book for magazine editors and art directors. Jan White, acknowledged for his ability to create unique, lively, and tasteful magazine formats, has collected over 1,000 of his ideas for handling the visual components of any kind of editorial material. Jan White is a well-known specialist in magazine format design and book design. He is responsible for the design or redesign of 70 U.S. and South American magazines and journals, 5 newspapers, and several dozen books. He has received 31 awards for design, including 3 Neal awards from American Business Press, and gold and silver medals from the Society of Publication Designers. 192 pages. 81/4 x 11. 200 B&W illustrations. Index. #0-2149-1. 514.50

Designers and typographers using a "Graphics Modifier" to do artwork and type modifications can spend a larger percentage of their time on actual design instead of the tremendous number of hours now involved in hand rendering. Increased production and profits due to greater capacity of design and more available design time. Think of the new business that can be generated by the ability to turn out high quality work in 'A the time of any of your competitors. (Unless they already own a 3000!) Call It: An Artdroid .. . A Robot Designer . . . or A Graphics Modifier 3000 Just remember this; it will turn out art and type modifications faster and better than anything in history! *GRAPHICS MODIFIER 3000 For information outside of the United States call Manfred Leyhausen Leyhausen Graphic Art Specials Gerreshemier Strasse 92 Postfach 5133, 4000 Dusseldorf 1 West Germany Tel: (0211) 3540 48/49/40

Use This Coupon To Order For 10 Days Free Examination! Watson-Guptill

❑ TO SAVE, I enclose payment, check or money order. Publisher pays postage and handling. Include applicable sales tax in the states of NY, OH, TN, CA, NJ, MA and VA. ❑ BILL ME, plus postage and handling ❑ CHARGE MY CREDIT CARD ❑ Visa. ❑ Master Charge Card No.

Expires

J Y Lee

Peter Young Naz-Dar Graphic Products Ltd. 4279 Steeles Ave. West Downsview, Ontario M3N1V7

2160 Patterson Street, Cincinnati, Ohio 45214

❑ Yes, please send Graphic Idea Notebook (#02149-1) at $14.50 for 10 days free examination. I understand that if I am not satisfied, I may return the book within 10 days for full refund or credit.

Name Address City

State

Zip

011e Fjaestad Beta Invest AB Kungsgatan 73 S-112 27 Stockholm, Sweden Tel: 08-546509

._

Signature

Tim Wood Alphatype Systems Limited 7 Regency Street London, England SW1 Tel: 01-821-0126

Robin Trading Company Room 201, Sam lin Bldg. 334-3, 3KA, Eulchi-Ro, Chung-Ku Seoul, Korea Tel: 265-2546 Ian Rayner Rayner Printing Plates, Ltd. Saville Mill, Saville Street Bolton, Manchester, England

For information on the Graphics Modifier or dealers inside the U.S. call A0600

Book will be shipped within 30 days of receipt of order.

BYERS CORPORATION BOX 26624 OKLAHOMA CITY OK 73126 405 235 0572


Only the following Subscriber Companies are licensed to manufacture and sell ITC typefaces:

Rents Hardy/Williams (Design) Ltd. 73 Newman St. London WI England 01-636-0474 Fbnt Manufacturer

AM International, Inc. Varityper Division 11 Mt. Pleasant Avenue East Hanover, N.J. 07936 (201) 887-8000 Phototypesetters and Photolettering Systems

libtoStar International 15450 E. Valley Blvd. City of Industry Calif. 91746 (213) 333-2600 or 330-5330 FotoStar II Display Setting Machines. 2" Film Fbnts

Aiphatype Corporation 7711 N. Merrimac Avenue Niles, Illinois 60648 (312) 965-8800 AiphaSette and AlphaComp Phototypesetting Systems CRS Digital Phototypesetter

Fundicion Tipogmfica Neufville, S.A. Puigmarti, 22 Barcelona-12 Spain Poster Types

Artype, Inc. 3530 Work Drive P.O. Box 7151 Fort Myers, Fla. 33901 (813) 332-1174 800-237-4474 Dry Transfer Letters Cut Out Letters Antologic, Inc. 1050 Rancho Conejo Blvd. Newbury Park, Calif. 91320 (213) 889-7400 APS-4/APS-5 CRT Phototypesetter Composition and Typesetting Systems H. Berthold AG Teltowkanalstrasse 1-4 D-1000 Berlin 46 Germany (030) 7795-1 Diatronic, ADS 3000, Diatext, Diatype, Staromatic, Staromat, Starograph Berthold of North America 610 Winters Avenue Paramus, N.J. 07652 (201) 262-8700 Diatronic, ADS, Diatype, Staromat, Diasetter. Repromatic

Graphic Products Corporation 3601 Edison Place Rolling Meadows, Ill. 60008 (312) 392-1476 Fbrmatt cut-out acetate letters and graphic art aids Graphic Systems World Trade S.A. Tour Gallieni 1 80 Avenue Gallieni 93170 Bagnolet France 360.1212 Graphiset Harris Corporation Harris Composition Systems Division P.O. Box 2080 Melbourne, Florida 32901 (305) 259-2900 Fbtotronic 4000, TXr, 1200, 600 CRT 7400, 7450

Bobst SA. Bobst Graphic Division CH-I001 Lausanne Switzerland 021/89.29.71 Phototypesetting Systems Dr. Boger Photosatz GmbH 2 Wedel in Holstein Rissener Strasse 94 Germany (04103) 6021-25 Manufacturers of Copytronic Phototext Composing Machines, Film Fonts, and Copytype Photolettering Systems and Fonts

Dr.-Ing Rudolf Hell GmbH Grenzstrasse 1-5 D2300 Kiel 14 . Germany (0431) 2001-1 Digiset Phototypesetting Equipments and Systems, Digiset-Fonts Information International 5933 Slauson Avenue Culver City Calif. 90230 (213) 390-8611 Phototypesetting Systems International Graphic Marketing Rue des Bosquets 12 Ch-1800 Vevey P.O. Box 33 Switzerland Font Manufacturer

Cello -11A Mfg., Inc. 35 Alabama Avenue Island Park LI., N.Y. 11558 (516)431-7733 Dry Transfer Letters Chartpak One River Road Leeds, Mass. 01053 (413) 584-5446 Dry Transfer Letters Compugraphic Corporation 80 Industrial Way Wilmington, Mass. 01887 (617) 944-6555 EditWriters, CompuVVriters, ibxt Editing Systems, Accessories and Supplies Degra Albert Deist Postf. 114 D-3508 Melsungen West Germany Display Typesetters. 2" Film Fbnts Esselte Dymo N.V. P.O. Box 85 Industrie Park-Noord 30 B-2700 Sint-Niklaas Belgium 031/76.69.80 (10 1.) Visual Systems Division Film Fonts International, Inc. 330 Phillips Ave. South Hackensack, N.J. 07606 201-440-9366 Manufacturers of fonts for: Alphatype/Alphasette 2" Display Film Fonts Harris Fototronic 1200, TXT, 4000 Filmotype 7711 N. Merrimac Avenue Niles, llinois 60648 (312) 965-8800 Film Fonts

Geographies, Inc. 1100 Seymour Street Vancouver, B.C. Canada V6B 3N3 (604) 685-8236 Dry Transfer Letters

Itek Composition Systems Division 34 Cellu Drive Nashua, N.H. 03060 (603) 889-1400 Phototypesetting Systems and Equipment, Film Strips, Standard and Segmented Discs, and Digitized Fonts Labomtoirellichot 23, Route De Seurre 21200 Beaune France 80-22 23 73 Manufacturer of fonts for: Singer/GSI/Wang Typesetters 44 and 48 Letraset International Ltd. St. Georges House 195/203 Waterloo Road London SE1 84J England (01) 930-8161 Dry liansfer Letters Letraset USA Inc. 40 Eisenhower Drive Paramus, N.J. 07652 (201) 845-6100 Dry Transfer I:etters Linographics 770 N. Main Street Orange, California 92668 . (714) 639-0511 Display typesetters, 2" Film Fonts

Mecanorma 78610 LePerray-en-Yvelines Paris, France (484 83 40) Dry Transfer Letters Mergenthaler Linotype Company 201 Old Country Road Melville, N.Y. 11747 (516) 673-4197 Linoterm, V-I-P, Linotron, Omnitech CRIlonic, Phototypesetting Equipment and Systems

PREM U F

MOD Graphic Systems Rockwell International 2735 Curtiss Street Downers Grove, Illinois 60515 (312) 963-4600 Information Products Division The Monotype Corporation Ltd. Salfords, Redhill, Surrey England Redhill 6 5959 Visual Communications Equipment Officine Menta Via Privata Venafro, 6 20154 Milano Italy (02) 38.42.08/39.43.65 Typesetting Machines

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Officine Simoncini s.p.a. Casella Postale 776 40100 Bologna Italy (051) 744246 Hot Metal Composing Matrices and Phototypesetting Systems Optronics International, Inc. 7 Stuart Road Chelmsford, Mass. 01824 (617) 256-4511 Phototypesetting Systems PhotoVision Of California, Inc. P.O. Box 552 Culver City. Calif. 90230 (213) 870-4828 Toll Free: 800-421-4106 Spectra Setter 1200, Visual Display Setter, and 2" Film Fonts

play line

Pressure Graphics, Inc. 1725 Armitage Court Addison, Illinois 60101 (312) 620-6900 Dry Transfer Letters Ryobi Limited 762 Mesaki-Cho Fuchu-Shi Hiroshima-Ken 726 Japan Text/Display Phototypesetters

ti urnish any of the

D. Stempel AG Hedderichstrasse 106-114 Frankfurt am Main-Sud Germany (0611) 6068-1 Type Division Thetype, Inc. 12 West 26th Street New York, N.Y. 10001 (212) 924-1800 Dry Transfer Letters Thchnographics/Film Fonts P.O. Box 552 Culver City Calif. 90230 (213) 870-4828 Toll Free: 800-421-4106 Film Fonts, Studio Film Kits, and Alphabet Designers Visi-Graphics 8119 Central Avenue Washington, D.C. 20027 (301) 366-1144 Dry Transfer Letters Visual Graphics Corporation 5701 N.W. 94th Avenue Tamarac, Florida 33321 (305) 722-3000 Manufacturer of Photo lypositor and Original lypositor Film Fonts Zipatone, 150 Fend Lane Hillside, Illinois 60162 (312) 449-5500 Dry Transfer Letters

For further information, write or call: INTERNATIONAL TYPEFACE CORPORATION 2 HAMMARSKJOLD PLAZA NEW YORK, NEW YORK 10017 (212) 371-0699 TELEX: 125788

LICENSED

At M.J. Baumwell we can modify any display line or logo Timm an furnish a variati

Thinking neatly done.

mb i

M J BAUMWELL 1YFOGRAPHYINc 461 81H AVENUE NEVV YORK NY 100D1 (212) 868-0515


88

Jozef Sumichrast

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A6B1P,EX3VIOKAMHOr1PCPKIALALIWW,bb131051 The English Alphabet" 25x38

The Cyrillic Alphabet" 25x38

These prints of the Cyrillic and English alphabets have appeared in shows throughout North America and Europe. They are also found in the permanent collections of the Sixth International Poster Bienniale of Warsaw, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the New York History Museum. Each poster is signed and sells for $35.00 or $50.00 a set. Send your check or money order (U.S. currency) to: JOzef Sumichrast P.O. Box 433 Dept. U Deerfield, Illinois 60015

Repositionable FORMATT cut-out acetate art aids give artists greater design flexibility. FORMATT cut-out acetate lettering, rules, borders, ornaments, shapes, and shading mediums are repositionable during their initial application to artwork. As a result artists have the ability to experiment with different layout possibilities while working with FORMATT. When artwork is complete with all FORMATT elements burnished firmly

CENTER DATES PAPERWORK: SIMPLE IS SMARTâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;MAKING PAPERWORK WORK February 2 thru March 27,12 noon thru 5:00 p.m.

into position the finished result is high quality reproduction artwork which is scratchproof, crackproof, and completely heat-resistant. For further information and a free catalog illustrating the complete FORMATT selection write: Graphic Products Corporation, 3601 Edison Place, Rolling Meadows, IL 60008.

R.O. BLECHMAN: BEHIND THE LINES April 6 thru May 22,12 noon thru 5:00 p.m. TYPOGRAPHY 2: 27th ANNUAL TYPE DIRECTORS CLUB EXHIBIT June 1 thru July 24,12 noon thru 5:00 p.m. INTERNATIONAL CALLIGRAPHY TODAY Return Engagement August 3 thru September 25,12 noon thru 5:00 p.m. VISION 80's October 5 thru November 25,12 noon thru 5:00 p.m. LETTERS ALIVE: A LETRASET SHOW December 7 thru January 22,12 noon thru 5:00 p.m.

I'm interested ) in repositionable FORMATT) T (products and request a free catalog.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THE ITC CENTER WILL BE CLOSED WEEKENDS AND ON THE FOLLOWING DATES: February 16,Washington's Birthday, Monday May 25, Memorial Day, Monday July 3, Day before Independence Day, Friday September 7, Labor Day, Monday October 12, Columbus Day, Monday November 3, Election Day, Tuesday November 26,Thanksgiving Day,Thursday November 27, Day after Thanksgiving, Friday December 24, Christmas Eve,Thursday December 25, Christmas Day, Friday December 31, New Year's Eve,Thursday

My Name Dept. /Title Company Street City

State

Zip

Mail to: Graphic Products Corporation, 3601 Edison Pl., Rolling Meadows, IL 60008 a


89

A_BCDEFGIIIJIi_L 111NOPORSTITVW XYZ;%. When it comes to combining beautiful alphabets with transfer lettering, Chartpak's "Velvet Touch" does it best. Velvet Touch's slick surface and vinyl ink make it easy to apply and the price of an 81/4"x11 1/4" sheet is only $3.75 -about half the price of other 110 lettering sheets. Pick one of our 300 alphabets and see for yourself.

chartpak A TIMES MIRROR COMPANY/ONE RIVER RD., LEEDS, MA 01053

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Translation:

We set Annual Reports in every language including English

There are over 1000 languages and dialects in which we set type for corporate communications and advertising material. lit King Typographic Service 305 East 46th Street, New York, New York 10017, (212) 754-9595 The Foreign Language Division of TGC

SOLUTION TO PUZZLE ON PAGES 30 & 31


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The rave reviews of everyone that has seen it here surely justifies your Herculian task. The exceptional quality, originality, and even good taste will surely land this book a place in the typographic hall of fame.

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Kenneth 13. Clialetzki, Circle Graphics ant of printing recalls the great personnages

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I've just received my copy of HOMAGE TO THE ALPHABET. It' s a magnificent volume, and you have my congratulations and my thanks! Drew Babb. J. Walter Thompson I

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Dear Phil's Photo Pfolks, It's Beautiful! Thank you!

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BACK NOW WITH RECENT SHIPMENT FROM YOU WITH THE SMELL OF THE PRESS STILL FRESH ON ITS GRAND PASES. AN INCREDIBLE J0 3 . . CONGRATS AND THANKS. Richard Jester New West Magazine

AS YOU CAN SEE BY OUR FIRST REVIEWS, THIS IS NO ORDINARY 11TEBOOK. In fact, it could be the best photolettering selection tool you'll ever use. To that end: 82 pages of one-line indexes, both alphabetized and categorized; 1160 large-size full alphabets, set in juicy clumps instead of strung out in lines, which truly affords you a better way to appraise a typeface. But beyond its utilitarian value Phil's Photo is its spirit lifting effect. To anyone 2321 Wisconsin Ave.NW. Washington, D.C. 2 Name Title who loves type, these pages are Address beautiful to behold. Read the letters up top. We don't exaggerate. State Zip No. of books at $48. plus $3. ea. shipping.

Homage is also beautifully built.

Company City Amount enclosed

(D.0 Residents Add 6% Sales Tax.)

7 ring foil stamped vinyl binder. All coated stock. No skimping. Phil's Photo is one of the country's largest exclusively photolettering typographers. We're known mostly in the mid-Atlantic region now. At $48, we expect this book to help spread our name around a little farther. Honestly, if you could see it in person, you'd be uncapping your pen right now.


91

If you are not receiving your own copy of U&Ic and would like to receive it free, please complete this form and mail to: U&Ic Subscription Dept. 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10017 9U •S •A •

Si vous ne recevez pas U&Ic mais souhaitex le recevoir gratuitement, veuillex remplir ce formulaire et ('addresser 6: U&Ic Subscription Dept. 2 Hammarskjold Plaza New York, N.Y. 10017 9U •S •A •

Wenn Sie nicht schon Ihr eigenes Exemplar von U&Ic erhalten und die Zeitschrift gem kostenlos beziehen mochten, Killen Sie bitte diesen Coupon aus und senden ihn an: U&Ic Subscription Dept. 2 Hammarskjold Plaza New York, N.Y. 10017, U.S.A.

❑ I want to receive U&Ic.

❑ J'aimerais recevoir U&Ic.

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GIVEN NAME

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CITY

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SIGNATURE

SIGNATURE

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DATE

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BUSINESS CLASSIFICATION

CLASSIFICATION PAR PROFESSIONS (Ne cocher qu'une seule fonction)

FIRMENKLASSIFIZIERUNG (Bitte eine ankreuzen)

(Check one only) (a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (1) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (I) (m)

Printer (Commercial, forms, etc.) Typesetting, Composing Advertising Agency, Art Studio, Design Newspaper, Magazine Book Publisher Packaging Internal Printing (not for resale) Education Libraries Government Corporation advertising, design, promotion Student Other

MY PRIMARY JOB FUNCTION IS:

(Check one only) (n) (o) (p) (q) (r) (s) (t) (u) (v) (w)

Artist, Illustrator Art Director, Creative Director Pasteup Artist Type Director Graphic Designer Advertising Manager, Sales Promotion Manager Production Manager Printing Buyer, Purchasing Agent Principal; Officer Other

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (i) (i) (k) (I) (m)

CODE POSTAL

Imprimerie (commerciale, formulaires, etc.) Composition a facon Agence de publicite, bureau de creation, studio Journal quotidien, periodique Edition de livres Emballage Imprimerie integree (non commerciale) Enseignement Bibliotheque Fonction publique Department de publicite dune entreprise Etudiant Divers

MON ACTIVITE PRINCIPALE EST : (Ne cocher qu'une seule fonction) (n) (o) (p) (q) (r) (s) (t) (u) (v)

Dessinateur, illustrateur Directeur artistique, directeur de la creation Metteur au net Type Director Graphiste Chef de publicite, directeur de la promotion Chef de la production Acheteur, vendeur d'espace Chef de service, employe

(w)

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NUMBER OF PERSONS EMPLOYED IN YOUR ORGANIZATION

NOMBRE DE PERSONNES EMPLOYEES DANS VOTRE FIRME

(1) (2)

(1) (2)

(3) (4) (5) (6)

1-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 250 and over

(3) (4) (5) (6)

1-9 10-19 20-49 50-99 100-249 250 et plus

POSTLEITZAHL UND ORT

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e) (f) (g) (h) (I) (j) (k) (I) (m)

Druckerei (Akzidenzen, Formulare, usw.) Schriftsetzerei Werbeagentur, Grafikdesignatelier Zeitungs- oder Zeitschriftenverlag Buchverlag Verpackungsdesignatelier oder Verpackungsdruckerei Hausdruckerei Lehrer (Schule, Fachschule, Universitat, usw) Bibliothek Beharde Werbeabteilung von Industrie- oder Handelsfirma Studierender Andere (bitte beschreiben)

MEINE HAUPTBERUFSTATIGKEIT 1ST: (Bille eine ankreuzen) (n) (o) (p) (q) (r) (s) (t) (u) (v) (w)

KUnstier, Illustrator Art-Direktor, Kreativ-Direktor Reinzeichner Typograf Grafikdesigner Werbeleiter, Verkaufsfarderungslefter Produktionsleiter Drucksacheneinkaufer Firmeninhaber, Direktor Andere (bitte beschreiben)

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1-9 10-19 20,49 50-99 100-249 ()Per 250


92

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DESIGNED TO MAKE SPECIFYING ITC TYPEFACES EASIER

THE ITC TYPEFACE COLLECTION


93

3. Alphabet display showings in sizes 30, 36, 48, 60 and 72 point plus 1" caps.

4. Complete character showing • of each ITC display font.

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5. Headline presentation in display size range.

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26 good reasons to use Benguiat Book

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Basic facts about"The ITC Typeface Collection"572 pages. 121/2"x 121/2' Hardbound, Smyth sewn for easy opening. $39.95

rInternational Typeface Corporation 2 Hammarsljold Plaza New York, New York 10017 Please send me "The ITC Typeface Collection: Enclosed is my payment of $39.95:` Ship my book postpaid. *New York State residents add applicable sales tax. For shipments outside the United States, please remit $41.45. (All orders must be accompanied by a remittance payable in U.S. funds. No C.O.D.s.) NAME/NAME NOM

STREET ADDRESS/STRASSE RUE ET N°

CITY TOSTLEIZAHL UND ORT'VILLE

STATE AND ZIP CODE/LAND/PAYS, CODE POSTAL

The ITC Collection includes all ITC typeface families issued through 1980 ITC American Typewriter ITC Avant Garde Gothic ITC Bauhaus ITC Benguiat ITC Benguiat Gothic ITC Bookman ITC Century ITC Cheltenham ITC Clearface ITC Eras ITC Fen ice ITC Franklin Gothic Friz Quad rata ITC Garamond Italia ITC Kabel ITC Korinna ITC Lubalin Graph ITC Newtext ITC Novarese ITC Quorum ITC Serif Gothic ITC Souvenir ITC Tiffany ITC Zapf Book ITC Zapf Chancery ITC Zapf International PLUS... The ITC Display Typeface Collection AND...The ITC Zapf Dingbat Series


• NENE •IIIII• •••• ••11111111 11 1111 ■ ■ •• •• ■ • • • •

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En vente... Ces brochurespecimens ITC sont livrables de stock

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Nunmehr... •■• konnen ■ ■ ■ Sie • ■ ■ diese ■ ■ ■ ■ ITC■ ■ ■ Schrift■ ■ ■ muster■ ■ hefte ■ ■ ■ bestellen. ■ • ■ ■ ■ ■

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Pour obtenir ces jolies brochures-specimens ITC, it suffit de remplir ce bon de commande et de nous le retourner. Toute commande doit etre accompagnee d'un avis de paiement acquitte. Priere de payer en $ americains au nom de ITC: Wenn Sie diese attraktiv entworfenen, farbvollen ITC-Schriftmusterhefte erhalten machten, f011en Sie bitte den Bestellschein aus. Alle Bestellungen mussen vorbezahlt werden. Senden Sie Ihre Zahlanweisung (in U.S.-Wahrung und zahlbar an ITC) zusammen mit dem Bestellschein an:

International Typeface Corporation 2 Hammarskjold Plaza, New York, N.Y. 10017, USA Name. Nom

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ITC BOOKLETS: _JTC American Typewriter _JTC Avant Garde Gothic with Oblique _ITC Avant Garde Gothic Condensed JTC Bauhaus _ITC Benguiat _JTC Benguiat Condensed _ITC Benguiat Gothic _JTC Bookman _JTC Century _ITC Cheltenham with Condensed _JTC Clearface _JTC Eras _ITC Fenice _ITC Franklin Gothic _Friz Quadrata _JTC Garamond with Condensed JTC Isbell _Italia __JTC Kobel __ITC KorInna with Kurslv JTC Lubalin Graph _JTC Newtext JTC Novarese JTC Quorum _JTC Serif Gothic _ITC Souvenir _JTC Tiffany _JTC Zapf Book __ITC Zapf Chancery __JTC Zapf Dingbats _ITC Zapf International U&Ic BACK COPIES:

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To obtain these handsomely designed, colorful ITC type specimen booklets, just complete this order form and mail it to us. All orders must be accompanied by a remittance. Please make checks payable, In U.S.funds, to ITC at:

Now... You can order these ITC Type Specimen Booklets

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____U &lc, Vol.1, No. 2 _U&Jc, Vol. 1, No. 3 _U&Ic, Vol. 2, No.1 _U&lc, Vol. 2, No. 2 _Ueslc, Vol. 2, No. 3 _JJ&Jc, Vol. 3, No. 2 _U &lc. Vol. 3, No. 4 _U&Jc, Vol. 4, No.1 _JJ8c1c, Vol. 4, No. 2 _U&1c, Vol. 4, No. 3 _U80.1c, Vol. 4, No. 4 _U&Jc, Vol. 5, No.1 _U&Jc, Vol. 5, No. 3 _U&Jc, Vol. 5, No. 4 _U &lc, Vol. 6, No.1 _Li &lc, Vol. 6, No. 2 _U&Jc. Vol. 6, No 4 _U&Jc, Vol. Z No.1 _118dc, Vol. Z No. 2 _11&1c, Vol. Z No. 3

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Foreign U.S. PRICE

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$1.50 4.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 1.50 2.50 1.50

Total order, In U.S. funds S Add postage for booklets S N.Y. Residents add state sales tax S Remittance In U.S. funds enclosed S

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Montant de la commande Affranchissement des brochures, en S americains S Paiement ci-joint (en $ annefIcaIns), total S

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.50

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94


95 Goodbye Gutenberg

A Graphics Sourcobook of filatoriels, Ent/inns:int and Services by,boti necMtl+&b Hones

&, Design -.

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By Design: A Graphics Sourcebook of Materials, Equipment and Services

The U&lc Book Shop reviews new books believed to be of interest to U&lc readers and lists the publishers, addresses, and the prices of the books so that the books may be ordered directly. All prices are for delivery within the U.S.A. or Canada. Prices listed are based on payment accompanying order. If payment is not included, you will be billed for handling and shipping charges. Please add your local and state sales taxes wherever applicable. For books to be delivered outside the U.S.A. or Canada, please request prices and shipping charges from the publisher.

by Jon Goodchild and Bill Henkin The authors have selected to recommend a wide variety of tools, materials, equipment, and services, and also tell where they can be obtained and at what price. Covers designer's furniture and storage equipment, lighting fixtures, paper and printing, typesetting and typography, calligraphy and hanC lettering, design schools and colleges, desks, chairs, work surfaces, the wholg gamut of artists'tools and materials, professional organizations and seminars, as well as available magazines, journals, and books. Quick Fox, Inc., 33 W 60th St., New York, NY 10023.256 pages. 8'/2 x 11. Paperbound $12.95.

Jasitf. White

Videotext: The Coming Revolution in Home/Office Information Retrieval.

Type Sign Symbol by Adrian Frutiger One of the world's great type designers (Univers, Frutiger, among others) and graphic artists, Adrian Frutiger has written about his life's work and his methods of working. For Frutiger lettering and type are not merely an aid to reading but a universal means of perception. Frutiger has designed everything from logotypes to Paris Metro, Charles De Gaulle, and Orly airport sign systems, as well as logotypes and books. His sculptures are in many materials including concrete, slate, metal, bronze, stone,and plastic. Some who have seen his sculptures and his delicate drawings think of him as a graphic poet. The text of the book covers the reasons for new typefaces and new techniques, computerreadable typefaces, legibility type in the environment and in architecture, scripts of foreign cultures, designing of logotypes and of signs and symbols, and artistic creation with matter and light. Hastings House Publishing Company Inc., 10 East 40th St., NY, NY 10016.156 pages.Over 500 illustrations. Multilingual text. 10x 10. $67.50.

Edited by Efrem Sigel Videotext is the generic term (accepted by some) for TVtransmitted information. It converts the entertainment-oriented TV set into an information terminal.There are two basic kinds of videotext In one version the receiving set is like a news ticker displaying brief items of interest (such as news, sports results, stock quotations, weather information, airline schedules). An adapter on the TV set enables the user to call the information to the screen. This is a passive system. The user can receive only the information being transmitted at the time the user chooses to watch. An interactive system uses a computer in the home or office terminal and sends its signals over ordinary telephone lines to the computer. It will make available huge data bases of information (kept up to date); with the aid of electronic directories and prompts, the user can request the information wanted. Simple graphics, in seven colors, are handled and eventually photographs will be transmitted in videotext systems. This book is a readable, authoritative report on the brief history of videotext throughout the world with emphasis on the British Ceefax and Prestelsystems. It explains what they offer, how they work, how they are likely to affect publishers, TV, and home or office users, and appraises the future of such systems. Knowledge Industry Publications, Inc., 2 Corporate Park Drive, White Plains, NY 10604.154 pages. 61/4 x 91/4.111ustrated. Index. $24.95.

by Anthony Smith This is a detailed and welli nformed look at how the computer/electronic revolution will change newspaper publish ing in the '80s. It considers every aspect of publishing, not just typesetting and printing. It considers the effect of new technologies on markets and marketing, on circulation management and on journalism and unions, and it reviews the role of the new media (the various forms of videotext) that will send information to a TV set in the home or office. The author (as does Alvin Toffler in "The Third Wave") breaks the history of newspaper publishing into three major phases or revolutions: (1) the development of writing, (2) the development of printing, (3) the computerization of printing and information storage and distribution. He considers the social as well as economic impact of each revolution. Oxford University Press, 200 Madison Avenue, NY, NY 10016. 367 pages. 04 x $16.95. CRT Typesetting Handbook by Stanley Rice Cathode-ray-tube typesetting is the method of the future. It combines vastly greater setting speeds, pretypesetting text manipu_ation, increased reliability, and almost infinite flexibility of control over graphic forms. This handbook of CRT samples and options is directed to the professional user, the type buyer who needs ready access to the basic text forms in order to enhance visualization and assure accurate purchasing decisions. Van Nostrand Reinhold, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042. 416 pages.81/2 x 11.$29.95.

Illustrators 21

Edited by Gerald McConnell, designed by Robert Hallock This 21st Annual of American Illustrations is a record of the selections'in the Society of Illustrators national exhibition. Nearly 500 pieces represent illustrations in advertising, editorial pages, books, film, television, and institutional publications. Beautifully printed. Index includes artists' addresses. Hastings House Publishing Company Inc., 10 East 40th St., NY, NY, 10016.368 pages, 100 in color 8N x 1P/4.535.00

graph's annual 80'81

Optical Letterspacing

â&#x20AC;˘

is

Inventive techniques fbridea designing Printed-Pages

notebook Graphic Idea Notebook

by Jan V. White A bookful of over 1,000 inventive techniques for designing printed pages, for converting routine material into provocative presentations. Written for magazine editors and art directors, but useful in the classroom, too. Chapters deal with getting attention, the editorial eye, combining and joining, direction/motion change, mug shots, boxes, alphabets/numbering, breaking up text, charts, maps. Watson-Guptill Publications, 2160 Patterson Street, Cincinnati, OH 45214.192 pages.81/2 x 11. $14.50.

by David Kindersley One of the problems that typographers, compositors, and book designers must confront is how to achieve good letterspacingâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;that is, how to make each letter appear exactly centered between its two adjacent letters. Since 1947, when he worked out a street-name alphabet for Cambridge, England, .Mr. Kindersley has researched the question in depth; this booklet is a full account of his conclusions. The Sandstone Press, 321 East 43rd Street, NY, NY 10017. 40 pages. 4'/ x 11. Softcover $12.40.

01311Y:

make it most legible

Mergenthaler VIP Typeface Catalogs, 2 Vols.

Compiled by Volk & Huxley A most comprehensive type specimen collection of 562 VIP typefaces. Features settings of traditional and modern faces and enables the designer to easily compare legibility, color, characters, and composition of the different type styles. Each typeface is shown in all sizes from 6 point to 36 point together with a complete showing of the font and an alphabet sample set in three choices of spacing. Van Nostrand Reinhold, Dept k, 7625 Empire Drive, Florence, KY 41042.576 pages each volume. 9 x 12. Paper $24.95 per volume. Set, $40.00.

Typography: how to make it most legible

by Rolf F. Rehe This concise bookconsiders every conceivable variable a designer can manipulate to maximize legibility. The author's conclusions and recommendations are based on a careful study of the tons of research in this field, but the reader is spared the heavy data and given the conclusions with clear, brief supporting facts and illustrations. Third revised edition was published in 1979 by Design Research International, PO Box 27, Carmel, IN 46032.80 pages.8 14 x 8iht. Paper $8.00.

Graphis Annual 1980/81

Edited by Walter Herdeg This 29th Annual, as usual, is a beautifully printed record of outstanding graphics from all over the world, representing such major design fields as advertisements, annual reports, booklets, book jackets, magazine covers, trademarks, letterheads, packaging, record covers, film, television, and editorial design. Hastings House Publishing Company Inc., 10 East 40th St., NY, NY 10016.247 pages, 72 in color 766 illustrations. Detailed captions. Indexes.% x 12. $59.50. The Book

A thorough directory of creative services in the Northeast United States with 6,000 listings. Covers art suppliers, photo-processing labs, stat services, artist/designer/ creative services, interior design and space planning, photographers, stock picture sources, retouchers, modeling agencies, color separations, printers, labels, paper, typographers, AVs/slides, film and TV producers, sound recording, marketing and research, direct mail, sales promotion, ad specialties, exhibits, advertising agencies, copywriters, public relations, media, airlines and travel agencies, messengers, restaurants, galleries, schools, organizations, translators. The Books, Ltd., PO Box 749, Westport, CT 06880.400 pages. 5 x 81/2. Paper, plastic comb binding. $18.00


C 'ENDAR OF EVENTS ALL ITC CENTER EVENTS TAKE PLACE ON BUSINESS DAYS. ADMISSION IS FREE. 2 HAM MARSKJOLD PLAZA, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10017-866 SECOND AVENUE (BETWEEN 46TH AND 47TH STREETS),THIRD FLOOR THE GALLERY IS CLOSED ON THE FOLLOWING HOLIDAYS: MONDAY, FEBRUARY 16; MONDAY, MAY 25 AND FRIDAY,JULY 3,1981 FOR THE FULL HOLIDAY CLOSING DATES SEE PAGE 88

CURRENTLY SHOWING, 12 NOON-5 PIV., CLOSES JANUARY 23,1981: TYPE A\D TECHNOLOGY

PAPERWOR < S VPLE IS SVART, VA <I\G PAPE ?WORK WORK FEBRUARY 2-MARCH 27,1981,12 \OON-5 P V

Created for ITC by Siegel & Gale,this exhibition features case histories of private sector anc Government efforts to WON their forms systems anc contracts. A model Census form tested in 1980, new IRS forms and Fooc Stamp forms system currently in use, will be shown. Bank, propery and casual -y and life insurance forms are some of the private sector examples shown.The evolution of the system as it goes through cevelopment stages anc research will be demonstrated by notes, sketches and drafts.

R.O. BLECH VA\ : BEHIND THE LI \ES APRIL 6-MAY 22,12 NOON-5 PM.

-

YPOGRAPHY 2: 27th A\ \UAL TDC EXHIBIT JUNE 1-JULY 24,12 \00\ -5 P.IV

An exhibition based on the book of the same name This major exhibition, sponsored by The Tyoe Directors which was recently published by Hudson Hills Press, Club, presents examples of ypographic excellence Inc. R.O. Blechman: Behind the Lines tells Blechman's in a wide range of media.The pieces, printed anc own story with hundreds of examples of his work which calligraphic, were selected by a panel of six judges have appeared in the New York -imes, the NewYorker and include outstanding work by -ype directors, -ypoand in movies and television commercials for Sony, graphic suppliers, calligraphers, agencies, studios, Alka Seltzer and others. and independent designers from arounc the world. The work on exhibition will be published in an annual in the Fall. CONTROLLED CIRCULATION POSTAGE PAID AT FARMINGDALE. N.Y. 11735 USTS pupa_ 073430

MOVING? CHANGE OF ADDRESS:

SEND THIS LABEL (OR A COPY) WITH YOUR CORRECTIONS TO: U&LC SUBSCRIPTION DEPT. 2 HAMMARSKJOLD PLAZA NEWYORK, N.Y. 10017

U&lc_vol.7-4  

U&lc Vol. 7 ©fonts.com

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