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Communicating with

Impact Publication 123

CSEA’s guide to creating effective chapter publications

AFL-CIO

California School Employees Association Revised March 2016

Our mission:  To improve the lives of our members, students and community.


Table of Contents Section 1: Getting Started . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 Discusses the role of the CCO and getting started as a newsletter editor. Also includes a sample newsletter.

Section 2: Newsletter Content . . . . . . . . . . page 13 Provides detailed information on how to provide the newsletter content members consistently say they want.

Section 3: Writing and Reporting . . . . . . . . . page 37 Covers everything from interviewing people and gathering news, to writing and editing articles.

Section 4: Layout and Design . . . . . . . . . . . page 59 Outlines basic methods of effective layout and design, including column formats, headlines and clip art.

Section 5: Printing and Distribution . . . . . . . page 79 Gives tips and suggestions for reproducing the chapter newsletter and getting it to bargaining unit members.

Section 6: Appendices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 85 Includes acronyms and abbreviations, CCOs’ legal rights, advertising guidelines, Communication Awards Competition and how to contact CSEA.

Style Guide and Glossary of Terms . . . . . . . . page 121 Index . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 135


Section 1

Getting Started This section discusses your role as a Chapter Communications Officer (CCO) and newsletter editor. It provides important resource information, help getting started and a sample chapter newsletter.

Contents Your role as a CCO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 Resource publications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4 Communication Tools. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 6 CSEA Template Library. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 7 Make a plan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 8 Sample newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 9


2


Getting Started

Your role as a CCO Throughout its history, CSEA has depended on the volunteer efforts of active members just like you. As a Chapter Communications Officer (CCO), you are a valuable asset to CSEA. Your local communications will strengthen your chapter and the union as a whole. A CCO’s duties vary from chapter to chapter, but the basic goal of every CCO is to inform members of what their union is doing and how they can get involved. In addition to flyers, announcements and working with your chapter Webmaster, your primary task is to create and implement a communications plan that keeps your chapter members informed and in touch with CSEA.

What is a chapter newsletter? Every CSEA chapter is supposed to regularly communicate with all members, usually by distributing a chapter newsletter to the members. The newsletter should contain information about your chapter’s contract, negotiations and employee benefits, as well as other CSEA news. As a CCO, you will need to gather this information and put it together in a newsletter. Don’t worry, you’ll have many resources to assist you— the first of which is this manual. It should contain everything you need to start producing a CSEA chapter newsletter.

You’ll get help every month Clip­sheet, a CSEA publication written just for CCOs, can be accessed at csea.com/clipsheet. It contains articles you can use in your newsletter, as well as flyers, Member Benefits ads and tips to help you improve your newsletter. Since Clipsheet is a statewide publication, it does not provide you with the important local news that chapter members want, so don’t rely on Clipsheet as your sole source of content for your newsletter. For additional information and news sources, call the CSEA Communications Department at (800) 632-2128 x1217 to get contact information for your Communications Committee representative.

i

For more information about all of the resources available to you from CSEA, see pages 4, 5, 18, 19, 39 and 120.

3


Resource Publications As a CSEA member communicator, you are free to reproduce or adapt any materials CSEA publishes for use in your local chapter. For example, many CCOs reprint articles from the CSEA website and Focus magazine and add in a local chapter angle at the end. Other CCOs use the Member Benefits section of the Clipsheet to highlight local CSEA discount programs in bulletin board flyers. Listed below are some of the CSEA materials available to you. Most of these publications can be obtained from your local field office or by contacting CSEA Communications at (800) 632-2128 x1217. If you’d like to find out about other publications, stop by your field office or ask your labor relations representative. Many publications are also available online at www.csea.com/publications.

■ Getting

CSEA’s Message Across, Publication 117— Contains general information on how to get your news to the media and how to maintain a relationship with the news media.

Getting CSEA’s

message acro

ss

Contract Commun ications How to keep chap ter members“in the

know”about the cont ract

AFL-CIO

California School Employees Assoc iation

Our mission: To improve the lives of our members, students and community. Publication 117

REVISED NoVEmbE

R 2003

■ Contract

Communications, Publication 125—A step-by-step manual for creating successful negotiations updates. It offers different approaches for different situations, complete with real-life examples. There is also information on reporting grievances and your rights under the law.

Publication 125

Layout & TipsDesign AFL-CIO

California Employees AssocSchool iation

Our mission: To improve the lives of our members, students and community. Revised April 2014

How to look profe ssional in print

■ Layout

& Design Tips, Publication 126—An overview on how to make your newsletter look more professional. AFL-CIO

California School Employees Assoc iation

Our mission: To improve the lives of our members, students and community. Publication 126

REVISED JanuaRy

4

2004


Getting Started

■ Clipsheet—An online collection of ready-to-use

articles for your chapter newsletter. Many of these articles can be localized to include information that is uniquely relevant to your chapter. Clipsheet articles are available at www.csea.com/clipsheet—just copy and paste the articles you want to use. 2013

Communica tion Awards

Awards of Distinction

Awards of Excellence Print

■ Communication Awards

Book, Publication 127— A collection of the most recent year’s top CSEA websites and newsletters.

Web

Jefferson Tiangco , Webmaster region33.csea.co m, Region 33 Area F

Fil Zamora, Editor News Flash 56, Region 56 Area C

Awards of Distinction

Web Francisco Tamayo , Webmaster www.csea471.com Area K, Region , Sweetwater High 471 52

E-Newsletter

Francisco Tamayo , Editor CSEA 471 Member Connection, Sweetwa Area K, Region ter High 471 52

Flyer

Ivan Pastrano, Commu Pizza Party!, East nicator Area G, Region Whittier 87 11

Awards of Distinction Best Design

Print

Web

Best News Articl

Print

e/Story

Theresa Stonem an, Author “District employe Fairfield-Suisun es shave heads for kids” 302 Area B, Region 68

Web

Francisco Tamayo , Webmaster “Montgomery Adult School targeted Sweetwater High for closure” Area K, Region 471 52

Awards of Distinction Print

Diana Cavana ugh, Editor CSEA Classifie d Area K, Region Advocate, San Marcos Unified 63 413

Best Use of Photo graphy

Print

Shirley Christin e Gonzalez, Editor CSEA Connect ions, Rowland 133 Area G, Region 35

Best Column/Edit orial

Jocelyn Woods, Author “Dr. Folo D. Rules”, Riverside COE Area F, Region 693 33

Web

Karen Walsten , Author “I would like to tell you a bit about Lake Elsinore me…” 598 Area F, Region 38

Francisco Tamayo , Webmaster www.csea471.com Area K, Region , Sweetwater High 471 52

E-Newsletter

Francisco Tamayo , Editor CSEA 471 Member Connection, Sweetwa Area K, Region ter High 471 52

Flyer

Francisco Tamayo , Communicator Get Out And Vote, Area K, Region Sweetwater High 471 52

■ Focus

magazine—Bi-monthly magazine that features important issues for classified employees and public education. This publication also features profiles of members, as well as information on employee rights and benefits.

Category not awarde d

Awards of Distinct ionBest Use of Photogr aphy (E-Newsletter) Awards of Distinct ion-Best Use of Photography (Flyer) Award of Distinct ionBest News Article/S tory (E-Newsletter) Award of Distinct ionBest Column/Editoria l (E-Newsletter) Publication 127

California School Employees Associat ion

2045 Lundy Avenue San Jose, CA 95131

PRESORTED FIRST-CLASS MAIL U.S. POSTAGE

SPRING 2014

PAID SAN JOSE, CA PERMIT NO. 1048

CSEA’S RETIREE NEWSLE TTER

■ The

Classified School Retiree—A quarterly publication produced by CSEA’s Retiree Unit highlighting issues and events important to retired members. 2

BIG

SAVE

Chair’s Messag e

7

District meetings are important

CONTENTS share

& love Retiree Take advantage Honor of some ed Byexclusive this holiday season! Statedeals Assem bly and the with friends

family today.

a CSEA member, you are eligible Faye Lane discounted for named movie passes, gift cards, purchasing park tickets and amusement Woman of more! the Year To As

3 5

District K Retiree Day

An informative and entertaining event

Mourning An Activist

8 9

To purchase these

items, visit csea.com/store

Prevent Credit And Telemarketing RS l PE Scams Ca

Steps you can

take

Gardening Tips

10

Member Benefit s

or call (866) ITS-CSEA

ITS-CSEA (487-2732)!

11

RETIREES SUPPO

CalPERS Update

Outlook is positive

Carol Jones was Make gardenin g easy devoted to CSEA and enjoyable The Retiree Unit newsletter is published (408) 473–1000 four times a year . Copyright 2014 by the California California School Polito; COMMUN Employees Associatio School Employees Associatio ICATIONS MANAGER n, 2045 Lundy n. Executive Director, DESIGN SPECIALIS , Anthony Lopez; EDITOR, Hugo Jiménez; T, Susan Hea, Jennifer Dave Low; COMMUN Avenue, San Jose, CA 95131, ICATIONS DIRECTOR Sanders; ADMINIST SENIOR DESIGN COORDINATOR, RATIVE ASSISTAN Jessica Salam; MULTIME, Frank T, Katherine Miller. DIA/ RETIREE UNIT The California School MISSION STATEME Employees Associatio NT: among all retirees, n Retiree Unit envisions to address issues a strong, organized that impact their program lives, and to assist CSEA’s active membersh for retirees to promote communi cation ip in accomplishing their retirement Visit us on the goals. web

at www.csea.com/re tiree

Tom Torlakson understands the value of classified school employees. Rememb to vote for him er on June 3rd for California Superintendent of Public Instructio n.

Discounts for retirees

IN THIS ISSUE:

Mourning a longtime activ ist ALSO: Attend your distric t meeting Woman of the Year Faye Lane

RT TORLAKSON Retiree mobiliz ation is vital to re-elect Tom

Torlakson State superinte nden understands value t of schools of classified CSEA needs

the help of its retirees to re-elect Californ support Torlakso ia Superintendent n because he underof Public Instruct stands the challeng ion es to another four-yea Tom Torlakson education and has facing California r term. fought tirelessly Torlakson has long to increase funding to schools. a friend to classified proven he is “As people who employees and devoted our lives understands the serving educatio value of classified n and who underwork. Primary stand the needs of our Elections will be schools, we on June 3. Retiree need to support Unit Chair Bill someon Regis e who has said it’s importa a history of good nt for CSEA retirees leadership,” Regis to said. “We need to re-elect Torlakso n (continued on pg. 6)

website—Go to www.csea.com/members for a wealth of information and CSEA news articles.

■ CSEA

5


Communication Tools CSEA’s Communication Tools (Comm Tools) page is your hub for information and resources to use in your newsletter and other publications. It can be accessed directly at www.csea.com/commtools or by going to the CSEA website and looking for it in the Officer Resources area under the Member Resources tab. Be sure to check it regularly as the content is updated frequently.

www.csea.com/commtools

Clipsheet

Artwork

Resources

Clipsheet is a terrific

CSEA has a variety of

Comm Tools hosts a wealth

resource for content. This

logos, banners, clip art,

of resources to help you

regularly updated online

photos, social media imag-

make the most of your

section of the website pro-

es and other artwork for

publications. In the “Good

vides you with ready-to-

you to download and use

Ideas” section, see exam-

use articles that you can

in your publications.

ples of what’s working well

cut and paste into your

in other chapter newslet-

newsletter.

ters. The “References” section links you to additional help and online resources.

Facebook

Join the CSEA Communicators group on Facebook to post questions, get answers and share your experiences with other CSEA communication officers. Find the link on Comm Tools or go directly to: www.facebook.com/groups/CSEAcommunicators

6


Getting Started

Layout and Design Support The Resources section of the online Communication Tools is a compendium of information, products and ideas to help you in the layout and design process. Under the “Resources” tab at www.csea.com/commtools, you will find a variety of templates, layout backgrounds, design ideas, tips and tools. We also provide the links to the best and most up-to-date free resources available online, including design and photo editing applications, graphics and other useful things. These materials and links will make it easy to create attractive newsletters, flyers, social media postings and other communication materials. We recommend using canva.com as your layout tool if you don’t have any design experience. Regardless if you are new or seasoned, or whether you use Canva, Adobe InDesign, Microsoft Publisher, Word or another program or application, the design materials we provide for you will fit your needs.

El Oso Cla

ssified Ne

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiatio ns are unde rway Our contrac

ws

March 2014

El Oso Cha pter 1020

t expires on the process May 31. of renegoti ating our cont We are now in the entire cont ract, which ract can be means changed by The results you. 2). In response of our contract survey are in (see to your inpu page areas be addr t, we are aski essed, nam ng that seve ely: health promotions ral benefits, sala and job desc ries, riptions.

Next chap ter meetin g

Wednesda y, March 6 • 5:00 p.m El Oso Mid . dle School ,

Room 18 On the age nda: • Negotiat ions • Modified work wee k • Nominati ons for Cha pter 2nd VP

In response to you that several r input, we are asking areas be add ressed.

We don’t beli eve contract some big secr negotiations et, should be bulletins. Wat so we will be publishi ch for thes ng negotiati e updates, ed on two ons which will -color stati be printonery Please beli eve only wha and numbered sequ entially. t written in is printed the El Oso in the bull etin Classified at chapter News or anno s, meetings. Rumors are unced it officially false. Unless from the nego you hear a bulletin, tiating team don’t cons or through ider the info Ask a chap rmation to ter officer be true. if you have We’re confi questions. dent that we settlement. can reach If you have a fair cont any ract information , attend a chap questions or need mor e Negotiations ter meeting or contact Chairperson ext. 524. John Doe at 555-983 5,

Bus driver saves child ’s life On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exit ed the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped performed out of the bus the Heimlich and second-grade maneuver and saved r’s life. the “It was a scar y moment,” that everythi Doe said. ng worked “I’m just glad out okay.” Superintend ent Joe Shm Doe receive oe has reco a commen mmended dation at the meeting. H that next school will also be board honored by at our next CSEA chapter mee ting on Mar ch 6 .

Inside th is issue

Bus driver

El Oso Cha pter 1020 to get a fair Negotiating contract Team wor for all. ks

save

s child’s life . . . . . . . . . President’s . . . . . page message . 1 . . . . . . . . . Opinion: Hea . . . . . . . . . page 2 lthcare . . . . . . . . . . . Welcome new . . . . . . . . page members 2 . . . . . . . . . Legislature . . . . . . . page considers bill 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Member Ben . page 3 efits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Cha pter 1020

Come Join our BBQ for CSEW! Another goal we have set for our Retiree Unit is to provide important and relevant information to our retirees via our Retiree newsletter and through other means. To achieve this, we have formed a retiree Communications Committee. Committee members are retirees who will keep their ears to the ground to find out what the hot topics that interest and impact retirees are. Communications Committee members will help determine whats included in this newsletter and will help in the development of other ways we will use to stay in touch with you.

Visit www.csea.com/commtools for layout and design resources

I wanted to let you know that the RUEB members that were up for election during the latest cycle received no opposition and were re-elected. The re-elected members are: District A Director Joe Rao, District C Director Pat Bollin, District E Director Faye Lane, District G Director Dawn Bronsema, District I Director Jennie Batiste, and myself. We look forward to continuing serving you and welcome your feedback.

7


Make a plan The first thing you’ll need to do is figure out a regular production schedule for your newsletter. This will help you maintain deadlines for contributors and will ensure that the news is still timely when it reaches your readers. If you’re unfamiliar with any of the terms on this page, don’t worry. They’ll be explained further on.

Sample Newsletter On the next few pages you’ll find a sample news­letter, the El Oso Classified News. Although this newsletter is completely fictional, it serves as a good model for your chapter news­ letter. Throughout this manual there are references to this sample newsletter.

Schedules and deadlines

❶ Plan ■

Decide what local (chapter) topics you want to cover. ■ Provide issue deadlines to newsletter contributors, such as chapter president, union stewards, labor rep, etc.

Gather Information ■

Talk with contacts (chapter executive board, committees, etc.). ■ Review written resources (Clipsheet, bulletins from the employer, etc.). ■ Conduct interviews; investigate stories.

❸ Write ■

Write articles succinctly with the most important facts at the beginning. ■ Include two-way communication and contact names for members.

❹ Edit ■

Check articles for content problems. ■ If required (or you're unsure of controversial content), show articles to appropriate chapter officials for their approval. Give them response deadlines. ■ Adjust story lengths to fit layout.

❺ Layout ■

Cut and paste stories (manually or on a computer) into your layout template. ■ Include appropriate graphics, subheads and other design elements.

8

❻ Proofread ■

Have at least one person (who didn’t write or edit articles) proofread for typos and mistakes. ■ Make any last-minute changes as necessary.

❼ Print ■

Reproduce enough copies for every chapter member plus other people on your mailing list. ■ Print mailing labels (if necessary).

❽ Distribute ■

Get copies to your readers.


El Oso Classified News March 2016

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed. We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting

Sample Newsletter

Getting Started

Wednesday, March 2 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18 On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

Bus driver saves child’s life On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exited the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped out of the bus and performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Inside this issue Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Chapter 1020

9


Page 2

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

What we get depends on you It has been over two months since our last contract expired, and we are finally negotiating a new contract. It is essential to get through this process as quickly as possible, without sacrificing any of our needs. Don’t worry, your negotiating team will fight hard to keep all of the entitlements, rights or benefits you were granted in the old contract. You may, however, receive even better health benefits, more equitable salaries and greater opportunities for job promotions! Show management that we support our negotiating team. Wear a CSEA button, T-shirt or hat, and participate in all meetings, activities and votes. Our strength is in our numbers and in our unity.

El Oso Classified News

Health benefits, salary rank high in contract survey Survey

Not a Priority

Priority

Negotiate a fair and equitable salary increase.

96%

4%

Maintain our current level of health benefits.

100%

—

Increase transfer opportunities.

53%

47%

Increase promotion opportunities. 77%

23%

Increase amount of additional pay for specialized skills.

46%

54%

Workplace issues

Agree

Disagree

OPINION

Staffing levels at worksites are adequate for work demands.

40%

60%

Every employee deserves quality healthcare

Workloads have not increased in the past year.

33%

67%

Promotions are handled fairly.

30%

70%

Transfers are handled fairly.

32%

68%

My responsibilities are clearly defined.

30%

70%

Discrimination based on sex or race is not a problem at work.

54%

46%

Workplace is adequate.

48%

52%

Sincerely,

Jane Doe, President CSEA Chapter 1020

by John Doe, VP In our chapter, not everyone is entitled to employerpaid health coverage. Those who work less than 25 hours a week are forced to pay for their own healthcare. What some of our colleagues spend on health coverage for their families often exceeds what they earn working for our district. As classified school employees, we must look out for one another. That is the reason why we must push for affordable healthcare coverage for all Californians. That way, our colleagues will be able to use their wages for food, rent and other necessities instead of having to spend all of their hard-earned money on nothing but health insurance.

If you have questions about our current negotiations, don't hesitate to call Chapter President Jane Doe at ext. 4150.

El Oso Chapter 1020

10

Recently, chapter members were given a contract survey to indicate your priorities for the new contract with the district. Here are the results (based on 90 surveys returned):

Sample Newsletter

March 2016


Getting Started

El Oso Classified News

Page 3

STEWARD’S REPORT

Welcome new members

Additional work must be offered to senior workers

Please look up these new folks and say hello. John Doe is a new Paraeducator at Meadows Elementary. He’s a special education expert and sign translator for hearing impaired students. John says he joined CSEA because he wants to participate in the decisions that affect our new contract.

by Jane Doe, Chief Job Steward

District management decided to assign two extra work hours to a new six-hour custodian. In doing so, the district disregarded our contract, which requires additional hours to be offered to the most senior employees first. We convinced the district to increase the hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight hours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too will be able to work eight hours per day.

Jane Doe is the new Sr. Clerical Assistant at El Oso High School. She moved here from San wwDiego, where she worked as a secretary in the county office of education. She has worked in public education for the past eight years.

Employees get promotions CSEA helped two EOHS employees who complained of being passed over for promotions that they felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to the employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has already been offered a second promotion. If you see something at your job site that doesn’t look right, it might be a violation of our contract. Know your rights and read your contract. You are the eyes and ears of the union. I can be reached at chiefjs@eloso.com or call ext. 5534. OUR CONTRACT

Report absences ahead of time Recently, there has been some confusion about reporting absences to your worksite. Section 15.2.1 of our contract deals with notification of absences. If you don’t follow the procedure in the contract, you run the risk of disciplinary action or even termination.

The contract basically says this: 1. If you are going to be absent, you are required to notify your worksite prior to the beginning of the work day. 2. To return to work, you must notify your site prior to the end of the work day before returning to service. The bottom line: If you can’t come to work, notify your site ahead of time!

Sample Newsletter

March 2016

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Get your job description When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

March Calendar 2

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

9

Staff Development Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

14

DEADLINE: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details .)

15

CSEA Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

El Oso Chapter 1020

11


Page 4

Member Benefits

El Oso Classified News

Your union is only a phone call away EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

New cars at fleet rates

President: Jane Doe, ext . 4150 Vice President: John Doe, ext . 2131 Secretary: Jane Doe, ext . 4104 Treasurer: John Doe, ext . 3129 CCO: Jane Doe, ext . 4189

Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive huge discounts on a new car?

JOB STEWARDS Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe Maintenance: John Doe

To locate the participating auto dealer nearest you, call Member Benefits at (866) ITS-CSEA (487-2732) for a complete and up-to-date listing.

chiefjs@csea.com jsmaint@eloso1020.com

CSEA CHAPTER COMMITTEES Constitution & Bylaws: John Doe, ext 2658 Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 Nominations: John Doe, ext 2862

Vision benefits for part-timers Members who work fewer than six hours per day may purchase vision insurance. The premium is $15 per month, and it covers you and your dependents.

Should you need assistance, call Healthcare Insurance Providers, Inc. (HIP) at (800) 555-1200.

Dim stairwells pose danger John Doe of the Health and Safety Committee is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, the lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast on the classroom signs. The stair striping is an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in compliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of a two-year plan agreed upon by the district.

candb@eloso1020.com hands@eloso1020.com negotiate@eloso1020.com nom@eloso1020.com

El Oso Classified News is published monthly, September–June . Please send your ideas, suggestions, or questions to CCO Jane Doe, 1025 Bear Creek Road, El Oso, CA 99893, call ext 4189, or email CCO@eloso1020.com . Sign up to receive our e-newsletter; send your e-mail address to CCO@eloso1020.com.

Visit our website, http://chapter1020.csea.com

Legislature considers CSEA-sponsored bill Long-term disability (LTD) is not always as long as you think. Our employer can deduct LTD days retroactively to the first sick day you used leading into your leave. A new bill being considered by the state Assembly would change this unfair law. The CSEA-sponsored bill, AB 1613 (Smith), would allow classified employees to use LTD after they exhaust their sick leave, thus extending the length of paid time off due to an injury or disability. Currently, teachers are the only school employees who enjoy this right. Contact our legislative representatives and let them know that this bill matters to you. Assembly District 95 Joe Shmoe

Assembly District 74 Jane Shmoe

150 Main St. #108 El Oso, CA 99893 Ph: 555-1234 shmoe@assembly.ca.gov

150 Main St. #111 El Oso, CA 99893 Ph: 555-5678 shmoe@senate.ca.gov

El Oso Chapter 1020

12

pres@eloso1020.com vp@eloso1020.com sec@eloso1020.com treas@eloso1020.com CCO@eloso1020.com

Sample Newsletter

March 2016


Section 2

Newsletter Content No matter how impressive the design or clever the wording, your newsletter will only be as good as the information it contains. Your newsletter should provide members with important information about their contract and benefits as well as chapter, regional and state news. In polls, CSEA members have consistently responded that these issues are what they want to read about the most (see pages 16–17). In your newsletter, you should focus most of your attention on these issues. This section will help you report the most important news to members.

Contents Finding news for your newsletter . . . . . . . . . . . . page 15 What CSEA members want . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 16 Where to find content. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 18 Contract communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 20 Contract education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 21 Contract negotiations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 22 Reporting grievances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 24 Health and welfare benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 25 Adding a local touch to state news . . . . . . . . . . . . page 26 Customize your calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 27 Announce chapter meetings. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 28 Get chapter news in minutes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 29 Leadership messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 30 Chapter elections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 32 List your chapter’s executive board. . . . . . . . . . . . page 34 CSEA discounts and Member Benefit ads. . . . . . . . . page 36 13


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Newsletter Content

Finding news for your newsletter

Be a reporter ■

Get out! Mingle with your

Be assertive! Ask for some

Keep alert! Read bulletin

Chapter news can be found just about anywhere, but it rarely comes knocking on your door. You have to go out and find it, and one of the best ways to do this is to network. By establishing more sources of information, not only will you be able to create better newsletters, you’ll make your job as CCO a lot easier.

Ask readers to contribute One easy way to get new stories is to just ask. A simple note in your newsletter asking readers to submit story ideas will put you in touch with your readers and get them involved too. Make sure your name, phone number, address, e-mail, worksite or other contact information is printed clearly, so readers can get their information to you.

co-workers. Talk about work and chapter-related events around the water cooler, the bus yard, wherever. Be a reporter, one who is “on duty and on the record” all of the time.

time at each chapter meeting, so you can solicit suggestions and input for your newsletter from your fellow members.

boards. Check out flyers and notices from all sites in your chapter. Read memos from the district. Be constantly on the lookout for new information or a new slant on old information.

Be gracious! Quote folks in your newsletter, acknowledge sources and always give credit where credit is due.

Caution: Some people may ask you

!

to publicize something that isn’t in the best interest of the chapter (such as complaining about an individual or school administrator). Consult with your chapter president or executive board about questionable topics.

15


What CSEA members want Consistently, CSEA members identify their chapter newsletter as their favorite and primary source of information about their union and their career. It’s the information that hits closest to home and most often is their prime connection to “pocketbook issues” such as salary, retirement, and healthcare benefits. Chapter websites can also be a great tool to add depth and timeliness to your chapter’s communication.

It’s important to note that while the chapter newsletters are members’ favorite source of information, it is not always the most appropriate—especially when information needs to get into members’ hands quickly. Depending on the situation, chapter communicators should also consider:

Newsletters, flyers, letters and email newsletters are all effective ways to communicate with members. 76% Your local CSEA chapter newsletter 70% Flyers left at your worksite 68% Co-workers or word of mouth 66% Letters mailed to your home 65% Bulletin boards and flyers at your worksite 64% Focus magazine 60% E-mail newsletters from your local CSEA chapter 55% In person information from a CSEA leader 57% Postcards mailed to your home CSEA chapter meeting 51% The Newslink elelctronic newsletter 41% The CSEA website 40% Telephone calls 21% Facebook 11% Text messaging 8% Twitter 0%

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10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%


Newsletter Content

According to CSEA’s member polling, here’s what news members want to read: ■

Information on healthcare and negotiated benefits

Updates on chapter contract negotiations

Information on health and safety issues

Updates on legislation and political developments affecting classified employees

Information on discounts and benefits programs

Information on upcoming CSEA workshops and seminars

Explanation of chapter contract provisions

Information regarding chapter grievances

Information about local CSEA activities

Profiles of CSEA member activists

Profiles of other CSEA members and what they do

Stories about CSEA members' community service

Information about CSEA’s annual conference

But don’t just take our word for it, the best way to determine what your chapter members are itching to read is to ask them! Many chapters survey their members in one edition of their newsletter, asking them to rate the contents of that publication; or to tell the editor what kinds of things they’d like to see in upcoming publications. You can contact CSEA’s Communications staff for more information on how to effectively survey your members.

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Where to find content Subject

People

Publications

Web Links

Health and Welfare Benefits

• Executive Board members

www.csea.com/healthcare

Insurance and fringe benefits available to employees

• Employer’s Benefits representative

• Benefit provider’s newsletters and/or pamphlets

• Focus Magazine

www.csea.com/retirement

Retirement information

• Member Benefits Coordinator (CSEA Headquarters)

• Understanding Your CalPERS Rights and Benefits (#907)

www.calpers.ca.gov

Negotiations Update

• Negotiating Team Members

• Contract Communications (#125)

www.csea.com/representation

Contract issues affecting members

• Executive Board members

• Insurance providers

CalPERS Information

• Labor Relations Representative

Announcements

• Site Reps

Personal items of interest to members (weddings, births, deaths, vacations, etc.)

• Union Stewards

Welcome New Members

• Site Reps

List of new members and their job sites (if possible include biographical info)

• Union Union Stewards

Profiles of Members

• Members

Interviews and short bios of local CSEA members

• Site Reps

Use your newsletter to ask for this information

• “Sunshine” Committee

• Treasurer • Employer Payroll Department • Use your newsletter to ask for this information

• Union Stewards • Executive Board members

Letters to the Editor

• Executive Board Members

Signed communications from members on union or work-related issues.

• Labor Relations Representative

• Use your newsletter to ask for members’ signatures or individual letters

Legislative and Political Issues

• Chapter Political Action Officer

• Focus Magazine

State, federal or local elections, legislation affecting CSEA members, school board, local government issues

• PACE Committee

• Legislative Reports

• Legislative Committee

• CSEA Insider e-newsletter

Contract Education

• Negotiating Team members

• Collective Bargaining Agreement

Explanation of contract articles

• Executive Board members

• Contract Communications (#125)

www.csea.com/capitolconnection

• Governmental Relations www.csea.com/rights

• Labor Relations Representative • Union Stewards

Know Your Rights/Did You Know

• Executive Board members

• Collective Bargaining Agreement

Explanation of union rights, interesting facts about the union

• Labor Relations Representative

• Know Your Rights (#311)

Grievance Updates

• Grievance Chairperson

Information on grievances (exclude names)

• Union Stewards

www.csea.com/rights

• Union Stewards • Chapter Meetings/Minutes

www.csea.com/commtools

• Employer’s operating procedures and policy book

www.csea.com/safety

• Executive Board members • Labor Relations Representative

Safety and Health Issues Information on job safety and wellness

• Member Benefits Coordinator (CSEA HQ) • Employer’s safety officer • Health and Safety Committee

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www.dir.ca.gov/dosh


Newsletter Content

Be sure to check out www.csea.com/commtools

Subject

People

Publications

Web Links

CSEA Statewide News

• Executive Board

• Focus Magazine

www.csea.com/members

Statewide news and activities

• Area Director

• CSEA Bulletins

www.csea.com/areas

• Labor Relations Representative

• Friday Mail

CSEA Area/Regional News

• Area Director

• Area and Regional Newsletters

Regional news and activities

• Regional Representative

• Focus Magazine

• Communications Committee Representative

• CSEA Bulletins

• Chapter President

• RPM Report

• Employer’s Personnel office

• District/Employer announcements

www.csea.com/career

• CSEA Member Benefits Representative

• Focus Magazine

www.csea.com/benefits

• Member Benefits Flyers

www.csea.com/discounts

Promotional/ Career Ladder Opportunities

www.csea.com/areas

• Friday Mail

Job and career advancement

CSEA Discounts and Member Benefits Discounts on entertainment, shopping and recreation for members

Staff Development Job training and personal enrichment opportunities

www.csea.com/store • Employer’s Staff Development or Personnel office

• The Directory of CSEA Educational Programs (#913)

www.csea.com/training

• Negotiating Team • CSEA Education and Training Staff

Workshops and Seminars

• Area Director

• Focus Magazine

www.csea.com/uniontraining

Union educational opportunities

• Regional Representative

• CSEA Bulletins

www.csea.com/offices

• Chapter Executive Board members

• Friday Mail

• CSEA Field Office staff

Local CSEA Activities

• Chapter Secretary

Chapter events and activities

• Executive Board members

Special Union Activities

• Area Director

• Focus Magazine

www.csea.com/events

Special events (Classified School Employee Week, installation dinners, awards, etc.)

• Chapter Executive Board members

• CSEA Bulletins

www.csea.com/offices

• Friday Mail

www.csea.com/areas

Calendar of Events

• Chapter Secretary

List of upcoming CSEA activities (chapter meeting dates, school board meetings, personnel commission meetings, etc.)

• Executive Board members

Annual CSEA Conference

• Chapter Delegates

Coverage of chapter delegates and conference proceedings

• Chapter President

• Chapter meeting agenda/minutes

• Chapter meeting agenda/minutes

• Chapter meeting agenda/minutes

www.csea.com/events www.csea.com/offices www.csea.com/areas

• Focus Magazine

www.csea.com/conference

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Contract communications There is a common misconception that bargaining needs to be secretive in order to be successful. This is absolutely false. Keeping the members informed is essential to maintaining your chapter’s solidarity. Whether you’re updating members about ongoing contract negotiations or explaining issues in an existing contract, your chapter’s contract is always news. It’s also one of the topics that CSEA members want to read about most in their chapter newsletter. Plan on writing something about your chapter’s contract or contract negotiations in every issue of your newsletter. You should work closely with your bargaining team chairperson and executive board for negotiations stories. They will often have the first and last word about what you should write about. For contract enforcement and education, talk to your chief union steward and executive board.

s unicatitheocontnract m m o C t Contrac r members“in the know”about

STEP 2 (continu ed) Survey

ep chapte How to ke

WHY COMMUNICATE ABOUT THE CONTRACT? You can eve n use a survey to set the tone and create realistic expectation s. Read the paragraph under the heading “Ec ono issues.” Not mic ice how it doesn’t talk about raises, but rather protecting pas t gains and rights.

In random telephone surveys of rank-and-file members conducted by periodically by CSEA, members overwhelmingly state that the most important benefit of their union membership is the contract that decides their wages, hours and working conditions. It’s not surprising then, that CSEA members want pocketbook information and information about contract-related services they receive from CSEA: 92 percent want health and insurance information; 90 percent want information about local contract negotiations; compared to only 27 percent who want information about local social activities.

n 125 Publicatio

AFL-CIO

ia School Californ sociation es As Employe lives of our

To help you meet that need, this booklet contains samples of CSEA chapter newsletters. The booklet is organized into several sections, to help you find the examples you need when you need them. These samples are complimented by sample flyers so your contract communications can be coordinated. As advertisers know, repetition of the “message” is the most effective way to get through to people—so by coordinating what you put in your newsletter, with what you put on bulletin boards, and in mailboxes, on web sites and telephone hotlines, you can make sure your chapter’s communications get the desired results.

rove the munity. : To imp com Our mission s, students and member 4 Revised

April 201

IMPORTANT NOTE:

It is highly recommended that you run a draft of your bargaining communications by your bargaining team chair, labor relations rep and/or chapter president to verify accuracy. A good reporter values accuracy above all else! Discuss ahead of time with your executive board who should handle this and then try to set up a system with that person so they’re available when you need them.

i 20

For more information about contract communications, order CSEA Publication 125, Contract Communications: How to keep chapter members “in the know” about the contract, by calling CSEA Communications at (800) 632-2128 x1217.

13


Welcome new members

STEWARD’S REPORT

Additional work must be offered to senior workers

Please look up these new folks and say hello.

Newsletter Content

John Doe is a new Paraeducator at Meadows Elementary. He’s a special by Jane Doe, Chief Job Steward education expert and sign translator District management decided to assign two extra for hearing impaired students. John work hours to a new six-hour custodian. In doing so, says he joined CSEA because he the district disregarded our contract, which requires wants to participate in the decisions that affect our Union Stewards other union leaders additional hours toand be offered to the most seniorare constantly telling the rank-and-file members to “read their contract.”new Butcontract. if employ ees first. We convinced the district to increase the hours of two custodians from seven to eight Jane Doe is the new Sr. Clerical you’ve ever readsenior a contract, you know that it’s not always Assistant at El Oso High School. She hours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too that easy to understand. Contracts are often confusing and moved here from San wwDiego, where will be with able tocomplicated work eight hours per day. loaded jargon. she worked as a secretary in the county ■ What are the most often asked As a communications officer, one of the most important things you can office of education. She has worked in questions getyears. about the do is to educate members about the contract by explaining important public education for the pastyou eight CSEA helped two EOHS employees who comcontract? sections in plain English. plained of being passed over for promotions that they ■ Does any specific area of the The key to contract education is simplicity. Talk with your chapter’s KNOW YOUR RIGHTS felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to contract seem to be especially contract experts (union stewards, negotiators, etc.) and decide which the employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has confusing to members? sections cause the most trouble. Then, have them explain the contract already been offered a second promotion. in basic terms. Write it down so someone who knows nothing about ■ How you explain these When you’re hired,do promoted or reclassified, If you see something at your job site that doesn’t the subject can understand it. For readers who want more detail, refer thea contract to job the employer mustparts giveofyou copy of your look right, it might be a violation of our contract. them to the specific section of the contract that you’re discussing. employees? description, salary information, Know your rights and read your contract. You are the work location,■work hours eyes and ears of the union. I can be reached at chief What do and we file the most work week. If anygrievances supervi- over? js@eloso.com or call ext. 5534. sor wants to change your job ■ How can we help employees S description, or if you find any A OUR CONTRACT better understand their rights   M discrepancies between the     P under the contract?      L description of your job and       E what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

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Contract education

Questions to ask your chapter’s contract expert(s)

Employees get promotions

Get your job description

Report absences ahead of time

Recently, there has been some confusion about reporting absences to your worksite. Section 15.2.1 of our contract deals with notification of absences. If you don’t follow the procedure in the contract, you run the risk of disciplinary action or even termination.

The contract basically says this: 1. If you are going to be absent, you are required to notify your worksite prior to the beginning of the work day. 2. To return to work, you must notify your site prior to the end of the work day before returning to service. The bottom line: If you can’t come to work, notify your site ahead of time!

March Calendar 6

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

9

Staff Development Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

14

DEADLINE: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details .)

15

CSEA Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

El Oso Chapter 1020 21


Contract negotiations As a communications officer, you play one of the most important roles in the negotiating process. The newsletter that you produce communicates important information to the members, while also achieving strategic goals determined by your chapter’s negotiating team and executive board. Successful collective bargaining largely depends on the strength and unity of the rank-and-file membership. The key to achieving this goal in any contract campaign is communication.

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Communicate before negotiations begin Working with your chapter’s negotiating team and executive board, you should start communicating with members long before negotiations begin. The best place to start is with a survey. It gets every member involved in the process from the beginning. Remind members of when the contract will expire or be re-opened, and also explain the difference. Then, distribute a survey that asks members to prioritize their interests (see sample survey in CSEA Publication 125, Contract Communications: How to keep members “in the know” about the contract, which you can order by calling CSEA Communications at (800) 632-2128 x1217).

Publicize survey results Make sure to publicize the results of the survey soon after the response deadline. This will help both chapter leaders and rank-and-file members identify the key issues. From this point on, you should begin publishing regular negotiations updates. Again, work closely with your negotiating team for subject matter and the tone they want to set. You should also have the negotiating chairperson sign off on the final draft of each update—this should make both of you more comfortable with the communications process.

22

Questions to ask your bargaining team, LRR and/or executive board ■

Who is our bargaining team?

When did they last meet? When will they meet in the future?

What actions can members take to support the team?

How would the contract proposals (ours and the employer’s) impact employees?

Would benefits and rights increase or decrease? How?

Would either proposal change procedures?

Why do we want to change this part of the contract?

Is there anything else that members should know about negotiations so far?


Newsletter Content

NEGOTIATIONS UPDATE

Transfer procedures could change Our CSEA negotiating team met with district representatives on April 10, 17 and 25. As in the previous sessions, our team felt positive about the outcome of the discussions. The three days were spent writing language on Transfers (Article 6) and on Leaves of Absence (Article 7). Additionally, a request was made to begin discussion on Wages (Article 11) and Asso­ciation Rights (Article 13).

S A   M     P      L       E

Transfers—Article 6 A Tentative Agreement has been reached on Article 6. Upon ratification by the membership, transfer requests will now be filed through Human Resources rather than the Personnel Commission. It is hoped that this will expedite the transfer process. Also, employees can now apply to transfer to a position in any related classification, whereas before, employees could only request a transfer to a position in their current classification. Additional language states that all employees who apply for transfer will now be granted an interview to compete for positions. A further change to this article will be that the District may not transfer an employee due to disciplinary action or because of an unsatisfactory evaluation. Leaves of Absence—Article 7 CSEA has submitted a proposal to the District changing the system under which employees are granted leaves of absence. Under this new proposal, employees will be allowed to use an additional 100 days at half pay (including sick hours) after they have exhausted all compensatory and accrued vacation time. Wages—Article 11 As reported in the last update, this may prove to be a lengthy negotiations process. CSEA demanded at the last negotiations session to open discussions on wages. We recognize the interests of our members and what type of salary increase you expect. CSEA will make a written proposal on a wage increase at the next bargaining session. Association Rights—Article 13 We expect to enter into discussions next session with a proposal for office space for CSEA. This will allow our members to meet with CSEA Chapter Union Stewards, Labor Relations Representa­tives and Chapter Officers, and it will provide a formal place to conduct chapter business. What happens next? The next bargaining session is scheduled for May 20 and 21, 1999. Article 7 (Leaves of Absence) and Article 11 (Wages) will be discussed. Negotiations will be the main topic of our next chapter meeting on April 1. If you have any questions or concerns, you can also call our chief negotiator, John Doe, at 555-9835, ext. 524.

What do you put in a negotiations update?

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A short summary of the issue, what just happened at the bargaining table, what’s next and what action workers can take to support the bargaining team.

Facts, figures and examples to support the union’s position.

Information about upcoming activities.

How workers can volunteer (whom to contact and how).

Avoid jargon and “insider” terminol­ogy. Simplify descrip­ tions wherever possible. 23


Reporting grievances Grievance representation (and informal problem resolution) is one of the most important ways the union helps members outside of contract negotiations. It’s important to report these activities to the rest of the membership for two reasons: first, it lets people know that CSEA assists its members when they need help; second, it helps educate other employees about their rights. For communications officers writing about grievances can seem like a monumental undertaking. It won’t be if you do three simple things:

❶ ❷

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What do you put in a grievance update? ■

Get help from your Union Steward or labor relations representative—even have him or her write it. You can edit it down to plain language. Keep it simple. It’ll be easier on you and your readers.

March 2014

STEWARD’S REPORT

Additional work must be offered to senior workers

Page 3 S A   M     P      L       E

by Jane Doe, Chief Job Steward

District management decided to assign two extra work hours to a new six-hour custodian. In doing so, the district disregarded our contract, which requires additional hours to be offered to the most senior employees first. We convinced the district to increase the hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight hours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too will be able to work eight hours per day.

Employees get promotions CSEA helped two EOHS employees who complained of being passed over for promotions that they felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to the employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has already been offered a second promotion. If you see something at your job site that doesn’t look right, it might be a violation of our contract. Know your rights and read your contract. You are the eyes and ears of the union. I can be reached at chiefjs@eloso.com or call ext. 5534. OUR CONTRACT 24

Report absences

Explain which section of the contract was violated and how.

A generic reference to the individual involved: “an employee,” “a transportation employee,” etc. It’s usually better to avoid using the grievant’s name. If there is a compelling reason, though, ask for permission first.

You don’t have to report about grievances every month.

Refer to the contract: 

A brief phrase or descripEl Oso Classified News tion of what the grievance is about: “an employee

denied vacation as guaranWelcome newwasmembers ourand contract. ” Please look up theseteed newby folks say hello. ■ Doe A short description of John is a new Paraeducator at the union’s position: Meadows Elementary. He’s a special  “We are and seeking back pay education expert sign translator andimpaired benefits.students. ” for hearing John

says he joined CSEA because he ■ A summary of where the wants to participate in the decisions that affect our grievance is: “we’re waiting new contract.

for a response from the dis-

Jane Doe thethe new Sr. Clerical trict.is If grievance is denied, Assistant at El Oso High School. She we’ll evaluate going to arbitramoved here from San wwDiego, where tion with a neutral third party.” she worked as a secretary in the county office of education. She has worked in public education for the past eight years.

i

For more information KNOW YOUR RIGHTS see Section 3, Grievance

Get your job description Updates, in CSEA Publication

125, Contract Communications: When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, How to keep members “in the the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, know” about the contract. work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do,


Member Benefits

Your union is only a phone call away

March 2016

Page 2 EXECUTIVE OFFICERS

New cars at fleet rates

President: Jane Doe, ext . 4150 Vice President: John Doe, ext . 2131 Secretary: Jane Doe, ext . 4104 Treasurer: John Doe, ext . 3129 CCO: Jane Doe, ext . 4189

Did you know that as a CSEA PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE member you can receive huge discounts on a new car?

El Oso Classified News Newsletter Content

pres@eloso1020.com vp@eloso1020.com sec@eloso1020.com treas@eloso1020.com CCO@eloso1020.com

Health benefits, salary rank Health and benefits Whatwelfare we get high in contract survey JOB STEWARDS

depends onconsistently you ranked To locate the participating auto dealerhave So-called “pocketbook” issues as John CSEA number one priority for Maintenance: Doe members’ jsmaint@eloso1020.com nearest you, call Member Benefits Recently, chapter members CHAPTER COMMITTEES information. They want Ittohas know their fringeCSEA benefits: health insurance, pension plan, etc. been about over two months at (866) ITS-CSEA (487-2732) Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe

chiefjs@csea.com

were given a contract survey Survey Constitution & Bylaws: since our lastofficer contract a complete John Doe, ext candb@eloso1020.com It’sforup to you asand a communications toexpired, get this information to2658 your readers—especially the negotiated to indicate your priorities Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 hands@eloso1020.com and we arebenefits finally negotiating a and up-to-date benefits. Talk to your employer’s representative ask for written materials that you can use to write for the new contract Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 negotiate@eloso1020.com new contract. It is essential to get listing. Nominations: John Doe, ext 2862 similar, nom@eloso1020.com the newsletter articles. If your chapter has an insurance committee or something talk with with thethem. district.Just Here are make sure to regularly include health and welfare benefits in your newsletter. Don’t rely on your employer to through this process as quickly as possible, without results (based on 90 El Oso Classified News is published monthly, the September–June . to CCO get sacrificing this information employees. any of to ourthe needs. Don’t worry, your nego- Please send your ideas, suggestions, or questions surveys returned): Jane Doe, 1025 Bear Creek Road, El Oso, CA 99893, call ext tiating team will fight hard to keep all of the entitle4189, or email CCO@eloso1020.com . S ments, rights or benefits you were granted in the old A Vision benefits   M Sign up to receive our e-newsletter; send your e-mailNot a address to CCO@eloso1020.com. Priority Priority contract. You may, however, receive even better    health P      L for part-timers benefits, more equitable salaries and greater opportu      E Visit our website, http://chapter1020.csea.com Negotiate a fair and 96% 4% nities for job promotions! Members who work fewer equitable salary increase. Show management we support our negotiatthanthat six hours per day may Legislature purchase vision insurance. Maintain ourconsiders current 100% — ing team. Wear a CSEA button, T-shirt or hat, and The pre mium is $15 per level of health benefits.bill participate in all meetings, activities and votes. Our CSEA-sponsored month,and and in it covers you and strength is in our numbers our unity. Increase transfer(LTD) opportunities. 47% your dependents. Long-term disability is not always as53%

Questions to ask your benefits long as you think.promotion Ourrepresentative employer can deduct LTD Increase opportunities. 77%

Sincerely,

Should you need assistance, call Healthcare Insurance Providers, Inc. (HIP) (800) 555-1200. Jane Doe,at President CSEA Chapter 1020 OPINION Dim stairwells pose danger

Every deserves John Doe ofemployee the Health and Safety Committee is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, the quality healthcare lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast

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23%

days retroactively to the first sick day you used ■ What are the most comIncrease amount of additional 46% 54% leading into your leave. mon questions you get from A new bill being considered by the state pay for specialized skills. employees, are the Assembly would change this unfair law.and Thewhat CSEAWorkplace issues Agree sponsored bill, AB 1613 (Smith), allow classified usual would answers that you give Disagree employees to use LTD after they exhaust their sick S them? 40% 60% A Staffing levels at worksites are leave, thus extend ing the length of paid time off due   M adequate for work demands. ■ What are the most common    injury P to an      L or disability. Currently, teachers are the complaints you get 33% from       E employees Workloads have notenjoy this right. 67% only school who employees, and how do you Contact our legislative representatives and let increased in the past year. respond to them? them know that this bill matters to you.

Promotions are handled fairly.

30%

70%

by class Johnroom Doe,signs. VP ■ What are theDmost confusing Assembly District 95 Assembly istrict 74 on the Transfers are handled fairly. 32%and 68% aspects of our benefits, The In stair striping is an Americans with DisabiliJoe Shmoe Jane Shmoe our chapter, not everyone is entitled to employerhow do you explain them to ties Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in My responsibilities 30% 70% paid health coverage. Those who work less than 25 150 Main St. #108 150 Main St. #111 compliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported employees? areCA clearly defined. El Oso, CA 99893 hours a week are forced to pay for their own healthEl Oso, 99893 that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of Ph: 555-1234 ■ Who can Ph:employees 555-5678 contact if care. What some of our colleagues spend on health a two-year plan agreed upon by the district. Discrimination basedshmoe@senate.ca.gov on sex or 54% 46% shmoe@assembly.ca.gov they have questions about their coverage for their families often exceeds what they

race is not a problem at work. benefits? earn working for our district. Workplace is ■ adequate. 48%to 52% As classified school employees, we must look When is our “window” El Oso Chapter 1020 out for one another. That is the reason why we must switch insurance plans? push for affordable healthcare coverage for all Cali■ Are there any changes in fornians. That way, our colleagues will be able to use If you have questions about ourthat current coverage or procedures their wages for food, rent and other necessities instead negotiations, don't hesitate to call employees should be aware of? of having to spend all of their hard-earned money on Chapter President Jane Doe at ext. 4150. nothing but health insurance. 25

El Oso Chapter 1020


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and

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ee is the ast

ilit in orted of

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS President: Jane Doe, ext . 4150 Vice President: John Doe, ext . 2131 Secretary: Jane Doe, ext . 4104 Treasurer: John Doe, ext . 3129 CCO: Jane Doe, ext . 4189

pres@eloso1020.com vp@eloso1020.com sec@eloso1020.com treas@eloso1020.com CCO@eloso1020.com

Adding a local touch to state news JOB STEWARDS

Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe Maintenance: John Doe

chiefjs@csea.com jsmaint@eloso1020.com

csea.com/commtools is a great resource for statewide news stories CHAPTER COMMITTEES thatCSEA you can include in your newsletter. Constitution & Bylaws:

John Doe, ext 2658 candb@eloso1020.com Whenever possible, you should try to add a local perspective to the stories you find online. For example, Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 if the story is about California elections,hands@eloso1020.com add a couple of paragraphs about what members in your chapter Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 negotiate@eloso1020.com are doing during the campaign. Are they phone banking? Nominations: John Doe, ext 2862 nom@eloso1020.com Registering voters? What’s going on at the local level? Is your chapter supporting a localNews school board candidate the ballot? Adding El Oso Classified is published monthly, on September–June . Please send your questions to CCO this information will ideas, really suggestions, enhance theororiginal story.

Jane Doe, 1025 Bear Creek Road, El Oso, CA 99893, call ext

or email CCO@eloso1020.com . At a 4189, minimum, you can add contact information. If the Comm Tools article says to contact a chapter leader, you should add the Sign up to receive our e-newsletter; send your e-mail appropriate name and phone number to the article. In the addressleader’s to CCO@eloso1020.com. sample below, the local reporter gives the name and address of their Visit our website, http://chapter1020.csea.com local legislators.

Legislature considers CSEA-sponsored bill

S A   M     P      L       E

Long-term disability (LTD) is not always as long as you think. Our employer can deduct LTD days retroactively to the first sick day you used leading into your leave. A new bill being considered by the state Assembly would change this unfair law. The CSEA-sponsored bill, AB 1613 (Smith), would allow classified employees to use LTD after they exhaust their sick leave, thus extending the length of paid time off due to an injury or disability. Currently, teachers are the only school employees who enjoy this right. Contact our legislative representatives and let them know that this bill matters to you. Assembly District 95 Joe Shmoe

Assembly District 74 Jane Shmoe

150 Main St. #108 El Oso, CA 99893 Ph: 555-1234 shmoe@assembly.ca.gov

150 Main St. #111 El Oso, CA 99893 Ph: 555-5678 shmoe@senate.ca.gov

26 1020 Oso Chapter

Contact information

This CCO added information on how readers can contact their legislators.


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Newsletter Content

Get your job description

Customize your calendar

When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, You will find a calendar of events in csea.com/commtools. work location, work hours and However, this is only a calendar of statewide events. You should try to work week. If any supervilocalize your newsletter’s calendar to include important dates for your sor wants to change your job CSEA chapter school district. description, or and if you find any discrepancies between the The calendar doesn’t have to be long. In fact, you can use it as a space description of page—making your job and it as long or short as needed. filler on your what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

March Calendar 6

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

9

Staff Development Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

14

DEADLINE: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details .)

15

CSEA Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

El Oso Chapter 1020

S A   M     P      L       E

March calendar

S A   M     P      L       E

National Nutrition Month

6

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p.m.

9

Staff Development Committee meeting El Oso Middle School, Room 189, 6 p.m.

13 Chapter Executive Board meeting, El Oso High School upstairs lounge, 5 p.m. 14 Deadline: Member of the Year Nominations 15 CSEA Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

Calendar fills space Using csea.com/commtools and your district’s calendar, you can make it longer or shorter to fill space. If you shorten it, just be sure to keep the most important items.

17 St. Patrick’s Day 22 Union Steward Training, El Oso High School, 8:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. 24 Health and Safety Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 189, 5 p.m. 30 Easter Sunday 31 Cesar Chavez Day, all CSEA offices closed

27


Announce chapter meetings How do you get more people to attend chapter meetings? You advertise them. Promote upcoming general membership meetings in your news­letter. Include all the important information: when, where, what time—but also try to highlight what will be discussed. The standard agenda for most chapter meetings (roll call, approval of minutes, good of the order, etc.) Is pretty dull on the surface, because it focuses on the meeting procedures instead of the issues that motivate members. So, rather than just publishing the entire agenda of your next chapter meeting, consider publicizing the main issues to be discussed.

Classified News

March 2014

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El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting Wednesday, March 6 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18 On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

Bus driver saves child’s life On Feb. 16, Advertise meetings ona boy began choking CSEA bulletin after boards he exited the bus on his ride home. In addition to advertising chapter Bus driver John Doe meetings in your newsletter, you immediately jumped should also promote them in flyers out of the bus and on your CSEA bulletin boards. performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Inside this issue 28Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1

President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2

Publicize issues to be discussed ■

Highlight what new business will be discussed and what important old business still needs to be addressed.

Issues motivate mem­bers, and people will be more likely to attend a meeting if they know what specific topics are going to be talked about.

Get the CSEA Bulletin Board Kit

If you don’t have the CSEA Bulletin Board Kit, your walls and your members are missing something. The kit has everything you need to help you draw attention to that chapter meeting flyer and other important information. The kit contains a CSEA poster, decorative headers and borders, “new info” arrows, a CSEA pocket folder, ready-to-use flyers and a chapter contact sheet. Contact your local field office and ask for the CSEA Bulletin Board Kit, or send an email to warehouse@csea.com.


March 2014

Page 4

Member Benefits Newsletter Content

EXEC

Get chapter news in minutes

New cars at fleet rates

Presiden Vice Pre Secretar Treasure CCO: Ja

Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive huge Most newsletters publish the minutes of chapter meetings. discounts on a new car?

JOB

The minutes are sometimes informative, but they are rarely To locate the participating auto dealer interesting to read. However, as CCOs, you can develop nearest you, call Member Benefits great news stories from these minutes.

Chief Jo Mainten

at (866) ITS-CSEA (487-2732) From contract updates to special chapter events, the minutes are a for a complete and great source for news ideas. Follow up on one or two subjects that up-to-date were discussed in the meeting with more information and/or interlisting. views. Write a headline, a lede, quote a few sources (chapter leaders) and presto—you have a chapter news story! Don’t give up on reporting chapNewspapers, by comparison, get a lot of their local stories from city ter news because you think there council meetings, which are not very exciting events. How­ever, each isn’t any. There’s always news. It meeting contains a few hot items that make for interesting news. The might not be the most exciting same holds true for chapter meetings. Writing about certain items will news, but it still could be internot only provide your readers with more interesting news, but it might esting to some people, and it lets also provoke interest in attending chapter meetings. Several city counMembers who work fewer members know their union is cils have seen their chambers packed with concerned citizens after the than six hours per day may working for them. Take this “Dim local press ran a story about a hot item on the next agenda. You can purchase vision insurance. stairwells” story for example. It’s still run the minutes as you always do, but your readers will appreciate The premium is $15 per not thrilling, but it is news. seeing some items also appear as news.

No news is bad news.

Vision benefits for part-timers

month, and it covers you and your dependents.

Turn this CSEA Chapter 1020 Meeting Minutes Health and Safety Committee The Health and Safety Committee had two members present at the meeting, John Doe and Jane Doe. John Doe thanked President Jane Doe and the executive board for holding the meeting at a time that he could attend. He reported that the committee has met once since the last chapter meeting and they discussed the issue of poor lighting in the stairwells. Doe said there is a lack of striping on the stairs and a lack of contrast on the classroom signs. Doe said the striping is a legal requirement and that the district is not in compliance. Doe said the district has a two year plan that includes embedding lights into the stairs.

You

Should you need assistance, call Healthcare Insurance Providers, Inc. (HIP) into this at (800) 555-1200.

Dim stairwells pose danger

S A   M     P      L       E

John Doe of the Health and Safety Committee is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, the lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast on the classroom signs. The stair striping is an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in compliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of a two-year plan agreed upon by the district.

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El Oso Chapter 102 29


Leadership messages Many chapter newsletters include a message from the leadership. It is often referred to as the president’s message.

What is the goal of the message?

Do

Take a position, state an opinion and explain why the chapter leadership is taking a particular action or ask for members’ support.

Don’t

Use this column to report regular news. That’s what the rest of the newsletter is for.

The president’s message sets the tone for current chapter events, such as contract negotiations, grievance settlements, political action and other events as well as the tone for the newsletter itself. Inspiration is not always easy to achieve, but a good president’s message should be both informative and motivational. The president’s message should NOT appear on the front page. Put your most interesting or pressing news items on the front page. By placing the president's message on page 2 or 3, you encourage your members to open and explore the newsletter.

The news article which discusses the process and imparts the information goes on the front page.

The president’s column, which is written to build unity among employees and motivate them to support the negotiating team, goes inside. March 2016

El Oso Classified News March 2016

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed. We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

It has been over two months since our last contract expired, and we are finally negotiating a new contract. It is essential to get

Next chapter meeting

On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

Bus driver saves child’s life On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exited the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped out of the bus and performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Inside this issue Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

What we get depends on you

El Oso Chapter 1020

Wednesday, March 2 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18

Page 2

PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

through this process as quickly as possible, without sacrificing any of our needs. Don’t worry, your negotiating team will fight hard to keep all of the entitlements, rights or benefits you were granted in the old contract. You may, however, receive even better health benefits, more equitable salaries and greater opportunities for job promotions! Show management that we support our negotiating team. Wear a CSEA button, T-shirt or hat, and participate in all meetings, activities and votes. Our strength is in our numbers and in our unity. Sincerely,

El Oso Classified News

Health benefits, salary rank high in contract survey Survey

Not a Priority

Priority

Negotiate a fair and equitable salary increase.

96%

4%

Maintain our current level of health benefits.

100%

Increase transfer opportunities.

53%

47%

Increase promotion opportunities. 77%

23%

Increase amount of additional pay for specialized skills.

46%

54%

Workplace issues

Agree

Disagree

OPINION

Staffing levels at worksites are adequate for work demands.

40%

60%

Every employee deserves quality healthcare

Workloads have not increased in the past year.

33%

67%

Promotions are handled fairly.

30%

70%

Transfers are handled fairly.

32%

68%

My responsibilities are clearly defined.

30%

70%

Discrimination based on sex or race is not a problem at work.

54%

46%

Workplace is adequate.

48%

52%

Jane Doe, President CSEA Chapter 1020

by John Doe, VP In our chapter, not everyone is entitled to employerpaid health coverage. Those who work less than 25 hours a week are forced to pay for their own healthcare. What some of our colleagues spend on health coverage for their families often exceeds what they earn working for our district. As classified school employees, we must look out for one another. That is the reason why we must push for affordable healthcare coverage for all Californians. That way, our colleagues will be able to use their wages for food, rent and other necessities instead of having to spend all of their hard-earned money on nothing but health insurance.

If you have questions about our current negotiations, don't hesitate to call Chapter President Jane Doe at ext. 4150.

Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Chapter 1020

El Oso Chapter 1020

See page 1 of sample newsletter. 30

Recently, chapter members were given a contract survey to indicate your priorities for the new contract with the district. Here are the results (based on 90 surveys returned):

See page 2 of sample newsletter.


Newsletter Content

Write a headline for the president’s message Identify the first major topic discussed in the message and then choose an active phrase that best sums up the president’s point. If you want to identify the column as the president’s message, do so in a smaller label, or “kicker” headline. Don’t do it in the main headline.

Make it look like news

Do

New contract signed Don’t

Do

If the president’s message is the most pressing news item, make it look like news. Use a kicker headline to say president’s message. Then, give it a bold, active headline.

Most chapter presidents have a lot to say, but they don’t always know how to say it. You might consider doing an interview with the president where they can answer questions and share information in a more relaxed atmosphere. Besides, there’s no “CSEA rule” that says you have to run a president’s message. If there’s nothing to say one month, consider asking the president to have another officer do the column.

Message from the President

President’s Message Why we’re urging a “yes” vote on the contract

Don’t

Make sure it has substance

President’s Message

Do

Message from the President

Message from 1st Vice President Why we need your help

Don’t

President’s Message Well, not much has happened yet in negotiations…

When practical, use a photo Since the chapter president is often the “face” of the chapter, it’s helpful if your printer can do quality photo reproduction to run a photo of your chapter president with his/her column.

31


Chapter elections You should promote chapter elections in your newsletter, but be careful not to promote one candidate over another. If you run election ads, make sure that all candidates are given an equal opportunity to advertise and make all ads the same standard size. After the elections, you can help members get to know their new leaders by writing short bios or personal profiles on them. It’s easy to do, and your readers will appreciate and enjoy the information.

Re-elect Jane Doe as your chapter vice president

S A   M     P      L       E

Basic guidelines to follow when writing a profile ■

First, let the officer you are profiling know that the article is an opportunity for them to introduce themselves to other members.

If you don’t have time to interview them, have the officers fill out a questionnaire. Then call them back if you have any additional questions.

Always be friendly and conversational—this is not a police investigation. Your subject will be more forthcoming when you are polite and respectful.

•  Classified employee for 21 years •  Current chapter vice president •  Former: chapter secretary, conference delegate, staff development committee member

Vote John Doe for chapter vice president I will: •  Listen to your needs •  Advocate on your behalf •  Protect your rights Experience: •  Negotiating team •  Union Steward •  Site representative

32

S A   M     P      L       E

Standardize ads Make ads for chapter officers the same size and give all candidates an equal opportunity to advertise.


Newsletter Content

Officer Questionnaire Professional Name:_____________________________________________________________________________ Official CSEA title:__________________________________________________________________ Job classification or title: _____________________________________________________________ Work location:_______________________________________________________________________ How long have you worked for this employer?_____________________________________________ What other jobs have you had here (if any)?_______________________________________________ CSEA member since:_________________________________________________________________ Positions held:_______________________________________________________________________ Committees:________________________________________________________________________ Contact phone number( ):______________________________________________________________

Personal (optional) Family:____________________________________________________________________________ Interests/hobbies:____________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ Other organizations you’re involved with:_________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________________________

Other Questions Please use the back of this questionnaire or attach additional pages. What are your goals as a chapter officer?—Be specific. How did you first get involved with CSEA? Why did you run for office? Is there anything else CSEA members might be interested in knowing about you?

33


List your chapter’s executive board Every newsletter should contain a “masthead” (editor’s box). Basically, it tells the reader about the publication and how to reach the people who produce it. You can also use this space to list the names and numbers of your chapter’s executive board and Union Stewards, as well as the names and locations of every site representative. This provides a fast and easy reference for members to get in touch with their leaders. In your masthead, don’t forget to mention when and how often your newsletter is published, by whom and how to contact the editor. Page 4

El Oso Classified News

Your union is only a phone call away EXECUTIVE OFFICERS President: Jane Doe, ext . 4150 Vice President: John Doe, ext . 2131 Secretary: Jane Doe, ext . 4104 Treasurer: John Doe, ext . 3129 CCO: Jane Doe, ext . 4189

pres@eloso1020.com vp@eloso1020.com sec@eloso1020.com treas@eloso1020.com CCO@eloso1020.com

S A   M     P      L       E

Final approvals ensure accuracy When you write about technical matters and use someone as an expert source (i.e., you base a negotiations update on information provided by your chapter’s negotiations chairperson), you probably want to get final approval on your article from the source. By attaching a form with a response deadline clearly marked on the front, you can also increase your chances of getting a timely response. You can use the form on the next page.

JOB STEWARDS Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe Maintenance: John Doe

chiefjs@csea.com jsmaint@eloso1020.com

CSEA CHAPTER COMMITTEES Constitution & Bylaws: John Doe, ext 2658 Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 Nominations: John Doe, ext 2862

candb@eloso1020.com hands@eloso1020.com negotiate@eloso1020.com nom@eloso1020.com

El Oso Classified News is published monthly, September–June . Please send your ideas, suggestions, or questions to CCO Jane Doe, 1025 Bear Creek Road, El Oso, CA 99893, call ext 4189, or email CCO@eloso1020.com . Sign up to receive our e-newsletter; send your e-mail address to CCO@eloso1020.com.

Visit our website, http://chapter1020.csea.com

Legislature considers CSEA-sponsored bill 34

Long-term disability (LTD) is not always as long as you think. Our employer can deduct LTD days retroactively to the first sick day you used

Give contact information in articles

In addition to listing chapter officers’ names and phone numbers together, you should provide this information where­ver it’s relevant in your articles. For example, give your bargaining team chairperson’s name in a story about contract negotiations.


Newsletter Content

Chapter Newsletter Approval Request To:_______________________________________________________________ From:____________________________ Phone:___________________________ Response Deadline: Month__________ Day________________ Year_________ The attached material, based on information for which you were a primary source, is scheduled for immediate publication in our chapter newsletter. The material will be published as is, unless I hear from you by the deadline. Please contact me as soon as possible to let me know if there is any incorrect information in the material or if the information is okay to print. It is being submitted to you for approval of the facts (proper dates, correct spelling of names and/or places, statement of fact, figures and dollar amounts, etc.). If you have any other concerns about the information contained in this copy, contact me as soon as possible and please be specific. Many thanks for your cooperation and prompt response! Notes or Comments ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________

35


CSEA discounts and Member Benefits ads In the CSEA Member Benefits Guide, Focus Magazine and on csea.com, you will find Member Benefits ads that you can run in your newsletter. These are generally ticket discounts that CSEA gets by purchasing in bulk quantities. The savings are immediately passed on to members, allowing them to get a return on their dues dollar.

Make your own local Member Benefits ads Just go to www.csea.com/discounts and look for discounts in your area that might interest your readers. You can use all the information provided or just some of it. However, if you edit it, make sure to include the price and where tickets can be purchased. Some discounts just require a CSEA membership card, so mention that, too. Some ticket prices are subject to change. If you’re not sure about the price, call Member Benefits at (866) ITS-CSEA (487-2732). March 2014

Page 4

Member Benefits

Ads make great space fillers You can use Member Benefits ads separately throughout your newsletter to fill empty holes.

36

New cars at fleet rates Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive huge discounts on a new car? To locate the participating auto dealer nearest you, call Member Benefits at (866) ITS-CSEA (487-2732) for a complete and up-to-date listing.

Vision benefits for part-timers Members who work fewer than six hours per day may

E

S Your union is only a A   M     P      L       E EXECUTIVE OFFICER

President: Jane Doe, ext . 4150 Vice President: John Doe, ext . 2131 Secretary: Jane Doe, ext . 4104 Treasurer: John Doe, ext . 3129 CCO: Jane Doe, ext . 4189

JOB STEWARDS Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe Maintenance: John Doe

CSEA CHAPTER COMMITT

Constitution & Bylaws: John Doe, ext 2658 Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 Nominations: John Doe, ext 2862

El Oso Classified News is publish Please send your ideas, suggestio Jane Doe, 1025 Bear Creek Road 4189, or email CCO@eloso1020.c

Sign up to receive our e-newsle address to CCO@eloso1020.com

Visit our website, http://ch


Section 3

Writing and Reporting Before you can deliver the news, you first have to go out and get it. Then, you have to write it down in a cohesive and understandable form. This section addresses everything you need to know from interviewing people to writing and editing your articles.

Contents Use your resources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 39 Writing a news article . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 40 Editorials in your newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 42 Writing a lede. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 44 Tight writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 45 Writing headlines. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 47 Stay active when you write. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 48 Interviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 49 What questions should I ask. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 50 Quotes and attribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 51 Facts and opinions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 52 Neutral language: race, religion and gender . . . . . . . . page 53 Good editing = good writing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 54 Proofreading vs. editing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 55 e-Newsletters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 56 Two-way communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 58


38


Writing and Reporting

Use your resources Before you start writing your newsletter, make sure you have the right tools. Good resources give you material for articles and references to help you write them. Here’s a list of the basics:

The contract Always keep a copy of your chapter’s collective bargaining agreement. Use it for article ideas, fact checking and to cite specific contract language.

Contract Communications (CSEA Publication 125) This book tells you everything you need to know about negotiations updates, contract education, grievance updates and legal rights.

Comm Tools This CSEA online publication provides you with ready-to-use articles, and artwork, and can be found at www.csea.com/commtools

Minutes of chapter meetings Review the minutes of recent chapter meetings to find article ideas, news, upcoming events and announcements.

Insurance/benefits material Collect all the information you can on your chapter’s health and welfare benefits (brochures, flyers, etc.). Use it for articles and information pieces in your newsletter.

CSEA information and literature CSEA has dozens of informational brochures, training publications and flyers, available through your field office. The CSEA website posts the most recent bulletins, news and information for you to use. Also, check with your chapter president for new information.

Reference tools Always have basic reference items within arm’s reach. These can include: a dictionary, thesaurus, grammar book, style guide, chapter or workplace directory, computer manual, calendar and anything else you use regularly.

39


Writing a news article The key to writing an effective news article is organizing your infor­mation so it’s highly accessible to the reader. This usually means disregarding many of the rules you were taught in English class. Sentences should be short and to the point. Paragraphs should be less than five sentences long, and they don’t need a topic sentence. Every sentence should contain new information and add to the overall story. Also, news stories don’t need a summary or conclusion at the end. The story can end abruptly after all necessary points have been made. However, your story will have more punch if it ends on a strong quote or fact.

Using the inverted pyramid model You can organize your information by using the “inverted pyramid” model. Newspapers have used this style of writing for decades, and your readers will be accustomed to reading news presented in this form. In the inverted pyramid, your first paragraph is a lead. Its main function is to grab the readers’ attention. The second paragraph summarizes the story in just a few sentences. Subsequent paragraphs contain facts and quotations that tell the story. In these paragraphs, organize your information so you make your most important points first and give the less pressing details toward the end of the story. It doesn’t have to be written in chronological order, just in order of importance. By putting your most important paragraphs at the top of the story, you’ll make your life as an editor a lot easier, too. If you need to shorten a story to make it fit on the page, you can just cut from the bottom. That way you won’t lose any of the important news on top.

40

Five “W”s and “H” Your news articles should always try to answer the five “W”s and the “H.”   ■ Who?

■ Where?

  ■ What?

■ Why?

  ■ When?

■ How?


Writing and Reporting

El Oso superintendent fired The inverted pyramid First Paragraph (Lede: gets reader’s attention) Second Paragraph (Summarizes story in a few sentences) Third Paragraph (Most important point) Fourth paragraph (Important point) Fifth Paragraph (less important point) Sixth Paragraph (least important point) Last Paragraph (Quote, fact or contact info)

Call to Action

The El Oso School Board has a big job ahead; it has to find a replacement for the superintendent it fired on Tuesday night. John Doe watched his 4-year term as chief of the El Oso School District come to an end Tuesday. Board members voted 5-4 to fire him, saying bad business decisions outweighed his achievements. In job evaluations turned in by his bosses, some board members expressed frustration in his leadership of El Oso’s public schools. That frustration carried the meeting, with a majority of the board voting to change directions. “I just did what I had to do,” board member Jane Smith said after the vote. “I'm hoping that we can go forward with getting the right person to run this district in the way it should run.” Doe’s tenure will end next month, one year before his contract expires. He will continue to collect his $210,000 salary through the end of the fiscal year. The school board will decide next Tuesday whether they will find a temporary schools chief or whether the district will go without a superintendent until a replacement is hired.

Whenever possible include a “call to action” in your article. Tell members what they can do to get involved or make a difference.

41


Editorials in your newsletter

An editorial is an article that expresses the views or opinion of the chapter’s membership or e-board. Editorials can be very powerful tools and should be informative, motivational or a call for action. Editorials should not be the point of view of a single person in the chapter, rather, they should provide an opinion that is shared by chapter leaders or the majority of the membership. Editorial article should also be used in a way that benefits the chapter. For example, an editorial can be used to persuade the chapter membership to vote for an elected official that is a friend to classified employees. It could also be used to reveal any unfair practices or unfair treatment of certain employees. Although editorials are opinions and view points, they should be written based on facts, not rumors. It is also important to remember libel laws when writing an editorial. Editorials should not be used to bash or defame. Like everything else in a chapter newsletter, they should be used to inform and to motivate and not to damage the character of any individual or group of individuals. As a rule of thumb, editorials should not be on the front page. They should be boxed or separated by another visual element. They should also be clearly marked “editorial” or “opinion” so that the reader does not confuse it with a standard news article. The writer of the editorial can be the communications officer, chapter president, member of the e-board or any rank-and-file chapter member. However, always keep in mind that the e-board should have knowledge of the topic that the editorial addresses and that the editorial should be for the benefit of the entire chapter membership.

42


tiating team will fight hard to keep all of the entitlements, rights or benefits you were granted in the old contract. You may, however, receive even better health benefits, more equitable salaries and greater opportunities for job promotions! Show management that we support our negotiating team. Wear a CSEA button, T-shirt or hat, and participate in all meetings, activities and votes. Our strength is in our numbers and in our unity.

Negotiate a fair and Writing and Reporting

equitable salary increase. Maintain our current level of health benefits.

Increase transfer opportunitie

Increase promotion opportun

Sincerely,

Increase amount of additiona pay for specialized skills. Jane Doe, President CSEA Chapter 1020 Clearly marked as an “opinion”

Author is identified

Workplace issues

OPINION

Every employee deserves quality healthcare by John Doe, VP In our chapter, not everyone is entitled to employerpaid health coverage. Those who work less than 25 hours a week are forced to pay for their own healthcare. What some of our colleagues spend on health coverage for their families often exceeds what they earn working for our district. As classified school employees, we must look out for one another. That is the reason why we must push for affordable healthcare coverage for all Californians. That way, our colleagues will be able to use their wages for food, rent and other necessities instead of having to spend all of their hard-earned money on nothing but health insurance.

S A Staffing levels at worksites are   M     Padequate for work demands.      L       E

Workloads have not increased in the past year.

Promotions are handled fairly Transfers are handled fairly. Informative/ factual My responsibilities are clearly defined.

Discrimination based on sex o race is not a problem at work. Call for action Workplace is adequate.

how it If youTells have questions would benefitdon't h negotiations, members Chapter President Jan

El Oso Chapter 1020

43


Writing a lede The “lede” (pronounced leed) is the first paragraph or two of your article and if it’s boring, you’ll lose the reader before they get to the good part. Think of your reader as a fish and your lede as a hook. If the hook is too big, the fish will be afraid to bite on your story. A good lede is usually no longer than 25 words. Anything longer than that, and you run the risk of losing the reader. Don’t worry about getting all the information into the lede. That should be saved for the second or third paragraph. The lede should set up the story. Once you’ve hooked the reader, reel them into the story with facts.

Getting the lead out of your ledes

Here’s some types of ledes that can add some variety to your newsletter:

Straight news lede XYZ Chapter 123 honored four members last month for their outstanding work on behalf of the district and the chapter.

Question lede How would you like to be fired? Tossed out after 17 years of service?

Quotation lede “I’ll never forget what this union has done for me and my family,” said Jane Jones as she was handed a relief check for $1,400.

Contrast lede Most CSEA members have a lot to be happy about. Paychecks are improving. We’re win­ning grievances. But things haven’t been all that fine for John Doe.

Teaser lede It was a day like any other day for John Doe, until the district’s maintenance supervisor called him into his office.

One-two lede The grievance procedure provides CSEA members with protection from unfair and unjust decisions by management. Ask Union Steward Jane Jones how it works.

44

Ledes are flexible You can use any one of these variations for practically any article. So next time you’re strapped for an idea of how to begin an article, check this list.


Writing and Reporting

Tight writing As writers and reporters, it is our job to be thorough and detailed; as editors, it is our duty to make that writing as “tight” as possible. This sometimes means taking a knife to our own masterpieces. As editors, we have an obligation to our readers to make the writing as easy to read as possible. This may be a cynical observation, but most readers look at a newsletter only as long as it takes them to walk to the trash can. For that reason, it is important to keep your newsletter concise. After all, what’s the point of writing something that people don’t read? Sure, there are loyal readers out there, but it is important to reach as many people as possible. That means editing with indifference and writing “tight.”

How to write “tight”

Simple vocabulary Short, simple, common words are the best. Avoid jargon and acronyms whenever possible. Explain difficult or technical terms whenever you need to use them (remember the new members who aren’t yet familiar with CSEA terms). Use adjectives and adverbs only when they are essential.

Do

Simplify and explain terms

Our chapter president and labor relations representative (LRR) filed a grievance to resolve disputes over our retirement benefits. Don’t

✔ Acronyms confuse readers

Use confusing and unnecessary jargon

Our CP and LRR went to PERB to valiantly fight for our right to negotiate our desired PERS benefits via the EERA.

Acronyms like CCO, LRR, etc. are confusing to most rankand-file members. Always spell them out the first time you use them in a story and put the acronym in parenthesis. Example: Labor Relations Representative (LRR). After you’ve spelled it out once, you can use the acronym on its own in subsequent sentences. 45


Do

❷ “Spoken” English

You were probably taught in English class to use formal language when writing. In journalism, however, the rules are different. You should try to write in a similar tone to that in which you speak. The best way to test your writing for awkward formal usage is to read it out loud. If it doesn’t sound like “spoken” English, fix it. This is particularly true of compound verbs, where contractions are used to make sentences read smoother.

Use contractions as in everyday speech The meeting wasn’t adjourned until after 7 p.m.

Don’t

Use formal compound verbs The meeting was not adjourned until after 7 p.m.

❸ Keep paragraphs and sentences short

Most paragraphs should be one or two sentences long. Quotations that form a complete sentence usually get a paragraph of their own. Sentences should average about 16 words. Make sure that leads are short and uncom­plicated. Cut out words that don’t add meaning and are redundant. Avoid the passive voice, which by its nature is wordy.

Do

Over the past few months, CSEA repre­sentatives have regularly visited our worksites to solicit contract ideas.

Quotes get their own paragraph

Don’t

Every time that you start a new quotation, begin a new paragraph. This will help draw attention to what’s being said and will help you keep your paragraphs short. Also, don’t let quotes directly follow each other, instead, break them up with a transitional paragraph.

46

Write short, simple sentences

Write long, wordy sentences In an ongoing effort to help the bargaining team, representatives from CSEA have been making regular visits over the past few months to our various worksites, where they have asked members to contribute their ideas for what they want in the next contract.


Writing and Reporting

Writing headlines What does it take to get your attention? Headlines should grab your attention and make you want to read the story. Unfortunately, too many good stories are ignored because the headline is neither bold nor compelling. One of the most common mistakes made by newsletter editors is the use of static headlines that have no verb action. The big offender is the label headline, such as: “President’s Message,” or “Com­mittee Report.” By themselves, these labels are boring, non-descrip­tive and bound to lose readers. But they’re easy to fix. Just add a brief thought that describes the action in the story, and the headline becomes more March 2014 Page 2 interesting. PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE

Sample Newsletter

What we get New cars at fleet rates depends on you

S A   M     P      L       E

Did you know that as a CSEA member youIt has been over two months can receive huge dis­ since our last contract expired, counts on a new car? and we are finally negotiating a To locate the partici­ new contract. It is essential to get pating autolabel dealer nearest Notice that the portion of the president’s message is through this process as quickly possible, without you, call Member Benefits at as significantly smaller than the active headline—it’s called (866) ITS­CSEA (487­2732) for a sacrificing any of our needs. Don’t worry, your negoa kicker head. It puts the emphasis on the action, because complete and up­to­date listing. tiating willpeople’s fight hard that’s whatteam catches eyes.to keep all of the entitlements, rights or benefits you were granted in the old S A contract. You may, however, receive even better health  M     P benefits, more equitable salaries and greater opportu-      L       E nities for job promotions! John Doe of the Health Safetyour Committee Show management that weand support negotiat-is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, ing team. Wear a CSEA button, T-shirt or hat, and the lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast on participate in all meetings, activities and votes. Our the classroom signs. strength is in ourstriping numbers an and in our unity. stair Americans withdraws Disabilities A straightThe headline gets the is message across and Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in com­ readers’ attention. Sincerely, pliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of a two­ year plan agreed upon by the district. For more information about placement of headlines Jane CSEA Chapter 1020 seeDoe, page President 68.

Dim stairwells pose danger

i

OPINION

El Oso Chapter 1020

Every employee deserves 1025 Bear Creek Road

Headlines explain what the story’s about

Headlines should sound conversational. Just pretend someone asked you what the story’s about. What would you tell them? Take that sentence, write it down in present tense and omit all superfluous words such as articles (a, Eladverbs. Oso Classified News an, the), adjectives and Then use the most active verb that fits and voila! You should have a pretty good headline.

Health benefits, salary rank What if the story is about several subjects? First, you shouldsurvey high in iscontract Your union only a phonedecide call away

whether or not to break the story ExEcutivE OfficErS up into separate articles. If chapter you Recently, members President: Jane Doe, ext. 4150 pres@eloso1020.com can’t, the headline should relate to were given a contract surve SurJohn vey Vice President: Doe, ext. 2131 vp@eloso1020.com in the firsttotwo para­ Secretary: something Jane Doe, ext. 4104 sec@eloso1020.com indicate your priorities Treasurer: graphs. John Doe, Then, ext. 3129you should consider treas@eloso1020.com for the new contract CPRO: Jane Doe, ext. 4189 cpro@eloso1020.com writing subheads for the additional with the district. Here are JOb StEwardS subjects. Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe Maintenance: John Doe Transportation: John Doe El Oso Middle School: Jane Doe

chiefjs@csea.com the results (based on 90 jsmaint@eloso1020.com surveys returned): jstrans@eloso1020.com

cSEa chaptEr cOmmittEES Constitution & Bylaws: John Doe, ext 2658 Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 NegotiateJohn a fairDoe, and Nominations: ext 2862 Political Action: John Doe, ext 3158 equitable salary increase. Site Reps: John Doe, ext. 2894 Staff Development: John Doe, ext 4104 Maintain our current

jseoms@eloso1020.com

Not a

candb@eloso1020.com Priority Priority hands@eloso1020.com negotiate@eloso1020.com 96% 4% nom@eloso1020.com pac@eloso1020.com siterep@eloso1020.com staffdev@eloso1020.com 100% —

level health benefits. El Osoof Classified News is published monthly, September-June. Please send your ideas, suggestions, or questions to CPRO Increase 53% Jane Doe, transfer 1025 Bearopportunities. Creek Road, El Oso, CA 99893, call47% ext 4189, or email cpro@eloso1020.com. Increase promotion opportunities. 77%

Sign up to receive our e-newsletter; send your e-mail address cpro@eloso1020.com. Increasetoamount of additional 46%

23% 54%

pay for skills. visit ourspecialized web site, http://chapter1020.csea.com Workplace issues

Agree

Disagre

Staffing levels at worksites are adequate for work demands.

40%

60%

Workloads have not increased in the past year.

33%

47

67%

POSTAgE


Stay active when you write Active voice is when the subject does the action in the sentence:

Don’t

Administrative transfers may only be initiated by the district after written reasoning has been provided to the unit member and the unit member consents to the transfer.

Do

The district can not transfer you without a written explanation and your consent. (Contract sec. 17.5).

We got a 10 percent salary increase.

Passive voice is when the subject has the action done to it: A 10 percent salary increase was received by us. Obviously, active voice communicates the message more clearly. Sometimes, however, identifying passive voice is tricky. It’s tempting to use passive voice, because it sounds official. Contract language, legal documents and other “official” documents are often written in passive voice. But remember, if it’s hard for you to read, it will be hard for your readers to read. As reporters, it is our job to interpret wordy language and rewrite it in plain English—using the active voice.

Caution:

!

If you interpret contract language, be careful not to distort the original meaning. You can always ask your union steward or labor relations representative to double check it for you. Also, show a reference to the original source, as shown above (Contract sec. 17.5).

48

Clues to identifying passive voice

The sentence is wordy.

It uses some form of the verb be.

It uses the past participle of the main verb (ending in -ing, -ed, -t or -en).

The word by or for is either used or implied.


Writing and Reporting

Interviews One of the best ways to get information and interesting quotes for a story is to interview people. It gives you a chance to ask the questions that are on the minds of your readers. Inter­views will also help you establish personal contacts with people in your chapter. Don’t be afraid to ask people for interviews—most people will be flattered if you ask them. If you’ve never interviewed someone before, try starting with people you know.

Here are some basic steps to follow when interviewing people:

Before scheduling an interview, try to become as familiar as you can with the topics you plan to discuss. Plan the questions that you will ask ahead of time. You cannot possibly ask everything that is on your mind, so narrow your questions to those that will elicit the most important information for your article.

Be flexible with the people you want to interview. Find a time that’s convenient to talk with them, and let them know what topics you plan on discussing. Busy people don’t want to be faced with a barrage of questions that might consume hours of their time, so try to stay focused.

Begin your interview with the easiest questions, usually factual ones, before moving on to those that might put your subject on the spot.

Pay attention to the answer that your subject is giving to the present question, and show interest in their response. Let your subject answer relevant questions that aren’t on your list. It’s an interview, not an interrogation.

Be sure to get the correct spelling of the person’s name and their job or CSEA title.

Remain courteous and professional at all times.

Use e-mail

You can ask people to respond to your question via e-mail if it is easier. Just make sure to provide a deadline for their response.

49


What questions should I ask? These are the basic types of questions that you should consider asking your subject: ■

Ask background questions that elicit the history of an issue.

Ask the subject to clarify or define terms relating to the issue.

Ask questions that trace the evolution of an issue.

Ask the subject to verify information, both for accuracy and to elicit quotations.

Ask questions that project events into the future.

Ask questions about how rank-and-file members can get involved.

Ask open-ended questions that allow the subject to address anything you might have failed to ask.

Here are sample questions posed to the chair­person of the CSEA negotiating team: ? Question: What did members tell you they wanted most in the new contract?

? Question: Explain how a step increase is different than a cost-of-living adjustment.

? Question: Why do we keep trying to get binding arbitration into our contract?

? Question: What issues have been addressed so far? What is the current status of our negotiations?

? Question: What happens if no agreement is reached between CSEA and the employer?

? Question: What can members do to support the negotiating team?

? Question: Is there anything else you think members should know about our contract negotiations?

i 50

For more questions to ask on specific topics, see the Content section, pp. 13–36.

Question and answer format

Sometimes the person you interview is the most important part of the story, or the responses to your questions are important to hear in their entirety. In this case, a Q&A format might be the best approach. It's important to decide if you’re going to do a Q&A format before you conduct the interview. Q&A questions should be carefully thought-out and written in advance. Unless you’re an expert at shorthand, you should also use a tape recorder to accurately record the responses.


Writing and Reporting

Quotes and attribution Quotations make a story more interesting and convincing The most common and effective way of using information gathered from an interview is to interject interesting quotations into your articles. Quotations should contribute something to the article beyond the facts, such as a point of view or an official position, and they should always be attributed to a source. Quotes should be attributed to a person, not just an organization (i.e., the employer or CSEA).

Paraphrasing Sometimes people make important points, but their words don’t work well in a quotation. This is especially true for people who give one-word responses or rambling answers to your questions. Instead of using their exact words you can summarize what they said and still attribute the comment to them. You just don’t use quotation marks. Below is an example:

Turn this Original quotation:  “Classified employees, such as paraeducators, custodians, bus drivers and school secretaries, who have direct contact with students in their everyday lives, are critical to the success of public education,” Jane Doe said. — This quote is long-winded and excludes some job classifications.

Do

“Our classified staff should really be proud of the important work they do, not just during Classified School Employee Week, but every day,” Principal John Doe said. —This an interesting quotation that expresses a point of view.

Don’t

“Classified School Employee Week is held the third full week in May,” the district said. —This is an undisputed fact that could just as easily be said without a quotation. Also, the quote is not attributed to a person.

into this Paraphrase:  Jane Doe believes that classified employees are critical to the success of public education.

— This sentence expresses the same thought and is still attributed to a source.

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Facts and opinions Opinions make great quotations

After several meetings, our negotiating team still has not reached a tentative agreement with management. Pay issues have been cited as a major sticking point.

Do

However, they should be handled delicately. The chapter newsletter belongs to the chapter, not one individual. As such, it should reflect your chapter’s position on issues and remain factually accurate. If readers think you sound overly biased, you’ll lose credibility with them. What is the difference between a fact and an opinion? A fact is information that you can check and determine to be correct or incorrect. An opinion is simply one’s views regarding an issue. Your articles should contain opinions in addition to facts, but they should be attributed to a chapter source. The easiest way to do this is by quoting or paraphrasing people.

— This is an objective report of the facts. Don’t

—This is an unattributed biased opinion.

Be ethical No matter how you use information obtained in an interview, there are some common guidelines to follow. First, the people you interview should know that what they say is “on the record,” and you will be using that interview for your chapter newsletter. Second, you should be accurate with your quotations, so take good notes or use a tape recorder. Finally, you should use good judgment with the content of your interview. If you feel it contains any false or defamatory information, you should check with your chapter president or CSEA labor relations representative before printing it.

We still don’t have a contract, because management continues to play games with key issues like pay increases.

Do

“We still don’t have a contract, because management continues to play games with key issues like pay increases,” said John Doe, chairperson of the CSEA negotiating team. —This time, the opinion is attributed to a credible source.

Use bylines

If the whole article is a column (such as a union steward’s report or a president’s message), you don’t need to use quotes. Just put a byline on the story that identifies who wrote the opinions, such as “by Jane Doe, Chief Union Steward.”

52


Writing and Reporting

Neutral language: race, religion and gender As a reporter, you should only refer to people’s race, religious affiliation or gender when absolutely necessary. Other than gender-based pronouns (he, she, his, hers) there are very few cases where you would ever need to make these distinctions. The best approach is to use neutral language. Be careful though; there are a lot of subtle prejudices in the English language. In today’s society, many customary words are simply inaccurate. Many traditional words have been changed. For example, “work­man’s compensation” is now called “worker’s compensation” and an “Assem­bly­man” is commonly referred to as an “Assembly member.” However, establishing neutral language is an ongoing process, and you will still come across problematic words. Some of these words are addressed in the CSEA Style Guide, which you can find after the appendices in this book.

Neutral words

Instead of using gender-biased words, try using these neutral replacements: worker

operator

employee

people

member

personnel

representative

folks

technician

staff

Don’t

Problems with pronouns

Every chapter member should read his (or his/her) contract.

One of the trickiest problems you’ll encounter with neutral language is the singular generic pronouns: he, she, his and hers. The best solution is to rewrite these sentences in plural form.

Do

All chapter members should read their contract.

Religious holidays

Do

Every chapter member should read the contract.

Even though the majority of members in your chapter might celebrate Christian holidays, focusing on one religion can exclude members of other faiths. In fact, the CSEA Board of Directors has even written a policy on this issue. Your best bet is to try to avoid religious references altogether and focus on the general cheer of the season. Stick to “season’s greetings” rather than “Merry Christmas.”

Caution: CSEA Policy 307.03

(as pertaining to the editorial policy of CSEA’s membership publication) states that “articles shall not contain any reference to religion unless germane to the article.”

! 53


Good editing = good writing Half of good writing is editing. It’s one thing to fix your mistakes, but true editing requires you to have an objective eye and an open mind. When you edit, make sure the words and sentences are strong and smooth reading. Later, you can proofread it for mechanical errors. During the editing phase, however, you just want to focus on how the article reads. It helps to do this before you layout your copy on the page. This will keep you focused on the content of the article rather than the length.

Read it out loud Try reading your writing out loud (not too loud). If something doesn’t read right, revise it. Stay flexible. Also, check your writing for content and accuracy. If you’re not sure about something, check it out. Don’t try to do everything at once. It helps to mark all of your corrections on a “hard copy” first. Then, go back and make your revisions when you’re done. Use the following checklist for basic guidelines.

Editing checklist Do I need to add any information?

Do I need to rewrite any parts?

q Did I write a lede sentence that hooks the reader?

q Are there ideas or parts that are confusing?

q

q Have I used any weak verbs (be, is, have) that could be replaced with more active ones?

Do I need to add any important details?

q Do I need to include a contact name and phone number?

q Have I spelled-out all acronyms on first use?

q Can I add a regional or state perspective to the story?

q Did I use wordy language where I could have been concise?

Do I need to cut any information?

Do I need to reorganize any parts of my writing?

q Did I include unnecessary details? q Have I repeated myself in the story? q Did I use unnecessary adjectives or adverbs? q Is this information important for my readers?

54

q Did I say the most important information first? q Is the information well ordered and easy to read?


Writing and Reporting

Proofreading vs. editing Proofreading is not the same as editing, but it’s equally important. When readers find technical mistakes in your newsletter, it undermines the credibility of the whole publication. Editing is when you check your stories for major content problems. You should usually do this before you begin laying out the pages of your newsletter, because these changes can significantly change the length of articles. Proofreading is where you analyze each sentence for technical mistakes, such as structure, punctuation, capitalization, spelling and grammar. It’s a good idea to have more than one person proofread your newsletter— especially those stories that you wrote.

Proofreading checklist Capitalization

Grammar

q Did I start all my sentences with a capital letter?

q Did I use singular verbs to modify singular nouns and plural verbs for plural nouns?

q Did I capitalize nouns that name specific people, places and things? q Was I consistent in my capitalization of job titles?

Punctuation q Does each sentence end with a punctuation mark?

q Do my pronouns (him, it) clearly refer to a previously used noun (president, district)? q Did I avoid ending a sentence in a preposition (in, out, on, etc...)? q Do all quotation marks and parentheses open and close?

q Did I use commas in a series? (Larry, Curly, Moe and the superintendent)

Sentence structure

q Did I place commas before connecting words (and, but, or) in compound sentences?

q Are my sentences direct and to the point?

q Did I punctuate quotations correctly?

q Did I write clear and concise sentences? q Did I avoid using the passive voice?

55


e-Newsletters Electronic newsletters are a great way to get chapter news out quickly and economically. e-Newsletters can also add a layer of dynamic interactivity for your readers. Some CCOs ask if they can just e-mail their print newsletter to members. The answer is yes, but that doesn’t make it an e-newsletter. Successful e-newsletters are written and designed differently than conventional print newsletters.

Links offer readers options and depth A good e-newsletter takes advantage of its biggest strength: the ability to link to additional resources. Research has found that most electronic readers are looking for portals of information rather than single-source documents. e-Newsletter editors can steer their readers toward multiple options while maintaining the integrity of their message. For example, you may have an e-newsletter article that deals with the district’s proposal to outsource classified employees. This would be a good place to use multiple links that tell the classified side of the story. Find links on the CSEA website, messages from your chapter leadership and so on. This way you can still shape the pro-classified message and offer your readers multiple links.

Get to the point E-newsletters should be succinct. Your readers are often browsing through your article with one finger on their computer mouse. If you don’t get to the point quickly, they will click away. Follow the inverted pyramid style (see pages 40–41) in e-newsletters but consider just using the “top” of the pyramid. If an issue is complex, consider breaking it up into multiple articles with one main article to access the various detailed elements. Also look for ways to incorporate or list resource links for readers. Most online readers prefer to navigate their way through a story by clicking on the information that interests them the most.

56


Writing and Reporting

Be current Electronic communication is expected to be immediate and current. There is no point in e-mailing members outdated information. Update it, or don’t send it at all. Some e-newsletters are distributed on a regular schedule—every other Monday or something like that. However, you may want to remain a little flexible on your schedule when it comes to information about contract negotiations, campaigns and organizing issues. Don’t send information so late that members can’t act on it. Likewise, don’t send it too early, where members forget about it. You may also want to consider augmenting your e-newsletter with “special alerts” on timely information.

Create Hyperlinks

Highlight a word and select Ctrl+K to create a hyperlink in Microsoft Word (PC).

Be accurate and professional E-newsletters can be forwarded to people far beyond your original distribution list. Make sure your facts are correct and your links function properly. Just like a print newsletter, your work should be professional and accurate. Many people tend to get informal, if not down right sloppy, when it comes to composing e-mail messages. Be sure to proofread your work and follow grammar and style guidelines. Your writing should be free of errors in spelling, punctuation and capitalization.

Make it official Be clear that your e-newsletter is an official communication from your CSEA chapter. Otherwise, readers may not give your work the credibility and respect it deserves. Include e-mail contact information for e-board members (with their permission).

Caution: Don’t spam your mem-

!

bers; encourage them to sign up for your e-newsletter. Also include an unsubscribe e-mail address on every e-newsletter for members who no longer want to receive it.

57


Two-way communication Good newsletters inform their readers. Great newsletters get them involved. Whenever possible, give your readers a contact or reference for more information on how they can get involved. Even if you print a list of chapter officers, Union Stewards, etc., you should also print that information with the news. For example, if you have a story about negotiations, tell your readers how to contact the negotiating team. With a grievance story, identify your chapter’s Union Stewards. It can be as simple as referring to the page in your newsletter where Union Stewards and negotiating team members are listed. You can do the same thing with the statewide news provided in Clipsheet or other publications. If you reprint a story about political action, tell chapter members how they can get involved locally by providing contact information for your chapter or region’s political action coordinator(s).

Collective voice builds solidarity Building solidarity among chapter members is an important function of your newsletter. One way to help you achieve this goal is to approach your articles with a “collective voice.” This writing style works especially well in negotiations updates and articles about chapter activities. To write in collective voice, think of the Declaration of Independence, which begins with the words “We the people.” It’s simply a matter of phrasing words in plural firstperson form. With rare exception, wherever you’re tempted to write “the members…” use the word “we” instead. One exception is when you need to be explicitly clear on who the “we” is. For example, “Members overwhelmingly approved the contract.”

58

This is collective voice:

S A   M     P      L       E

Without our contract, our benefits could be cut…

We ratified our contract proposal…

At our last chapter meeting we discussed…

We need volunteers to phonebank…


Section 4

Layout and Design This section covers the basics of newsletter design. It should help you create better-looking newsletters that are easy to read and fun to design.

Contents Laying out your newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 61 What’s it called?. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 62 Designing your front page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 64 Choosing a column format. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 65 Modular design. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 66 Placement of headlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 68 Types of headlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 69 Body text should be basic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 70 Four ways to break up text. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 72 Designing a flyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 74 How to use images . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 75 Photographs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 76


60


Layout and Design

Laying out your newsletter Simplicity is the key to design. Keeping things simple will take less time to design, it will take you less time to lay out your newsletter, and it will make your articles easier to read. Stick to a basic format: no more than three different typefaces, consistent type sizes, relevant clip art and plenty of white space. The main goal to bear in mind when designing your pages is accessibility. You want to invite readers into your newsletter, and you want them to stay there. If your design is too boring they might not even look at the first page. If it’s too cluttered and busy, they might look at your newsletter, but they won’t read it. Try to find the middle ground, which is a clean-looking design that’s appealing and accessible.

Graphics and design Be careful when using graphic elements such as photographs and clip art. When strategically used, graphic elements make a page visually interesting and easy to read. However, when graphics are placed on a page just to fill space, the results can be confusing to the reader.

61


What’s it called? Anatomy of a newsletter Banner (nameplate, banner)

El Oso Classified News March 2014

Volume 13, Issue 10

Headline (sans serif font)

Pullquote (blurb) Body text (copy) (serif font)

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed. We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting Wednesday, March 6 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18 On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exited the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped out of the bus and performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Chapter 1020

Rule

62

Bullets

Bus driver saves child’s life

Inside this issue

Clip art/ photo (graphics)

Volume/ issue number

White space

Box


Layout and Design

Kicker headline

Alley

March 2016

Byline

El Oso Classified News

Page 3

STEWARD’S REPORT

Welcome new members

Additional work must be offered to senior workers

Please look up these new folks and say hello. John Doe is a new Paraeducator at Meadows Elementary. He’s a special education expert and sign translator for hearing impaired students. John says he joined CSEA because he wants to participate in the decisions that affect our new contract.

by Jane Doe, Chief Job Steward

District management decided to assign two extra work hours to a new six-hour custodian. In doing so, the district disregarded our contract, which requires additional hours to be offered to the most senior employees first. We convinced the district to increase the hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight hours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too will be able to work eight hours per day.

Jane Doe is the new Sr. Clerical Assistant at El Oso High School. She moved here from San wwDiego, where she worked as a secretary in the county office of education. She has worked in public education for the past eight years.

Employees get promotions CSEA helped two EOHS employees who complained of being passed over for promotions that they felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to the employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has already been offered a second promotion. If you see something at your job site that doesn’t look right, it might be a violation of our contract. Know your rights and read your contract. You are the eyes and ears of the union. I can be reached at chiefjs@eloso.com or call ext. 5534. OUR CONTRACT

Report absences ahead of time

Subhead (sans serif font)

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Get your job description When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

Recently, there has been some confusion about reporting absences to your worksite. Section 15.2.1 of our contract deals with notification of absences. If you don’t follow the procedure in the contract, you run the risk of disciplinary action or even termination.

March Calendar

The contract basically says this: 1. If you are going to be absent, you are required to notify your worksite prior to the beginning of the work day. 2. To return to work, you must notify your site prior to the end of the work day before returning to service. The bottom line: If you can’t come to work, notify your site ahead of time!

2

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

9

Staff Development Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

14

DEADLINE: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details .)

15

CSEA Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

El Oso Chapter 1020

March 2014

Page 4

FolioBenefits Member

New cars at fleet rates List of chapter Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive officers huge discounts on a new car? To locate the participating auto dealer nearest you, call Member Benefits at (866) ITS-CSEA (487-2732) for a complete and up-to-date listing.

Masthead Vision benefits for part-timers Members who work fewer than six hours per day may purchase vision insurance. The premium is $15 per month, and it covers you and your dependents.

Should you need assistance, call

El Oso Classified News

Your union is only a phone call away EXECUTIVE OFFICERS President: Jane Doe, ext . 4150 Vice President: John Doe, ext . 2131 Secretary: Jane Doe, ext . 4104 Treasurer: John Doe, ext . 3129 CCO: Jane Doe, ext . 4189

pres@eloso1020.com vp@eloso1020.com sec@eloso1020.com treas@eloso1020.com CCO@eloso1020.com

JOB STEWARDS Chief Job Steward: Jane Doe Maintenance: John Doe

chiefjs@csea.com jsmaint@eloso1020.com

CSEA CHAPTER COMMITTEES Constitution & Bylaws: John Doe, ext 2658 Health & Safety: John Doe, ext 4240 Negotiations: John Doe, ext 4195 Nominations: John Doe, ext 2862

candb@eloso1020.com hands@eloso1020.com negotiate@eloso1020.com nom@eloso1020.com

El Oso Classified News is published monthly, September–June . Please send your ideas, suggestions, or questions to CCO Jane Doe, 1025 Bear Creek Road, El Oso, CA 99893, call ext 4189, or email CCO@eloso1020.com . Sign up to receive our e-newsletter; send your e-mail address to CCO@eloso1020.com.

Visit our website, http://chapter1020.csea.com

Legislature considers CSEA-sponsored bill Long-term disability (LTD) is not always as long as you think. Our employer can deduct LTD days retroactively to the first sick day you used leading into your leave.

63


Designing your front page Banner The banner, or nameplate (title of your newsletter), at the top of your front page should be bold and easily identified as a publication for classified employees. The banner should look the Date, volume, same from month to month (except for the issue number date, volume and issue number). It should also mention that the pub­lication comes from the California School Employees Association, and the banner should include your chapter name and number.

Date, volume and issue number Make sure your newsletter has a date (the month of publication is fine) on the front page. You may include a volume and issue number. The volume number usually refers to the year of publication, and the issue number refers to the month. See volume/issue number entry in the Glossary for more details.

Teasers A lot of readers don’t get past the front page. Teasers promote stories on the inside pages to pique readers’ interest and get them to read on. Just take a couple of lines to advertise the stories and note which page they’re on. Teasers should catch the readers eye, but they shouldn’t compete with the front page stories.

Announcements You should also place important announcements on the front page. Advertise chapter meetings and events in boldface text, so they grab your readers’ attention.

64

Banner

El Oso Classified News March 2014

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed. We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting Wednesday, March 6 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18 On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

Bus driver saves child’s life On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exited the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped out of the bus and performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Inside this issue Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Chapter 1020

Teasers

What’s front-page news?

?

Your most important news—especially important chapter news—goes on the front page. Your readers want news that affects them directly and immediately, and they don’t want to go hunting through your newsletter to find it. So, put it right on the front page. To prioritize your stories refer to “What CSEA Members Want” (see pages 16–17).


Layout and Design

Choosing a column format News from around the region Autumn Valley

One-column format

The chapter hopes to make this the “Year of the Employee” through contract education, know-your-rights and awareness of PERS benefits. They will be holding a mini workshop this month. The chapter executive board has appointed four site reps at each high school and two at each elementary and middle school. They are assessing their year-round calendar and its effect on employees.

Rangeview The chapter is participating in the Membership Unity Program (MUP). They are seeking clarification and more information on the rights of police officers.

Vista Pacifica

One-column newsletters are obviously the easiest to produce, but they are not the easiest to read. If you do a one-column layout, make your outside margins extra wide and use plenty of subheads and white space, so you don’t end up with a massive gray block of text.

The chapter is still negotiating on several issues. The district is trying to limit the number of delegates the chapter can send to CSEA’s annual conference. Transportation department employees are having a difficult time maintaining full-time status. The chapter is currently surveying the membership for their contract proposal.

Willow County The chapter is still negotiating and working on a clerical reclassification. Negotiators have some overtime issues with the transportation department. Two elementary schools are starting four tracks in July.

Dim stairwells pose danger John Doe of the Health and Safety Committee is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, the lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast on the classroom signs. The stair striping is an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in compliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of a twoyear plan agreed upon by the district.

New cars at fleet rates Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive huge discounts on a new car? To locate the participating auto dealer nearest you, call Member Benefits at (800) 632-2128, ext. 262 for a complete and up-to-date listing.

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Get your job description When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

El Oso Classified News • March 1998

Two-column format Two-column layouts give you more flexibility, and they’re still relatively easy to produce. This format also gives you the advantage of using Clipsheet articles without having to reformat them. Make sure your “alley” between columns is wide enough to break up the columns— especially if you’re using ragged right margin (as seen here).

Page 4

El Oso Classified News March 2014

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed. We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting Wednesday, March 6 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18 On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

Bus driver saves child’s life On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exited the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped out of the bus and performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Inside this issue Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Chapter 1020

Three-column format Three-column layouts give you a lot of flexibility, but they require a lot of extra planning. If you do three columns, be careful not to let your columns get too narrow. You should also avoid justifying your text—the more narrow your columns get, the bigger the gaps will be between words.

65


Modular design

El Oso

Volum e 13, Iss ue 10

How do you get all of your stories to fit together on a page? One solution is to use a modular design.

Negotia tions ar e underw Our con ay tract exp the pro ires

Classifie

ponse to that severayour input, we are asking l areas be addre

The sample newsletter (El Oso Classified News) is based on a modular design. Modular design works like a jigsaw puzzle. The page is divided into equally-sized “blocks” that form a modular page grid (see below). Stories are written to fit within one block, two blocks or more. Because the individual blocks are equal in size, each block becomes a moveable, interchangeable piece of the puzzle.

ssed. We don some big ’t believe contrac secret, so t negotia bulletins. tions sho we will be uld be Wa ed on two tch for these upd publishing neg otiation -co ates, wh s Please bel lor stationery ich will be and num ieve onl bered seq printy what is written in the El uentially. printed in Oso Cla at chapte ssified Ne the bulletins, r meetin ws gs. Rumo it officia rs are fals or announced lly from the negotia e. Unless a bulleti n, don’t you hea r consider ting team or thro Ask a cha the ugh pter offi cer if you information to We’re con be true. have que fident tha stions. settlement t we can . If you reach a have any informa fair con tion, atte questions trac t nd a cha Negotiat or need pte more ions Ch airperson r meeting or con ext. 524 tact John Do . e at 555 -9835,

El Oso

Next ch apter

• Negot iations • Modifi ed work week • Nomin ations for Chapter 2nd

Inside this

issue

saves chil d’s life . President’s . . . . . . . message . . . . . . pag . . . . . . . e1 Opinion: . . . . . . . Healthcar . . . . . pag e . . . . e2 Welcom . . . . . . . e new me . . . . . . . mbers . . page 2 Legislature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . conside . page 2 rs bill . . Member . . . . . . . . Benefits . . . . . . pag . . . . . . . e3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

Chapter 1020

Page• March 4 El Oso Classified Press 2014 El Oso Oso Classified Classified Press Press •• March March 2014 2014 El

Text Block

Text Blocks Modular Page Grid

66

life

On Feb . 16, a boy beg an chokin g after he exi bus on his ted the ride hom Bus driv e. er immedia John Doe performe tely jum d ped out of the second-gra the Heimlich ma bus and neuver der’s life and sav . “It was ed the a scary that eve moment,” rything Doe said worked . “I’m jus Superin out oka t glad tendent y.” Doe rec eive a com Joe Shmoe has recom mendation meeting. H at the nex mended that at our nex will also be hon t sch ool boa ored by t chapte rd CSEA r meetin g on Ma rch 6 .

El Oso Classified Press • March 2014

El Oso Classified Press • March 2014

Chapter 1020

VP

saves ch ild’s

Sample Newsletter

El Oso Classified Press • March 2014

El Oso

meetin Wednesd g ay, March El Oso 6 • 5:0 Middle 0 p.m. School, On the Room 18 agenda :

Bus driv er

Bus driv er

El Oso Ch to get a apter 1020 Ne fair con go tract for tiating Team works all.

d News

March 2014

cess on May 31. We the entire of renegotiating are now our contract in can be cha contract, which The resu means nge 2). In resp lts of our contrac d by you. onse to t survey your inp areas be ut, we are are in (see page add asking tha promotion ressed, namely : hea t sev s and job description lth benefits, sala eral ries s. , In res


Layout and Design

Modular design gives you options As you can see, a modular design gives you several options in your page layout. The key to making it work is editing your stories to fit the space available in the blocks. A modular grid might seem a little restrictive at first; but after working with it a few times, it will save you a lot of time on the layout.

#1

#2

#3

News from around the region Autumn Valley Chapter hopes to make this the “Year of the Employee” through contract education, know-your-rights and awareness of PERS benefits. They will be holding a mini workshop this month. The chapter executive board has appointed four site reps at each high school and two at each elementary and middle school. They are assessing their year-round calendar and its effect on employees. Rangeview Chapter is participating in the Membership Unity Program (MUP). They are seeking clarification and more information on the rights of police officers. Vista Pacifica Chapter is still negotiating on several issues. The district is trying to limit the number of delegates the chapter can send to CSEA’s annual conference. Transportation department employees are having a difficult time maintaining full-time status. The chapter is currently surveying the membership for their contract proposal.

New cars at fleet rates

El Oso Classified Press • March 2014

Layout #1

Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive huge discounts on a new car? To locate the participating auto dealer nearest you, call Member Benefits at

at (866) 487-2732 for a com-

plete and up-to-date listing.

Dim stairwells pose danger

John Doe of the Health and Safety Committee is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, the lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast on the classroom signs. The stair striping is an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in compliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of a twoyear plan agreed upon by the district.

Willow County Chapter is still negotiating and working on a clerical reclassification. Negotiators have some overtime issues with the transportation department. Two elementary schools are starting four tracks in July.

Region 102 job board Autumn Valley Unified (555-1234) FT Child Nutrition Manager I (Deadline: 4/21/99)

FT Department Secretary (Deadline: 4/21/99) Rangeview (555-3456)

FT Executive Legal Secretary (Deadline: 4/5/99)

PT Paraeducator-Children’s Center (Deadline: 4/7/99) Vista Pacifica Job Hotline: (555-6789)

March calendar 6

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p.m.

9

Staff Development Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p.m.

14

Deadline: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details.)

15

CSEA State Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

Get your job description

When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

plete and up-to-date listing.

Get your job description

When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

Page 4

Layout #2

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Did you know that as a CSEA member you can receive huge discounts on a new car? To locate the participating auto dealer nearest you, call Member Benefits at

at (866) 487-2732 for a com-

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

El Oso Classified Press • March 2014

New cars at fleet rates

Dim stairwells pose danger

John Doe of the Health and Safety Committee is concerned over the poor lighting in the stairwells, the lack of striping on the stairs and the lack of contrast on the classroom signs. The stair striping is an Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirement, and the district is not in compliance. As for the stairwell lighting, Doe reported that lights will be embedded into the stairs as part of a twoyear plan agreed upon by the district.

March calendar 6

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p.m.

9

Staff Development Committee meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p.m.

14

Deadline: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details.)

15

CSEA State Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

News from around the region Autumn Valley Chapter hopes to make this the “Year of the Employee” through contract education, know-your-rights and awareness of PERS benefits. They will be holding a mini workshop this month. The chapter executive board has appointed four site reps at each high school and two at each elementary and middle school. They are assessing their year-round calendar and its effect on employees. Rangeview Chapter is participating in the Membership Unity Program (MUP). They are seeking clarification and more information on the rights of police officers. Vista Pacifica Chapter is still negotiating on several issues. The district is trying to limit the number of delegates the chapter can send to CSEA’s annual conference. Transportation department employees are having a difficult time maintaining full-time status. The chapter is currently surveying the membership for their contract proposal.

Willow County Chapter is still negotiating and working on a clerical reclassification. Negotiators have some overtime issues with the transportation department. Two elementary schools are starting four tracks in July.

Region 102 job board Autumn Valley Unified (555-1234) FT Child Nutrition Manager I (Deadline: 4/21/99)

FT Department Secretary (Deadline: 4/21/99) Rangeview (555-3456)

FT Executive Legal Secretary (Deadline: 4/5/99)

PT Paraeducator-Children’s Center (Deadline: 4/7/99) Vista Pacifica Job Hotline: (555-6789)

Page 4

El Oso Classified Press • March 2014

Layout #3

67


Placement of headlines Headlines are often the most visually striking element on the page, so their placement is important. One of the most common pitfalls for newsletter editors is “tombstone heads.” That’s when two headlines sit side by side in parallel columns. The two headlines compete with each other for the reader’s attention and can sometimes be read together if they’re too close. Tombstones often mark the death of an otherwise well-written page in your newsletter, but they can be avoided. Here are a few simple solutions:

March 2014

El Oso Classified News

Page 3

Welcome new members Legislature considers CSEAPlease look up these and say hello. sponsored bill new for folks future

Additional work must be offered

STEWARD’S REPORT

to senior workers in future Additional work must be by Jane Doe, Job Steward offered toChief senior workers

John Doe is aisnew Paraeducator at Long-term disability (LTD) Meadows Elementary. He’s acan special not always as long as you think. Our employer education expert andfirst sign translator deduct LTD days retroactively to the sick day you work hoursmanagement to a new six-hour custodian. In two doing so, District decided to assign extra used leading into your leave. for hearing impaired students. John the district our contract, which requires work hours todisregarded a new six-hour custodian. In doing so, A new bill being by the because state Assembly says considered he joined CSEA he hours to be our offered to the which most senior theadditional district disregarded contract, requires would change this unfair law. The CSEA-sponsored wants to participate in the decisions that affect ourbill, employees first.toWe to increase additional hours beconvinced offered tothe thedistrict most senior AB (Smith), would allow classified employees to new1613 contract. the hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight employees first. We convinced the district to increase use LTD after they exhaust their sick leave, thus extendhours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too the hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight Doeoffisdue the to new Clerical ing the length of Jane paid time an Sr. injury or diswill be able to work eight hours per day. ability. Currently,Assistant teachers are theOso onlyHigh school employees at El School. She hours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too who enjoy this right. moved here from San wwDiego, where will be able to work per day. Employees get eight theirhours promotions Contact our legislative representatives and let them she worked as a secretary in the county CSEA helped two EOHS employees who comknow that this bill matters to you. She has worked in office of education. plained of being passed over for promotions that they public education years.District 74 Assembly Districtfor 95the past eight Assembly felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to the CSEA helped two EOHS employees who comJoe Shmoe Jane Shmoe employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has already plained of being passedpromotion. over for promotions that they 150 Main St. #108 150 Main St. #111 been offered a second KNOW YOUR RIGHTS felt they deserved. We resolved both to El Oso, CA 99893 El Oso, CA 99893 If you see something at your jobsituations site that doesn’t thelook employees’ satisfaction, and one hasKnow Ph: 555-1234 Ph: 555-5678 right, it might be a violation of employee our contract. already been and offered second promotion. shmoe@assembly.ca.gov shmoe@senate.ca.gov your rights readayour contract. You are the eyes and When you’re hired, promoted or reclassified, If of youthesee something your jobatsite doesn’t ears union. I can beatreached ext.that 5534. the employer must give you a copy of your job look right, it might be a violation of our contract. description, salary information, Know your rights and read your contract. You are the work location, work hours and eyes and ears of the union. I can be reached at chiefwork week. If any supervijs@eloso.com or call ext. 5534. OUR CONTRACT sor wants to change your job Your union is only a phone call away description, or if you find any OUR CONTRACT EXECUTIVE OFFICERS discrepancies between Recently, there has the President Jane Doe, ext. 4150 description of your job and 1st Vice President John Doe, ext. 2131 been some confusion about 2nd Vice President John Doe, ext. 2658 what youabsences actually to do,your reporting Secretary Jane Doe, ext. 4104 contact any CSEA officer. worksite. Section 15.2.1 Treasurer John Doe, ext. 3129 of our contract deals with Public Relations Jane Doe, ext. 4189 Recently, there has been some confusion about notification of absences. JOB STEWARDS reporting absences to your worksite. Section 15.2.1 of John Doe, Maintenance If you don’t follow the proDoe, Central our Jane contract dealsKitchen with notification of absences. If youPage 3 cedure in the contract, you News El Oso Classified March 2014 John Doe, Transportation don’t follow the procedure in the contract, you run the run of disciplinary 6 the risk Chapter 1020 meeting, Jane Doe, El Oso Middle School STEWARD’S REPORT Welcome new members riskJane of disciplinary action or even termination. Doe, Meadows Elementary action or even termination. management decided to assign two extra by JaneDistrict Doe, Chief Job Steward

Employees get promotions Don’t

Because these two headlines are side-by-side, with no rules or box to separate them visually, readers could be confused. Get your job description

Use appropriate artwork alongside the inner-edge of one of the headlines (don’t it in both Reportuse absences aheadheadof time lines or it will get too busy). Report absences Do

Do

Use boxes to call attention to important items.

ahead of time

March Calendar

El Oso Classified News March 2014

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed. We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting Wednesday, March 6 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18 On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week • Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

Bus driver saves child’s life On Feb. 16, a boy began choking after he exited the bus on his ride home. Bus driver John Doe immediately jumped out of the bus and performed the Heimlich maneuver and saved the second-grader’s life. “It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. H will also be honored by CSEA at our next chapter meeting on March 6 .

Inside this issue Bus driver saves child’s life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 1 President’s message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3 El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4

El Oso Chapter 1020

68

El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

CHAPTER COMMITTEES Additional workthis: must be TheCSEA contract basically says Constitution and Bylaws: John Doe, ext. 2658 offered to senior workers Health and Safety: John Doe, ext. 4240

Please look up these new folks and say hello.

1. If you arebygoing beJobabsent, Jane Doe, to Chief Steward you are required Nominations: John Doe, ext. 2862 District management decided to assign twoof extra to notify your workDoe, site prior to the beginning the Political Action: John ext. work hours to 3158 a new six-hour custodian. In doing so, Siteday. Reps: John Doe, ext. 2894 work the district disregarded our contract, which requires Staff Development:additional John Doe, ext.to4104 hours be offered to the most senior 2. To return to work, you must notify your site Ways and Means: employ John Doe, ext.We 3197 ees first. convinced the district to increase prior to the end of the work day before returning to NEGOTIATIONSthe hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight hours per day. As for the six-hour custodian, he too service. John Doe, ext. 4195 will be able to work eight hours per day. The bottom line: If you can’t come to work, El Oso Classified News is published monthly, September-June. Employees promotions notify your site of time! get Please send yourahead ideas, suggestions or questions to Jane Doe, CSEA helped1025 two EOHS employees who Chapter Public Relations Officer, Bear Creek Road, ElcomOso, plained of being passed over for promotions that they CA 99893 or call ext. 4189.

El Oso Classified

felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to the employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has already been offered a second promotion. If you see something at your job site that doesn’t look right, it might1998 be a violation of our contract. News • March Know your rights and read your contract. You are the eyes and ears of the union. I can be reached at chiefjs@eloso.com or call ext. 5534.

John Doe is a new Paraeducator at The basically says this: meeting, 9 contract Staff Development Committee Meadows Elementary. He’s a special 1.education If you areandgoing to be absent, you are required expert sign translator El Oso Middle School, Room 18, beginning 5 p .m . for hearing impaired students. John to notify your worksite prior to the

says he joined CSEA because he of the work day. wants to participate in the decisions that affect our new contract. 2. To return to work, you

14

DEADLINE: Member of the Year must notify your site Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details .)

prior end of the work day before Jane Doe isto thethe new Sr. Clerical Assistant at El Osoto High School. She returning service. moved here from San wwDiego, where she workedline: as a secretary in thecan’t countycome to work, notify The bottom If you office of education. She has worked in your site of time! public education for ahead the past eight years.

15

CSEA Board of Directors meeting, Paso Robles

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS

Get your job description

El Oso Chapter When 1020 you’re hired, promoted or reclassified,

OUR CONTRACT

Report absences ahead of time Recently, there has been some confusion about reporting absences to your worksite. Section 15.2.1 of our contract deals with notification of absences. If you don’t follow the procedure in the contract, you run the risk of disciplinary action or even termination.

The contract basically says this: 1. If you are going to be absent, you are required to notify your worksite prior to the beginning of the work day. 2. To return to work, you must notify your site prior to the end of the work day before returning to service. The bottom line: If you can’t come to work, notify your site ahead of time!

the employer must give you a copy of your job description, salary information, work location, work hours and work week. If any supervisor wants to change your job description, or if you find any discrepancies between the description of your job and what you actually do, contact any CSEA officer.

March Calendar 6

Chapter 1020 meeting, El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

9

Staff Development Committee meeting,

14

DEADLINE: Member of the Year Nominations (Contact any CSEA officer for details .)

15

CSEA Board of Directors meeting,

El Oso Middle School, Room 18, 5 p .m .

Paso Robles

El Oso Chapter 1020

Page 1


Layout and Design

Types of headlines ■ Straight

Headline:

Members approve contract

Specifications: – One to two decks (lines) – Summarizes action of story – Most effective and commonly used style of headline ■ Kicker

Headline:

Know your rights

You’re entitled to sick leave

Specifications: – Kicker is half the size of main headline – Two to four words long – Sometimes is underlined – Provides built-in white space (see glossary) to make page more appealing ■ Drop

Write headlines after text

One way to make your headlines fit neatly above your articles is to write them after all of the articles are laid out on the page. As you place the articles on the page, simply block out the space that you want the headlines to take by drawing blank text boxes above your articles. Then, using your consistent headline font and size, type in a headline that fits the box.

Headline or Deck Headline:

Negotiations Begin

Health Benefits deemed top priority by employees

Specifications: – Second deck half the size of the main headline – Same width as main headline – Usually two lines – Visual transition: takes the reader from big type of main head to body copy ■ Hammer

Headline:

Want a better contract? Support your CSEA negotiating team

Specifications: – First deck sets up message – Second deck hammers it home – Grabs readers attention; hits them over the head.

i

For more information about writing headlines, see page 47.

69


Body text should be basic Stick to the basics when choosing your body text. It should be easy to read.

Body text generally uses a serif font Serifs are short line crossings on letters. Most books and news­ papers use this kind of font, and readers are more comfortable reading serif text.

Serif Font

serif

Employees serif

Draw attention without distracting You can use boldface or italic type to draw attention to small sections of text. How­ever, you should use it spar­ingly, or it will lose its impact and also become difficult to read.

Don’t use display fonts Display and script fonts are designed and spaced for large point sizes. They can make the text (or information) illegible in body text sizes.

One space after a period Even though your high school typing teacher probably told you to put two spaces after a period, standard typesetting style for newsletters calls for only one space. It saves on space and looks more professional.

Punctuate inside quotes Place commas and periods within closing quotes regardless of context. Place all other marks of punctuation – question and exclamation marks, colons and semicolons – outside, unless they’re part of the quoted material.

Dont' over use color. Using too many colors is distracting and hard to read. Stick to just one or two dark colors for your text. 70

serif

serif

AVOID USING ALL CAPITAL LETTERS IN YOUR TEXT TO CREATE IMPACT; THEY ARE DIFFICULT TO READ AND SLOW THE READER DOWN.

Display Fonts

ARIAL BLACK

Univers Ultra Condensed

Shelly Allegro Punctuation Style

“It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.”

Don't over use color

“It was a scary moment,” Doe said. “I’m just glad that everything worked out okay.”


Layout and Design

Divide words to stretch line length You might occasionally end up with holes at the end of a line because the first word on the next line is particularly long. You can fix this by dividing that word with a hyphen. However, be careful that you only divide words from the top of the page down after all text is absolutely final on the page. Otherwise, any changes in the text could throw off your line endings and leave you with awkwardly hyphenated words in the middle of a line. If you want to divide a word, here’s the rule:  Most com­puter programs automatically divide hyphenated words, because it’s a natural break. You can also divide a word between syllables to break a line. Dictionaries indicate these breaks with dots and accents. Don’t break syllables that only have two or fewer letters in them (example: “a-bide” or creat-ed”); and don’t end a paragraph with a word fragment. Hyphenating long words at the end of a line will make rows of text look better on the page.

Align text to left (ragged right edge) For consistency’s sake, align everything to the left. Don’t worry about the ragged edges, just make sure there is enough white space in your alleys (the space between columns).

Do

Notice the layout in the El Oso Classified News. The text is aligned to the left. The right edge is ragged. It is to prevent the large distracting spaces that occur between words.

Don’t justify your text

Flush left, ragged right text

Most programs have an option that allows you to either justify, center, align right or align left your columns. Don’t justify your text, or you will have gaps between words. Don’t

Be Careful with URLs

When printing a web address, be careful not to break it into two lines. Adding a hyphen or a period at the end of it can change the URL, rendering it useless. There are several free URL shorteners available online if you need a shorter address.

We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classi­fied News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiations team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true.

We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classi­ fied News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiations team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true.

Justified text

71


March 2014

Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas❶ be Subheads addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, are a great way to break up long promotionsSubheads and job descriptions. Do blocks of text on the page. It also gives your In response your input, we are asking readers to more “entry points” into the story. that several areas be addressed. If the headline didn’t get their attention, maybe a particular subhead will. Subheads are usually We don’t contract negotiations onlybelieve one line, and they are usuallyshould writtenbelike some big secret, so we be publishing negotiations headlines withwill a subject and a verb. bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will printTo make them stand out on the page,besubheads ed on two-color stationery numbered are almost alwaysand bolder on the sequentially. page than the Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, body copy. Using a smaller size of your headline written in font the El Oso Classibefied or announced will usually all News you need to set your subat chapter heads meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear apart from the body text. it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Boxes Nego❷ tiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, You can draw attention to important information ext. 524. by putting it in a box. Most computer programs allow you to draw boxes or tables in which you can insert text, or you can carefully draw boxes with a ruler.

El Oso Chapter 1020

Next chapter meeting Wednesday, March 6 • 5:00 p.m. El Oso Middle School, Room 18

Four ways to break up text

It’s important to leave adequate space between the text and the lines of the box, otherwise it will look crowded and messy. Also, you should use boxes sparingly. Too many boxes on a page can be distracting to the reader.

On the agenda: • Negotiations • Modified work week

S A   M     P      L       E

• Nominations for Chapter 2nd VP

March 2014

Bus driver saves child’s life

STEWARD’S REPORT

Additional work must be On Feb. 16, a boy began choking offered to senior workers

after he exited the bus on his home. District management decided to assign tworide extra Bus driver John work hours to a new six-hour custodian. In doing so,Doe imme diately jumped the district disregarded our contract, which requires additional hours to be offered to the most senior out of the bus and employ ees first. We convinced the district increase performed the Heim lich maneuver andtosaved the the hours of two senior custodians from seven to eight second-grader’s life. hours“Itper day. formoment,” the six-hour custodian, he too was a As scary Doe said. “I’m just glad will be able to work eight hours per day. that everything worked out okay.” Superintendent Joe Shmoe has recommended that Doe receive a commendation at the next school board meeting. will also honored by CSEA CSEAHhelped twobe EOHS employees who comS A plained of being passed over for at our next chapter meeting on promotions March 6 . that they   M

Welco

Please loo

by Jane Doe, Chief Job Steward

Employees get promotions

P felt they deserved. We resolved both situations to          L the employees’ satisfaction, and one employee has      E Doalready been offered a second promotion. If you see something at your job site that doesn’t look right, it might be a violation of our contract. Bus your driverrights savesand child’s . . contract. . . . . . . . .You . . . .are page Know readlife your the 1 eyes and ears of the union. President’s message . . .I .can . . . be . . .reached . . . . . . .at . .chiefpage 2 js@eloso.com or call ext. 5534.

Inside this issue

Opinion: Healthcare . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2

Welcome new members . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 2 OUR CONTRACT Legislature considers bill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 3

El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works to get a fair contract for all.

Page 3

Report absences Member Benefits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 4 ahead of time

wants to pa new contra

public educ

KNOW Y

Get yo

When the employ description work locati work week sor wants t description discrepanci description what you a contact any

Recently, there has been some confusion about

El Oso Chapter 1020 absences to your worksite. Section 15.2.1 of reporting our contract deals with notification of absences. If you don’t follow the procedure in the contract, you run the risk of disciplinary action or even termination.

The contract basically says this: 72

1. If you are going to be absent, you are required to notify your worksite prior to the beginning of the work day. 2. To return to work, you must notify your site

6

Ch El

9

Sta El

14

DE


El Oso Classi Volume 13, Issue 10

Negotiations are underway

Pull Quotes Pull Quotes (also called blurbs) are another effective design gimmick used to draw attention to important information. They are also an excellent way to break up long columns of text. However, pull quotes should be used sparingly and strategically. Just locate an interesting line of text, then nest it in the column, set it off from the body text (usually larger type in italics). You can also use a thin line to separate it from the rest of the text— but like boxes, you should allow for enough white space between the text and the line. Pull quotes will give your reader another entry point into the story and make your page more accessible.

2014 Layout andMarch Design

Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in the process of renegotiating our contract, which means the entire contract can be changed by you. The results of our contract survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions. Do

Bullets and symbols Symbol fonts (sometimes called dingbats) come with most software packages for computers. They can be very useful in breaking up lists of information. The key to using symbols is consistency. Pick one or two types of symbols and stick with them. Arrows and large dots (commonly called bullets) are basic, but work well at calling attention to a line.

S A   M     P      L       E

N

Wedn El Os

On the • • •

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed.

Bus d

We don’t believe contract negotiations should be some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you hear it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

performe second-g “It w that every Supe Doe rece meeting. at our ne

Bus dri

Preside

Opinion

Welcom

Legisla

Turn this Classified employees are clear about what they want in the new contract. They want quality health benefits with no increase in the co-pay; a fair and equitable salary increase; more promotional opportunities and staff development.

Membe

El Oso Chapter 1020 Negotiating Team works into this to get a fair contract for all.

Classified employees are clear about what El Oso Chapter 1020 they want in the new contract: Bullets

• Health benefits • Salary increase • Career growth 73


Designing a flyer

Our CSEA

Flyers can be effective communication tools, but their success depends greatly on good, clean design. Good flyers should be bold and easy to read in just a few seconds. That means, you should not try to cram information on the page, but instead distill the main point into a bold heading and maybe just a few lines of additional lines of text.

Clean Layout Flyers should have a clean layout that supports visual thinking so people can take in the information with minimal conscious effort. Also, leave plenty of “white space” on the page to help draw attention to your subject.

Images You don’t have to use an image on a flyer, but it can definitely help draw attention to your subject. Just make sure your image supports the topic you are writing about.

Contract

Vacation • Wages

• Holidays

Results Contract Survey

ts Are Wages & Benefi ty Your Top Priori

t suronse to the contrac ne for the great resp tract negotiations. con wants to thank everyo ng es omi Jon upc y Jerr our nt s for Chapter Preside ritize your concern e responses to prio vey. We’ll use thes YOU SAID: HERE’S WHAT y of survey rwhelming majorit IORITY of an ove 4 to 6 ARE THE TOP PR t of you are looking for a raise in the S GE ➤ WA cen per 50 than respondents; more percent range. re hest priority for mo FITS is the next hig R HEALTH BENE ➤ KEEPING OU you. than 65 percent of for more than 65 ANCES is a priority RATION OF GRIEV BIT AR G ➤ BINDIN percent of you. a probERTIME PAY is T GETTING OV RK HOME OR NO ➤ TAKING WO ents. ond resp the of half lem for more than in XYZ District is /MERIT SYSTEM than NEL COMMISSION according to more , ON ees RS loy PE E emp d TH sifie ➤ best interests of clas not working in the ondents. sive half of the survey resp develop comprehen e survey results to to you for a vote A staff will use thes CSE and team g contract proposals brin ’ll ive We rece Our negotiating ll ks. ou’ wee —y re information over the next few contract proposals p an eye out for mo to the district. Kee before we submit them about this meeting. details notices with more tract proposal develop ut negotiations, con pter officer. stions or input abo cha que or any ber have mem you team In the meantime, if tact any bargaining rent contract , con ment or even our cur

AFL-CIO

loyees Association California School Emp

ST_7046A

Text The heading of your flyer should use large, bold text that can be seen on a bulletin board or other posting place. It should also use strong active words (see more on page 47–48). Support text should be brief and use a consistent font. If you have more information than can fit in a few lines of text, direct people to your newsletter, website or other resources to get additional information.

Information to include Be sure to include an action that readers can take. If you want them to attend an event, be sure to include details about when and where they should go.

74

Make it official Just as with any publication you create, be sure to identify your flyer as an official CSEA Flyer. You can add a small image of the CSEA Shield with “California School Employees Association” written at the bottom of the flyer and let everyone know who created it.


El Oso Class

How to use images Images can literally make or break the design of your newsletter.

Do

Images should go with the story Carefully chosen and well-placed photographs or clip art can make a newsletter stand out and grab the readers’ attention. First, make sure the image belongs to a story on the page, in both its location and its theme. Images should give the reader a visual clue as to what the story is about. Then make sure the image fits the overall tone of the newsletter and doesn’t detract from important information. Finally, don’t use too many images on a page. It’s a newsletter, not a greeting card.

Don’t use art for art’s sake If you have a “hole” in your newsletter where there is no text, don’t simply fill it Don’t with clip art. Maybe there’s more information you can add to the story, a pull quote that you can insert or just leave some extra white space. Nothing ruins a good newsletter faster than irrelevant clip art plopped on the page, especially if it’s used as “decoration” between and around stories.

ed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, written in the El Oso Classified News or announced at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Layout Unlessand youDesign hear it officially from the negotiating team or through Volume don’t 13, Issue 10 the information to be true.March 2014perfo a bulletin, consider seco Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. S A We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract “   M     P settlement. If you have any questions or need more      L that       E Our contract expires on May 31. We are now in information, attend a chapter meeting or contact S W the process renegotiating our Doe contract, which means Nego tiationsofChairperson John at 555-9835, Doe the entire ext. 524. contract can be changed by you. meetE The results of our contract survey are in (see page at ouO 2). In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions.

Negotiations are underway

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed.

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We don’t believe contract negotiations should be Op some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printW ed on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. Le Please believe only what is printed in the bulletins, Vol. VII Issue 61020 Negotiating California School Employees Association Me El Oso Chapter Team works written in the El Oso Classified News or announced S to get a fair contract for all. A at chapter meetings. Rumors are false. Unless you   M S hear A P it officially from the negotiating team or through           M L Negotiations are underway Tabl           P E Eltrue. Oso 1 perf a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be     Chapter L contract expires on have questions. seco Ask aOur chapter officer if you Bus dr       E December 31. We arethat nowwe in can reach a fair contract We’re confident Preside the process If ofyou renegotiating that settlement. have any questions or need more our contract, which means the information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Opinio entire contract can be changed Doe Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, by you. Welcom mee ext. 524. The results of our contract at o survey are in (see page 2). In response to your input, Legisla we are asking that several areas be addressed, namely: CSEA health benefits, salaries, promotions and job descriptions. Memb

El Oso Class

In response to your input, we are asking that several areas be addressed.

We don’t believe contract negotiations should be Artwork available online some big secret, so we will be publishing negotiations at csea.com bulletins. Watch for these updates, which will be printed

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on two-color stationery and numbered sequentially. There is a wide selection of only logos, banners, clip in artthe bulletins, Please believe what is printed and photographs available to you GoNews to or announced in the El Oso online. Classified written www.csea.com/commtools. El Oso Chapter Negotiating Team you works at chapter meetings.1020 Rumors are false. Unless hear to get a fair contract for all. it officially from the negotiating team or through a bulletin, don’t consider the information to be true. Ask a chapter officer if you have questions. El Oso Chapter 1 We’re confident that we can reach a fair contract settlement. If you have any questions or need more 75 information, attend a chapter meeting or contact Negotiations Chairperson John Doe at 555-9835, ext. 524.

Nex


Photographs A picture is worth a thousand words. What’s more, members love to see pictures of themselves and people they know in your newsletter and other CSEA publications.

What photographs should you use? Use high-quality photographs that add something to the content of your publication. Don’t just add photos because you have them. As for subject matter, the best photos show CSEA members in work environments or participating in community activities and events. Photos of members serving students is a great idea, but make sure you have a photo release for the student if the student is a minor (see page 90).

In some cases you may need to need obtain a signed photo release to use a person’s image in your publication. Here are some general guidelines:

76

Photo Usage (Legalities)

have blanket releases for students (but you should double check to see if a student’s family opted out of that release.)

• If what you are shooting is considered newsworthy and/or is in a public area, you do not need a release (technically).

• When in doubt, get permission (both the subject and location). To be safe, always get a signed release.

• For any shoot involving children, get permission from their parent/guardian first; then have them sign a release form (Release Form available on page 90). Many school districts

• You do not need a release from a CSEA member, but if possible, ask if it’s okay to use their photo—especially if it will be posted online.


Layout and Design

Technical considerations

RESOLUTION— For print, make sure you use high resolution photographs. It helps to shoot all your images at a high resolution. That way you can downsize the images for online use.

This low resolution photo looks pixelated and distorted.

COMPOSITION—Try to avoid busy

backgrounds that distract from the subject you are shooting. You also want the subject to stand out and not fade into the background. Whenever possible, fill the frame with your subject and crop out the distractions in the background.

▲ This busy composition should be cropped to focus in on the subject

LIGHTING—Make sure you have good

lighting where you are taking photographs. When in doubt, use your flash! Dark photos do not reproduce well in print publications.

▲ The photo on the left is too dark and the subject fades into the background. The one on the right is better.

CROPPING—Use image editing tools to

crop in on the subject you want to highlight. Many times you will want to show a person from their shoulders to the top of their head. (Avoid cropping people in the middle of their head.)

▲ This photo should be cropped to focus attention on the subject.

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Section 5

Printing and Distribution It’s only news if somebody reads it, and the more the better. This section gives you ideas and suggestions for reproducing your newsletter and getting it to your readers.

Contents Reproducing your newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 81 Distributing your newsletter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 82


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Printing and Distribution

Reproducing your newsletter Newsletters can be reproduced on a photocopy machine, or printed in the employer’s print shop (if allowed by your contract or the employer’s policy) or at an outside facility. Other chapters take their newsletter to high school or college print shops for students to print as part of their class work.

Printing/copying options

Use your employer’s equipment. Employers who have their own print shop often charge the chapter for only the cost of the materials used. Check with your chapter president about what employerowned equipment and materials are available for you to use in producing/distributing your chapter newsletter: computers, paper, photocopying/printing machines, labels and district mail services.

Go to your CSEA field office. If you can’t use your employer’s equipment, you can make arrangements with your CSEA field office to reproduce it there for free. Just coordinate your print time in advance with the field office secretary and allow enough time for the field office to fit it into their schedule. See Appendix G for a directory of CSEA field offices.

Take it to a copy shop. You can also go to a local print shop, but it can be expensive.

Determining your costs

Most chapters budget for the cost of their newsletters. The CCO figures out how many copies need to be produced and the chapter pays for the paper, printing and any other costs. Check with your chapter’s executive board about making your newsletter a budget priority.

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Distributing your newsletter Now that it’s in print, how do you get your newsletter ready for distribution? Stapling, labeling, and counting copies for distribution to work sites can be handled quickly by site representatives, the executive board or newsletter committee, or you may want to ask Union Stewards to help. The newsletter keeps your members informed, but it’s also a vehicle to advertise CSEA and recruit members. All bargaining unit members— whether or not they are CSEA members—should receive your newsletter. One copy of the newsletter should be posted on CSEA’s bulletin board at each work site. If the newsletter is mailed via U.S. mail, consider obtaining a bulk mail permit to reduce postage costs. Information on bulk mail regulations and fees is available from the post office.

How to deliver your newsletter For those chapters that do not have access to the employer’s mail systems (district “pony” or internal mail), here are some of the avenues to get your chapter communications to your bargaining unit members:

82

Site Representatives/Union Stewards This is by far the most effective distribution method (even better than employer mail) if your chapter has a functioning, active site rep system. That’s because it not only gets chapter communications to bargaining unit members, but it also helps build the union and keep it strong. In survey after survey, people prefer face-toface communication over any other method. And, one of the site representative’s primary duties is communication with the workers at their site. Here’s how to utilize this system. ■

Obtain a count from each site rep of approximately how many employees are at their site. Periodically update the counts. Always give each site rep some extra copies for new employees or for other needs.

Attend chapter meetings and/or site rep meetings to get materials to the site reps for distribution at their sites. Or work out a system to get an executive board member or the site rep coordin­ator to distribute the newsletter at these meetings.

Or you can set up a “pony system” to get materials to each site rep. Here’s how one might work: Count out stacks for each site. Group them by geography (either home addresses or worksites). Deliver the groups to the nearest homes/sites for each geographic “grouping.” Those site reps take the materials for their site out of the box and then deliver the rest to the next nearest site rep…and so on.

Ask for a mailing list

Your chapter treasurer should have an up-to-date list of every member’s home address and work site.


Printing and Distribution

❷ E-Mail

E-mail is a very cost-efficient way to distribute your newsletter, but it is less personal than face-to-face delivery from Union Stewards and site reps. You can e-mail your newsletter to members as an attacment— Portable Document Format (PDF) is the most accepted formatting option. You can copy and paste your articles directly into the body of an e-mail, but it may limit your design options. Newsletters can also be posted on your chapter website, and your e-mail can simply link readers to their location.

Caution: If you use

!

e-mail to distribute your newsletter, be sure to provide print copies for those members who are not on your e-mail distribution list.

You can also post your newsletter on your chapter’s website. Talk to your chapter webmaster or visit csea.com/webmaster. Keep in mind that there are major differences between an e-mailed “print” newsletter and an electronic newsletter. See page 56 for more on preparing e-newsletters. Try to protect your readers’ privacy. If you are not using a mailing list server, create a group mailing list or use the blind carbon copy or BCC address field to insert recipients’ e-mail addresses. This way, readers will only see their own address on the e-mail, and you will not be publishing everyone’s e-mail address when you send a newsletter.

Other District Employees In the event your chapter doesn’t yet have a reliable site rep system, you can ask classified employees who regu­larly travel throughout the workplace in the course of their jobs if they wouldn’t mind dropping off your materials. These employees include bus drivers, maintenance workers, painters, grounds workers, etc. Who knows, you could eventually recruit them to be CSEA activists! U.S. Mail Often a last resort because of the cost, the U.S. mail can be a viable option in certain cases: ■

If your chapter has no other means of distribution and/or the chapter executive board authorizes the expenditure of chapter funds for this purpose. Be sure your mailing list is kept up-to-date by periodically publishing a change-of-address form.

You can obtain a bulk mail permit from the post office. This can save money, particularly if you send materials at bulk rates.

If you do use U.S. mail, you should know that there are certain requirements you must meet if you aren’t using an envelope. Ask your post office for information about the mailing requirements for “self-mailers”—better yet, take a recent copy of your newsletter to the post office and ask them what changes would need to be made before it would be accepted as a self-mailer.

Who should receive your newsletter

Send to every member and fee payer in the chapter.

Send at least one copy a year to nonmembers, so they can see what CSEA has to offer them.

Post a copy on CSEA bulletin boards at each work site.

Consider mailing to administrators, board members and others, in addition to employees.

Send a copy to your Communications Committee member and consider exchanging newsletters with other chapters in your region/area.

Send a copy to: CSEA Communications Dept. 2045 Lundy Avenue San Jose, CA 95131

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➎

Your chapter website and social media accounts In addition to the physical printing and distribution of your newsletter, you can post your newsletter on your chapter website and social media accounts so that your members can access it whenever they are most comfortable. As with e-mailing your newsletter, you'll need to save it as a PDF in order to place it on your website. In this format, anybody can view it exactly the way it looks in print.

csea.com

You can post an update on your Facebook page that the next edition of the newsletter is now available. Be sure to include a link to your website where the newsletter is located so your members can simply click on the Facebook link to read.

facebook

You can also post a link to your chapter’s Twitter or other social media accounts. The biggest advantage to posting your newsletter on your website and to social media is to allow your members the freedom to access it whenever and from wherever they need. Also, many people would prefer to read an electronic copy rather than a physical copy. It's important to provide your newsletter in multiple places and formats so that your message reaches the greatest number of your members.

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Section 6

Appendices Contents Appendix A—Acronyms and abbreviations. . . . . . . . page 86 Appendix B—Your legal rights. . . . . . . . . . . . . page 88 Appendix C—Model Release Form. . . . . . . . . . . page 90 Appendix D—Advertising . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . page 91 Appendix E—Communication Awards Competition. . . . page 92 Appendix F—Sample Evaluations. . . . . . . . . . . . page 96 Appendix G—How to Contact CSEA . . . . . . . . . . page 120


Appendix A

Acronyms and abbreviations AAA

American Arbitration Association

CPAC

Chapter Political Action Coordinator

AAD

Alternate Area Director

CPI

Consumer Price Index

AAP

Affirmative Action Program

CPRO

Chapter Public Relations Officer (now CCO)

AB

Assembly Bill

CS

Chapter Secretary

ACA

Affordable Care Act

CSEA

California School Employees Association

AD

Area Director

CSEW

Classified School Employee Week

ADA

Average Daily Attendance (used in computing state funding of public schools)

CSMCS

California State Mediation and Conciliation Service

CT

Chapter Treasurer

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act

CTA

California Teachers Association

ADEA

Age Discrimination in Employment Act

cto

compensatory time off (also comp. time)

AFL–CIO

American Federation of Labor—Congress of Industrial Organizations

CVP

Chapter Vice President

AFSCME

American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees

decert

decertification

DFEH

Department of Fair Employment and Housing (California)

AFT

American Federation of Teachers

DFO

Director of Field Operations

ALJ

Administrative Law Judge

DI

Disability Insurance

AP

Association President

DOE

Department of Education

ARR

Assistant Regional Representative

DOI

Department of Insurance

BOD

Board of Directors

DAF

Disaster Assistance Fund

BOT

Board of Trustees

EAP

Employee Assistance Program

b.u.

bargaining unit

E-Board

Executive Board

C&B

Constitution & Bylaws

EC

Executive Committee

CABE

California Association of Bilingual Education

E.C.

Education Code

CalPERS

California Public Employees’ Retirement System

ED

Executive Director

c.b.

collective bargaining

EE/ER

c.b.a.

collective bargaining agreement

Employee/Employer Relations (many workplaces have these committees and/or meetings)

CCC

California Community Colleges (California’s community college system)

EEOC

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (federal)

EERA

Educational Employment Relations Act

EOE

Equal Opportunity Employer

e.o.l.

effects of layoff

ESD

Elementary School District

ESL

English as Second Language

FD

Field Director

FELA

Federal Emergency Leave Act

FICA

Federal Insurance Corporation of America (Social Security)

FLRB

Federal Labor Relations Board

FLSA

Fair Labor Standards Act

FO

Field Office

FSOC

Factual Statement of Charges

FS/SFP

Fair Share Service Fee Payer

g.b.

governing board (school board of education)

g.p.

grievance procedure

gr.

grievance

CCD

Community College District

C.D.A.

Child Development Assistant

c.e.

classified employee

CEB

Chapter Executive Board

CEO

Chief Executive Officer

CFIER

California Foundation for the Improvement of Employer-Employee Relations

ch.

Chapter

CLC

Central Labor Council (AFL–CIO)

CLF

California Labor Federation

COBRA

Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act

COE

County Office of Education

COLA

Cost-of-Living Adjustment

comp. time compensatory time (also cto) CP

Chapter President

6062_0514

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Appendices

Acronyms & Abbreviations (cont’d) grievant

P.C.

Personnel Commission

HEERA

Higher Education Employment Relations Act

PERB

Public Employment Relations Board

HQ

Headquarters

PERS

Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS)

HSD

High School District

PN

Personal Necessity

IA

Instructional Assistant

p.n.

public notice

IBB

Interest-Based Bargaining

RCM

Regional Council Meeting

ICT

Intermediate Clerk Typist

rgn.

region

IS

Information Systems Department (CSEA)

R/N

Research/Negotiations

IWC

Industrial Welfare Commission

RPAC

Retiree Political Action Coordinator

j.d.

job description

RPM

Regional Presidents’ Meeting

J.P.A.

Joint Powers Agency

RCO

Regional Communications Officer

JUSD

Joint Unified School District

RR

Regional Representative

K–12

Kindergarten through 12th grade

RTP

Release Time Program

K–14

Kindergarten through 14th grade (community college)

RU

Retiree Unit

RUEB

Retiree Unit Executive Board

KYR

Know Your Rights

SFP

Service Fee Payer

LCAP

Local Control Accountability Plan

SB

School Board

LEP

Limited English Proficient

SB

Senate Bill

LCFF

Local Control Funding Formula

SB 1960

Senate Bill 1960 (Fair Share Legislation)

L.O.

Layoff

SCT

Senior Clerk Typist

LOA

Leave of Absence

SD

School District

LRR

Labor Relations Representative

SDI

State Disability Insurance

MB

Member Benefits/Services Department (CSEA)

SEIU

Service Employees International Union

MMB

Meyers, Milias, Brown Act

SFP

Service Fee Payer

M&O

Maintenance & Operations

SLRR

Senior Labor Relations Representative

MOY

Member of the Year

SR

Standing Rule

MSD

Merit School District

SR

Site Representative

MSDS

Material Safety Data Sheet

SRC

Site Representative Coordinator

NEA

National Education Association

Supt.

Superintendent (or supervisor)

neg.

negotiate

T.A.

Tentative Agreement

NLRA

National Labor Relations Act

TSA

Tax Sheltered Annuity

NLRB

National Labor Relations Board

u.a.

unilateral action

OI

Organizing Institute

UI

Unemployment Insurance

o.s.

organizational security

ULP

Unfair Labor Practice

OS

Office Services Department (CSEA)

USD

Unified School District or Union School District

OSHA

Occupational Safety and Health Act

V.C.

Victory Club (CSEA)

OST

Officer Skills Training

VP

Vice President

O.T.

Overtime

W.C.

Workers’ Compensation

o-t-j

on-the-job

WW

Wall-to-Wall bargaining unit

PAC

Political Action Coordinator (Regional)

WWB

PACE

Political Action for Classified Employees (CSEA’s political action committee)

Win-Win Bargaining (also interest-based bargaining)

gt.

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Appendix B

Your legal rights Freedom of Speech and the Press Freedom of speech and the press is guaranteed by the California and U.S. Constitutions. These guarantees protect not only the content of your newsletter, but also its circulation and distribution to the readers. Bright v. Los Angeles Unified School District (1976) 18C.3d 450.

Employer Regulations Regulation of these freedoms by school districts is reasonable only where the restrained speech is likely to cause “substantial disruption of, or material interference with school activities.” Tinker v. Des Moines School District (1969) 393 US.503, 514. Los Angeles Teachers Union v. Los Angeles City Board of Education (1969) 71 C.2d 551, 559.

Union Rights Employee organizations have “…the right to use institutional bulletin boards, mailboxes and other means of communication, subject to reasonable regulation, and the right to use institutional facilities at reasonable times for the purpose of meetings concerned with the exercise of the rights guaranteed by [the EERA].” Government Code Section 3543.1(b). In view of the constitutional protections afforded speech content, any such regulation must be limited to what is necessary to avoid substantial disruption of material interference with employer operations. “A state is without power to impose an unconstitutional requirement as a condition for granting a privilege even though the privilege is the use of state property.” Danskin v. San Diego Unified School District. (1946) 28 C.2d.536, 545-546. Each case must be analyzed on its own facts, but certainly any regulation which gives a school administrator discretion to determine permissible content is too broad. However, the Public Employment Relations Board (PERB) has held that unstamped union newsletters that are bundled and addressed to a named site representative or school site, are “letters” under federal postal laws. Therefore, a school district may not be required to permit union use of its internal mail system to deliver newsletters to employee mailboxes. Long Beach Unified School District (1989) PERB Decision No. 721.

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Appendices

Libel Freedom of speech does not protect a chapter from lawsuits and damages for libel. In other words, if you print untruthful remarks that might damage a person’s reputation, you and CSEA could be sued. However, you should not be afraid to take a stance or to make criticisms. If a remark is truthful, you can not be held liable for damages.

Copyright Guidelines Copyright is an author’s legal right to control the reproduction and use of their creative work. This work can include literary, graphic, photographic, audio-visual and musical works. CCOs should note that nearly all newspaper articles, cartoons and other published works are protected by copyrights and are illegal to reproduce without the copyright owner’s consent. You can rewrite articles in your own words, because facts and ideas are not protected by a copyright. However, you should try to verify facts with the original sources whenever possible. If you do rewrite an article, attribute your sources and avoid using the same or essentially the same combination of words and story structure used in the original article. It’s okay to reproduce articles from Clipsheet and other CSEA publi­ cations in your chapter newsletter. To reproduce copyrighted articles from any other source, you will need to get permission from the editor, publisher, photographer or other copyright owner. Since your newsletter is nonprofit with a relatively small circulation, newspapers will generally grant you permission to reprint their articles as long as you credit the article to them.

Caution:

!

To reproduce copyrighted articles from any other source, you will need to get permission from the editor, publisher, photographer or other copyright owner.

Generally, the bottom line is that any article, clip art, cartoon or photos that are copyrighted should not be used in your newsletter without consent. It opens CSEA to lawsuits over copyright infringement.

Copyright and the Internet Copyright law applies to the Internet just as much as it does to printed material. So if you want to reprint something, ask the publisher or webmaster for permission. There are, however, some exceptions to the law that allow you to use portions of articles for non-commercial use (such as a local newsletter). Be sure to give full credit to the original author and website or simply give the URL so people can read the full story. Be careful with some websites which frequently remove articles and make old URLs useless.

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Appendix C

California School Employees Association (Asociacion de Empleados Escolares De California)

Model Release for Video/Photography Descargo de Modelo para Video/Fotografia I hereby irrevocably consent to and authorize the use and reproduction by CSEA, or anyone authorized by CSEA, of any and all photographs/video which you have this day taken of me, negative, positive, digital or tape in any CSEA print or electronic publication. All images shall constitute CSEA property, solely and completely. Yo, por medio de esta forma, consiento irrevocablemente e autorizo el uso y la reproduccion por CSEA, o de qualquier persona autorizada por CSEA, de qualquier y todas las fotografias/ videos que han tomado de mi en este dia, negativas, positivas, digital o cinta en qualquier publicacion de CSEA electronica or publicada. Todas las imagines seran propiedad de CSEA enteramente y completamente.

Model (Print name) Modelo (nombre en letra de molde)

Signature / Firma

Date / Fecha

Street Address / Direccion de calle

City / Ciudad

Zip / Codigo postal

Witnessed By (Print name) Testigo (nombre en letra de molde)

Signature / Firma

I am over 18 years of age. / Soy mayor de 18 años.

 Yes / Si

 No* / No*

*If the person is under 18, consent should be given by parent or guardian below. *Si la persona es menor de 18 años, padre or tutor legal tiene que dar permiso abajo.

I hereby certify that I am the parent or guardian of the minor named above. I do give consent without reservation to the foregoing on his/her behalf. A traves de esta forma, yo certifico que soy el padre or tutor legal de la persona menor mencionada arriba. Doy permiso sin reservaciones de parte de el/ella.

Parent/Guardian (Print name) Padre/Tutor legal (nombre en letra de molde)

Signature / Firma

Witnessed By (Print name) Testigo (nombre en letra de molde)

Signature / Firma

Date / Fecha

CSEA Communications Department  2045 Lundy Avenue, San Jose, CA 95131 (800) 632-2128  Fax (408) 577-0582 F-7038-10

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Appendix D

Advertising One way to help pay for the cost of producing your chapter newsletter is to include advertisements. You can ask local businesses (restaurants, shops, service providers, etc.) if they would be interested in advertising in your newsletter. You can also solicit advertising from CSEA-endorsed vendors (not listed in the Member Benefits Guide), such as local attorneys who participate in CSEA’s Legal Referral Program. You should show potential advertisers a couple of issues of your newsletter, and let them know a little bit about your news­letter and your readers.

Ad revenue must cover production costs only Since CSEA chapters fall under non-profit status, all ad revenue you collect will need to be applied directly to your operating costs. Talk to your chapter president about creating a newsletter budget that’s a separate line item in your chapter’s budget.

Caution: If you run ads, you must include a disclaimer

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If you run any advertisement(s) in your newsletter, you must also print the following disclaimer (usually in your masthead): Advertisements do not constitute any endorse­ments by CSEA or entitle any advertiser to special consideration from CSEA members or staff.

Official CSEA advertising guidelines: The CSEA Board of Directors has adopted the following advertising guidelines, which apply to all CSEA print and online publications (statewide, area, region and chapter). ■

No ad which denigrates any individual on the basis of gender, race, religion, handicap or sexual preference will be accepted.

No ad will be accepted from a foreign producer if the product being advertised is available from U.S. sources.

No paid political ad will be accepted.

No ad will be accepted from a company involved in a labor dispute.

No ad from any company on CSEA’s boycott list will be accepted.

No ad which, in CSEA’s estimation, is misleading will be accepted. Check www.csea.com/boycottlist

No ad for alcoholic beverages, cigarettes or related products or firearms will be accepted.

No advertisement which competes with the components of CSEA’s Member Benefits program will be accepted (refer to www.csea.com).

CSEA reserves the right to reject (prior to closing) any ad which it deems unacceptable for political, moral, legal or aesthetic reasons.

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Appendix E

Communication Awards Competition Every year, CSEA’s Communications Committee recognizes CSEA communicators for their outstanding print and electronic communications. Winners are selected for up to 18 award categories. Even if you are just starting out, it’s a good idea to enter the competition. You’ll receive constructive feedback from the Communications Committee judges. Some of their comments might help you with your future communication tool, whether it be a printed newsletter, an electronic newsletter, website or flyer. Entering the competition will also make you more familiar with the priorities and criteria that CSEA is looking for in its chapter communications. The deadline to enter is May 15 of each year. Look in the mail around February for a special communications bulletin containing the official entry packet and rules.

Award categories

Awards are given for each of the different communication tools: Print, e-Newsletter, Web, and Flyer.

Basic rules

The “Award of Excellence” is awarded to the communicator who receives the highest overall ranking based on the criteria for his/her communication tool.

You may submit an entry in each of the award categories.

Entries must be received by the specified deadline.

All qualifying entries will be judged by members of the Communications Committee.

Entries will be judged on an official evaluation form.

The “Award of Distinction” is awarded to the best in specific subcategories, such as Design, News Article, Editorial, and Use of Photography.

Criteria Entries are evaluated based on criteria—such as content and design— established for each specific category.

Newsletter

❶ Contract information/education/enforcement,

negotiations news, and negotiated benefits. Communicating about the contract is important throughout the year. In each issue, consider an article educating members on their rights within the contract.

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Appendices

If your chapter is in negotiations, remember that members want all the information you can provide on negotiations. Fringe benefits are almost as important as salary to most members. You should give an explanation of the negotiations process from surveying what members want in their new contract and listing the members of the negotiating team, to reporting after each bargaining session, to publicizing the results of ratification votes and highlights of the new contract. Your newsletter should report on dispute resolutions, grievances, or any enforcement of your members’ contract rights. You should list the contract provision that was upheld, but names and/or worksites do not have to be mentioned. Union steward reports, including Union Stewards’ names and contact information, as well as the above information is critical to the strength of your chapter and its contract.

How to enter

Entry packets are available in February. Complete the entry form and submit all requirements to the Communications Department by the May 15 deadline.

❷ Chapter news and member benefits

Your newsletter should include newsworthy items and special interest stories. Include a calendar of chapter meeting, chapter activities, meeting agendas, executive board members’ names and contact information, items of personal recognition or interest, and articles about members in different departments. You should also report on CSEA’s member-only discounts, telling them how they can recoup their dues dollars in savings. To find discounts that will interest your members, use Clipsheet and/or visit the Member Benefits section of the CSEA website, csea.com/benefits.

❸ State and legislative/political news

Look to the Clipsheet and communications your chapter president receives from CSEA to provide news about issues and/or legislation that impact all classified employees. Be sure that articles tell your readers how they can take action. Include CSEA programs in which your members may want to participate. Articles should mention deadlines and application details whenever appropriate.

Design The overall layout of your newsletter should be inviting to the reader, easy on the eye, neat and uncluttered. Your headline and body type styles should be easy to read. Art and/or photos should be used throughout the newsletter and should relate to content. Appropriate use of fonts, white space, columns and margins should be consistent throughout. Neon or astrobrite paper should be avoided. The banner, which is located on the front page, should include your chapter name and number, the CSEA shield, name of publication, and the month/year of distribution. The editor’s box should have the editor’s name (and others who helped produce the newsletter), mailing address, frequency of publication, and you may include other contact information as well. 93


❺ Writing skills, mechanics, originality

Your newsletter should not have misspelled words or typos. All rules of grammar and punctuation should be followed. Related names, facts, and dates should be consistent within each article as well as between articles. Articles should be concise and easy to read. Originality in writing is appreciated by your readers. Distribute your newsletter to all bargaining unit members, administration and school board members. Post your newsletter on the CSEA bulletin boards at each worksite, and on your website and social media accounts. Your goal is to produce a monthly publication.

e-Newsletter

Judging Newsletters

To fairly judge retiree newsletters, regional newsletters and chapter newsletters together, each has it's own evaluation form with equal weighted categories. See pages 96–101 for sample evaluation forms.

❶ Content

Your electronic newsletter content should be current, succinct, and written with the audience in mind: members, prospective members, non-members, parents, press, etc. Make good use of hyperlinks to break up long information into multiple pages. Provide contact information. Your e-newsletter should provide the appearance of a credible organization.

❷ Design

Your layout should be inviting to read with art and/or photos relating to content. Colors should be consistent throughout the e-newsletter, not using too much or too little. Font should be consistent and easy to read. Provide an option for a “printer friendly” version. The banner should include your chapter name and number, name of publication and date of publication. Provide interactivity so your readers are able to communicate with the editor, subscribe or unsubscribe, download material to distribute or post, etc. Ask members to volunteer, attend meetings, write to the school board, etc.

❸ Writing skills, mechanics, originality and distribution

Your e-newsletter should be consistent with related names, facts and dates. It should be well written, creative, concise and easy to read without errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization. Distribute your e-newsletter to all bargaining unit members and chapter leadership, school board members and administration.

Flyer

❶ Content

Include the 5 Ws and H: who, what, when, where, why and how. Use a strong and active headline. Have a clear purpose and call to action. Be sure to include contact information.

❷ Design

Your flyer should be inviting and easy to read; keep it simple and clean. Use art/ photo relevant to content. All body copy should be in the same typeface, keeping it short and to the point. Include the CSEA shield and chapter name and number.

94


Appendices

Website

❶ Content

Content should be original and creative, current and succinct, without errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization. It should be written with the audience in mind: members, prospective members, non-members, parents, press, etc. Make good use of hyperlinks to break up long information into multiple pages. Provide information about the chapter, including contact information. Your website should provide the appearance of a credible organization. Be sure to include chapter news, member benefits, legislative/political news, contract information/negotiations news, and negotiated benefits.

❷ Design

The first page of your website should tell you whose site it is, what you do, and how to begin to use the site. Include the CSEA shield. Use consistent font; colors should be consistent throughout the site, not using too much or too little. Sub-level pages should complement the design of the homepage. Content should be 80% of the page and navigation 20%. Special effects should add to the overall design. The length and width of the pages should be no more than three full screens for the homepage.

❸ Graphics

Take into consideration that users log on with different speeds and operating systems and use images of reasonable size. Images should add to the overall design; if it accompanies text, it should add to the content.

❹ Interactivity

Provide the ability to communicate with the webmaster. Ask your audience to do something, such as volunteer, attend meetings, call or write the school board or state representative. Give them the ability to join an e-mail list. Include downloadable material to distribute or post.

❺ Navigation/ease of use

Your website should “pop up” in your browser in a reasonable amount of time, based on access speed. Use a logical layout when placing content and links, use consistency in page navigation. It should be easy to understand where to “click,” use relevant and accurate link descriptions. It should be simple to understand where you are within the site. Special effects, such as mouse-overs and pop-up navigation, should be helpful. Provide a search feature. When posting downloadable files, be sure they are of reasonable size and include instructions on how to download. If specific software is needed to view content, it should be noted. Your site should be sensitive to varying access speeds of users.

95


Appendix F

Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Print/Chapter A-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Excellence – Print/Chapter)

I. Contract Information/Education/Enforcement, Negotiations News, and Negotiated Benefits • Contract Information/Education — An article, section, or paragraph from the contract — An explanation of what the above means to members

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

• Negotiations News — Where the chapter is in the negotiations process — Relevant information based on where the negotiations process is (e.g., survey, survey results, negotiation update, ratification vote results, etc.)

— Negotiations Team/Committee Members’ names and contact information.

• Negotiated Benefits — Highlight negotiated benefits (e.g., health insurance, salary, other fringe benefits)

• Contract Enforcement/Grievance — Information on a contract violation, the section(s) violated and resolution.

— Information on grievances filed with outcomes (keeping in mind confidentiality).

— An article relating to current or past grievances with a call to action (Has this happened to you? etc.)

• Job Steward Report — Job steward names and contact information. — Know Your Rights information (May or may not be contract related). There should be a KYR article even if there is no formal job steward

in the chapter. Originality encouraged

II. Chapter News and Member Benefits • Chapter News — Chapter calendar of events — Meeting agenda / highlights — Executive board names and contact information — Other items of interest to chapter members (e.g., special interest,

 Comments

member recognition)

• Member Benefits — Member-only discounts and benefits (Clipsheet localized)

III. State and Legislative/Political News • State News — Clipsheet articles, localized whenever possible — Localized references to Focus Magazine, csea.com • Legislative/Political News — Legislative news, political news, including a call to action. — Local political action (school board, bond measure, Assembly/Senate races, including a call to action).

96

 Comments


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Print/Chapter (cont’d) A-1

IV. Newsletter Design • Newsletter Design — Layout inviting to read — Art / photo related to content — Headline font and body font consistent throughout the newsletter — White space, columns and margins consistent throughout the

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

newsletter

— Paper: Neon or astrobright paper should be avoided • Banner — Located on front page, including: — Chapter name and number, CSEA shield — Name of publication — Month/Year of publication • Editor’s Box — Editor’s name (and others who helped produce the newsletter) — Mailing address (may have other contact information) — Frequency of publication

V. Writing Skills, Mechanics, Originality • Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within each article as well as between articles

 Comments

— Articles concise and easy to read • Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization • Originality — Well written, creative • Distribution — Newsletter published a minimum of five times per year — A monthly publication should be your goal

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

97


Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Print/Region A-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Excellence – Print/Region)

I. Regional Information/Education • RR’s message • Chapter reports (roundtable) • List of chapter presidents, including chapter name and number and

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

contact information

• RPM training highlights • Standing committee reports

II. Regional News • Calendar of events • Meeting agenda / highlights • Training opportunities • Regional team (ARR, RPRO, Regional Secretary) names and contact

 Comments

information

• Other items of interest to members (e.g., special interest, member recognition)

III. State and Legislative/Political News • State News — Clipsheet articles, localized whenever possible

— Localized references to Focus Magazine, csea.com Legislative/Political News

 Comments

— Legislative news, political news, including a call to action. — Local political action (school board, bond measure, Assembly/Senate races, including a call to action).

• PAC report

IV. Newsletter Design • Newsletter Design — Layout inviting to read — Art / photo related to content — Headline font and body font consistent throughout the newsletter — White space, columns and margins consistent throughout the

newsletter — Paper: Neon or astrobright paper should be avoided. Banner — Located on front page, including: — Region number, CSEA shield — Name of publication — Month/Year of publication

• Editor’s Box — Editor’s name (and others who helped produce the newsletter) — Mailing address (may have other contact information)

— Frequency of publication

98

 Comments


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Print/Region (cont’d) A-1

V. Writing Skills, Mechanics, Originality • Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within each article as well as between articles — Articles concise and easy to read

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

• Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization

• Originality — Well written, creative

• Distribution — Distributed to Regional Team, chapter presidents, CPROs, and LRRs serving the region.

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

99


Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Print/Retiree A-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Excellence – Print/Retiree)

I. Council Information/Education • President’s message • CalPERS/retirement issues/information • District director’s message

II. Council News and Member Benefits •

Council News

— Calendar of events — Meeting agenda / highlights — Training opportunities

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

— Council leadership names and contact information — Other items of interest to members (e.g., special interest, member

recognition) — Volunteer opportunities Member Benefits — Member-only discounts and benefits (Clipsheet localized) — Granny Grants

III. State and Legislative/Political News •

State News — Clipsheet articles, localized whenever possible — Localized references to Focus Magazine, csea.com

Legislative/Political News — Legislative news, political news, including a call to action

 Comments

— Local political action (school board, bond measure, Assembly/Senate elections, including a call to action)

• PAC report

IV. Newsletter Design • Newsletter Design — Layout inviting to read — Art / photo related to content — Headline font and body font consistent throughout the newsletter — White space, columns and margins consistent throughout the newsletter — Paper: Neon or astrobright paper should be avoided

• Banner — Located on front page, including: — Council number, CSEA shield — Name of publication — Month/Year of publication

• Editor’s Box — Editor’s name (and others who helped produce the newsletter) — Mailing address (may have other contact information) — Frequency of publication

100

 Comments


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Print/Retiree (cont’d) A-1

V. Writing Skills, Mechanics, Originality & Distribution • Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within each article as well as between articles — Articles concise and easy to read

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

• Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization

• Originality — Well written, creative

• Distribution — Council leadership — All council members — District director — Retiree Unit Executive Board

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

101


Sample Evaluation: Excellence–e-Newsletter A-2

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Excellence – e-Newsletter)

I. Content • •

• • • •

Content is succinct Content is written for the audience(s) in mind — Members, prospective members, non-members, parents, press, etc. Good use of hyperlinks (used to help break up long information into multiple pages) Content is current Contact information is provided Provides the appearance of a credible organization

II. Design •

E-Newsletter Design — Layout inviting to read — Art / photo related to content — Use of color: Not too much, not too little. Colors should be consistent throughout the e-newsletter. — Should provide an option for a “printer friendly” version — Font should be consistent and easy to read. (Consider font size, type, color and background color.)

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

Banner — Including the chapter name and number/region number/retiree council number. — Name of publication — Date of publication

• Interactivity — Should be able to communicate with the Editor. — You are asked to do something. (Join; volunteer; attend meetings; call or write your state representatives, school board member, congressmen) — Ability to subscribe/unsubscribe — Ability to download material to distribute or post

III. Writing Skills, Mechanics, Originality & Distribution

• Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent — Concise and easy to read • Writing Mechanics

Comments

— No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization • Originality — Well written, creative • Distribution — Members and leadership — All bargaining unit members, school board members, administration (chapters only)

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

102


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Web A-3

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Excellence – Web)

I. Content • •

The content is succinct The content is written for the audience(s) in mind. — Members, prospective members, non-members, parents, press, etc.

• •

No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization Good use of hyperlinks (used to help break up long information into multiple pages) Original and creative Content is current Information about the chapter/region/council, including contact information Provides the appearance of a credible organization Standard content of the union Web site includes: — Chapter/Region/Council News — Member Benefits — Legislative/Political News — Contract information/negotiation news (Chapters only) — Negotiated Benefits (Chapters only)

• • • • •

II. Design •

• •

• • • • •

The first page should tell you whose site it is, what they do, and how to begin to use the site Includes CSEA shield Sub-level pages — Sub-level pages have a consistent design — Complement the design of the homepage — Content is 80% of the page and navigation 20% Use of color: Not too much or too little; colors are consistent throughout the site Provides an option for a “printer friendly” version Font is consistent and easy to read (Consider font size, type, color and background color) Special effects (scrolling news, mouse-overs, etc.) should add to the overall design The length/width of pages is appropriate (No more than three full screens for the homepage)

III. Graphics

• The site considers that users log on with different speeds and operating systems • The images of reasonable size • The images add to the overall design • If graphic image accompanies text, it should add to the content

IV. Interactivity • •

• •

Ability to communicate with the Webmaster You are asked to do something (Join; volunteer; attend meetings; call or write your state representatives, school board member, congressmen) Ability to join an e-mail list Ability to download material to distribute or post

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

 Comments

 Comments

103


Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Web (cont’d) A-3

V. Navigation/Ease of Use •

• • • • • • •

The site “pops up” in your browser in a reasonable amount of time, based on your access speed The site seems to have a logical layout. Content and links are where you expect them to be There is consistent navigation from one page to the next Easy to understand where to “click”. Link descriptions should be relevant and accurate Simple to understand where you are within the site Special effects (mouse-overs, pop-up navigation) should be helpful There is a search feature Downloadable files — Files to be downloaded are of reasonable size — There are instructions on how to download a file — If specific software is needed to view this content, it should be noted. You should be able to download this software from a link from the site — The site is sensitive to varying access speeds of users

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

104


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Excellence–Flyer A-4

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Excellence – Flyer)

I. Content • 5 Ws and H (who, what, when, where, why, how) • Strong, active headline • Clear purpose • Call to action, including contact information

II. Design • Inviting and easy to read, simple and clean • Art/photo relevant to content • All body copy in the same typeface • Copy short and to the point • CSEA shield, including organizational I.D. (chapter, region, retiree council)

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

105


Sample Evaluation: Design–Print B-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Design – Print)

Design • Newsletter Design — Layout inviting to read — Art / photo related to content — Headline font and body font consistent throughout the newsletter — White space, columns and margins consistent throughout the

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

newsletter

— Paper: Neon or astrobright paper should be avoided • Banner — Located on front page, including: — Chapter name and number, CSEA shield — Name of publication — Month/Year of publication • Editor’s Box — Editor’s name (and others who helped produce the newsletter) — Mailing address (may have other contact information) — Frequency of publication

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

106


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Design–e-Newsletter B-2

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Design – e-Newsletter)

Design •

E-Newsletter Design — Layout inviting to read

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

— Art / photo related to content — Use of color: Not too much, not too little. Colors should be consistent throughout the e-newsletter. — Should provide an option for a “printer friendly” version — Font should be consistent and easy to read. (Consider font size, type, color and background color.) • Banner — Including the chapter name and number/region number/retiree council number. — Name of publication — Date of publication • Interactivity — Should be able to communicate with the Editor. — You are asked to do something. (Join; volunteer; attend meetings; call or write your state representatives, school board member, congressmen) — Ability to subscribe/unsubscribe — Ability to download material to distribute or post

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

107


Sample Evaluation: Design–Web B-3

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Design – Web)

Design •

• •

• • • •

The first page should tell you whose site it is, what they do, and how to begin to use the site Includes CSEA shield Sub-level pages — Sub-level pages have a consistent design — Complement the design of the homepage — Content is 80% of the page and navigation 20% Use of color: Not too much or too little; colors are consistent throughout the site Provides an option for a “printer friendly” version Font is consistent and easy to read (Consider font size, type, color and background color) Special effects (scrolling news, mouse-overs, etc.) should add to the overall design The length/width of pages is appropriate (No more than three full screens

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

for the homepage)

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

108


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Design–Flyer B-4

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Design – Flyer)

Design • • • • •

Inviting and easy to read, simple and clean Art/photo relevant to content All body copy in the same typeface Copy short and to the point CSEA shield, including organizational I.D. (chapter, region, retiree council)

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

109


Sample Evaluation: Photography–Print C-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Photography – Print)

I. Newsworthiness • • • • •

“A picture is worth a thousand words” The picture tells the story without the need for an article The picture illustrates what the article is about. The picture inspires emotion/action in the reader The picture should be timely — It was taken at the same time as the event that the article talks about — Pictures of events as they take place or things as they happen are better than posed pictures Photo and caption should be complementary

II. Imagery •

• • • • •

Focus on the important part of the event/action when taking the picture — Action shots are better than static ones Be sure all the main players/events you want to capture are in the picture. Be sure the image isn’t too busy — Keep the background clean Frame the picture correctly (don’t cut off heads, etc.) Focus correctly (so that the image isn’t blurry) Fill the frame with the subject

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

110


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Photography–e-Newsletter C-2

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Photography – e-Newsletter)

I. Newsworthiness • • • • •

“A picture is worth a thousand words” The picture tells the story without the need for an article The picture illustrates what the article is about. The picture inspires emotion/action in the reader The picture should be timely — It was taken at the same time as the event that the article talks about — Pictures of events as they take place or things as they happen are better than posed pictures Photo and caption should be complementary

II. Imagery •

• • • • •

Focus on the important part of the event/action when taking the picture — Action shots are better than static ones Be sure all the main players/events you want to capture are in the picture. Be sure the image isn’t too busy — Keep the background clean Frame the picture correctly (don’t cut off heads, etc.) Focus correctly (so that the image isn’t blurry) Fill the frame with the subject

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

111


Sample Evaluation: Photography–Web C-4

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Photography – Flyer)

I. Newsworthiness • • • • •

“A picture is worth a thousand words” The picture tells the story without the need for an article The picture illustrates what the article is about. The picture inspires emotion/action in the reader The picture should be timely — It was taken at the same time as the event that the article talks about — Pictures of events as they take place or things as they happen are better than posed pictures Photo and caption should be complementary

II. Imagery •

• • • • •

Focus on the important part of the event/action when taking the picture — Action shots are better than static ones Be sure all the main players/events you want to capture are in the picture. Be sure the image isn’t too busy — Keep the background clean Frame the picture correctly (don’t cut off heads, etc.) Focus correctly (so that the image isn’t blurry) Fill the frame with the subject

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

112


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Photography–Flyer C-3

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Photography – Web)

I. Newsworthiness • • • • •

“A picture is worth a thousand words” The picture tells the story without the need for an article The picture illustrates what the article is about. The picture inspires emotion/action in the reader The picture should be timely — It was taken at the same time as the event that the article talks about — Pictures of events as they take place or things as they happen are better than posed pictures Photo and caption should be complementary

II. Imagery •

• • • • •

Focus on the important part of the event/action when taking the picture — Action shots are better than static ones Be sure all the main players/events you want to capture are in the picture. Be sure the image isn’t too busy — Keep the background clean Frame the picture correctly (don’t cut off heads, etc.) Focus correctly (so that the image isn’t blurry) Fill the frame with the subject

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

113


Sample Evaluation: News Article/Story–Print D-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (News Article/Story – Print)

I. Content •

5 Ws and H (who, what, when, where, why, how)

• • • • • •

Facts only (no personal opinions) Written in “inverted pyramid style” (most important information first) Strong, active headline Strong lead Use quotes (early in the article) to tell the story Use “active” voice

II. Quality of Writing •

• •

Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within the article — Concise and easy to read Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization Originality — Well written, creative

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

114


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: News Article/Story–e-Newsletter D-2

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (News Article/Story – e-Newsletter)

I. Content •

5 Ws and H (who, what, when, where, why, how)

• • • • • •

Facts only (no personal opinions) Written in “inverted pyramid style” (most important information first) Strong, active headline Strong lead Use quotes (early in the article) to tell the story Use “active” voice

II. Quality of Writing •

• •

Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within the article — Concise and easy to read Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization Originality — Well written, creative

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

115


Sample Evaluation: News Article/Story–Web D-3

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (News Article/Story – Web)

I. Content •

5 Ws and H (who, what, when, where, why, how)

• • • • • •

Facts only (no personal opinions) Written in “inverted pyramid style” (most important information first) Strong, active headline Strong lead Use quotes (early in the article) to tell the story Use “active” voice

II. Quality of Writing •

• •

Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within the article — Concise and easy to read Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization Originality — Well written, creative

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

116


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Column/Editorial–Print E-1

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Column/Editorial – Print)

I. Motivate/Persuade • Develop an opinion • Change an opinion • Take action • Act a certain way

II. Use of Facts • Facts build the case. • Tell why or why not • Credible statistical sources • Cannot contradict CSEA policy, constitution & bylaws, or official positions • Must be directly attributed to a person or group

III. Quality of Writing • Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within the article — Concise and easy to read • Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization • Originality — Well written, creative • Keep CSEA and the chapter in a positive light • Civilized discussion; don’t put people on the defense • People are more likely to adopt a new idea when not annoyed • Everyone believes that they are right; offer them a better choice • Explain the evidence and a positive basis for your argument • People will listen longer to pleasant, fact-based comments and points

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

117


Sample Evaluation: Column/Editorial–e-Newsletter E-2

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Column/Editorial – e-Newsletter)

I. Motivate/Persuade • Develop an opinion • Change an opinion • Take action • Act a certain way

II. Use of Facts • Facts build the case. • Tell why or why not • Credible statistical sources • Cannot contradict CSEA policy, constitution & bylaws, or official positions • Must be directly attributed to a person or group

III. Quality of Writing • Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within the article — Concise and easy to read • Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization • Originality — Well written, creative • Keep CSEA and the chapter in a positive light • Civilized discussion; don’t put people on the defense • People are more likely to adopt a new idea when not annoyed • Everyone believes that they are right; offer them a better choice • Explain the evidence and a positive basis for your argument • People will listen longer to pleasant, fact-based comments and points

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

118


Appendices

Sample Evaluation: Column/Editorial–Web E-3

California School Employees Association COMMUNICATION AWARDS EVALUATION (Column/Editorial – Web)

I. Motivate/Persuade • Develop an opinion • Change an opinion • Take action • Act a certain way

II. Use of Facts • Facts build the case. • Tell why or why not • Credible statistical sources • Cannot contradict CSEA policy, constitution & bylaws, or official positions • Must be directly attributed to a person or group

III. Quality of Writing • Writing Skills — Related names, facts, and dates consistent within the article — Concise and easy to read • Writing Mechanics — No errors in grammar, spelling, punctuation and capitalization • Originality — Well written, creative • Keep CSEA and the chapter in a positive light • Civilized discussion; don’t put people on the defense • People are more likely to adopt a new idea when not annoyed • Everyone believes that they are right; offer them a better choice • Explain the evidence and a positive basis for your argument • People will listen longer to pleasant, fact-based comments and points

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Excellent

Very Good

Good

Fair

Comments

 Comments

 Comments

General Comments

Overall Evaluation

119


Appendix G

How to Contact CSEA CSEA Headquarters

2045 Lundy Avenue, San Jose, CA  95131 (408) 473-1000  •  (800) 632-2128 Accounting

FAX (408) 943-1746

Association President FAX (408) 922-6859 Communications

FAX (408) 577-0582

Executive

FAX (408) 321-8227

Field Operations

FAX (408) 432-8578

Human Resources & Training

FAX (408) 435-5021

Information Systems

FAX (408) 321-8226

Legal

FAX (408) 954-0948

Member Benefits

FAX (408) 432-6249

Organizing

FAX (408) 954-9417

Research

FAX (408) 954-9417

Member Benefits

(866) IT’S-CSEA (487-2732)

Governmental Relations Office

1127 11th Street, Suite 346 Sacramento, CA 95814 (916) 444-0598  •  (800) 867-2026 FAX (916) 444-8539

Costa y Valles Field Office

1505 Gardena Avenue Glendale, CA 91204 (818) 244-1545  •  (800) 834-9959 FAX (818) 244-8899

Fresno Field Office

2501 West Shaw Avenue, Suite 107 Fresno, CA 93711 (559) 226-4200  •  (800) 439-6626 FAX (559) 226-8428

North Bay Field Office

2345 Stanwell Circle Concord, CA 94520 (925) 676-5755  •  (800) 464-7717 FAX (925) 676-8351 120

Orange Field Office

326 West Katella Avenue, Suite E Orange, CA 92867 (714) 532-3766  •  (800) 564-9979 FAX (714) 771-8412

Rancho Cucamonga Field Office

10211 Trademark Street, Unit A Rancho Cucamonga, CA 91730 (909) 466-1006  •  (800) 526-9297 FAX (909) 466-1105

River Delta Field Office

5375 North West Lane Stockton, CA 95210 (209) 472-2170  •  (800) 757-4229 FAX (209) 472-2089

Sacramento Field Office

8217 Auburn Boulevard Citrus Heights, CA 95610 (916) 725-1188  •  (800) 582-7314 FAX (916) 725-3735

San Diego Field Office

6341 Nancy Ridge Drive San Diego, CA 92121 (858) 458-0300  •  (800) 675-9939 FAX (858) 677-8992

Santa Fe Field Office

4600 Santa Anita Avenue El Monte, CA 91731-9912 (626) 258-3300  •  (800) 988-6949 FAX (626) 444-1373

South Bay Field Office

3350 Scott Blvd, Bldg 18 Santa Clara, CA 95054 (408) 261-7990  •  (800) 487-2440 FAX (408) 235-8678


Style Guide and Glossary

Style Guide and Glossary of Terms A__________________________ Accept, Except—Accept means to receive. Except means to exclude. Acronym—A word formed from the initial letters of a compound term. Always spell out a term upon first use, followed by the acronym in parenthesis. Ex: Classified School Employee Week (CSEW) is the third week in May. Active Voice—Correct style of sentence construction, where the subject of the sentence performs the action. See page 48. Addresses, Online—Online addresses should be published in italics, and you should try to construct the sentence so the address does not come at the end of a sentence or run into any punctuation (Ex: Send your e-mail to us at website@csea.com and/or call the toll-free phone number...). In general, most e-mail addresses and World Wide Web addresses are no longer case-sensitive (upper and lowercase); however, just to be safe, publish online addresses exactly as they are submitted to you. Check online addresses to make sure they work before publishing them in your newsletter. Administrative Law Judge (ALJ)—An official who conducts hearings under the jurisdiction of an agency (formerly known as a hearing officer). Most CSEA contacts with administrative law judges are in connection with disputes under collective bargaining and unemployment laws. Advertisements, CSEA Candidates—Advertisements for candidates for CSEA offices should be treated consistently, showing no favoritism to any candidate. Publish ads exactly as they are submitted, and give each candidate the same amount of space for their ads. Advertisements, Paid—Refer to CSEA’s advertising guidelines (Appendix D). Affect, Effect—Affect is a verb, meaning to influence. Effect is a noun, meaning a result. Age—Only use a person’s age when it’s an essential element of the story (such as retirement eligibility). Agency Shop—A provision in a collective bargaining agreement that requires, as a condition of employment, employees in the unit who fail to join the union to pay a service fee to the union or a designated charity. This provision is to compensate the union that, by law, must provide full and equal representation to all members of the unit it represents. Aid, Aide—Aid is assistance. Aide is a person (Ex: instructional aide). CSEA’s preferred usage is paraeducator. Alley—Space between columns of type on a page. Also called Gutter. Appreciating Classified Employees (ACE)—A program occurring annually during Classified School Employee Week. The ACE program consists of school district administrators and trustees shadowing classified employees for a portion of a day to learn first-hand their daily responsibilities and contributions to public education. Arbitration—A dispute settlement procedure, generally in the contract, where the union and the employer submit their differences to a third party for a final and binding decision. Arbitrator—An impartial third party to whom the employer and the union submit their disputes for decision (award). May also be referred to as an arbiter, hearing officer or umpire. Area, CSEA—Capitalize when used with the letter of the area, when referring to CSEA areas (Ex: Area H); lowercase when plural or when used generically (Ex: In our area, there are several CSEA regions.). 121


Area Code—Use parenthetical style [Ex: (408)]; Put a space between the area code and the phone number [Ex: (408) 473-1000]; Don’t use a “1” before the (800) in a toll-free number. Area Director—See Titles, Membership entry. Assembly, Assemblymember—See Legislature entry. Associated Press (AP)—The Associated Press Style Guide is the industry standard for style. This CSEA Guide, however, supercedes the AP Guide. Association—Capitalize only when used with the full name: California School Employees Association. Use “association” sparingly as a lowercase second reference; “union” is the preferred usage for a second reference (Ex: CSEA is the union for classified employees). Association President—CSEA’s highest-ranking member leader elected by the delegates at the association’s conference. Capitalize when using before a proper name (EX. Association President John Doe). See also Titles, Membership entry.

B__________________________ Back Pay—Wages required to be paid to an employee who has been denied rightful pay or who has been discharged or disciplined in violation of a legal or contract right. Banner—Portion of front page of a newsletter that graphically presents its name and subtitle, and may include publication date, volume/issue number and other information. Bay Area—Uppercase when denoting widely known regions (Ex: the San Francisco Bay Area). Blurb—Short quotation from an article repeated in large type as a graphic within a column of text. Also called Callout or Pull Quote. No attribution is necessary. Double quote marks only—and then only when using a direct quote from the body copy. If you are pulling out text that you wrote (it’s not a quote in the body of the story), don’t put quote marks around it in the blurb. Board of Directors, CSEA—Capitalize and always use “The CSEA Board of Directors” on first reference. However, lowercase “board” in abbreviated subsequent references (the board took action to...). See also Titles, Membership entry. Same goes for a chapter executive board, or any other board (PERS board, etc.). Body Text—The articles that make up the bulk of a newsletter, excluding their headlines, bylines, subheads and photo captions. Should be in a serif font no smaller than 10 points. Also called Text or Copy. Boldface—Heavier version of a type style. Bullets—Bold dot (•) used for emphasis. Often used in place of numerals in a list. When using bullets in body copy or in a box, capitalize the first letter of the first word only. Punctuate consistently. Bumping—Exercise of rights in a seniority system. Rights of workers with job seniority to displace newer employees when conditions require temporary or permanent layoffs, or to obtain preference over newer employees in choice of shifts, runs, dates of vacations, etc. Byline—Credit line at the beginning of a story telling who wrote it.

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Style Guide and Glossary

C__________________________ Callout—See Blurb entry. Caption—Identifying or descriptive text accompanying a photograph or other visual element. Also called a Cutline. Cease and Desist Order—Directive issued by the National Labor Relations Board or Public Employment Relations Board of California requiring the employer or union to abstain from an unfair labor practice. Chairperson—Use “chairperson,” regardless of gender. Capitalize when used before a proper name (Ex: Scholarship Committee Chairperson Jane Doe). Lowercase the title when it appears after a proper name (Ex: Jane Doe, Scholarship Committee chairperson, said...). See also Titles, Membership and Committees, CSEA entries. Chapter—Use the word “members” with the word “chapter,” to humanize the sentence; people will feel more empathy with the actions of “chapter members” as opposed to the actions of inhuman “chapters.” Capitalize and always use the full chapter name and number on first reference (Ex: El Oso Chapter 1020 members). Chapter Officers—(President, Secretary, Chapter Communications Officer (CCO), Bargaining Chairperson, Union Steward, etc.). See Titles, Membership entry. Classified Employee—Acceptable alternate references are: classified workers, classified staff, classified workforce, educational workforce and school employees. When discussing CSEA members working together with other groups in coalition, it’s acceptable to use “public employees.” Try to avoid “classifieds” as much as possible. Classified School Employee Week—“Employee” is singular, not plural. Acceptable to abbreviate to CSEW in second references. Clip Art—Drawings and graphics that are ready for printing. Collective Bargaining Agreement (CBA)—A unionized employee’s contract. Acceptable to interchange with “contract.” Commas (series)—Don’t use commas before the last element in a series (Ex: Dick, Jane and Spot), unless the series contains a compound element (Ex: secretaries, maintenance and groundskeepers, and custodians are eligible...). Committees, CSEA—Capitalize the formal name of all committees (chapter and state) and distinguish between a “chapter” and a “state” committee. Compound Modifiers—When a compound modifier—two or more words that express a single concept— precedes a noun, use hyphens to link all the words in the compound except the adverb very and all adverbs that end in ly (Ex: a first-quarter touchdown, a bluish-green dress, a full-time job, a know-it-all attitude, a very good time, an easily remembered rule). Conference—Capitalize when used as a proper noun (the full conference name). (Ex: Members at the 2013 Annual Conference; or the 87th Annual Conference). Lowercase when used as an adjective or as a generic noun (Ex: At the annual conference; conference delegates took action to...). Conference Delegates—Refers to members elected to attend CSEA's annual conference. Contact Names—When giving a contact name try to include the person’s phone number and extension number if applicable.

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Contract—See Collective Bargaining Agreement entry. Contracting-In—The CSEA program where workers inside a department bid against outside contractors to provide a district service (such as transportation). On first reference always use: CSEA’s Contracting-In Program. Contracting-Out—The practice of hiring outside contractors to do work normally done by bargaining unit employees. Always lowercase and hyphenate this phrase. Contributors Box—Lists contributors to newsletter articles. Copy—See Body Text entry. Copy editing—Checking and correcting a document for spelling, grammar, punctuation, inconsistencies, inaccuracies, and conformity to style requirements. Copyright—Ownership of creative work by the writer, photographer, or artist who made it. (See page 89.) Cost-of-Living Adjustment (COLA)—This generally refers to a clause in a contract providing for wage adjustments based upon changes in the Consumer Price Index. Co-workers—Hyphenate. CSEA Association President—Not “CSEA’s (possessive) association president.” Uppercase “association” when title is capitalized before a proper name (Ex: CSEA Association President John Doe). See also Titles, Membership entry. CSEA President—Capitalize when using before a proper name (EX. CSEA President John Doe). See also Titles, Membership entry. Cutlines—Use commas to note location in photo (Ex: John Doe, left, gets an award). Cutlines are always written in present tense, unless used for historical effect.

D__________________________ Datelines—City where news event occurred, typed in all capital letters at the beginning of a story. (Ex: SACRAMENTO—The governor signed important legislation for classified employees...). Decades—Use numerals with no apostrophe (Ex: 1960s). Exception: Headlines can use abbreviated form for copy fitting purposes (Ex: ‘60s). Decertification (Decert)—Withdrawal of a union from the status of exclusive bargaining unit representative. The vote could be for no representation, or for a rival union to be the exclusive bargaining agent. Dingbat—A decorative symbolic device used to separate items on the page, denote items in a list, or at the end of an article (Ex: n t ✓ ➐). District—Lowercase unless used with full name (Ex: The district has agreed...; El Oso School District has agreed...). Duty of Fair Representation (DFR)—The employee organization recognized or certified as the exclusive representative for the purpose of negotiations and representational matters shall fairly represent each and every employee in the appropriate unit.

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Style Guide and Glossary

E__________________________ Editing—Checking and correcting a document to make sure it’s organized well, is easy to read and covers all relevant information. Also, cutting or lengthening a story to fit the desired space on a page. Editor—Person responsible for the content in a publication. Editor’s Box—See Masthead entry. Editor’s Note—A brief message from the editor about a story that needs additional information or an explanation to the readers. Usually appears at end of an article in bold italics. Editorial—An article which reflects the opinion of the writer or publication. Education Code (Ed Code)—The state law that governs California public education. Always capitalize and spell out on first reference. Educational Employment Relations Act (EERA)—Also known as SB 160 (Rodda) and the Rodda Act. The EERA is that portion of the California Government Code that provides the right to public school employees to join unions, organize and engage in collective bargaining with their employers. Employee Assistance Program (EAP)—Term used to describe a program, usually administered by a joint union/management committee, which attempts to identify employees with personal problems which may also affect their worklife. This includes, but is not necessarily limited to, identifying alcohol and drug-related problems and making referrals to public and private resources for assistance. Employer-Employee Relations Committees (EERC)—A holdover from pre-collective-bargaining days, these joint union/management committees meet periodically to discuss major problems and concerns—whether or not the issues are subject to the grievance procedure or to negotiations. Their information sharing suggests that both parties are willing at all times to meet to review problems and complaints before the issues become formal grievances or collective bargaining disputes.

F___________________________ Fact-Finding—Identification of the major issues in a particular dispute (usually contract negotiations), review of the positions of the parties and resolution of factual differences by one or more finders of fact who then make recommendations for settlement of the dispute. Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA)—Federal statute originally enacted in 1938. The act prohibits oppressive child labor, establishes minimum hourly wage and overtime hours in excess of 40 hours per week, equal pay for equal work, required payment for work suffered or permitted by employers, etc. Fair share payer—All non-union employees in a bargaining unit. These individuals are assessed a fee used to defray the cost of services rendered by the exclusive representative. Also Service fee payer (SFP). Field Office—Capitalize when used with location as the proper name of a place (Ex: CSEA Fresno Field Office). Lowercase when used generically (Ex: CSEA’s field offices are located throughout the state...). Flush Left—Type aligned vertically along the left side of a column, with a staggered (ragged) right edge. Flush Right—Type aligned vertically along the right side of a column, with a staggered (ragged) left edge.

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Folio—Information that runs at the top or bottom of every page (except the front page), usually containing the name of the publication and the page number. Font—Complete assortment of characters of one typeface (Ex: Times Roman, Helvetica, etc.). Format—Size, shape, and style of a layout or printed piece. Fringe Benefits—Term used to encompass all benefits provided by law and contract, such as holidays, vacation, sick leave, insurances, medical benefits, pensions, etc., in addition to direct wages.

G__________________________ Graphics—Artwork in a newsletter that adds visual interest. Grievance—An employee complaint; an allegation by an employee, group of employees or the union of a harm by the employer or that the collective bargaining agreement has been violated. Grievances are dissatisfactions that may or may not involve subjects covered by the agreement. They could be violations of employer policy, rules, past practices and law.

H__________________________ Headline—Group of words that summarizes and advertises the article that follows. Headlines should be written in present tense; should contain a subject and a verb; and should not contain articles (a, an, the). Headquarters, CSEA—Always uppercase. Preferred use is “CSEA Headquarters in San Jose.” As a second reference use “CSEA Headquarters” or “headquarters.” Healthcare— CSEA has adopted usage style of one word. Higher Education Employer-Employee Relations Act (HEERA)—Similar to the EERA and administered by PERB, this act governs collective bargaining for employees of California’s state universities and colleges.

I___________________________ Impasse—A point in contract negotiations where either or both parties determine no further progress can be made toward reaching an agreement. In the public sector, impasses call for the intervention of a mediator appointed through the Public Employment Relations Board (PERB). Industrial Accident or Illness—An injury or illness arising out of, or in the course of employment. Internet—This is a proper noun and should always be uppercase. Italics—Letterforms that slant to the right.

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Style Guide and Glossary

J___________________________ Jargon—Obscure, confused, or “insider” language marked by acronyms or long words. Union Steward, Shop Union Steward—Union representative elected or appointed to represent unit workers at a particular site or group of sites, departments, work group, etc. Duties generally include posting of union notices and news, receiving, investigating and processing grievances, recruiting new members, reporting union activities and programs to union and unit members, etc. Works in cooperation with other chapter leaders and the LRRs. Job Titles—See Occupational Titles entry. Jumps—Also called Jumpline or Jump Cut. It directs readers to the page upon which a story is continued. They are always italicized (Ex: Continued on page 3; See Negotiations Update, page 3 ). Just Cause (Also referred to as “Reasonable Cause” or simply “Cause”)—Sufficient reason for discipline; a term commonly used in agreement provisions safeguarding unit members from unjust punishment. A criteria often used by arbitrators in discipline hearings. Justified—Type with lines beginning and ending evenly. Not recommended for newsletters, which should generally be flush left.

K__________________________ Kicker—Small, secondary headline placed above an article’s primary headline to supplement it.

L __________________________ Labor Relations Representative (LRR)—A paid CSEA staff person who works for, but is not a member of CSEA. Like all other paid CSEA staff, LRRs do not vote on any union matters. LRRs are assigned a certain number of CSEA chapters, which they help with all matters pertaining to representation of the bargaining unit, including: assistance with grievances, contract negotiations, and quasi-judicial hearings. vLast Best Offer—An attempt by the negotiating parties to effect a settlement of contract negotiations with the implied threat of a strike or lockout if the offer is not accepted. Also a method of arbitration in which each party submits its “last best offer” to the arbitrator who must choose one as his final decision. This form of arbitration is sometimes referred to as “baseball” arbitration, “either/or” arbitration and “forced choice” arbitration. Layout—Plan for a newsletter showing position and size of text and graphics. Leading—Amount of space between lines of type. Pronounced “ledding.” Leads—A source for information you would include in a story. Ledes—The first few sentences of an article. Should be no longer than one or two sentences. Pronounced “leed.” Legislation—Refers to a bill that has not been passed into law yet. So, when you are explaining the intent of legislation, always use the subjunctive form [Ex: the bill would (not “will”) restrict...].

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Legislator—Refers to elected members of the Legislature. Also called State Representative. Capitalize Assemblymember and Senator when it appears before a name, but do not capitalize it when used generically or after a comma. Never capitalize legislator, as it is a common noun. Legislature—Refers to a specific body in California’s state government (the Assembly and Senate). Since it is a proper noun, always capitalize Legislature, but don’t capitalize “state.” (Ex: state Legis­lature.) Capitalize Assembly and Senate always. Always distinguish between state and national senators (Ex: The state Senate opposed the U.S. Senate’s position). Lowercase—Letters that are not capitals.

M__________________________ Make Whole—The process of undoing a wrong against an individual who has been harmed by an employer. The employee is “made whole” by reinstatement with back pay in the same status that he/she would have been had there been no improper action. Making whole may also involve adjustments in seniority, wage status, promotions, etc. Margins—White space that forms the border of a pagad—Block of information in a newsletter that idenanization, its address, telephone number, frequency of publication, and editor’s name. Also called Editor’s Box. Mediation—Neutral third party intervention and assistance to facilitate a settlement of a dispute between the employer and the employee’s union. Membership Figures—CSEA has more than 220,000 members (this includes retiree members). CSEA represents “nearly 230,000 classified and other public employees” (this figure includes the the non-members CSEA represents). For current membership/representational figures, use the CSEA Accounting Department’s monthly membership report to the association Board of Directors (mailed to the chapter presidents in the board meeting minutes). Memorandum of Understanding (MOU)—A binding, written agreement between a chapter and their district that typically serves as an addendum to the contract. Meyers, Milias, Brown Act (MMB)—The California labor law covering public employees who work for cities, counties and special districts.

N__________________________ Newsletter—Short, usually informal publication presenting specialized information to limited audiences on a regular basis. Northern California—Uppercase when denoting widely known regions (Ex: Area A is in Northern California). Number—Issue number; see Volume/Issue Number entry. Numerals—Spell out numbers of nine or fewer. Use numerals for numbers of 10 or more (Ex: The three events drew a crowd of 250 people). Do not begin a sentence with numerals.

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Style Guide and Glossary

O__________________________ Occupational Safety and Health Act (OSHA)—Law adopted in 1970 giving the federal government authority to prescribe and enforce safety an health standards in most industries. (CAL-OSHA is the California equivalent.) Occupational Titles—Lowercase (Ex: secretary Jane Doe, maintenance worker John Doe). Capitalize official job titles (i.e. as they appear in the contract), including those which use Roman numerals (Ex: Clerk III Jane Doe, Maintenance Technician John Doe). Officers, CSEA—Capitalize title when used before proper name; lowercase when they are separated from the name by a comma or when used generically (Ex: Secretary John Doe; Jane Doe, secretary; Candidates for secretary...). See also Titles, Membership entry. Offices, CSEA—Capitalize the name of CSEA offices and departments (Ex: CSEA Governmental Relations Office). See also Field Office entry. Online—This phrase is always one word, whether it’s used as a noun or as a modifier. Out-of-Class Pay—Extra pay for work performed which is not required of the employee’s position.

P__________________________ PACE—Political Action for Classified Employees Committee (state level). Should be referred to as “the union’s (or CSEA’s) political action committee (PACE).” Lowercase this paraphrase. Party Affiliation—Democrat, Republican, etc. Always uppercase. Passive Voice—The form of the verb used when the subject is the receiver of the action. Active voice is the preferred usage. (See page 48.) PDF File—Adobe Acrobat™ file format. Some Clipsheet pages are available in this format on CSEA’s website (www.csea.com). To use these files, you will need computer software called Acrobat Reader™, which you should be able to download onto your computer for free. Plain Text—Highly translatable file format. You can import the file directly into your word processing or layout program. You should be able to customize or edit any plain text file to fit your newsletter. Proofreading—Carefully checking printed copy for errors before the publications goes to press. Should be done by someone other than the author of the article(s). Proposition, Ballot—Capitalize when used with a number (Ex: Proposition 98). Always spell out “proposition” in first reference. Acceptable to abbreviate in headlines and in subsequent references, when used with a number (Ex: Prop. 98). Lowercase when used generically (Ballot propositions determine...). Acceptable alternatives are “ballot initiative” and “ballot measure.” Protected Activity—Any activity protected by law permitting employees to organize, form, join and participate in organizations of their own choice and be represented by such organizations in their professional and employment relations with an employer.

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Public Employees’ Retirement System (CalPERS)—Note plural possessive—this is the “official” name. Executive board of CalPERS is called the “CalPERS Board of Administration.” Any abbreviation of that, or any abbreviated second reference should be lowercase (Ex: The CalPERS board...). Always spell out first reference, unless it’s explained (Ex: CalPERS, our retirement system, is ... ). Public Employment Relations Board (PERB)—The administrative agency designated to oversee the provisions of California’s public-sector collective bargaining laws. Pull Quote—See Blurb entry.

Q__________________________ Quotations, Attribution—All quotes should be attributed to a specific person, not an organization. Put person’s name first, “said” second (Ex: Smith said). Give person’s CSEA or job title on first attribution. If the title is long, it’s okay to put the “said” first (Ex: said John Doe, chairperson of the Health and Safety Committee).

R__________________________ Ragged Left—Type not justified at the left margin. Ragged Right—Type not justified at the right margin. Ratification—Formal approval vote of a contract or amendments to an existing contract by vote of the union members of the unit. (Refer to CSEA Policy 610.) Ream—Five hundred sheets of paper (printer/copier paper is usually packaged in this quantity). Reclassification—The upgrading of a position to a higher classification as a result of the gradual increase of the duties being performed by the incumbent in such position. Reclassification of a position may grant the incumbent of such position certain legal and contractual rights. Region, CSEA—On first reference use “Region” and number (Ex: Region 4). Lowercase “R” in Region when used generically (Ex: CSEA has 69 regions statewide..., your region can...). In a title, capitalize Region when used with a number, even when it appears after the comma (Ex: Jane Doe, Region 69 representative, said ...) Regional Political Action Coordinators (PACs)—Preferred style on first reference is: John Doe, Region 10 political action coordinator. Preferable to refer to them as “political action coordinators” on subsequent references, but “PAC John Doe” is acceptable if title is used excessively in the story. Lowercase if used generically. Don’t use apostrophe in “PACs.” See also Titles, Membership entry. Regional Communications Officers (RCOs)—See entry above. Preferred style on first reference is: Jane Doe, Region 5 communications officer. OK to refer to them as “communications officers” or “RCOs” (no apostrophe) on subsequent references. See also Titles, Membership entry. Regional Representative (RR)—Preferred style on first reference is: Jane Doe, Region 14 representative. See also Titles, Membership entry. Religious References—Don’t use unless germane. Instead, use “Happy Holidays”, “Season’s Greetings”, “Spring Break” or “Winter Break”.

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Style Guide and Glossary

Reopener, Reopening Clause—Clause in a contract calling for the reopening of the current contract usually at a specified time. Multi-year contracts usually have annual reopeners. Retroactive Pay—Wages due for past services required when wage increases are made effective as of an earlier date. Reverse—Light image on a dark background (Ex: white type on a black box).

S__________________________ Sans Serif Type—Type without serifs. (See page 70.) Scanner—A computer hardware device that reads information from a photograph or other paper-based art into a digital file that can be stored on a computer disk, manipulated in various software programs, and placed electronically in a page layout program. School Board—Lowercase the phrase “school board” (Ex: Members of the El Oso school board...) Uppercase only the official name of the school board, which usually has the words “Board of Education” in it (Ex: The El Oso Board of Education ... ). Semi-colon—Use sparingly; dash is preferred. Serif Type—Type that has short lines crossing the ends of letters. (See page 70.) Service Fee Payer (SFP)—All non-union employees in a bargaining unit. These individuals are assessed a fee used to defray the cost of services rendered by the exclusive representative. (Also Fair Share Payer) Site Representative—A communications link between the members at a site and their local chapter. Site representatives organize, educate, direct people to sources of service, post union notices and news, and assist Union Stewards and paid union staff in their representational duties. Southern California—Uppercase when denoting widely known regions (Ex: Area I is in Southern California). Style Guide—The rules for treatment of forms of address, titles, numerals, punctuation and other standards. Also called Style Sheet. (Examples of style guides: Chicago, Associated Press, or Strunk and White; all are available at most bookstores.) Subhead—Small headline within an article explaining what that section of the article is about. Also called Subheadline. Often used to break up large blocks of body text. Sunshining—The term used to describe the public notice requirements of the EERA where initial proposals and counterproposals of the school district employer and the union must be presented at a public meeting prior to the start of negotiations.

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T__________________________ Tag Line—A line that gives additional information about a publication, usually a slogan (Ex: El Oso Classified News—All the news you need to know). Text—See Body Text entry. Titles, Membership—Capitalize the following when they appear before a proper name: Chapter President Association President

Chapter Vice President

Association First Vice President

Chapter Secretary

Association Second Vice President

Chapter Treasurer Association Secretary Regional Representative Area Director

Chapter Communications Officer

Regional Communications Officer

Titles, Multiple—Use most relevant or highest-ranking title on first reference; spread other titles throughout the story. Limit use of titles to those that are relevant to the story (it’s not necessary to use every title), as too many can get confusing for the reader. Generally, use one “union” title and one “occupational” title. If you can only use one, the preferred title is the occupational title. Tombstone—Two headlines placed side-by-side so they seem at first to glance to be only one. Should be avoided. Type Style—Variations of a typeface, such as: italic, condensed bold, etc. Typo—A mistake in text entry into a typewriter or computer. Short for “typographical error.”

U__________________________ Unfair Labor Practices (ULP)—Employer or union practices forbidden by the collective bargaining law. This usually involves management efforts to avoid collective bargaining and to deny the union and employees representational rights. Unjustified—Alternate term for ragged. Uppercase—Capital letters.

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Style Guide and Glossary

V__________________________ Volume/Issue Number—Identifies publication/cataloging information for a newsletter. Volume usually corresponds to year. Number usually corresponds to month of the year or number of newsletters published that year. For example, the first issue your chapter ever produced should be: Volume 1 / Issue 1. The second issue should be: Volume 1/ Issue 2, and so on. The first issue in the second year of publication should be Volume 2 / Issue 1, and so on. Volume and issue tracking helps future leaders keep a historical, orderly filing and reference system.

W__________________________ Website—One word. (Ex: Our chapter’s website...) White Space—Term referring to blank areas of the page that frame or set off text. Worker’s Compensation—A system of insurance required of employers providing payments to workers or their families for loss of income due to occupational illness, injury or fatalities. Workload—One word, not two. Workplace—One word, not two. Worksite—One word, not two. World Wide Web—This is a proper noun and should always be uppercase. The abbreviation WWW should also be uppercase when used alone. CSEA’s official website is: www.csea.com.

X Y Z_______________________

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Notes:

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Index

Index

content, 13–36

A

contract education, 21, 48

abbreviations, 86–87

contract negotiations, 22–23

acronyms, 45, 86–87

copying (photocopying), 81

active voice, 48

copyright, 89

advertisements, 36, 91

costs, 81, 91

content approval, 34 contract communications, 20

announcements, 28, 64

D B

date, volume and issue number, 62, 64

banner, 62, 64

deadlines, 8

benefits, health and welfare, 25

design, 59–77

blurbs, 62, 73

distribution, 82–84

boxes, 62, 68, 72 bulletin boards, 28

E

bullets, 62, 73

e-mail, 56–57, 89 e-newsletters, 56–57, 83, 94

C

editing, 45–46, 54

calendar, 27

editorials, 42–43

chapter elections, 32–33 chapter executive board, 34

F

chapter leadership messages, 30–31

facts and opinions, 42–43, 52

chapter meetings, 28

fonts, 62–63, 70

chapter news, 15, 29–32, 64, 93 chapter newsletter (general purpose), 3, 15

G

clip art, 61, 62, 75

grievances, 24

Clipsheet, 36 collective voice, 58

H

column formats, 65

headlines, 47, 62–63, 68–69, 74

Communication Awards competition, 92–119

health and welfare benefits, 25

Communication Tools, 6, 36, 75

hyphenating words, 71

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I

Q

interviews, 32, 49–51

quotations, 46, 51, 52, 70

J

R

layout, 61–77

race, religion and gender, 53 readers, 15–17, 58, 83–84

L

reporting, 15, 40, 49–51

leadership message, 30–31

resources, 18–19, 39

ledes, 44 legal rights, 88–89

S

libel, 89

schedules, 8 statewide news, 26, 93

M

subheads, 63, 72

mail, 83 mailing lists, 82–83

T

masthead, 34, 63

teasers, 64

Member Benefits, CSEA, 36

text, body, 62, 70, 73–74

modular design, 66–67

text, justified, 71 two-way communication, 58

N neutral language, 53 newsletter competition, 92–95

O opinion, 42, 52

P passive voice, 48 printing, 8, 81 proofreading, 8, 55 pullquotes, 62, 73

136

U URLs, 71

W website, 5, 84 writing, 39–58


Publication 123 Communicating with Impact