Issuu on Google+

SCULL DESIGN PORTFOLIO


TOPOLOGY VS. TOPOGRAPHY

This was an exploration into techniques of digital fabrication. As a class, we began by studying different topographies, not with the goal of replicating them, but researching their means of formation and using the digital medium to explore manipulation of fields in a 3D space. I chose to study the formations of sand caused by natural (wind) and unnatural (footsteps) forces. By analyzing the cause and effect patterns on these nomadic topographical shifts, I hoped to find a means to create an original pattern and apply into a spatial and faรงadal medium. Initially, the goal was to apply these learned techniques into a physical context: a shipping container space in which we were allowed to envelope the interior or puncture the exterior in whichever way we chose. The setting was meant to take place during the internationally renown Art Basel, so the focus shifted to spatial formulation with a specific series of programs, which would include space for display, seating, and interaction. However the proposed surfaces were more than a series of pushes and pulls. It became a series of responses to external influences. People passing by, varied lines of sight and height, larger areas for display versus smaller viewports, etc. With the ideal parameters set, the next step was to create a series of iterations that would eventually transform into an overall envelope. Initially, the overall surface consisted of a single panel with a simple Voronoi-type pattern. The ideal behind the surface condition was that it would adapt to the different programs inherent in an art gallery setting. This meant the pattern would need to transform over a period of time over the span of the surface. The techniques learned in the initial typological studies, specifically the blend, proved critical to the overall prototype. The process of creating the skin was in itself a learning process, researching how actual skin folds and shifts to stimuli and adapts to circumstances. One pattern led to another, one row was sewn onto another, and the end result became an aggregated facade.

2


3


to•pol•o•gy (n) The study of the properties of geometric forms that remain invariant under certain transformations, as bending or stretching to•pog•ra•phy (n) 1. The relief features or surface configuration of an area 2. A schema of a structural entity (the mind, field of study, society) reflecting a division into distinct areas having a specific relation or position to one another

4

Surface Deformation - CNC Milled Prototype


“Mantis” by Ali K. Qureshi

Mantis + Voronoi Wall + Container = Basel

5


6

Surface Deformation - 3D Printed Prototype


7


STUDIES IN PROTOTYPING

The techniques learned in Digital Fabrication were quickly put to use on a larger scale. Exercises in using any and all available tools for fabrication were encouraged, and experimentation became a necessity. But to jump scale was certainly a challenge; from a theoretical patternization, to prototyping as a microcosm, and ultimately building full-scale so that interaction could be put to the test; all led to roadblocks and obstacles. Planning, material gathering, and a series of trials and errors with unfamiliar machinery did lead to positive results. I quickly learned that experimentation does not trump design, nor vice versa, but rather complements the other. One does not find the boundaries of a design without pushing its physical limitations and that of your own. I felt the process behind the build, from determining proper materials and tools, create software-compatible models to a limited cutting space, and techniques in assemblage, were more important than the final model itself. I was more content in the process of prototyping. Error also played a role in the design process. What seemed like “battle wounds� were made in the panels, which added to the learning experience. Instead of disguising these wounds, I opted to make them evident as a reminder that the prototype is never perfect, but meant to serve as an example. Lacerations in the material (similar to a self-inflicted wound made while making a simple studio model) cited empathy with the material. Realizing this, the prototype almost gained humanistic tendencies. Like the material, I had my own scars from design. From here, a relationship was built with the design, and I opted to expose these flaws, rather than hiding them. I felt there was beauty in the imperfection.

8


9


10

Rough Pass - 1/2� Double Flute Carbide End Mill on Dual-layered 1/2 MDF


Second Pass

11


12

Third Pass


Final Pass - 1/4� Double Flute Carbide End Mill

13


14

Contour Pass - 1/4� Double Flute Carbide End Mill


15


16

4’ x 6’ partial proposal for wallpartition using the Voronoi panels. Each panel was milled doublesided to allow for visual access from either side. It was designed to be a mixed-use surface that would allow for sound-dampening, light filtering, and visual engagement with the user and the space


17


REACTION-BASED DESIGN

Intrigued by the concept of tracking movement through space, I sought to investigate relationships between people and the spaces we occupy. The previous projects were studies into surface manipulation and brushed the idea of occupation. But to explore the precise relationships we have with stimuli around us I needed a more scientific approach. This was achieved at the culmination of Design Studio where we were asked to partake of a semester long design-build for an installation that was meant to stage an event: a presentation of Grad 2 students and their definitions for “mobile architecture”. To stage an event we needed to know our space, the School of Architecture, inside and out. We also had to approach the assignment along the guidelines of The Art of War by Sun Tzu Polemics arose: Was the real “enemy” the physical construct of the school, our gripes and means to correct how we felt movement should circulate? Or the establishment with its impositions and restrictions for event holding and engagement? Were the students its “supplies”, and if so, by distracting them with event are we choking off the opponent’s life-source? What means could we devise to “attack” through architecture and come out victorious? The result became an all-out engagement of the senses, using visual, audible, and constructed mediums. From this spawned further experimentation in engaging users from their normal routine of movement, and instead diverting them to occupy new spaces. This was done with a series of customdesigned seating placed in areas adjacent to classrooms and alcoves found around the school. These pieces soon took a life of their own, adopted by the general population and assimilated into the “local culture”. New configurations were made outside of the ones initially anticipated, and circulation was stunted whereas a normal user would simply brush past an area without thought. In the end, we felt these investigations and installations became a success for their function: to question who determines path in a space and giving control to the masses, not the establishment.

18


19


Diagrammatic study of the Battle of Al Alamein, 1942

20


ARCH PER IMA

Spatial relationships from the Battle of Al Alamein contributed to the organization of strategies to “engage” users within the defined space. To bring forth users into the space, we staged an event which we allied ourselves to the current Grad class to bring forth their representations of “mobile architecture” and further study the movements of people within a defined space.

www.archperima.blogspot.com

Installation Strategem - Floor Plan

architecture fashion show

pca courtyard 01.29.09 6pm

21


REACTION-BASED DESIGN PT. 2

As an addendum to the previous design-build project regarding circulation versus stimuli, my design partner and I felt it was necessary to coordinate an “attack” on our enemy, the given establishment of circulation and path In order to create a dialogue with the context the forms are inserted within, inspiration is drawn from the conceptual process used by Bernard Tschumi in his design of the generators of FIU’s School of Architecture. The forms are meant to portray the process erosion due to the forces of compressed circulation that results from the placement of these spatial obstructions inside an already ‘hemmed-in’ space. While the overall forces of the newly created circulatory paths inform the overall distortion of the forms, a more intense erosion occurs on the faces in direct contact with these forces. Similarly, ‘webbed’ residual surfaces are formed when the obstruction is bifurcated to create variable seating conditions.

22


23


1

2

3

1

20

2 3 4 8

5

6

4 6

5

7 19

7

9

8 10

11

9

12

11

18 17

12

16

13 14

13

Unit a Unfolded

16

15

10

17

18

14 14

1

13

18

17

19

3

Unit b2 Unfolded

20

Unit a

11

4

7

10

5 6

24

Unit b1 Unfolded

16

12 2

15

15

8

Cut Line Mountain Fold Valley Fold

Unit b1

9

Unit b2


Global Erosion

“webbed” surfaces

Direct Contact Erosion

25


b2.

a.

b1.

b.

b.1

b.2

Base Units

b.4

b.5

Mutations of (b.)

a-b.3_(1) a-b.4_(1)

a-b.1_(1)

26

b.3

a-b.5_(1) a-b.2_(1)

a-b.5_(2)

a-b.2_(2)

a-b.1_(2)

a-b.3_(2)

a-b.4_(2)

a-b.1_(3)

a-b.3_(3)

a-b.4_(3)

a-b.5_(3)

a-b.2_(3)

a-b.1_(4)

a-b.3_(4)

a-b.4_(4)

a-b.5_(4)

a-b.2_(4)


27


28


29

Theodore Gibson Park and Community Center


30 Level 1

Level 2


EAST ELEVATION

WEST ELEVATION

NORTH SECTION

WEST SECTION

31


32 Existing Site

Proposed Site


33 Proposed Site


34


35


Scull Portfolio v2.0