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Page 1

Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Twin Cities, MN Permit No. 93723

ANNUAL GIVING 37 South College Avenue St. Joseph, MN 56374 Please direct questions to 800-648-3468, ext. 3 or mutsch@csbsju.edu

WILL YOU BE THE ONE? Have you thought about including the College of Saint Benedict in your will, living trust or estate plan? Called a charitable bequest, a gift like this offers some key advantages. Since all it takes is a few sentences in your will or trust, it’s simple. Because it’s a planned gift, you ensure your values and ideals carry beyond your

Informed AN INSIDE LOOK AT HOW PHILANTHROPY SHAPES SAINT BEN’S

lifetime and can support many different areas — so it’s flexible. It can be set up to leave a certain amount, to leave a certain percentage or to be contingent on events — so it’s versatile. Plus, if your estate is subject to estate tax, your gift is entitled to an estate tax charitable deduction for the gift’s full value. Questions? Ask Bill Hickey, director of gift planning, at 320-363-5480 or whickey@csbsju.edu.

Informed AN INSIDE LOOK AT HOW PHILANTHROPY SHAPES SAINT BEN’S

WIN NTE ER 2014

ACCIDENTALLY INSPIRATIONAL Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98 p. 2

> $100K wasn’t the BIG number p. 4 > Bridget Cummings ’15, on and off the course p. 6 > Turning prospects into students p. 8 > A growing transformation p. 11 A CENTURY OF CONNECTION


Donor Spotlight

A Note From the President

ACCIDENTALLY INSPIRATIONAL

A GROWING TRANSFORMATION

C.S. Lewis once wrote what every parent knows: “Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.” It’s the kind of lesson parents agonize over because we rarely get to watch the final exam.

Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98

Thomas and Jana Vucetich? We’re pretty sure you’ve done a good job on this one with your daughter, Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98. But kudos to you, Th omas and Jana, for sneaking in a refresher course recently – even if you didn’t realize you were doing it! Unbeknownst to Trista, the Vucetichs have been making a gift to the annual giving program almost every year, starting before she even graduated. And, like her parents, Trista is a consistent donor. But this year, after catching her parents in the act, Trista was inspired to substantially increase her gift during our $100K in a Day challenge. This is why we say that every gift matters. Not only is there no telling whom your gift will help, there’s no telling whom your gift will inspire.

2

Inspired “My parents inspired my gift today. I noticed in the 2013 Honor Roll they were listed as parents who donated last year. My parents make a very modest income, so it warms my heart they have continued to support Saint Ben’s long after I have graduated. Their contribution shows me how much they value what Saint Ben’s provided me as an undergraduate.” Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98

With your help and trust in College of Saint Benedict, we have made great strides in the last decade. When I arrived here, the endowment was hovering around $20 million. Today, that has more than doubled to about $52 million. Likewise, the annual fund has nearly tripled from about $1 million to $3 million. Over $2 million of that goes directly to students as scholarships. Saint Ben’s has never been a rich institution but always has been one that manages its resources well and puts students first. Being a college with modest resources is similar to being an individual with modest resources. Wealthy colleges

have assets to leverage. And organizations like granting agencies, lenders and even donors are more likely to invest in wealthy institutions because they perceive that investment as being less risky or because, psychologically, it always pays to “back a winner.” Ironically then, Saint Ben’s will attract more resources the richer it becomes. But a large endowment is not only an indicator that an institution is worth supporting. Because an endowment exists in perpetuity, the interest it generates will provide scholarships and faculty development dollars for all time. Because Saint Ben’s endowment is still comparatively small, this is another way in which we are disadvantaged relative to our

competitors. Simply put, our competitors’ bank accounts produce more interest income on an annual basis. It is also vitally important that we continue to grow the annual fund while we grow the endowment. A $1 million endowment provides about $50,000 in operating revenue each year, so annual gifts of $50,000 provide scholarships as if they were a $1 million endowment. As our closest friends and donors, you have stuck with Saint Ben’s and with me as we have begun to make this transformation. I am deeply and personally grateful for your support, and I hope and pray that Saint Ben’s continues to earn your trust in its second century.

11


Centennial Gala Celebrate a Century of Connection Don’t miss this grand finale to our centennial year and an opportunity to wish President MaryAnn Baenninger a fond farewell.

UPCOMING EVENTS THURS, JAN. 9 – Centennial Celebration in San Francisco, The University Club of San Francisco SAT, JAN. 11 – Centennial Celebration in Los Angeles, Marina del Ray, Calif. SAT, JAN. 25 – Centennial Celebration in Nassau, Bahamas WED, FEB. 5 – Presidents’ Reception, Washington, D.C. THURS, FEB. 13 – Centennial Celebration in Denver, Colo.

WHAT INSPIRED

YOUR GIFT?

FRI, FEB. 14 – Mingling & Music, Minneapolis

Individual tickets and sponsorship packages available. Visit www.csbcentennial.com/gala.

TUES, FEB. 18 – Job/Internship Fair Networking Reception, St. Paul THURS, FEB. 20 – Benedictine Law Fest, Twin Cities

APRIL 26, 2014

A CENTURY OF CONNECTION

THE DEPOT DOWNTOWN MINNEAPOLIS

WED, FEB. 26 – Midwinter Luncheon, Minneapolis

SAT, APRIL 26 – Centennial Gala, The Depot, Minneapolis THURS, MAY 29 – Young Alumnae President’s Circle Reception

Save the Date

“It’s a great way to turn $500 into $1,000. Thank you to the matching donors.”

“I’m so proud to be a Bennie!” Rebecca Tusa Parker ’98

Miles & Lisa Beacom, parents of a Bennie

WED, FEB. 26 – Professional Development Series: LinkedIn with Judy Zimmer ’84, Minneapolis THURS, APRIL 24 – Scholarship & Creativity Day, CSB Campus

FRI-SUN, JUNE 27-29 – Reunion (for classes ending in 4 and 9), CSB Campus

On Nov. 13, we set out with an ambitious goal to raise $ 100,000 in a single 24-hour period. Our alums, parents, faculty, staff and friends ended up contributing over $ 240,000. How did that happen?!

“I have seen first-hand the value of my education and the alumnae network that comes with it.”

“I give to support the 5-year-old girl who will want to attend Saint Ben’s someday.”

Rachel J. Peterson ’11

Judy Zimmer ’84

“MaryAnn Baenninger.” Pamela Bacon, CSB/SJU associate professor of psychology

“I’m always inspired by Saint Ben’s and its women.” Jessica Guentzel Himmerick ’05

“In honor of Betty Ann Sullivan Haas ’56.” Loretta O’Hern Kelly ’56

“I love CSB and Blazer athletics.” Chauntae Ruppe Nichols ’03

“Grateful for the guidance, grace and excellence of Rita Knuesel and Axel Theimer.” Rev. Jill K. Warner ’81

3


THE REALLY BIG NUMBER In November, during our $100K in a Day challenge, a lot of attention was understandably paid to the donation total number – $240,539. But almost lost in the shuffle was the intriguing really big number: 780 donors.

4

giving circle, a number of small donors band together to concentrate their giving and deliver a bigger collective impact.

With a spark of inspiration from some generous matching donors, 780 separate decisions were made that led to something quite amazing. Individually, the gifts averaged “just” $172.23, but collectively they made a very substantial addition to our scholarship fund.

According to Susan Stehling in her article, “Giving circles bring individual donors together,” posted Nov. 6, 2013, at www. startribune.com, “Individuals are the primary source of charitable giving in Minnesota. In Giving in Minnesota, 2013 Edition, the Minnesota Council on Foundations reports that $3.8 billion or 70 percent of the state’s charitable contributions in 2011 came from individuals.”

Consciously or not, this mirrors a trend nationally in what is quickly becoming a more organized movement: giving circles. In a

“Saint Ben’s alums have been similar to a de facto giving circle for years,” says Vice President of Institutional Advancement

Kimberly Ferlaak Motes ’89. “Many of the principles and motivators are the same: a common sense of identity, a commitment to the organization’s mission, a genuine sense of belonging and of participation in something bigger than oneself…” When Bennies stay connected, with each other and with the college, they keep that circle strong. Modest gifts beget more modest gifts. And collectively, big results happen. The buzz around our centennial year has made this a perfect example, according to Motes. “It’s clear to me that collective excitement within our circle of alums was a key factor in exceeding the goal for the $100K in a Day challenge.”

Percent of new CSB students who applied to at least 5 colleges 22%

in 2000

13%

in 1990

Several years ago, our institutional research staff developed a survey to identify our key sources of market advantage, the parts of the CSB experience that resonate most clearly with new students and their parents. We provide newly enrolled students (and, later, their parents) with a list of characteristics and experiences and ask them to tell 41% us how important each in 2013 was to their final choice. Those responses are always interesting, but alone they aren’t sufficient. So we also ask them to indicate how CSB compared to their next best choice on a scale of much better to much worse. When we put both of those findings together, we gain tremendous insights into our students’ values and preferences.

The results have been useful and occasionally even surprising. Our key sources of advantage vis-à-vis our competitors among new CSB students last fall included the friendly people they met during the recruitment process, our study abroad opportunities, our emphasis on personal values, the jobs our graduates obtain after college and our academic reputation. Those perceptions help shape our messages as well as our admission activities. More importantly, they position CSB for enrollment success in a remarkably competitive marketplace.

Jon McGee SJU ’84 has worked in higher education research and policy for over 20 years. He’s been part of the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University community since 1999. 9


Jon McGee, V.P. of Planning and Public Affairs

DEFINING DEMAND For all the resources colleges pour into recruiting a new class, it’s surprising — even shocking — how little effort most colleges make in understanding how students make their final choice. Why did students choose who they did? What made one institution better than (or at least different from) the others? The answ wers to t those que uestions make all thee di th diff ffereence ce in thee woorl rld because they sayy much about bo th he waay ay we are u de un ders rsto sttooood d by st stud uden ud entts ts and families.

8

Our students have lots of choices. New CSB students in fall 2013 applied to more than 500 colleges across the country. More than four in 10 of them applied to at least five colleges, fewer than one in 10 only to CSB. Today it’s more important than ever that we understand the factors that affect their choice. What are our key sourcces es of advantage?

hours

5


Student Spotlight

A LONG WAY FROM THE FAIRWAY While the Saint Ben’s women’s golf team was playing a practice round last spring break, Bridget Cummings’ cell phone rang. On the other end was the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., to interview the Blazers’ junior for a prestigious internship. Despite being caught off guard during her interview, Cummings was selected for an internship in the Office of Legislative Affairs in Washington, D.C., where she worked as a liaison between Capitol Hill and the Department of Justice. As a natural leader, Washington, D.C., seemed like a perfect fit. “It was a fast-paced internship. I had to stay calm and be patient, which translates to golf,” said Cummings. “I learned to focus on what I’m doing and not freak out under pressure.” 6

Cummings also found that teamwork, like in athletics, was the key to a successful office environment. “Teamwork is something you have to learn in an office,” said Cummings. “Each person represents our office, so when one person succeeds,

look more well-rounded. We are not going to school for a scholarship. We are going for an education.” While her plans beyond college are uncertain at this point, a return to

Bridget went on to help lead the Blazers to a fourth-place finish at the 2013 MIAC Championship in October with her own very impressive third-place individual performance! everyone does and when one person fails, everyone does.” Attending Saint Ben’s has given Cummings the opportunity to pursue a political science major and economics minor while competing in a sport she loves. “I love how school can come first,” she said. “Our whole life isn’t about a sport but it’s about balance. That’s what makes us stand out. It makes student-athletes

Bridget Cummings ’15, on day three of the 2013 MIAC Women’s Golf Championship.

Washington remains in the back of Cummings’ mind. “I have a passion for public policy,” she said. “I want to work in D.C. where everything happens. I’d love to be working in the White House one day.” Excerpted from “MIAC Friday Feature: Saint Benedict golfer’s experiences come full swing” by Megan Gaard, posted on the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference website at www.miacathletics.com/news_ links/features/2013-14/100413_feature_CSB_golf.

7


Student Spotlight

A LONG WAY FROM THE FAIRWAY While the Saint Ben’s women’s golf team was playing a practice round last spring break, Bridget Cummings’ cell phone rang. On the other end was the Department of Justice in Washington, D.C., to interview the Blazers’ junior for a prestigious internship. Despite being caught off guard during her interview, Cummings was selected for an internship in the Office of Legislative Affairs in Washington, D.C., where she worked as a liaison between Capitol Hill and the Department of Justice. As a natural leader, Washington, D.C., seemed like a perfect fit. “It was a fast-paced internship. I had to stay calm and be patient, which translates to golf,” said Cummings. “I learned to focus on what I’m doing and not freak out under pressure.” 6

Cummings also found that teamwork, like in athletics, was the key to a successful office environment. “Teamwork is something you have to learn in an office,” said Cummings. “Each person represents our office, so when one person succeeds,

look more well-rounded. We are not going to school for a scholarship. We are going for an education.” While her plans beyond college are uncertain at this point, a return to

Bridget went on to help lead the Blazers to a fourth-place finish at the 2013 MIAC Championship in October with her own very impressive third-place individual performance! everyone does and when one person fails, everyone does.” Attending Saint Ben’s has given Cummings the opportunity to pursue a political science major and economics minor while competing in a sport she loves. “I love how school can come first,” she said. “Our whole life isn’t about a sport but it’s about balance. That’s what makes us stand out. It makes student-athletes

Bridget Cummings ’15, on day three of the 2013 MIAC Women’s Golf Championship.

Washington remains in the back of Cummings’ mind. “I have a passion for public policy,” she said. “I want to work in D.C. where everything happens. I’d love to be working in the White House one day.” Excerpted from “MIAC Friday Feature: Saint Benedict golfer’s experiences come full swing” by Megan Gaard, posted on the Minnesota Intercollegiate Athletic Conference website at www.miacathletics.com/news_ links/features/2013-14/100413_feature_CSB_golf.

7


Jon McGee, V.P. of Planning and Public Affairs

DEFINING DEMAND For all the resources colleges pour into recruiting a new class, it’s surprising — even shocking — how little effort most colleges make in understanding how students make their final choice. Why did students choose who they did? What made one institution better than (or at least different from) the others? The answ wers to t those que uestions make all thee di th diff ffereence ce in thee woorl rld because they sayy much about bo th he waay ay we are u de un ders rsto sttooood d by st stud uden ud entts ts and families.

8

Our students have lots of choices. New CSB students in fall 2013 applied to more than 500 colleges across the country. More than four in 10 of them applied to at least five colleges, fewer than one in 10 only to CSB. Today it’s more important than ever that we understand the factors that affect their choice. What are our key sourcces es of advantage?

hours

5


THE REALLY BIG NUMBER In November, during our $100K in a Day challenge, a lot of attention was understandably paid to the donation total number – $240,539. But almost lost in the shuffle was the intriguing really big number: 780 donors.

4

giving circle, a number of small donors band together to concentrate their giving and deliver a bigger collective impact.

With a spark of inspiration from some generous matching donors, 780 separate decisions were made that led to something quite amazing. Individually, the gifts averaged “just” $172.23, but collectively they made a very substantial addition to our scholarship fund.

According to Susan Stehling in her article, “Giving circles bring individual donors together,” posted Nov. 6, 2013, at www. startribune.com, “Individuals are the primary source of charitable giving in Minnesota. In Giving in Minnesota, 2013 Edition, the Minnesota Council on Foundations reports that $3.8 billion or 70 percent of the state’s charitable contributions in 2011 came from individuals.”

Consciously or not, this mirrors a trend nationally in what is quickly becoming a more organized movement: giving circles. In a

“Saint Ben’s alums have been similar to a de facto giving circle for years,” says Vice President of Institutional Advancement

Kimberly Ferlaak Motes ’89. “Many of the principles and motivators are the same: a common sense of identity, a commitment to the organization’s mission, a genuine sense of belonging and of participation in something bigger than oneself…” When Bennies stay connected, with each other and with the college, they keep that circle strong. Modest gifts beget more modest gifts. And collectively, big results happen. The buzz around our centennial year has made this a perfect example, according to Motes. “It’s clear to me that collective excitement within our circle of alums was a key factor in exceeding the goal for the $100K in a Day challenge.”

Percent of new CSB students who applied to at least 5 colleges 22%

in 2000

13%

in 1990

Several years ago, our institutional research staff developed a survey to identify our key sources of market advantage, the parts of the CSB experience that resonate most clearly with new students and their parents. We provide newly enrolled students (and, later, their parents) with a list of characteristics and experiences and ask them to tell 41% us how important each in 2013 was to their final choice. Those responses are always interesting, but alone they aren’t sufficient. So we also ask them to indicate how CSB compared to their next best choice on a scale of much better to much worse. When we put both of those findings together, we gain tremendous insights into our students’ values and preferences.

The results have been useful and occasionally even surprising. Our key sources of advantage vis-à-vis our competitors among new CSB students last fall included the friendly people they met during the recruitment process, our study abroad opportunities, our emphasis on personal values, the jobs our graduates obtain after college and our academic reputation. Those perceptions help shape our messages as well as our admission activities. More importantly, they position CSB for enrollment success in a remarkably competitive marketplace.

Jon McGee SJU ’84 has worked in higher education research and policy for over 20 years. He’s been part of the College of Saint Benedict and Saint John’s University community since 1999. 9


Centennial Gala Celebrate a Century of Connection Don’t miss this grand finale to our centennial year and an opportunity to wish President MaryAnn Baenninger a fond farewell.

UPCOMING EVENTS THURS, JAN. 9 – Centennial Celebration in San Francisco, The University Club of San Francisco SAT, JAN. 11 – Centennial Celebration in Los Angeles, Marina del Ray, Calif. SAT, JAN. 25 – Centennial Celebration in Nassau, Bahamas WED, FEB. 5 – Presidents’ Reception, Washington, D.C. THURS, FEB. 13 – Centennial Celebration in Denver, Colo.

WHAT INSPIRED

YOUR GIFT?

FRI, FEB. 14 – Mingling & Music, Minneapolis

Individual tickets and sponsorship packages available. Visit www.csbcentennial.com/gala.

TUES, FEB. 18 – Job/Internship Fair Networking Reception, St. Paul THURS, FEB. 20 – Benedictine Law Fest, Twin Cities

APRIL 26, 2014

A CENTURY OF CONNECTION

THE DEPOT DOWNTOWN MINNEAPOLIS

WED, FEB. 26 – Midwinter Luncheon, Minneapolis

SAT, APRIL 26 – Centennial Gala, The Depot, Minneapolis THURS, MAY 29 – Young Alumnae President’s Circle Reception

Save the Date

“It’s a great way to turn $500 into $1,000. Thank you to the matching donors.”

“I’m so proud to be a Bennie!” Rebecca Tusa Parker ’98

Miles & Lisa Beacom, parents of a Bennie

WED, FEB. 26 – Professional Development Series: LinkedIn with Judy Zimmer ’84, Minneapolis THURS, APRIL 24 – Scholarship & Creativity Day, CSB Campus

FRI-SUN, JUNE 27-29 – Reunion (for classes ending in 4 and 9), CSB Campus

On Nov. 13, we set out with an ambitious goal to raise $ 100,000 in a single 24-hour period. Our alums, parents, faculty, staff and friends ended up contributing over $ 240,000. How did that happen?!

“I have seen first-hand the value of my education and the alumnae network that comes with it.”

“I give to support the 5-year-old girl who will want to attend Saint Ben’s someday.”

Rachel J. Peterson ’11

Judy Zimmer ’84

“MaryAnn Baenninger.” Pamela Bacon, CSB/SJU associate professor of psychology

“I’m always inspired by Saint Ben’s and its women.” Jessica Guentzel Himmerick ’05

“In honor of Betty Ann Sullivan Haas ’56.” Loretta O’Hern Kelly ’56

“I love CSB and Blazer athletics.” Chauntae Ruppe Nichols ’03

“Grateful for the guidance, grace and excellence of Rita Knuesel and Axel Theimer.” Rev. Jill K. Warner ’81

3


Donor Spotlight

A Note From the President

ACCIDENTALLY INSPIRATIONAL

A GROWING TRANSFORMATION

C.S. Lewis once wrote what every parent knows: “Integrity is doing the right thing, even when no one is watching.” It’s the kind of lesson parents agonize over because we rarely get to watch the final exam.

Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98

Thomas and Jana Vucetich? We’re pretty sure you’ve done a good job on this one with your daughter, Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98. But kudos to you, Th omas and Jana, for sneaking in a refresher course recently – even if you didn’t realize you were doing it! Unbeknownst to Trista, the Vucetichs have been making a gift to the annual giving program almost every year, starting before she even graduated. And, like her parents, Trista is a consistent donor. But this year, after catching her parents in the act, Trista was inspired to substantially increase her gift during our $100K in a Day challenge. This is why we say that every gift matters. Not only is there no telling whom your gift will help, there’s no telling whom your gift will inspire.

2

Inspired “My parents inspired my gift today. I noticed in the 2013 Honor Roll they were listed as parents who donated last year. My parents make a very modest income, so it warms my heart they have continued to support Saint Ben’s long after I have graduated. Their contribution shows me how much they value what Saint Ben’s provided me as an undergraduate.” Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98

With your help and trust in College of Saint Benedict, we have made great strides in the last decade. When I arrived here, the endowment was hovering around $20 million. Today, that has more than doubled to about $52 million. Likewise, the annual fund has nearly tripled from about $1 million to $3 million. Over $2 million of that goes directly to students as scholarships. Saint Ben’s has never been a rich institution but always has been one that manages its resources well and puts students first. Being a college with modest resources is similar to being an individual with modest resources. Wealthy colleges

have assets to leverage. And organizations like granting agencies, lenders and even donors are more likely to invest in wealthy institutions because they perceive that investment as being less risky or because, psychologically, it always pays to “back a winner.” Ironically then, Saint Ben’s will attract more resources the richer it becomes. But a large endowment is not only an indicator that an institution is worth supporting. Because an endowment exists in perpetuity, the interest it generates will provide scholarships and faculty development dollars for all time. Because Saint Ben’s endowment is still comparatively small, this is another way in which we are disadvantaged relative to our

competitors. Simply put, our competitors’ bank accounts produce more interest income on an annual basis. It is also vitally important that we continue to grow the annual fund while we grow the endowment. A $1 million endowment provides about $50,000 in operating revenue each year, so annual gifts of $50,000 provide scholarships as if they were a $1 million endowment. As our closest friends and donors, you have stuck with Saint Ben’s and with me as we have begun to make this transformation. I am deeply and personally grateful for your support, and I hope and pray that Saint Ben’s continues to earn your trust in its second century.

11


Non-Profit Organization U.S. Postage PAID Twin Cities, MN Permit No. 93723

ANNUAL GIVING 37 South College Avenue St. Joseph, MN 56374 Please direct questions to 800-648-3468, ext. 3 or mutsch@csbsju.edu

WILL YOU BE THE ONE? Have you thought about including the College of Saint Benedict in your will, living trust or estate plan? Called a charitable bequest, a gift like this offers some key advantages. Since all it takes is a few sentences in your will or trust, it’s simple. Because it’s a planned gift, you ensure your values and ideals carry beyond your

Informed AN INSIDE LOOK AT HOW PHILANTHROPY SHAPES SAINT BEN’S

lifetime and can support many different areas — so it’s flexible. It can be set up to leave a certain amount, to leave a certain percentage or to be contingent on events — so it’s versatile. Plus, if your estate is subject to estate tax, your gift is entitled to an estate tax charitable deduction for the gift’s full value. Questions? Ask Bill Hickey, director of gift planning, at 320-363-5480 or whickey@csbsju.edu.

Informed AN INSIDE LOOK AT HOW PHILANTHROPY SHAPES SAINT BEN’S

WIN NTE ER 2014

ACCIDENTALLY INSPIRATIONAL Trista Vucetich Anderson ’98 p. 2

> $100K wasn’t the BIG number p. 4 > Bridget Cummings ’15, on and off the course p. 6 > Turning prospects into students p. 8 > A growing transformation p. 11 A CENTURY OF CONNECTION

Profile for CSB & SJU

CSB Winter 2014 Informed Newsletter  

CSB Winter 2014 Informed Newsletter  

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