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FY2017 Justice & Mental Health Collaboration Program Law Enforcement Assistance Webinar Maria Fryer Justice Systems/Corrections Policy Advisor Substance Abuse and Mental Health Bureau Of Justice Assistance Gerard Murphy & Nicola Smith-Kea Council of State Governments Justice Center Wednesday, February 9, 2017


Overview Welcome and Introductions Background and Overview of JMHCP Review of FY17 JMHCP Solicitation

Overview of Police-Mental Health Collaboration Resources Questions & Answer


Welcome and Introductions Presenters: • Maria Fryer Policy Advisor, Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) • Jerry Murphy Director, Law Enforcement Program, CSG Justice Center • Representatives from the Rockingham/Harrisonburg (VA) Mobile Crisis Unit


Questions? • Please type your questions into the Q&A box on the lower right hand side of the screen.


Prior JMHCP Application Webinar Information

General JMHCP Application/Solicitation Webinar Conducted February 2, 2017 for all interested applicants https://csgjusticecenter.org/mental-health/webinars/responding-tothe-2017-justice-and-mental-health-collaboration-solicitation/


Overview Welcome and Introductions Background and Overview of JMHCP Review of FY17 JMHCP Solicitation

Overview of Police-Mental Health Collaboration Resources Questions & Answer


National nonprofit, nonpartisan membership association of state government officials Represents all three branches of state government Provides practical advice informed by the best available evidence

https://csgjusticecenter.org/

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Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program Funding • Mentally Ill Offender Treatment and Crime Reduction Act (MIOTCRA) Public Law 108-414 signed into law in 2004 with bipartisan support • Authorized JMHCP: $50 million for criminal justice-mental health initiatives • The MIOTCRA amended and reauthorized JMHCP for five years in 2008 (Public Law 108-416) • In 2016, the 21st Century Cures Act amended and reauthorized the JMHCP program first created by MIOTCRA 8


Overview of JMHCP The Justice and Mental Health Collaboration Program (JMHCP) supports innovative cross-system collaboration to improve responses and outcomes for individuals with mental illnesses or co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders who come into contact with the justice system.

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Review of Solicitation

The Fiscal Year 2017 solicitation can be accessed at: https://www.bja.gov/Funding/JMHCP17.pdf

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Overview Welcome and Introductions Background and Overview of JMHCP Review of FY17 JMHCP Solicitation

Overview of Police-Mental Health Collaboration Resources Questions & Answer


Bureau of Justice Assistance • Mission: to provide leadership and services in grant administration and criminal justice policy development to support local, state, and tribal justice strategies to achieve safer communities.

The JMHCP has supported over $92.4 million in total grant programing across the country.

https://www.bja.gov/ 12


Review of Solicitation: Grant Categories Category 1: Collaborative county approaches to reducing the prevalence of individuals with mental disorders in jail • Funding amount: $200,000 • Project period: 24 Months Category 1 grantees will demonstrate a system-wide coordinated approach to safely reduce the prevalence of individuals with mental disorders in local jails. For more information, please refer to General JMHCP Application/Solicitation Webinar https://csgjusticecenter.org/mental-health/webinars/responding-to-the-2017-justiceand-mental-health-collaboration-solicitation/ 13


Review of Solicitation: Grant Categories Category 2: Strategic planning for law enforcement and mental health collaboration • Funding amount: $75,000 • Project period: 12 Months Category 2 grantees will 1) conduct a comprehensive agency assessment of policy and practice, 2) develop an agency training plan, 3) build and maintain a data collection system, 4) and partner with mental health and the community.

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Review of Solicitation: Grant Categories Category 3: Implementation and Expansion • Funding amount: $300,000 • Project period: 24 Months Category 3 grantees will 1) implement targeted mental health and justice system interventions to address the needs of individuals with mental disorders, or 2) expand or enhance a well-established mental health and justice system collaboration program. 15


FY17 Law Enforcement Focus • Category 2: Strategic planning for law enforcement and mental health collaboration • Category 3: Implementation and Expansion – Law Enforcement Applicants

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Category 2: Strategic planning for law enforcement and mental health collaboration • New grant category • Available to a relatively large number of law enforcement agencies • 40 potential grant awards • Agencies will receive training and technical assistance to plan and design a police- mental health collaboration (PMHC) program. 17


Category 2: Strategic planning for law enforcement and mental health collaboration

Allowable Uses

• Personnel costs related to a coordinator position to lead a review and planning process. • Consultant services to assist with improving data collection • Conducting an evaluation of a local existing PMHC program, e.g. Crisis Intervention Team or Mobile Crisis Team. Priority consideration will be given to grantees that include evaluation as a program component (see “Priority Considerations” section).

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Category 2: Strategic planning for law enforcement and mental health collaboration

Allowable Uses

• Meeting expenses related to planning. • Travel costs – to attend the Mandatory Strategic Planning Session. – related to visiting approved law enforcement–mental health learning sites for peer-to-peer learning or approved conferences to further develop the strategy (e.g., JMHCP, CIT, etc.).

Law Enforcement-Mental Health Learning Sites: https://csgjusticecenter.org/law-enforcement/projects/mental-health-learningsites/ 19


Category 3: Implementation and Expansion

Law Enforcement Applicants

Law enforcement applicants must demonstrate in the narrative: 1. A written action plan describing areas needing improvement. 2. An executed memorandum of understanding or other similar written agreement between the law enforcement agency and one or more behavioral health partners. 3. A description of training curricula and in-service training regarding behavioral health. 4. A letter of commitment of leadership from the law enforcement agency and/or local officials to carry out this plan. 20


Category 3:Implementation and Expansion

Law Enforcement Applicants

Law enforcement applicants must demonstrate in the narrative: 5.

The availability of data and capacity to measure the following for people with mental health needs/co-occurring disorders: – Number or rates of arrest – Diversion from jail – Referrals or warm hand-offs to behavioral health or services providers – Number or rate of incidents involving the use of force – Number or rates of injuries to officers or citizens

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Category 3: Law Enforcement Responses

Allowable Use

This may include, but is not limited to, a combination of the following: • Developing engagement/receiving or diversion centers for individuals in custody of law enforcement. • Developing or enhancing electronic information systems. •

Developing or expanding PMHC programs such as co-responder programs or Crisis Intervention Teams

Conducting a local evaluation of an existing PMHC program, such as a Crisis Intervention Team (based on the components under “Program Evaluation”). 22


Overview Welcome and Introductions Background and Overview of JMHCP Review of FY17 JMHCP Solicitation

Overview of Police-Mental Health Collaboration Resources Questions & Answer


What is a PMHC? A PMHC program is: – A law enforcement-based program, which involves collaborating with a mental/ behavioral health entity. – Designed to divert individuals with mental illness or in mental health crisis from unnecessary jail bookings and/or hospitalization.

For more information check the BJA PMHC Toolkit: https://pmhctoolkit.bja.gov

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Common Types of PMHC Programs

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Crisis Intervention Team • CIT is the most commonly used approach by law enforcement agencies. • Based on the Memphis Model – 10 core elements • Process of addressing system change for crisis care within a community as a whole through intentional coordination across service providers • Recommended by CIT International: – To be considered CIT trained, one must complete a 40-Hour CIT training curriculum – Individuals should volunteer into a CIT program – 25% of an agency should be trained 26


Co-Responder Team • Specially trained officer and a mental health crisis worker respond together to mental health calls for service. • Draws upon the combined expertise of the officer and mental health professional • Team is able to link people with mental illnesses to appropriate services or provide other effective and efficient responses. 27


Mobile Crisis Team • Mental health professionals respond – At the request of officers, to the scene of calls – At requests directly from community members or families and friends. • MCTs help to stabilize encounters and assume responsibility for securing mental health services

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Case Management Team • Officers, often in collaboration with mental health professionals: – Carry a caseload of consumers. – Engage individuals who have repeated interactions with law enforcement. – Work with consumers to develop solutions specific to the individual’s needs to reduce repeat interactions. • Approach strives to encourage individuals to: – Stay connected to mental health services and community resources; – Adhere to treatment plans and medication regimens, and – Fulfil other responsibilities such as work, school and training 29


Tailored Approaches Law enforcement agency: – Intentionally selects various response options to build a comprehensive and robust program. – Begins with the expectation that every patrol officer must be able to respond effectively to mental health calls. – Enhances their patrol force with officers or detectives whose primary responsibilities are to liaise with stakeholders, and to coordinate criminal justice and mental health resources. 30


Current LE Grantees’ Locations FY15 Grantee (13)

Location

City of Burbank

CA

City of Charlotte

NC

FY14 Grantee (7)

Location

Houston

TX

FY16 Grantee (8)

Location

City of Chicago

IL

City of Cleveland

OH

Alamance County

NC

City of Joplin

MO

City of St. Helens

OR

Boston

MA

City of San Marcos

TX

Lake County

FL

City of New OrleansLA

City of Somerville

MA

Columbus

OH

Lake County

IL

Oklahoma City

OK

Clermont County

OH

McLean County

IL

Jones County

MS

Montana

Osceola County

FL

Rockingham County

VA

Rutherford County

NC

St. Louis County

MO

Statewi de AL

Town of Windsor

CT

City of Albuquerque

NM

Montgomery County St. Paul

MN 31


Examples of Current Grantees Initiatives • • • • • • • •

Case Management Teams Crisis Intervention Teams Crisis Intervention Training Crisis Intervention Training (Corrections) Co-Responder Teams Data Collection and Tracking Follow-up Teams Jail Diversion

• 9-1-1 Diversion • Mental Health Court • Mental Health Evaluation Team • Mental Health Response Teams • Mobile Crisis Team • Mental Health Response Team • Triage Center

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Agency Example

Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit A Partnership between Rockingham County, the City of Harrisonburg and the HarrisonburgRockingham Community Services Board 33


Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit

Presenters:

• Kelly Royston - Rockingham/Harrisonburg Crisis Intervention Team Coordinator • Cheryl Krech , Captain, Retired - Rockingham County Sheriff’s Office, Law Enforcement Specialist • Katrina Didot, LCSW - Harrisonburg-Rockingham Community Services Board, Mental Health Clinician

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Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit

Program Goals 1.

Continue established partnerships with mental health and law enforcement organizations.

2.

Appropriately divert persons requiring immediate psychiatric interventions prior to entering the criminal justice system.

3.

Connect frequent mental health consumers to resources within the mental health system.

4.

Follow up with high risk individuals that have been determined as having a mental illness and have been released from the criminal justice system.

5.

Reduce law enforcement time on calls associated with mental health consumers.

6.

To expand the hours of the Mobile Crisis Unit (MCU) to cover Monday through Friday, 8AM – 4PM.

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Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit

Program Component / Features •

A certified law enforcement officer is teamed up with a licensed mental health clinician at the jail in order to expedite the assessment of a serious mental illness for persons in custody.

The MCU works with both the Booking Sergeant and the Magistrate to determine options during the process of charges and final disposition.

Referrals to in-patient care and community or jail resources occur at the time of final disposition.

The MCU follows-up with individuals that have been released from the jail and have been determined as having a mental illness that places them at a high risk for future criminal justice involvement.

The MCU follows up with members of the community that have been identified as possibly needing immediate mental health services. 36


Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit

Program Challenges

• New Program in the Community – unchartered territory… • Understanding and learning what the MCU can do in order to effectively resolve situations. • Educating the Jail Staff and the Community Services Board as to what we can do to help resolve situations within the jail and the community. • Learning to fill service/treatment gaps without duplicating existing services. • Finding creative responses to existing service gaps. • Learning to prioritize responses due to time constraints (part-time program).

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Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit

Program Accomplishment

The MCU has been: • able to find a balance between serving the needs of the jail and the needs of the community eliminating “down time” for the unit. • able to connect individuals to valuable services, local community connections and mental health care that prevents re-incarceration and re-hospitalization. • doing community outreach to other service organizations and non-profits , educating them as to how we may be able to assist them. 38


Rockingham/Harrisonburg Mobile Crisis Unit

What we have learned:

• It was imperative to meet with other organizations with similar programs in order to develop a successful program for our community. • The MCU helped to establish a stronger working relationship between Law Enforcement and the Community Services Board. • Mental health consumers seem to not favor law enforcement officers. The MCU combated this challenge by dressing the law enforcement officer in a soft uniform (BDU’s, CIT polo shirt, duty belt and neutral jacket) and by driving an unmarked vehicle. • It is important to collect data and develop a way to use this data to demonstrate the success of the program. 39


Overview Welcome and Introductions Background and Overview of JMHCP Review of FY17 JMHCP Solicitation

Overview of Police-Mental Health Collaboration Resources Questions & Answer


Resources FY2017 Solicitation: https://www.bja.gov/Funding/JMHCP17.pdf General JMHCP Application/Solicitation Webinar Conducted February 2, 2017 for all interested applicants https://csgjusticecenter.org/mental-health/webinars/responding-to-the-2017justice-and-mental-health-collaboration-solicitation/

Planning and Implementation Guides: An excellent resource to assist in outlining the scope and deliverables of your proposals. https://csgjusticecenter.org/mental-health/technical-assistance/


Resources Information on JMHCP: https://www.bja.gov/ProgramDetails.aspx?Program_ID=66 OCFO Customer Service: 888-549-9901 (option 2): An excellent resource to assist in developing your budget worksheet BJA Grant Writing Manual: https://www.bja.gov/gwma/index.html Council of State Governments Justice Center: http://csgjusticecenter.org/ BJA PMHC Toolkit: https://pmhctoolkit.bja.gov


Contact Information for Grant Application • The NCJRS Response Center hours of operation are 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. eastern time, Monday through Friday, and 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. eastern time on the solicitation close date. • For technical assistance with submitting an application, contact the Grants.gov Customer Support Hotline at 800-518-4726 or 606-545-5035, or via email to support@grants.gov. The Grants.gov Support Hotline operates 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, except on federal holidays. • For assistance with any unforeseen Grants.gov technical issues beyond an applicant’s control that prevent it from submitting its application by the deadline, or any other requirement of this solicitation, – contact the National Criminal Justice Reference Service (NCJRS) Response Center: • toll-free at 800-851-3420; via TTY at 301-240-6310 (hearing impaired only); • email grants@ncjrs.gov; fax to 301-240-5830; or • web chat at https://webcontact.ncjrs.gov/ncjchat/chat.jsp. Council of State Governments Justice Center | 43


Overview Welcome and Introductions Background and Overview of JMHCP Review of FY17 JMHCP Solicitation

Overview of Police-Mental Health Collaboration Resources Questions & Answer


Questions and Answer Session • Please type your questions into the Q&A box on the lower right hand side of the screen.


Contact Information

Maria Fryer – Policy Advisor Maria.Fryer@usdoj.gov 202-514-2000 Veronica Munson – State Policy Officer Veronica.Munson@usdoj.gov 202-514-9537 Nikisha Love - State Policy Officer Nikisha.Love@usdoj.gov 202-616-8241

Gerard (Jerry) Murphy gmurphy@csg.org 646-383-5761 Cynthea Kimmelman-DeVries Ckimmelman-devries@csg.org 646-383-5757 Nicola Smith-Kea nsmith-kea@csg.org 301-915-9718 Talia Peckerman tpeckerman@csg.org 646-356-0048


Thank You Join our distribution list to receive CSG Justice Center project updates! csgjusticecenter.org/subscribe For more information, contact Olivia Randi, orandi@csg.org.

The presentation was developed by members of the Council of State Governments (CSG) Justice Center staff. The statements made reflect the views of the authors, and should not be considered the official position of the Bureau of Justice Assistance, the CSG Justice Center, the members of The Council of State Governments, or the funding 47 agencies supporting our work.


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