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Message from the Provincial Superior Miracles Dear Friends of Nazareth,

of Divine Grace at Work

broken. Relationships become stronger. In these 10 years, we have proven our durability and pliability as we continue to journey together in the Kingdom.

As I sit in my office writing to you with the promise of spring in the air, many thoughts that I would like to share with you come to mind. This year, 2017, we are Province Plan celebrating the 10th anniversary of Holy Looking toward the future sparked the Family Province; we are in the final stages need for a new province plan. A steering of our province plan; and, we are marking committee was formed to work with the the continued good works of our Sisters critical issues raised by the Sisters of the throughout the Province. province. This Committee worked with a Consultant and other Sisters to craft 10th Anniversary an action plan to address these critical of Holy Family Province issues. This planning document has In May, 2007, we reconfigured our five received significant development over the individual provinces into Holy Family last few months and is presently in its Province for the sake of our mission. final stages. The final draft will be sent The intent was to be stronger together to the Sisters for their review prior to our in our mission and to be open to God’s Province Assembly on April 1. designs in the future. This decision was not without its drawbacks and problems as you can imagine but with the Spirit’s

“I see a veritable miracle of divine grace at work among you in the United States.” B LE S S ED M A R Y O F J ES U S T H E GOOD SHE P H ER D, J U N E 1 , 1 8 9 8

guidance we have been experiencing greater availability for mission; increased relationships across the areas; greater understanding of the skills and competencies of the Sisters; and better utilization of all of our resources. Our charism and mission continue to be our springboard for action.

Our hope is that the plan will give us, as individuals and as a province, the assurance and energy that we are wise stewards of all that God has entrusted to us in our CSFN life and mission. The finest outcome would be a sense of promise about God-with-us now and in the future yet to come, as we continue to “take the long view”.

Continued Good Work of the Sisters

Following our General Chapter Call, our Sisters have reached out in a number of ways, some of which are included in this newsletter. For example, in addition to working with immigrants in various capacities, the Sisters in Des Plaines The traditional symbol representing a 10th have opened their doors to a “Familyanniversary is tin or aluminum. As the to-Family” Program sponsored by NAMI number of years increases, the strength (National Alliance on Mental Illness). This of the materials used also increases. Tin 12 session program beginning in March and aluminum represent durability and is specifically for family members and pliability, meaning it can be bent but not friends of adults who live with mental

illness. Sisters volunteer to offer Nazareth hospitality for the evening as the program continues. Sr. Barbara Jean Wojnicki, CSFN Provincial Superior Our Sisters in Mount Nazareth are reaching out to Veterans organizations to assist in their needs; Holy Family Institute will be accepting unaccompanied minor immigrant children on campus; our Sisters in New England continue to support the local food pantries and anticipate needs at the parish and school levels; and our Sisters in Texas are actively engaged in offering spiritual assistance to address the needs in the area. When we look back at all that has been part of the last ten years, our hearts are filled with a deep sense of gratitude for God’s many blessings: for those with whom we partner in ministry; for those who share our mission; for our benefactors, our friends, our Associates; for those who have been inspired by our Nazareth charism; and for those who continue to journey with us. We, as vowed members, continue to shape our lives on Gospel values in the spirit of our Mother Foundress. We have every reason to be confident about our identity as Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth and enthusiastic about our mission to families. And we continue to thank God for you, our readers, for your support, encouragement and promise of prayer. Lovingly in JMJ,

W E , T HE S I S T E R S O F T H E H O LY FA M I LY O F N AZ AR E T H , AR E C ALLE D TO E XT E N D T H E KI N G D O M O F G O D ’S L OVE AMONG OURSE LV E S A N D OT H ER S BY L I VI N G TH E S P I R I T O F J E S U S, M AR Y AN D J O S E PH WH O S E LI V E S WE R E C E N T E R E D I N T HE LOVE OF GOD AND ONE A NOT H E R. W E W I T N ES S TO TH I S L OV E T H RO UG H D E D I C AT E D S E RV I C E TO T H E C H U R C H , E S PE C I ALLY I N M I N I STRY TO THE FAMILY.

– CSFN Covenant of Love 2 | VOLU ME 11 • N U MB ER 1 • S P R I N G 2 0 1 7


A Tribute by Edward H. Sobeck Children, each and every one a blessing — Gifts to us, to our world. Proving that life can go on. Few can resist the power of their presence And the wonder of their pure innocence. Each color blind for they only see with their hearts. Trusting to be cared for and guided. To grow in body, mind and spirit. To be loved and to love. To cry, to laugh, to dare to dream. Yet, like the weather, life is not always fair. And, for some, there may be more tears than laughter. Through no fault of their own — they become children in need — Of a society that would care about them and help raise them. There were, and are still now, good people recognizing this need and wanting to help. The Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth were among them. Not for material gain, but truly caring souls. Giving of themselves with sacrifice and dedication in a place called Holy Family Institute, Emsworth, PA. Through the years, many children were cared for — taught important, decent values. Thusly, better prepared to take their own place in our country, in our world. With the hope that, yes, their dreams really can come true. I know all this to be true — for I was one of those children in need. I will always be aware of how blessed I truly was to be cared for by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. P I C TU R ED A BOV E: THE ORIGINA L HO U S E AT H O LY FA M I LY IN ST IT U T E I N E M S WO R T H , PA . ON TH E COV E R OF T H I S I S S U E , P L E A S E RE A D MR. SO B E C K ’S L ET T E R TH AT ACCO MPA N I ED TH I S P O E M

I speak now for all of the many children whose young lives were touched by the Sisters. We are your legacy — a legacy which lives on in us and in our children. Thank you for being there when us children needed you. For that, God will reward you — and we will never forget you. May God Bless you now and always. S I N C E R E LY, O N E F O R T U N AT E H O LY FAM I LY I N S T I TUTE BOY — 1938 – 1953

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Vocations by Sr. Michele Vincent Fisher, CSFN, Provincial Councilor

A culture of vocations: Dare to dream God’s dream

W E S EE K TO F OST E R T H E AWA R EN ES S THAT EV E RY PE RSO N IS C A L L ED BY G O D TO LOVE A ND TO GIV E O N E’S L I FE I N LOVI NG SE RV ICE .

“As Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, we believe that it is in the family that our vocation is born and first comes to fruition.” — SR. MIC H EL E VI N C EN T FI S H E R

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be encouraged to understand that the deepest longing of the human heart is to know and love Our Lord personally, to follow Him faithfully and to serve Him generously right now in our common vocation to holiness and in whatever specific vocation He is inviting us to embrace. God has a great dream for us and we are called to discover it and embrace it as our own.

A few years ago, when invited to offer an eighth grade graduation retreat, I wondered what I would say to the students to help them understand how much their lives and their choices had the potential to bring God’s love to the world. As I surfed my way through hundreds Discovering God’s of songs, I came dream is not a across a song “solo” job. In a entitled: “Dream sense, it takes God’s Dream,” a “village.” It by Bryan Sirchio. starts with our The words jumped DISCOVERING GOD’S DREAM IS NOT A ‘SOLO’ JOB. immediate family off the screen as and encompasses I realized what a our neighborhoods, parishes, schools, deep connection this made to the whole sports teams, civic groups and concept of vocation: organizations to which we belong. “I’m dreaming of the call God is offering Each of these groups has something to to me / How to use my energy and my reveal about God’s dream for our lives. best gifts / To do the work of Christ — to Acknowledging this reality, we speak say, God, please use my life / To spread about the importance of building a Your healing love — and to live Your truth. “culture of vocations.” / Dream God’s dream / Holy Spirit, help When one speaks of “culture,” it brings us dream!” [Words by Bryan Sirchio, to mind a set of beliefs, values, attitudes Crosswind Music, 1991] and practices that identify a group of Believing that God has a dream for my people and serve to support the goals life energizes me and makes me want and work of that particular group. As a to talk with God and listen more deeply Catholic community, we seek to foster the to the voice of God who reveals himself awareness that to me in the midst of every person is my ordinary life. How called by God to important for us to love and to give help others, especially one’s life in loving our youth and young service. Together, adults, to experience we support God in this way and to and encourage become aware of the each person tremendous dignity to discover of our common call this deepest to holiness and to calling, to live F RO M T H E T I M E A C H I LD I S BO R N , I T I S a life lived in union T H E FAM I LY T H AT M O D E LS T H E E S S E N T I AL a discerning with Christ. We must E LE M E N T S O F U N C O N D I T I O N AL LOV E . lifestyle and to


Vocations make choices that are consistent with the beliefs, values, attitudes and practices that will promote life, love, faith and freedom. As Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, we believe that it is in the family that our vocation is born and first comes to fruition. From the time a child is born, it is the family that models the essential elements of unconditional love, self-sacrifice, gratefulness, reconciliation and healthy discipline. Teaching children to pray and introducing them to the elements of our faith creates a strong foundation for building a friendship with God. Just as important as attending weekly Mass and setting aside time for daily prayers is the equally important value of showing how to care for others, being concerned about the needs of extended family members, neighbors and the poor. Helping children and youth to be good listeners, to develop patterns of healthy friendships and appropriate respect for times of solitude also opens children to become discerning individuals. Spending time having fun and playing together, enjoying God’s gifts of beauty in the natural world around us and having quality conversations at mealtimes or in the car are all wonderful ways to help our young people to discover God’s dream for their lives.

BU I LD I N G A ‘C U LT U R E O F VO C AT I O N S ’ I S U LT I M AT E LY AN I N V I TAT ION TO ACCEPT THE G RE AT ADV E N T U R E O F F O LLOWI N G C H R I S T WH O LE H E AR T E D LY AN D UNRESERVEDLY.

Schools and other groups, teams and organizations model the values of community building, discipline, hard work, critical thinking, healthy socialization and development and strengthening of personal gifts and talents that can be offered in loving service for the good of others.

G OD ’S D R E AM F O R YO U AN D F O R M E C R I E S O U T F O R F U LF I LLM E NT.

Building a “culture of vocation” also involves being somewhat counter-cultural. Learning that life is more about being faithful than about being successful and that happiness and fulfillment are found in God and in giving of oneself means that sometimes we will find ourselves swimming against the current of our society. Connecting with friends and groups that share similar values will help us to keep our hearts and minds aflame with a passion for the things of God. Parish youth and young adult groups, campus ministry and Christian service groups, college

Newman Centers and prayer groups are all great ways for us to strengthen our faith and sharpen our understanding of vocation. Learning the art of discernment is also one of the building blocks of sustaining a culture of vocation. Discernment is a way of engaging life that puts God at the center of all that we do. Learning to look at all sides of an issue, listening for what resonates strongly as well as what causes resistance, seeking God’s plan above our own set of criteria and allowing others to weigh in on our decisions open the door for a more fruitful life; a life

rooted in freedom and joy in the Spirit. Building a “culture of vocations” is ultimately an invitation to accept the great adventure of following Christ wholeheartedly and unreservedly. Whether your call to holiness is lived out in the single, married, ordained or religious life, God’s dream for you and for me cries out for fulfillment. It takes a daily “yes” to life, with all of its joys and struggles, and a sincere commitment to stay the course, to run the race with all that we have and to bring others with us as we cross the finish line! Go ahead…DREAM! 9 VO LU M E 1 1 • N U M BER 1 • SPRING 2017 | 5


Around the Province: Immigration Ministry Let’s leave the security of our comfort zone

PICT U RE D RIG H T: S R . T E R E S A M A R Y LU K A SZ E W SK I, CS FN , A .K A . “ S R . TE R I ” , W IT H O N E O F TH E E S L S T U D EN TS AT T H E SIST E RS OF S T. J O S EP H W EL C O M E CE N T E R I N P H I L A D EL P H I A . PH OTO US E D W I T H P E R M I S S I O N F RO M T HE S S J W EL C O M E C E N T E R .

“...Our communion with God and our sisters roots us in our Nazareth identity and strengthens us for mission. Enriched by these encounters, we will venture out to the peripheries with courage and joy. We will leave the security of our comfort zone, and go with love to where the needs of families are most urgent.” — T HE CA LL O F TH E C S FN ’S X X I V G E NE R A L C H A P TE R ( 2 0 1 5 )

It was Independence Day 1885 when 11 Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth (CSFN), along with Mother Foundress, Blessed Mary of Jesus the Good Shepherd (Frances Siedliska), arrived at New York Harbor, having made the treacherous transatlantic crossing. That evening, they boarded the train for a two-day, cross-country journey to serve Polish immigrants. The Sisters had answered the call to serve, teach and care for immigrant children and their families, a ministry that continues almost 150 years later. Today, CSFNs in the U.S. serve families, both those who have spent many generations in this country and those who are immigrants seeking a different and, hopefully, a better life. In story after story, our Sisters who work with immigrants tell of individuals and families who have “endured extreme danger and difficulty” to make their way to the U.S. They talk of those who, through hard-work, courage, perseverance and diligence, have tried to rebuild their lives in the U.S. They also mention fear. Sr. Teresa Mary Lukaszewski (“Sr. Teri”), CSFN, who serves as an English language tutor at the Sisters of St. Joseph Welcome Center in Philadelphia, describes the “joy” she experiences

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teaching students from the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Mexico and Puerto Rico. “They are highly motivated to learn English so they can live better lives here in the U.S.,” she says. “It pains me to see my students feeling so vulnerable given recent U.S. political occurrences and all the misconceptions about immigrants.” As a long-time immigration advocate, Sr. Cathy Fedewa, CSFN, agrees, “There are so many false myths out there about immigrants.” In addition to her work as assistant provincial superior for the Holy Family Province, Sr. Cathy also ministers to immigrants through the Interfaith Committee for Detained Immigrants, is a member of the Sisters and Brothers of Immigrants, volunteers as an ESL tutor and helps the South Texas Family Residential Center (a family detention center in Dilley, TX) with clerical data input. This advocacy is not without its challenges, though, says Sr. Cathy. “I often question whether my presence is of any value in my detention ministry, especially when there is a language barrier… But, every time I experience the gratitude of the detainees I know that whatever I can offer has an impact.” Sr. Mary Ellen Gemmell, CSFN, who is a member of Justice for Immigrants, says she “sees first-hand families


Around the Province suffering greatly because they are separated from loved ones and families fearing deportation…” In her ministry at St. Katherine of Siena School and Holy Family University, Sr. Mary Ellen teaches Spanish in hopes that she may help students open “their hearts and minds to other cultures.“ Sr. Teri believes the average person — Catholic or non-Catholic, vowed religious and the laity – must “have an open mind and an open heart and not listen to the fearful prejudice that is being promulgated these days.” Is there a solution to the turmoil, prejudice and fear regarding immigrants, migrants and refugees?

Each of the Sisters interviewed about their immigration ministry says the same thing: pray.

Interested in learning how you, too, can be a part of an immigration ministry? We invite you to explore these websites prayerfully and with an open mind and Sr. Mary Ellen explains, “We can work heart to learn more about immigration together to influence our current political issues and to discover how you can help: ideas through prayer, sacrifice, openness • United States Conference of to current problems, participation in Catholic Bishops — usccb.org activities and a positive attitude toward • Leadership Conference of our brothers and sisters from other Women Religious — lcwr.org countries seeking refuge.” • Justice for Immigrants — Blessed Mary of Jesus the Good justiceforimmigrants.org Shepherd came to the U.S. to serve • Interfaith Committee for Detained Polish immigrant families. “I feel I am Immigrants — icdichicago.org continuing her work in this ministry,” says Sr. Cathy, “not in the same way, but in the • Sisters and Brothers of Immigrants — sistersandbrothersofimmigrants.com best way I can. The immigrants’ needs are different now, but I can contribute • Sisters of St. Joseph Welcome Center — ssjwelcomecenter.org at least a little for their welfare.” 9

Social justice through direct service

BY S R . C AM I LLE KWI AT E K, C S F N

there was a lack of classroom space at the center, the pastor of St. Timothy’s parish graciously gave us permission to open a satellite center in the convent, located in Northeast Philadelphia.

While on retreat this summer at St. Mary’s by the Sea in Cape May, NJ, I met Sr. Constance Trainor, SSJ, who is the director of the Sisters of St. Joseph (SSJ) Welcome Center in Kensington (Philadelphia). The center “enables immigrants and others to improve their quality of life through access to education, support services and programs of self-sufficiency,” according to their mission statement.

Since October, I have been teaching English to women from Ecuador and Vietnam. For me it is truly a Blessing and Joy to be with these women who have a strong desire to improve their proficiency in English to be able to get better employment, help their children with life situations and prepare for citizenship.

heart.” These words, along with a calling to welcome the stranger, moved me out of my comfort zone to reach out to the immigrants, some of whom have encountered many difficulties to get to our country and make a better life for their families. As Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, we need to become a listening presence to families in our ministries and respond to the injustices that impact the families of the world, especially to the influx of new immigrants and refugees who are reaching out to us for help.

I would like to encourage anyone who has the time and desire to help these people, Being a member of the CSFN’s Peace to volunteer to work with them in some and Justice committee since 2008, I capacity to make their lives a little better. wanted to be active in social justice causes through direct service, which was For me it has been a rewarding experience and I am truly grateful for the opportunity a directive of our recent chapter. that was presented to me by becoming St. John Paul II once said, “Seek to help part of the SSJ Welcome Center. 9 I went for an orientation and became our brother and sister refugees in every F O R I N F O R M AT I O N ON THE SSJ WELCOME interested in teaching English as a second way possible by providing a welcome C E N T E R , PLE AS E V I S IT THEIR WEB SITE AT ... Show them an open mind and warm language (ESL) to the immigrants. Since S S J WE LC O M E C E N T E R. ORG. VO LU M E 1 1 • N U M BER 1 • SPRING 2017 | 7


Around the Province Sisters: “I hope that this whole process of becoming one province will call each of us to examine deeply what being a Holy Family Sister means for each of us as individuals; what it means in our relations with one another and what it means in our relations with people who are not members of the congregation. My dream is that we mirror the love of the Holy Family and the Holy Trinity, love our Nazareth so much that we want to see vocations increase, and thus live in such selfless charity that many young women, attracted by the obvious joy on our faces would seek to enter.”

In looking forward to the future, several thoughts were shared:

Sister M. Beatrice Piusinska said that this process reminded her of the Pastoral Planning for a preferred future undertaken in the 1980’s. She saw leadership and organizational skills surfacing among the membership and feels that that work has laid the foundation for what is happening now.

Sister Clare Marie Butt believes, “Change involves adjustment, and my hope is that each of the Sisters and their colleagues in ministry will work together to make the new province a success. I believe that God has directed us in this process, and I trust God will continue to accompany us...”

Sister Mary Ellen Gemmell wrote from Puerto Rico: “I turned to spiritual reading for help (once the decision was made for reconfiguration). I came across an idea of Blessed John XXIII: ‘In what is necessary — unity; in what is incidental — flexibility; in everything — charity.’ That thought has helped me to be open to others’ opinions, lifestyles, and insights.”

Sister Dorothea Jurkowski wrote: “The future of Holy Family Province is not really clear to me yet... But, like Mother Foundress in 1885 when she set sail with half of the congregation to a new land, Nazareth has received a distinct call from God to become one so that our mission will be more fully realized as we speak with one voice…”

Quoting again from Sister Ann: “I feel this process will be beneficial to all. I have lived in two provinces and visited another and found in all that the Spirit of Nazareth is very much alive and present ... we will be one body — one Nazareth.”

CSFNS AT A PROVINCE RECONFIGURATION MEETING IN 2003

Sister Angelica Zajkowski shares what seemed to be the consensus of the many responses from across the United States: “As I reflect on the past and look forward to the future, I know I am journeying with my family of Nazareth Sisters. Holy Family Province will be strong and effective in spreading the Gospel message through the diverse and generous talents and ministries of the Sisters.” Several Sisters who shared their thoughts acknowledged the vision, risk-taking and long hours of work that have brought us to this point in our journey. They expressed their gratitude to our American leadership for guiding us through this time in our history. 9

Meander with God by Sr. Geraldine M. Wodarczyk, CSFN (2009) In Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania the Allegheny and Monongahela Rivers merge forming the Ohio. When I lived in Pittsburgh, at times I noticed distinct debris-filled rivers blending to form this new entity. At other times, I just knew the merging took place. Were the rivers teaching me about the letting go that would eventually be asked of me as my province of origin merged — along with four other U.S. provinces — to form a new entity in this country? The observation prepared me to see the good

that flows from such merging. Rivers usually flow from north to south, some meandering as the topography winds — east and west — south to north — but always “just rollin’ along.” As religious women, God invites us to follow the topography of human need as the Spirit leads. Such meandering may seem from some heights to be parting from the directional course. Yet such meandering is at the very nature of some rivers and

who we are as religious women! Let us celebrate that conscious meandering and be carried by the surprise of its unfolding. E D I TO R ’S N OT E : S R . GERALDINE WAS THE F I R S T AS S I S TAN T PROVINCIAL SUPERIOR FOR T H E N E WLY M E R G E D HOLY FAMILY PROVINCE. T H I S R E F LE C T I O N F I RST APPEARED IN “M I DWI V I N G A V I BR ANT FUTURE,” A BO O KLE T PU BLI S H E D B Y THE LEADERSHIP C O N F E R E N C E O F WO MEN RELIGIOUS (2009). I T I S R E PR I N T E D H E RE WITH PERMISSION F RO M S R . AN N M AR I E SANDERS, IHM, AS S O C I AT E D I R E C TO R OF COMMUNICATIONS F O R LC WR .

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Ministry Profiles

Eight decades of religious life: Sr. Ignatius Remian of Our Mother of Perpetual Help by Sr. Michele Vincent Fisher, CSFN, Provincial Councilor

“I reminisce…and I think: God…all these years… how fast these years went by…it’s all in eternity… all in the hands of God!” — SR. IG N AT I U S R E M I A N

She’ll tell you that she can no longer see, and that blindness has taken the light from her eyes, yet the light from within Sr. Ignatius Remian shines as bright as the noon-day sun. As she speaks, every word paints a thousand pictures. In quiet contemplation, she reposes on her bed, with her rosary enfolded around her weathered hands. When I enter her room to visit, I am greeted with a warm smile and an invitation to “come and sit for a while.” I feel like a novice sitting at the feet of the master and I am eager to receive the wisdom that comes from a woman who has spent 80 of her 97 years as a Sister of the Holy Family of Nazareth. If you wonder how she passes her days, Sr. Ignatius will say: “I reminisce…and I think: ‘God…all these years…how fast these years went by…it’s all in eternity…all in the hands of God!” Having had a great devotion to the Blessed Mother since she was a little child, young Marie Remian was hopeful that on the day of her novitiate entrance in 1937, she would surely be given a Marian name. She still clearly remembers the words: “Nunc nomen invocabilis… Santa Ignatia” (From now on your name will be called Ignatius). “Why Ignatius?” she questioned Mother Regina. “Dear Sister, just like Saint Ignatius, your life will be ‘ad majorem Dei

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gloriam’” (for the greater glory of God). Through the years, Sr. Ignatius reflected on her patron saint: “Before he became a saint he was a ‘bad boy.’ He had a strong willpower and the grace of God to give up all that he had and then to lead a life of mortification. In his suffering, he learned his mission. He learned Jesus Christ and from that moment forward, he never looked back.” Clearly, Saint Ignatius and Sr. Ignatius have been great companions! Sr. Ignatius’ missionary spirit was already being fostered when her Nazareth journey led her to Albano, Italy to complete her novitiate training from 1937-39. As the world was about to enter into the Second World War, Sr. Ignatius freely and joyfully gave herself to our Lord, professing her vows of chastity, poverty and obedience. The time for long hours of quiet prayer and contemplation that mark the period of the novitiate became a distant memory as young Sr. Ignatius stepped onto the ocean-liner that would bring her back to the U.S. and back to her native Chicago to take up residence at Saint Mary of Nazareth Hospital. As the hospital was growing, more sisters were needed for ministry which necessitated training and education. Sr. Ignatius recalls the grueling schedule that called for early morning rising for community prayer, morning classes at De Paul University followed by afternoon and evening shifts working in the hospital lab and x-ray departments, a quick


Ministry Profiles evening meal, prayers and finally time to prepare for the next day’s classes. Being a medical technologist, Sr. Ignatius was frequently awakened in the middle of the night to go back to the lab to assist with the needs of critical care patients. Emergencies know no time! Dedication and persistence paid off, and by 1946, Sr. Ignatius had earned her bachelor’s degree from De Paul University, taken her Boards at Northwestern University and Mt. Sinai Hospitals and became a nationally certified medical technologist. In 1947, just two years after her final profession, Sr. Ignatius was summoned to go to Mother Frances Hospital in Tyler, TX to temporarily fill in for a sister who needed to return to Chicago to care for her ailing mother. The provincial superior told her: “Take enough clothes for about four months.” With her one suitcase in hand, she dutifully boarded the train. Being concerned about their little sister, big brothers Edmund and Arthur handed money to the conductor and said: “Make sure our sister gets something to eat and a cup of coffee!” Four months turned into fifteen years and a tour of duty that included ministry at Mother Frances Hospital, Tyler, TX; Holy Cross Hospital, Taos, NM; Bethania Hospital, Wichita Falls, TX; and, St. Joseph Hospital, Clayton, NM. Sr. Ignatius not only ministered in the hospital laboratories and served as a staff supervisor but also engaged in critical research and was a part of the Board of Medical Technologists for the State of New Mexico, working with various pharmaceutical companies to enhance patient treatment. The demands of ministry and community life caught up with Sr. Ignatius, and in 1952, she found herself a patient at Loretto Hospital in Dalhart, TX with a diagnosis of tuberculosis. Encouraged to recuperate in a dry, warm environment, Sr. Ignatius spent the next two years

undergoing rigorous treatments and re-gaining her strength at a sanatorium in Albuquerque, NM. Like her patron, Saint Ignatius, the time of her infirmity was a time of spiritual re-awakening and personal transformation that reminded her of the value and transformative power of suffering.

IL to become the local superior for the community of sisters who lived and served at Holy Family Medical Center. As things in her life began to shift, she still had a desire to minister in healthcare and served for the following thirteen years as a surgery liaison, finally retiring to Nazarethville in 2006 at the age of 87.

S R . I G N AT I U S I N T H E LAB AT S T. M AR Y O F N AZ AR E T H H O S PT I AL I N C HICAGO (1978).

Strengthened by the Spirit, Sr. Ignatius returned to hospital ministry in New Mexico and Texas and in 1962, when her own mother was suffering from ill health, she finally re-boarded that long-awaited train to Chicago. Sr. Ignatius returned to St. Mary of Nazareth Hospital and was privileged to have the opportunity to be part of building the new hospital location in the early 1970’s. Using her years of expertise and experience in the lab, her input was sought when designing the model for the new laboratory space. In addition, she went from supervising a staff of twenty to shepherding a staff of eighty-nine. After twenty-four years of faithful service at Saint Mary of Nazareth Hospital and already in her fiftieth year of religious life, Sister Ignatius returned to Des Plaines,

Now, Sr. Ignatius spends her days in prayer. She points to the spot on her shelf occupied by a lovely statue of the Blessed Virgin given to her by her mother for her tenth birthday and tells me that Mary is truly our companion on the journey. Sr. Ignatius is peaceful, and when she looks back over her life, she says with a smile: “Forgive me, Lord…I was kind of young and I wasn’t too smart yet!” Yes, this is what 80 years in religious life looks like! In Sr. Ignatius’ own words: “I offer these 80 years, all through the heart and hands of Jesus, Blessed Mother and Saint Joseph, to You, Heavenly Father, for your blessing and for your greater glory and honor and for my sanctification and salvation.” 9 VO LU M E 1 1 • N U M BE R 1 • SPRING 2017 | 11


Ministry Profiles Language diversity and family unity: reflections on ministry work at HFU by Sr. Angela Cresswell, CSFN

EDI TO R’ S N OT E : SR. A N G EL A C R ES S W EL L , C S F N, PH. D. IS A N A S S I S TA N T P RO FE S S O R AT HOLY FA MILY UN IV E R S I TY ( H FU ) I N PHI LA DE LPHIA . SH E A L S O S E RV ES A S DI R EC TOR OF T H E FA M I LY C E N T E R . S R . ANGE LA E A RNE D A B.A . FRO M H O LY FA MI LY UN IV E RSIT Y, A M .E D. FRO M MI LLERV ILLE U N IV E RS I T Y A N D A P H .D. F ROM U N IV E RSIT Y OF S O U TH FL O R I DA .

Several months ago, I accepted an unexpected change in my ministry. In addition to continuing to teach two levels of Spanish in the School of Arts and Sciences here at the university, I assumed the role of director of the Family Center – a joint venture sponsored by Holy Family Province and the university since 2013 in Northeast Philadelphia. With only a few months’ experience in this new area of service, I will focus this reflection on my ministry of educating young adults. My personal relationship with Our Lord is what gives me life in my ministry. Forty years ago as a novice in the field, I would probably have credited a vibrant relationship with my students or the freedom to be creative and

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resourceful as sources of fuel to energize me. On the other hand, perhaps it is only a more profound awareness of Who I am working for and why I continue to do what I do, that accounts for the different perspective. The last forty years have witnessed unimaginable changes in our world, in family life, and certainly how we relate to and educate youth. My need for wisdom, patience, and compassion impels me to rely on His enduring Presence, to listen to His gentle guidance in my dealings with colleagues and students. Undoubtedly they are members of a family and I am frequently entrusted with their personal experiences in the hope of my prayerful support. With the freedom I have to pray with each class, my students know it is safe to acknowledge God at work in their lives; thus, I feel privileged each time they email me or come to my office to ask me to pray for a member of their family. Although I have no illusions of being indispensable, I believe and trust that I am exactly where the Lord wants me to be; that there is both a reason and purpose to my ministering to the people presently in my life. And that fact keeps me in my ministry. In general, the greatest challenge for me in working with contemporary youth is to maintain the academic standards of a university, while meeting their need to succeed amid the reality of inadequate preparation only too often. This is not a trivial concern because I have observed significant changes in the abilities and performance of students over the last

40 years. Through no fault of their own, they enter the university with inadequate skills and motivation. The study of foreign language — in a world where English is promoted across the globe — is truly a foreign concept for many students. Despite the ‘shrinking’ of the world primarily because of technology, there appears to be a lack of attraction to learning other cultures through a study of language. With a country as multicultural as the U.S., there is a need to appreciate the diversity midst the unity of these 50 states. A greater understanding of our largest minority would be a step in the right direction. My small contribution to improve this situation using my present circumstances was to propose an interdisciplinary course, Spanish for Health Care, for students aspiring to enter the health field. The proposal was accepted by the appropriate committees and will be introduced in our Fall curriculum. It is my hope that not only will the study be useful in providing some proficiency in serving the growing population of Spanish-speaking patients with limited English, but also serve to increase motivation for the study of Spanish. Cultural as well as linguistic instruction are addressed in the course. Compared to the years of service of many faculty — both religious and lay here at Holy Family University — I am an adolescent having served only ten years. There have been many changes both in the physical appearance of the campus and the student population. If I compare it to my own time as a student in the late 60s, I would have to say it is almost unrecognizable since there were only three buildings at that time. I believe the biggest difference for me is in the student population. We are far more


Ministry Profiles

multicultural than we were 47 years ago and that’s a good thing. When our students cite their reasons for choosing and continuing to matriculate at our university, it is because they want to experience and do experience a family environment. They know we care. And isn’t that what we’re all about?

I would have to say that each time I hear this expressed or receive a token of gratitude I experience a special moment in my ministry. As the Family Center grows in participants who attend our evening workshops to empower families primarily through education, may they,

too, return because they experience our family environment. 9

F O R I N F O R M AT ION ABOUT SPRING 2017 PRO G R AM S AT H OLY FAMILY UNIVERSITY’S FAM I LY CENTER, PLEASE VISIT HOLYFAMILY. EDU

Sr. Janice Marie Blados brings beauty, blessings to everyday encounters by Tammy Townsend Kise, Communications Director “I really have a passion for life,” Sr. Janice Marie Blados said on one of those rare days when she had a few moments to pause and reflect for a few minutes on her ministry. “What drives me is the whole idea of encountering people and forming right relationships. My ministry allows me to do that.” Sr. Janice Marie, known as “JB” among her CSFN sisters, serves as the chaplain for LIFE Pittsburgh, an insurance program that provides inclusive care to the frail elderly with chronic health conditions, allowing them to stay in their homes as long as possible. As a full-time member of LIFE Pittsburgh’s team of nurses, doctors, physical and occupational therapists, social workers, dietitians and others, Sr. Janice Marie, along with all the LIFE team members, works daily to improve the lives of the program’s participants. “The interdisciplinary team works together to provide for the needs of the participants,” she said. “LIFE Pittsburgh is one of the few LIFE programs that has full-time chaplains.” As chaplain, Sr. Janice Marie assists with the spirituality needs of LIFE participants and reaches out to their families to help with end of life issues. She begins with

a spiritual assessment of each new participant, asking them to consider how she can help sustain their spirituality and what they would like their final days to be. “The final days of someone’s life are a sacred time,” she explained. “I ask them how they want me to help them and what they want from LIFE Pittsburgh and their family in their last days and hours. Everyone struggles with end of life questions and many struggle with the need to care for elderly family members. A spiritual presence can help to ease the transition from independence to interdependence, from life to death.” With enthusiasm and passion, Sr. Janice Marie spoke of the many blessings she receives from ministering at LIFE. “I really see the face of God in each of the people I work with,” she said. “In their suffering, they don’t give up. They have a faith that speaks to me.” As Sr. Janice Marie spoke, the minuteby-minute demands of her work diverted her attention a few times. She patiently paused in her reflection to help those who had stopped in her office, always conscious of the importance of her ministry. “There’s always more to do,” she said.

S R . JAN I C E M AR I E BLADOS ENJOYING HER PAS S I O N F O R LI F E

“Sometimes I feel pulled in so many directions, but I remind myself there is a God and it’s not me.” In a helping position such as hers, she says, it’s easy to feel she must do everything and help everyone. So, where does she find the peace, strength and balance necessary for this demanding ministry? “I must have a deepening relationship with God

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Ministry Profiles

The Privilege of Ministry

SR. X AV I E R K O ZU BA L W I TH ST U D E NT S FRO M O U R L A DY O F CA LVA RY SCH O O L I N P H I L A D E L P H I A W H E RE SH E T U TO R E D S T U D EN TS. (PHOTO F ROM O U R LA DY O F C A LVA R Y, 2 0 1 4 )

by Sr. Xavier Kozubal, CSFN EDI TOR ’ S N OT E : SR. XAV I E R K O ZU BA L R EC EI VE D A BA F RO M H O LY FA M I LY C O L L EG E (NOW HO LY FA MILY U N I VE R S I T Y ) I N 1 9 6 6 , A N M A F ROM D E T ROIT U N I VE R S I T Y M ER C Y I N 1 9 68 A N D A PH D F RO M TH E U N I V ER S I TY OF M A RYLA N D IN 1975 . S H E EN TE R E D T H E C S F N C O MMU N IT Y IN 1 9 6 0 .

In 2013, I retired from my ministry as director of an inner city women’s center in Philadelphia. After 21 years of active ministry there, I prayed for a new direction in my life. I consulted with Sr. Clare Marie Butt, CSFN, and she suggested volunteering at Nazareth Hospital. Since I had a certificate in pastoral counseling, I asked to be part of the spiritual care department and was accepted. Sr. Eileen Therese Przybylowski, CSFN, has mentored me in this new endeavor. I have the privilege of visiting patients, talking with them and giving them a blessing. Some of the patients I see are Catholics and some are not. Most accept a visit. Many share with me their experience of God and religion and many ask me to pray for them. Some are grieving the loss of loved ones and some

are dealing with serious illnesses. Before beginning my day I ask the Holy Spirit to guide me. Before I leave each patient I ask Jesus to lay His healing hands upon them and bathe them in His healing love. I ask this blessing for myself as well. If I need to talk about my experiences, I can share them with Sr. Eileen Therese. What keeps me motivated to continue in this ministry is Jesus’ words in Matthew 25: “Whatever you do for others, you do for me.” I know that when I visit someone in pain or grief I am not only comforting that person but Jesus as well. I feel grateful for this opportunity. Another ministry I am engaged in is the ministry of the word, writing articles for the wellness column. [This column appears in “Family Forum,” a newsletter for CSFN sisters in the Holy Family Province]. When I studied pastoral counseling at Neumann University in the early 90s, I was exposed to a holistic model of wellness. I was trained to consider the whole person — body, mind, heart and spirit. And so I find inspiration for daily

living in this model. Each part interacts with the others. Whatever we do to have a healthier spirit also affects our mind and emotions as well. When I reflect on wellness, a topic surfaces in my mind and I research the topic on the Internet and ponder the material. I believe the Spirit comes to help me in this project. Many of the topics are things I need to consider in my own journey toward wellness and I hope others do the same. Each step we take toward physical, mental, emotional and spiritual wellness leads us closer to the wholeness we shall someday experience. One day a week, I still continue to return to the inner city women’s center. This is also a Matthew 25 ministry. It is a day program where women can come and enjoy the support of other women. Some are homeless, some are drug addicted and some are prostitutes — all in need of love and support. There they find people who truly care about them. They can also take a shower, eat a meal, do laundry and attend a support group. It is good to be there. 9

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In Memoriam Sister Rita Marie Kocanda N OV E M BER 6 , 1 9 4 0 — N OV E M BER 5 , 2 0 1 6

On the day before her 76th birthday, in the 60th year of religious life, Sr. Rita Marie Kocanda peacefully took her last breath at Nazarethville in Des Plaines, IL, surrounded by her religious sisters and their prayers. Born on November 6, 1940 in Rivesville, West Virginia, Rita was the thirteenth and youngest child of Polish immigrant parents, John and Mary (Saflarski) Kocanda. There were difficult times in her early life. Her father worked in the coal mines to provide for the family while her mother cared for the children. By the time Rita was old enough for school, her parents separated. Mrs. Kocanda moved to Chicago with the four youngest children to be closer to Rita’s aunt. Many years later, her parents reconciled and her father returned to the Church, events that held very special meaning for Sr. Rita. In Chicago, Mrs. Kocanda worked various jobs, including cleaning the rectory, so she could support the family and send her children to Catholic school at St. Adalbert’s. Sr. Rita recalled her mother instilling in her a love of God as well as faithful devotional practices. Her mother taught her that life would always be filled with both good and bad experiences. In eighth grade, Rita was accepted as an aspirant in the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. She became a postulant on May 1, 1956, professed her first vows on May 3, 1959 and final vows on August 10, 1965. In 1966, Sr. Rita graduated from De Lourdes College in Des Plaines, IL with a Bachelor of Science degree in education. For nearly thirty years, Sr. Rita served

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as a teacher in Chicago area schools including St. Hedwig, St. Emily, Immaculate Heart of Mary, St. Hyacinth, Holy Trinity, St. Adalbert, St. Camillus, St. Josaphat, St. Patricia and St. Michael. In the late 1980’s, after providing care for her ailing mother and eldest brother, Sr. Rita “felt the call to be of assistance to the sick and dying.” For the next seventeen years, Sr. Rita served as chaplain at Holy Family Hospital in Des Plaines, IL. She also worked with seminarians from the University of St. Mary at the Lake in Mundelein, IL, assisting with their preparation for pastoral care ministry. Due to memory issues, in 2009, Sr. Rita moved to Nazarethville where she continued her pastoral ministry as long as she was able. “I find that there is always a chance to minister to others, whether it be in the hospital, the classroom or the convent…,” Sr. Rita wrote during the years she was a chaplain. “The most important task of ministering is simply listening, sharing and praying together or for someone. This is not only the task of the minister, but also of every Christian.” Sr. Rita’s funeral Mass was November 9 at the Provincialate in Des Plaines, IL. Interment was at All Saint’s Cemetery, also in Des Plaines, on November 10. 9

Sister M. Salvatore (Hedwig) Samko AU G U S T 2 0 , 1 9 2 0 – N OV E M BE R 7 , 2 0 1 6

Hedwig Samko, called Agnes by family and friends, was born in Worcester, MA on August 20, 1920. She, along with her twin sister Frances, were the daughters of Joseph and Stephanie (Moszczynska) Samko. The baby girls were welcomed

home by their older brothers Alphonse and Charles. Sr. Salvatore’s siblings, including her twin sister in 2007, preceded her in death. Mr. Samko, an expert tailor who worked at an exclusive shop in downtown Worcester, sewed Agnes and Frances’ coats and made them matching muffs to protect their hands from the frigid New England weather. Though they were fraternal twins, Mrs. Samko preferred to dress the sisters alike. Both girls attended St. Mary School in Worecester, MA through eighth grade where they first encountered Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. With the positive influence of God, the sisters and her mother, Agnes chose to attend Nazareth Academy in Philadelphia to begin to discern her religious vocation. Frances had her own plans, and the twins separated for the first time. Life as a student at Nazareth Academy was a smooth transition for Agnes. Her days were filled with academic classes, extracurricular activities, a spiritual formation program, small chores and study. Holidays and summers were enjoyed in Worcester with her family. On June 6, 1938, before her senior year, Agnes became a postulant and continued her discernment which would make religious life a reality. During this formation period, Agnes had numerous opportunities for personal growth and development in Christian maturity. She spent time in prayer, discerning the authenticity of her vocation to religious life. On June 22, 1939, Agnes, dressed in a black habit and white veil, received the name Sister M. Salvatore and became a novice. This intense twoyear spiritual preparation program provided opportunities for Sr. Salvatore to grow in intimacy with Jesus through prolonged periods of


In Memoriam prayer, study of and meditation on Sacred Scripture and participation in the liturgical life of the Church. At the completion of her novitiate on June 20, 1941, Sr. Salvatore made her profession of temporary vows, receiving a black veil and a Nazareth cross. On August 12, 1947, she made her perpetual profession of vows, received a silver ring with the inscription “My Beloved to me and I to Him” and became known as Sr. M. Salvatore of Jesus and Mary. Sr. Salvatore earned a Bachelor of Arts from Holy Family College in Philadelphia and a Master of Hospital Administration degree from St. Louis University in Missouri. For more than 55 years, she was a visible and loving presence at Nazareth Hospital in Philadelphia where she served as an x-tray technician and administrator. In January 1987, Sr. Salvatore became the first President of the Nazareth Healthcare Foundation. Though she retired in October 1999, she continued to be a very active presence in the volunteer department at the hospital. “I loved being faithful in praying for and visiting the sick,” Sr. Salvatore said about her tenure at the hospital. In January 2012, Sr. Salvatore became a resident of Mount Nazareth in Philadelphia. Even in declining health, she remained prayerful and pleasant. On November 7, 2016, in the 78th year of her religious life, Sr. Salvatore passed away at Mount Nazareth. Her Mass of Resurrection was held at the Chapel of Mount Nazareth on November 14, followed by interment at Community Cemetery, both in Philadelphia. 9

Sister Patrice (Marion) Feher F E BR UAR Y 7 , 1 9 3 1 – N OV E M BE R 3 0 , 2 0 1 6

For 47 years, Sr. Patrice Feher served the students of Holy Family University (HFU) in Philadelphia, first as a history professor and later as the Dean of Students and Vice President of Student Services. Yet, her ministry extended far beyond teaching and administration at the university. Sr. Patrice was a mentor and advisor to countless students through the years. Beloved by alumni, faculty, staff and students, Sr. Patrice was known for cheering on the university’s athletes, organizing dinners for senior citizens and playing Scrabble in the residence halls. Those who attended the university through the years fondly recall her “Breakfast of Champions” before finals. Sr. Maureen McGarrity, CSFN, President of HFU, described her as “a cornerstone of the Holy Family University community for decades.” In 2009, a wing of the newly constructed Stevenson Lane Residence Hall at HFU was dedicated as the “Sister Patrice Feher, CSFN Wing.” In 2010, the Association for Student Affairs at Catholic Colleges (ASACCU) honored Sr. Patrice with the Founders’ Award for her exceptional contributions to ASACCU and Catholic higher education. Born on February 7, 1931 in Williamstown, PA, Marion Feher was the third child of George and Mary (Adams) Feher. Along with her siblings Andy, George and Mickey, Marion attended Sacred Heart of Jesus Grade School and Williamstown Catholic High School, both in Williamstown, PA, graduating in 1948. Despite her enduring fondness for the small town in which she spent her early formative years, career opportunities

attracted her to Bristol, PA, a borough about 20 miles northeast of Philadelphia. While residing there with her immediate family, she began discernment of a vocation to religious life. After she explored several options, her prayer and reflection solidified her decision that serving families as a member of the congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth (CSFN) was the way in which she could best answer the call of God to her heart. On February 2, 1955, Marion began her formation journey with the CSFNs and professed her first vows on August 15, 1957. Sr. Patrice made her final vows on August 11, 1963. Before becoming HFU’s cornerstone, Sr. Patrice taught social studies in Pennsylvania and was a submistress of novices during their initial CSFN formation. With a Bachelor of Arts degree from Holy Family College (now university) and a Master of Arts degree from Temple University, also in Philadelphia, Sr. Patrice began teaching history at her alma mater in 1969. Friends, family, students and colleagues remember Sr. Patrice for her listening presence, tempered wisdom, willingness and desire to serve. “I know that this loss will be felt deeply by all of us,” Sr. Maureen said in her announcement of Sr. Patrice’s death to the HFU community. “Let’s keep her and our community close to our hearts and in our prayers.” Sr. Patrice passed away at St. John Neumann Nursing Home, Philadelphia, on November 30, 2016 in the 61st year of her religious life. The Mass of Resurrection was held at Nazareth Academy High School chapel, Philadelphia on December 3. 9

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In Memoriam Sister M. Therese (Bernadine) Frankowski MA RCH 1 4 , 1 9 3 7 – JA N UAR Y 3 , 2 0 1 7

Bernadine Frankowski was born on March 14, 1937 to Casimir and Frances (Kowalska) Frankowski in the Polish Hill neighborhood of Pittsburgh. She was youngest of four and attended Immaculate Heart of Mary grade school where for nine years she was taught by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. She and many of her grade school friends pretended to be “sisters” and would talk about joining the convent together. By the sixth grade, this desire wore off for most of the girls, but not for Bernadine. Her teachers approached her about joining and becoming an aspirant at Mt. Nazareth Academy. Bernadine was uncertain and she believed she was restrained by the “providence of God” to go in another direction. She decided to attend Elizabeth Seton High School. Bernadine, known by her nickname “Deany,” described her high school years as the “four happiest years of my life, up to that time.” Deany made life-long friends. She was a member of the swim team, had a boyfriend, worked at St. Francis Hospital and continued to explore religious life. She credits the Sisters of Charity with their “tender counsel and advice” for nurturing her vocation. Once convinced she had a vocation to religious life, Bernadine’s dilemma was which community she should join. She finally believed that she should enter the Sister of Charity until she met the Mistress of Novices, Sr. Frances Sikorska, of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. Through Sr.

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Frances, Bernadine was convinced that Nazareth was where she belonged. In a letter of reference, Sister of Charity Caroline Joseph wrote, “... if Bernadine had not been called by God to join your order I would have been delighted to see her in ours.” On August 15, 1954, Bernadine received the veil of a postulant of the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth. She became a novice on August 12, 1955 and made her first vows on June 10, 1957 in Albano, Italy. Sr. Therese professed her perpetual vows in 1963. Sr. Therese began her ministry at St. Francis Cabrini Elementary School in Allen Park, MI. She also served at St. Joan of Arc School in Library, PA and as a counselor for high school girls at Holy Family Institute. As a math and science teacher at St. Christopher Elementary School in Detroit, MI, Sr. Therese inspired a vocation to religious life for Linda Yankoski, one of her students. In 1972, she became the postulant director for Linda. At Duquesne University, Sr. Therese completed her Bachelor’s degree in 1966 and Master’s in Educational Counseling in 1971. In 1992, Sr. Therese was elected to serve as a full time Provincial Counselor. When her position as provincial counselor ended in 1998 she went to work at Jubilee Kitchen in Pittsburgh as a social worker. She served at Jubilee Kitchen until she had her knee replacement surgery on August 16, 2016. Through Sr. Therese many people experienced hope, the goodness of God, and the mercy of Jesus. Girls she counseled at Holy Family Institute, now mature women, visited her while she lived at Vincentian Home following her stroke on September 11, 2016. Sr. Therese

E XC E R PT FROM A LETTER FOUND O N SR. THERESE’S CASKET:

“...the news of your passing has me so broken-hearted. You were there when I was doing all the wrong things in life, and you never turned your back on me. You believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself. You prayed for me every time you saw me. I’ve never met anyone who made me feel like I belonged somewhere. You are the reason that I have five years clean... I’ll always think of you, and remember your smile... Save me a place in Heaven for when my time comes.” surprised the physical therapists by asking for the song, “Stressed Out,” by Twenty-One Pilots with which to exercise, bringing smiles and laughter to the room. Sixty-three years ago, Bernadine wrote in her autobiography, “Now that Jesus has brought me here where, at first, I was among strangers, I know He will not abandon me. Through His graces, I desire to live hidden with Him in His earthly home, Nazareth, and one day be united with Him in His heavenly home.” Sr. Therese died Jan. 3, 2017 at Vincentian Home, Pittsburgh. A Mass of Resurrection was on Monday, January 9 at Holy Family Manor Chapel in Pittsburgh. 9


Development / Association Come Celebrate With Us

Spring... Nature’s way of saying “Let’s Party!”

The 2017 Grateful Gathering to benefit the retired and infirm Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth will be Saturday, April 29, 2017, 5:00 to 10:00 p.m. at Holy Family Manor Auditorium in Pittsburgh.

The CSFN 2017 Social, benefiting the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth, will be Friday, May 19, 2017, 7 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the The Philadelphia Ballroom in Philadelphia. Tickets are $70 per person and include hors d’oeuvres, open bar, dinner and sweet table. The evening will include live and silent auctions, tombola and 50/50 chances. Sponsorship opportunities are also available. The deadline to purchase tickets is April 21.

Tickets are $25 per person and space is limited. Ticket price includes buffet, dessert, wine, beer, soda, coffee and tea. The evening will include auctions and raffles. Cash, checks, credit cards are welcome. The evening is hosted by the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth.

For more information, please contact Allison Taylor, Assistant Director of Development, at 215-335-4805 or ataylor@nazarethcsfn.org.

For more information, contact: Sr. Madeleine Rybicki, 216-2249186 or Sr. Sandra Sharon, 412-913-7929.

Association of the Holy Family Directors meet in Rome During the first week of March, Sr. Virginia Rozich, National Director of the Association of the Holy Family (AHF), and Sr. Michael Marie Franzak, AHF spiritual director for the Midwest Area, were in Rome to meet with other AHF directors from the Sisters of the Holy Family of Nazareth (CSFN) provinces. The meeting, called by CSFN Superior General M. Jana Zawieja, focused on changes in the AHF in the last five years and ways the AHF ministers to families. The weeklong meeting included a review of the successes, challenges, materials and orientation programs that associates receive in CSFN provinces throughout the world. “The AHF is very different in the U.S.,” said Sr. Virginia. “In Europe, there is a family-centered focus with picnics,

S R . MI C H ALE M AR I E ( S E C O N D ROW, FAR LE F T ) AN D S R . V I R G I N I A ( S ECOND ROW, FAR RIGHT) W I T H CS F N S AT T H E AH F M E E T I N G I N RO M E .

socials and pilgrimages and an emphasis on the family as the domestic church. There are also younger sisters in Europe to help with the Association. In the U.S, the association movement is focused on individual spiritual development, faith sharing and partnership in the charism and tends to attract an older population.”

Watch for updates on the meeting and news about the association on our website. And don’t miss an article on long-time associate Mary Bremer and the role religious sisters have played in her life. 9 To read more, visit nazarethcsfn.org/ category/news/ahf/ VO LU M E 1 1 • N U M BE R 1 • SPRING 2017 | 19


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VOLUME 11 • NUMBER 1 | SPRING 2017 NAZARETH CONNECTIONS IS PUBLISHED THREE TIMES A YEAR BY THE SISTERS OF THE HOLY FAMILY OF NAZARETH IN THE USA. EDITOR: TAMMY TOWNSEND KISE PROOFREADERS: SR. CLARE MARIE KOZICKI SR. JUDE CARROLL SR. LUCILLE MADURA DESIGN/PRINT: QUANTUM GROUP

QUESTIONS, COMMENTS, SUGGESTIONS? PLEASE CONTACT: COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT SISTERS OF THE HOLY FAMILY OF NAZARETH 310 N. RIVER ROAD, DES PLAINES, IL 60016 847-298-6760, X144 TTOWNSEND@NAZARETHCSFN.ORG NAZARETHCSFN.ORG “LI K E” U S O N . . .

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EDITORIAL BOARD: SR. ANGELA SZCZAWINSKA SR. BARBARA FRANCES SAMP SR. CAROL SZOTT SR. JUDE CARROLL SR. KATHLEEN ANN STADLER SR. LUCILLE MADURA SR. MARCELINA MIKULSKA SR. MARCELLA LOUISE WALLOWICZ SR. MARY LOUISE SWIFT SR. TERESILLA KOLODZIEJCZYK KATHERINE BARTH

The Lord be praised, all is well, for He gives me strength and His holy grace.

FAC EBO O K .C O M / C S FN .U S A

— BLE S S ED FRANCISKA SIEDLISKA, F O U N D R E S S O F T H E S I S T E R S O F T H E HOLY FAMILY OF NAZARETH

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