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Handbook


Table of Contents Why Study the Liberal Arts?............................................. 3 Why Study the Liberal Arts at CSB/SJU?.......................... 3 The Learning Outcomes................................................... 4 Foundational Coursework................................................ 6 Ways of Thinking and Themes.......................................... 9 Upper-Level, Integrative Coursework.............................. 14 Additional Components.................................................. 16 Quantitative Reasoning.......................................... 16 The Benedictine Raven ......................................... 16 Engagements......................................................... 16 Integrated Portfolio................................................. 18 Co-Curricular Requirements................................... 19 Global Language Proficiency.................................. 19 Study Abroad......................................................... 19 Transferring In........................................................ 20 Full Integrations Curriculum Diagram............................. 22

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Integrations Curriculum


Why Study the Liberal Arts? A Liberal Arts Education is education for life. For citizenship. For purpose. The Liberal Arts teach students how to think for themselves, free from bias or indoctrination. The key elements of the Liberal Arts – broad-based learning, critical thinking, writing and speaking, working as a team, thinking through uncertainty and into the unknown, thriving in diversity, literacy – are the skills that employers want. They are also the skills that help you thrive as a citizen and as a person.

Why Study Liberal Arts at CSB/SJU?

Our Integrations Curriculum is founded on key learning outcomes that we want all our students to learn. These learning outcomes blend traditional liberal arts skills such as writing and thinking about the common good with contemporary liberal arts skills such as collaboration and information literacy.

Because most of the large issues facing the world today require a breadth of skills and knowledge, we use themes to tie together the different disciplinary ways of thinking. This provides a coherence and relevance to the connections among students’ courses.

We recognize the value of learning outside the classroom and require students to engage with the world around them. Students take part in experiential learning, global engagement and artistic engagement as a way of intentionally learning from the world around us.

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The Learning Outcomes ANALYZING TEXTS: Elicit and construct meaning from texts. COLLABORATION: Interact effectively in a group while incorporating diverse perspectives. COMMON GOOD: Develop a conception of a moral life that incorporates concern for the common good. GENDER: Examine the social construction of gender and related individual and systemic inequities. INFORMATION LITERACY: Identify, evaluate and responsibly use information. METACOGNITION: Optimize one’s own thinking and learning processes. QUANTITATIVE REASONING: Solve quantitative problems and develop and communicate arguments supported by quantitative evidence. (Designation—both the beginner and intermediate will be met in the same course.) RACE AND ETHNICITY: Examine the social construction of race and ethnicity and resulting inequities. RELIGIOUS ENGAGEMENT: Analyze religious engagement with society. SPEAK: Construct ideas, opinions and information in appropriate oral forms. THEOLOGICAL REASONING: Think critically about sources, doctrines, and themes of the Christian tradition. WRITE: Construct ideas, opinions and information in appropriate written forms.

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Integrations Curriculum


Lea rni n CSD g Fou nd : Id The entit ations y oE x p lora Lea rni ng tions T he E ma xplor CSD tic Fo ations cus :S The ystem o In s Lea tegra tion rni ng Inte s gra tion s

Learning Outcomes Analyzing Texts Collaboration Common Good Gender Information Literacy 1 Metacognition 1 Quantitative Reasoning* Race and Ethnicity Religious Engagement Speak Theological Write 1

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CSD stands for Cultural and Social Difference

This chart shows where learning outcomes will be assessed. At the heart of the Integrations Curriculum are 12 Learning Outcomes that provide the foundation for all student learning in our general education requirements. Each Learning Outcome is taught at least twice, with increasingly rigorous standards. The Learning Outcomes provide a consistency to student learning and ensure that our students develop the proficiencies at the heart of a liberal arts education.

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Foundational Courses These three courses build the foundation for your liberal arts education at CSB and SJU. They prepare students in the basic learning outcomes that they will use the rest of their academic and professional lives: Writing, Information Literacy, Metacognition, Collaboration, Speaking, Analyzing Gender, Race and Ethnicity, Analyzing Texts, Exploring the Common Good, Religious Engagement and Theological Reasoning.

Learning Foundations (4 credits) The Learning Foundations course begins the process of experiencing and reflecting on the interconnected nature of a liberal arts education. It is writing intensive, but also introduces students to information literacy and metacognition – the ability to think critically and deeply about one’s learning. The topics of these courses are diverse and intended to be taught by faculty from across all divisions. - Course must be completed in the first year. - One officially approved Artistic Engagement event must be incorporated into the course. - Course may NOT carry engagement requirements, Quantitative Reasoning or a Way of Thinking. - Students who have completed a college level writing course at another institution (must have a college transcript with grade of C or higher) can transfer in that course as Foundations but must take the 2 credit Explorations course. - AP and IB courses may not count for Foundations.

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Cultural and Social Difference: Identity (4 credits) This course examines why gender, race or ethnicity, in isolation, is insufficient to conceptualize either individual or social identity. Students will learn to think critically about their own gendered, racial and ethnic identities as well as identify the social and cultural factors that shape and contribute to each. This course must address gender, race and ethnicity in the contemporary United States. The ways in which gender, race and ethnicity intersect must be given prominent attention in this class. An understanding of intersectionality requires recognizing that gender, racial and ethnic identities are dynamic and that each is experienced differently, depending on how they combine in any one person. An exploration of intersectionality will also involve study of how these and other identities dynamically connect to systems of power. In other words, efforts to achieve justice in any one of these areas must take the others into account. - Course must be completed in the first year. - Course can be taught in any department and can count towards majors. - Course does not contain prerequisites and may be 100 or 200 level. - One co-curricular event related to gender and one co-curricular event related to race and/or ethnicity must be incorporated into the course. These may be fine arts events, but do not need to be. - The course may not carry engagement requirements, cannot satisfy a Way of Thinking requirement and cannot also satisfy the Theological Explorations or Theological Integrations courses. The course may not be a Foundation, Explorations or Integrations course.

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Theological Explorations (4 credits) This is the first of two courses focused on theology. Students think critically about sources and themes of the Christian tradition and begin to explore religious engagement with society. This class also includes a grounding in Benedictine Hallmarks such that students are prepared to meet their Benedictine requirement later. - Course must be completed in the first 3 semesters. - Course does not contain prerequisites and must be 100 level. - The course may not carry engagement requirements, cannot satisfy a Way of Thinking requirement and cannot also satisfy the Cultural and Social Difference courses. The course may not be a Foundation, Explorations or Integrations course.

Learning Explorations (2 credits) This 2-credit course will be taken by students (first year or transfer) who have already completed a writing composition course and will be capped at 18 students. It functions as both an introduction to their general education experience at a Catholic, Benedictine college, and as a writingintensive course. The topics of these courses are diverse and intended to be taught by faculty from across all divisions. - Course must be completed in the student’s first year. - Course may NOT carry engagement requirements, Quantitative Reasoning or a Way of Thinking. - Student must have successfully completed (earned a grade of C or higher) an approved writing composition course from another school. - One officially approved Artistic Engagement event must be incorporated into the course.

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Ways of Thinking and Themes The Ways of Thinking are intended to capture some of the basic differences in how disciplines study and understand the world. We believe it is important for students to not just have expertise in a particular major, but to leave college with a basic understanding of the value and methods of all ways of examining our world. The themes provide a locus around which the different Ways of Thinking can be understood and integrated. By studying one of the themes – Justice, Truth or Movement – through different Ways of Thinking, students will come to appreciate the role that all disciplines play in understanding and appreciating the world around us. Each student will take 5 different Ways of Thinking courses (4 credits in each Way of Thinking). Ways of Thinking courses may count towards major/minor programs. Students cannot count more than 2 different Ways of Thinking in any one department or program. Unless otherwise noted, a course will carry only one Way of Thinking. At least three of the Ways of Thinking courses must be on the same theme. (The remaining 2 Ways of Thinking courses can be on any theme or have no theme.) In order to count towards the Thematic Course Requirement, the themed Way of Thinking course must be either Thematic Focus or Thematic Encounters designations. Students will take one Thematic Focus course (can be 200 or 300 level) and 2 Thematic Encounters courses (at least 1 at the 300 level). Thematic Focus courses are 100% on the theme. Thematic Encounters courses are 25% on the theme.

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The Ways of Thinking Abstract Structures Course may carry ONE Engagement, and/or QR, and/or Benedictine Raven.

This Way of Thinking focuses on formal and symbolic representations of objects, structures and/or experiences. Through this focus, this Way of Thinking examines such representations and the relationships between them and explores ways that formal and symbolic models can be applied to a range of more concrete examples and situations. Abstract reasoning by its nature requires unambiguous, systematic, and/or well-defined rules for the creation and manipulations of symbols and relationships. Students will focus on developing representations (numeric, symbolic, graphical, and otherwise) and rules. These courses will refine students’ manipulation and understanding of those representations and rules appropriate to the subject being studied. As Abstract Structures model objects, structures and relationships, a course would be expected to cultivate students’ abilities to move fluently between these abstract representations/models and the concrete examples (and/or simpler abstractions) they represent. Examples of Abstract Structures include but are not limited to: music theory; symbolization and evaluation of the validity of arguments; analysis and composition of algorithms and computer programs; analysis and development of mathematical models; linguistic analysis; deductive arguments and formal proofs. - Course may be themed (Thematic Encounter 100, 200, 300 level or Thematic Focus 200 or 300 level.) - Course may carry ONE Engagement requirement (unless semester-long study abroad) and either QR or the Raven.

Artistic Expression Course may carry ONE Engagement, and/or QR, and/or Benedictine Raven.

This Way of Thinking includes the making, performance, and/or examination of artistic works through a lens of direct engagement with individual pieces of art. An experiential and critical understanding of artistic ways 10

Integrations Curriculum


of thinking emerges from three sources: the process of moving from creative impulse to artistically informed production; the direct engagement with artistic expression, with focused consideration of relevant art form(s), style(s), and/or context(s); and intentional reflection on the experience of the work of art. Artistic knowledge, whether as artistic creation, contextual understanding, or critical reflection, will most successfully emerge from multiple experiences of this process, allowing students to discover and communicate their thoughts. Students will directly engage with individual works of art in these courses. This engagement may be by creating original works, performing existing works, or through the examination of art works from the critical perspectives used by professional arts critics, arts theorists, and arts historians who examine historical or contemporary art forms primarily as art works. As a way of thinking, Artistic Expression may be cultivated through studio-, performance-, or workshop-based courses, including individual lessons; or through studies relating to the criticism or theory of the fine arts. - Course may be themed (Thematic Encounter 100, 200, 300 level or Thematic Focus 200 or 300 level.) - Course may carry ONE Engagement requirement—likely ARTE (unless semester-long study abroad) and either QR or the Raven.

Human Experience Course may carry ONE Engagement, and/or QR, and/or Benedictine Raven.

This Way of Thinking seeks to recognize and understand how humans have represented and constructed the human experience, and to thereby empower students as critical and creative agents in their own lives and communities. This Way of Thinking is the study of how human beings use texts, in different times and places, to understand, represent, and shape their world, and their experience of that world. Students will investigate, interpret, and analyze texts such as written works, spoken language, visual images, film, song, performance, or other cultural artifacts, in order to explore how human engagement with the world constructs meaning and shapes particular social and historical contexts. Particular attention Integrations Curriculum

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will be paid to the ways in which elements of expression are influenced by their place and period of production. Students will explore human efforts to make sense of the world around them and the ways in which those efforts shape the human experience. This Way of Thinking recognizes that human experience may involve textual engagement with community, internal life, the natural world, and/or the past and future. Key to engaging this process is the act of writing, in which students learn to reflect, refine, focus, and clarify their own analysis as active participants in making meaning of the world around them. - Course may be themed (Thematic Encounter 100, 200, 300 level or Thematic Focus 200 or 300 level.) - Course may carry ONE Engagement requirement (unless semester-long study abroad) and either QR or the Raven.

Natural World Course may carry ONE Engagement, and/or QR, and/or Benedictine Raven.

This Way of Thinking examines the structures and interactions within the natural world. The natural world comprises the physical universe, both living and non-living, as well as the forces that act on it. This empirical mode of inquiry relies on constructing hypotheses and testing them with data collected through observation and experimentation to learn about the natural world. Students will distinguish between inquiry that aims at empirical knowledge and other forms of human inquiry and knowing. These courses will enable students to have a deeper understanding of the natural world and prepare students to evaluate scientific claims critically through an appeal to factual evidence. These courses are accompanied by lab periods where students will make observations, collect data, appropriately analyze their results, and communicate their findings. - Thematic Focus 200 or 300 level. - Course may carry ONE Engagement requirement (unless semester-long study abroad) and either QR or the Raven. 12

Integrations Curriculum


Social World Course may carry ONE Engagement, and/or QR, and/or Benedictine Raven.

This Way of Thinking uses the scientific method to examine and understand social phenomena, such as human behavior, cognition, and how institutions, structures, and norms shape human behavior. This way of thinking involves both qualitative and quantitative research methods. The ultimate goal of such work is to draw generalizable conclusions about societies, institutions, groups, and individuals that are valid beyond the context of the research. Students in these courses will consider theories, learn basic social scientific methods, and engage with social scientific evidence to describe the world and test ideas about societies, institutions, groups, and/or individuals. - Course may be themed (Thematic Encounter 100, 200, 300 level or Thematic Focus 200 or 300 level.) - Course may carry ONE Engagement requirement (unless semester-long study abroad) and either QR or the Raven. Student A Justice Theme

Student B Movement Theme

Abstract Structures

MATH 118 AP credit No Theme

MUSC 111 No Theme

Artistic Engagement

ART 200 Thematic Encounters Justice Theme

THEA 117 Thematic Encounter Truth Theme

Human Experience

ESS 390 Thematic Focus Justice Theme

ENGL 382 Thematic Encounter Movement Theme

Natural World

ESSS 308 Thematic Encounters Justice Theme

PHYS 103 Thematic Encounter Movement Theme

Social World

PSYC 111 PSEO credit through SCSU No Theme

POLS 343 Thematic Focus Movement Theme

Ways of Thinking

Integrations Curriculum

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Upper-Level Integrative Coursework Cultural and Social Difference: Systems This is the second of the two-course series. Students will demonstrate an understanding of how constructions of race, gender, and ethnicity shape cultural rules and biases and how these constructions vary across time, cultures, and societies. In addition, students will critically analyze the ways in which these forms of identity raise questions of justice with regard to access and participation in communal life. This class may address gender, race, and ethnicity in any context, including the contemporary United States, other nations or cultures, and/or various points in history. The ways in which gender, race, and ethnicity intersect are given prominent attention in this class. An understanding of intersectionality requires recognizing that gender, racial, and ethnic identities are dynamic and that each is experienced differently, depending on how they combine in any one person. An exploration of intersectionality will also involve study of how these and other identities dynamically connect to systems of power. In other words, efforts to achieve justice in any one of these areas must take the others into account. - Prerequisite: CSD: Identity - Course may carry Engagements. - Course may carry the Benedictine Raven. - Course may count towards majors. - Course may not satisfy a Way of Thinking.

Theological Integrations This is the second of two courses focused on theology. This 300-level 14

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course can be on any topic that meets the learning outcomes, moving students into interpretation of theological sources and analysis of religious engagement with society. The second theology courses can be on a variety of topics. These topics can include religions other than Christianity. - Prerequisite: Theological Explorations - Course may carry Engagements. - Course may not carry the Benedictine Raven. - Course may count toward majors. - Course may not satisfy a Way of Thinking

Learning Integrations This 4-credit course is the culmination of the student’s general education in the Liberal Arts. It will be taken in the student’s junior or senior year after they have taken their three same-themed courses. It functions as both a culminating general education experience and a writing-intensive course. Students build on their writing skills acquired in the foundations writing class and any optional exploration writing classes, with a focus on the integration and transfer of student learning across their college experience. Students must demonstrate reflection on their learning and how they address complex values. The topics of these courses are diverse and intended to be taught by faculty from across all divisions. This course is intended to provide the students with an opportunity to integrate their coursework. In particular, this will be an opportunity to draw connections among their thematic coursework and integrate their general education courses and artistic and co-curricular activities. - Course may NOT carry engagement requirements. - One officially approved Artistic Engagement event must be incorporated into the course. - Course is capped at 18 students - This course cannot count toward a major. Integrations Curriculum

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Additional Components Quantitative Reasoning The ability to make sense of numerical information is essential in our data-driven world. Due to our increasing reliance on data, poor quantitative reasoning skills can lead to serious consequences when numerical information is misunderstood or deliberately made misleading. Also due to the ubiquitous nature of data, this skill is one that is increasingly necessary for all adults. - This is a designation that can be attached to any course except Theological Explorations and Learning Foundations, Explorations, or Integrations.

The Benedictine Raven The intent of this designation is to encourage students to reflect on a Benedictine perspective throughout their curricular work giving particular attention to the practices, values, and heritage of the Benedictine tradition. This designation asks students to use texts or experiences inside or outside the classroom to reflect on how a Benedictine perspective might apply to questions in contemporary life. - Designation cannot attach to Theological Explorations or Integrations. - Designation can attach to any other class but may be particularly suited to CSD: Systems or Thematic Focus classes.

Engagements We recognize that much learning takes place outside of the classroom and the Engagements are intended to honor and refine that learning. The tradition at CSB/SJU has been to prepare students to think about their life

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holistically – that we prepare our students to live a full and purposeful life across many dimensions, to bring their full selves to their career, their communities, their personal and spiritual lives. We have done this in part by making experiential-based learning an integral part of the curriculum. Engagements can be met either as a designation attached to a class, or as an activity that students take part in outside of class. In the case of study abroad, both the global and experiential engagements will be attached to most trips.

Artistic Engagement

One of the many things the fine arts do particularly well is push students into the uncomfortable – many students are unfamiliar with the kinds of fine arts events we offer. This is a goal of a liberal arts education; to get students more comfortable with being uncomfortable and accepting of the unfamiliar. Artistic performances may include music, theater, gallery exhibitions, public readings, etc., but they must all be officially approved as an Artistic Engagement event – not all artistic performances will count. Students are required to attend and submit a reflection on four separate Artistic Engagement events. Two of those are built into existing classes: Learning Foundations and Learning Integrations. The remaining two can either be taken as a designation attached to a class or by the student individually choosing to attend an approved event and submitting a reflection essay to the portfolio.

Experiential Engagement

The ability to take the knowledge and skills one has learned in class and apply them to real-world situations outside of the classroom is the essence of experiential learning and what comprises this Experiential Engagement. CSB and SJU have a strong tradition of providing these opportunities to students and the Integrations Curriculum ensures that all students have the opportunity to benefit from this high-impact practice. Students can earn this as a Integrations Curriculum

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designation attached to a class, or through their involvement in pre-approved Experiential Engagement activities such as Undergraduate Research, internships, service-learning, study abroad, and entrepreneurial opportunities.

Global Engagement

The ability to interact appropriately and sensitively with those from other cultures and nations is an important skill in the 21st century and a hallmark of a liberally educated person. This engagement asks students to develop an awareness of their own and other cultures from outside the US through direct experiences and develop strategies for adapting effectively and appropriately to intercultural situations. Students who study abroad with a CSB/SJU program (either short-term or long-term) will satisfy this engagement. The global designation can also be attached to courses on campus when they provide opportunities to directly interact with citizens from another country.

The Integrated Portfolio A key element of the general education curriculum is the Learning Integrations course where students reflect on their liberal arts education. The portfolio plays an important part in this – as a part of each course they take in the Integrations Curriculum students are required to submit one artifact (a paper, recording, picture, etc.) from the course, along with a reflection on that artifact, into the eportfolio. This gives students the opportunity to curate a comprehensive and holistic collection of their learning, and then use that as a resource to draw upon as they work to integrate their coursework. Additionally, the portfolio is fully portable, meaning that students can further customize it as a sample of their work to share with prospective employers.

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Co-Curricular Requirements Because our schools host numerous speakers, film series, and other events, we are committed to having students use these as compliments to what they learn in the classroom. There are 9 required co-curricular, arts, and ARTE events. Specifically: - 4 approved Artistic Engagement events (two embedded in courses and two as part of the ARTE Engagement Designation.) - 2 arts events embedded in the Artistic Expression Way of Thinking class. - 2 arts or co-curricular events embedded in the Culture and Social Difference: Identity course (one focused on gender and one focused on race or ethnicity.) - 1 co-curricular or arts event related to the theme of their Thematic Focus course.

Global Language Proficiency The ability to speak, listen, read, and write a second language is invaluable. It fosters direct communication and expands cultural understanding. Students are expected to develop minimal competencies in another language as evidenced by meeting a proficiency standard equivalent to three semesters of college-level language classes. Global Language 211 is the minimum requirement for language proficiency. Students may test out of the requirement. (The language requirement did not change from the Common Curriculum to the Integrations Curriculum.)

Study Abroad Both semester-long and short-term study abroad programs will all have the EXP and GLO engagements, although some programs may contain additional courses that satisfy Integrations requirements. Check with the Center for Global Education for program-specific details.

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Transfer Students and Post-Secondary Credits Transfer students should refer to the transfer student guidelines linked on page 21. Students transferring in courses which meet the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum Learning Outcomes can count some courses towards the Integrations Curriculum Requirements. Please refer to Table 2 for the Integrations Curriculum equivalents.

MN Transfer Learning Goal Communication/ English/Writing Science (1 Lab)

Math or Logic History and Social Science Humanitites and Fine Arts Human Diversity

MN Required Courses 1

IC Equivalent

2 (1 biological, 1 physical) Science Lab 1 3

Natural World WoT & QR

Abstract Structures Social World WoT

3 (at least 1 HM, Human Experience WoT 1 FA) Artistic Expression WoT 1 CSD: Identity

Global Perspective 1

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Learning Foundations

Current language requirement still applies

Integrations Curriculum


Post-secondary credits fall into 2 major categories: those courses taught through a college or university (PSEO and CIS) and those taught in high schools (AP and IB). PSEO and CIS credits transferred into CSB/SJU with a college transcript and grade of C or higher may count for Integrations Curriculum requirements. Review an overview of transfer guidelines for PSEO and CIS courses. Review an overview of transfer guidelines for AP courses. Review an overview of transfer guidelines for IB courses.

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MAKING CONNECTIONS ACROSS ACADEMIC DISCIPLINES Students will complete five required courses in the key learning traditions, called Ways of Thinking. These courses cover all academic disciplines, allowing students to customize their academic exploration. Themes embedded in many of these courses will showcase how seemingly unrelated fields can be connected.

THEMES

WAYS OF THINKING

Truth

Abstract Structures

Justice

Artistic Expression

Movement

Human Experience Social World Natural World

Students will take one course in each Way of Thinking. Three of those courses must be on the same theme.

CONNECTED LEARNING ENGAGED LEARNING THINK BEYOND THE CLASSROOM

Global Engagement

Artistic Engagement

Active learning happens inside and outside of the classroom. Students will participate in three experiential activities and submit a reflection prompt guiding them to relate their academic experience to their environment and activities.

Experiential Engagement

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Integrations Curriculum


MARKETABLE SKILLS FOR A LIFETIME

Learning Foundations

INTG 105

Learning Integrations

Students will complete two required courses focused on building core skills critical to academic and professional success, such as speaking, writing and quantitative reasoning.

Quantitative Reasoning

This designation is embedded in the curriculum and ensures students can understand and evaluate arguments using quantitative data.

CORE SKILLS PURPOSEFUL LEARNING EXPOSURE TO MULTIPLE PERSPECTIVES CULTURAL AND SOCIAL DIFFERENCE

LANGUAGE

THEOLOGY

The Benedictine Raven

Language 111 Identity

Theology Explorations Language 112

Systems

Theology Integrations Language 211

This designation is embedded in the curriculum and ensures students develop an awareness of a Benedictine perspective (practices, values and heritage).

Students will complete seven required courses that collectively enable them to think critically about their place in the world and how they can make a difference.

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