Page 1

CRUX

vol.one

MAGA

ZINE

C O N N E C T I N G C R E A T I V E M I N D S AND WORLDS

ss. 2011


I F E X P E R I M E N T S I N S P I R E , C A N T H E C L I M A X O F C R E A T I V I T Y B E F O U N D ?

vol.one ss. 2011


C OLOPHON CRUX

EDITOR IN CHIEF Eve Keskinen

ART DIRECTOR Elyse Moland

TEXT EDITORS Eve Keskinen Elyse Moland

EDITOR Ines Veselcic

EDITOR Tiffanni Trench

www.crux.com

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS AND PRODUCERS

Thomas Anfield Odette Beja Rachel Etigson Charlotte Lokin Brontie Naylor-Jones Martijn Nekoui Emmi Ojala Louis Reith Marco Van Rijt Martin C. De Waal Isabelle Wenzel

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Hanah Chung Ivano Salonia Ana Rita Sousa Malou Tan

PRINTING Elco Extension Prinsengracht 384 1016 JB Amsterdam mail@elcobv.nl www.elcobv.n

A SPECIAL THANK YOU Frank Jurgen Wijlens Charlotte Lokin Anneloes Van Gaalen AMFI Independent Magazine Minor Staff


INTRODUCING CRUX Crux is a moment that is present in every creation. This moment is central to any process. We see fashion itself as a process, an ongoing experiment that contains its own crux. CRUX magazine is a tangible time capsule with pages that are spattered with evidence that inspiration can be multifaceted. The CRUX family and friends set out on a journey of creating experiments, capturing the zeitgeist, and locating the crux, all in the name of inspiration. By doing so, we explore the climax of creativity where something new and exciting is born.

Individuals who are not afraid of breaking rules, fooling around or failing

and what is currently in vogue, it is about collective mediums creating something that not only reflects but also surpasses time. OUR first issue of Crux is full of that jittery, creative energy which hopingly is contagious. We once read the quote “A fool is a man who never tried an experiment in his life.” This way of thinking inspired the formation of Vol. 1’s hypothesis. CRUX wants to know, are you a fool?

E V E K E S K I N E N / E LY S E M O L A N D

miserably form this issue. We believe fashion is not only about beautiful clothes

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P H O T O B Y H A N A H C H U N G C R U X M A G A Z I N E F E AT U R E : 2 = 1


2-3

H Y P O T H E S I S

4-5

INTRODUCTION

7 8-11

I N D E X

2-1

12-23

L E T E M P S D E L’ I N N O C E N C E

24-27

LOUIS REITH

28-35

THOMAS + HIS TOASTER

36-37

OUT OF THE BLUE

38-41

LOSE THE MEDIUM

42-53

S U S P E N D

54-61

3X

62-63

CAMOUFLAGE

64-65

INSIDE OUT

66-67

CONTRIBUTORS/ C O N T A C T

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21 RACHEL

Accessory Designer/ Graphics/Multimedia racheletigson.com

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ODETTE

Photographer/Illustrator/ Accessory Designer apachecollections.com


2 ARTISTS

making

1

f i nal creation

RAC H E L E T I G S O N A N D O D E T T E B E J A C O M B I N E T H E I R TA L E N T S . D O C U M E N T E D B Y P H OTO G RA P H E R H A N A H C H U N G . A N E X P E R I M E N T I S C R E AT E D T H AT E X A M I N E S T H E P RO C E S S O F D E S I G N A N D T H E S E A RC H F O R I N S P I RAT I O N .

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J E W E L R Y D E S I G N RA C H E L E T I G S O N / O D E T T E B E J A


INTERVIEW BY ELYSE MOLAND

WHAT WAS THE MOMENT THAT YOU

about creation. We worked well together and

WOULD DESCRIBE AS THE CRUX OF THIS

complemented each other’s process.

COLLABORATION?

O> The nature of this project was quite

R> We found the crux when our own visions

spontaneous and fast paced so there was no

for the piece came together and became one.

time to think of an approach, we just had to do

The moment when we met in the middle and

it and get it done.

said “yes, this is what we both envisioned”. It created a sense of excitement and a clear direction.

WHAT PREVIOUS SKILLS DO YOU

O> It all started coming together when we

FEEL HELPED YOU THE MOST IN THIS

found the pieces that we would use for the

COLLABORATION?

jewelry.

R> I have worked in wardrobe and styling for some time now, so I found my experience in that area to be helpful during the process of

WAS IT A CHALLENGE TO FIND A COMMON

the photo shoot.

INSPIRATION FOR APPROACHING THIS

O> Having experience in planning and styling

PROJECT?

photo shoots was definitely useful in this

R> Not at all! We were very open to each

collaboration. Being able to think on the spot

other’s ideas. Finding our focus was a very fun

and create something out of nothing was also

and exciting process.

a plus.

O> As individuals, we are all inspired by different things, but it was interesting to see

WHAT DO YOU FIND MOST INSPIRING?

that Rachel and I were both on the same page

R> I can find almost anything inspiring. For

in terms of inspiration. Finding a common

me it does not come directly from the fashion

inspiration was not a challenge for us.

industry but more so from everyday life. I find honest things the most inspiring for me. It is not always what it is that influences me but

WERE THERE NOTICEABLE DIFFERENCES

more the way I see it that I find most inspiring.

WITH YOUR APPROACH TO CREATING THAN

O> I am inspired by my friends, my family

YOUR FELLOW COLLABORATOR?

and everything that surrounds me. Culture in

R> Everyone has their own way of doing things

particular.

and I think that is one of the great things

“ I F I N D H O N E S T T H I N G S T H E M OS T I N S P I R I N G ”

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LE TEMPS DE L’INNOCENCE A rigid triangle of exaggerated formality: The black and white pictures of the church boy choir with tight collars and CRUX

seriousness beyond their years echoes an almost eeire sense of restraint. This sublime atmosphere reminds us of times when we behaved, and makes us think, maybe it’s time to reclaim our innocence or at least look like we have and button up.


STYLING AND ART DIRECTION EVE KESKINEN / TIFFANNI TRENCH PHOTO GRAPHY ANA RITA SOUSA / IVANO SALONIA MODEL RUBEN / ELITE MODEL MANAGEMENT AMSTERDAM M A K E - U P RO N N Y E LV E R S / H A I R

MILENA MARCZYNSKA

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S W E AT E R F I L I P P A K

P O LO S H I R T / N E C K L A C E C O S


CRUX S H I RT F I L I P PA K

COLLAR COS


S W E AT E R S T Y L I S T S O W N

PA N T S C L U B M O N AC O


CRUX ^ S H I RT T E N U E D E N I M E S DRESS COS


S W E AT E R A R M A N I

COLLAR COS


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S H I RT AC N E


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S H I RT AC N E

S W E AT E R A M E R I C A N A P P A R E L


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^ A R T I W O R K LO U I S R E I T H


ou i s

ei t h

I n k , f i n e l i n e r a n d v i n t a g e b o o k p a p e r s , a r e t h e m e d i u m s o f choice which Louis Reith manifests in his dynamic works .

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turntable, but I asked a friend to record a loop on a MiniDisc so

HOW DO YOU FIND INSPIRATION?

I could listen to it. For years, I used old paper structures in my

I turn on the coffee machine, play my favorite song of

digital work to give solid colors more feeling. As if the image

the week, clean up my desk, organize my tools, stare

carries a certain history. But in the end I got tired of faking

out of the window till the sun goes down and then I start.

it with a computer, so I started working on them directly.

I really prefer working in the evening and at night. I guess I'm more focused around that time of the day.

YOUR WORK GIVES A SENSE OF PEACE AND BALANCE.

^ A R T W O R K LO U I S R E I T H

I N T E RV I E W B Y I N E S V E S E LC I C

DESCRIBE YOUR USUAL CREATIVE PROCESS?

WHAT DRIVES YOU TO CREATE THESE SPECIFIC Most of my works start with a theme and within this theme

COMPOSITIONS? WHILE WORKING ON THEM DO

I look for interesting words to transform into abstract

YOU EXPERIENCE THE SENSE OF TRANQUILITY? 

compositions. When a piece doesn't consist of a word,

 A person recently said to me: "You know what I like about your

it translates a certain environment like the mountain

work? It feels calming to just look at triangles, squares and

landscapes, an event or tool, like the guitar-shaped piece.

circles." I think it's because geometric shapes are so familiar to us, they give us a sense of peace. I guess it's my way of telling a

To experiment, I make personal pieces; I draw names

story, a story

of friends or do swaps with other artists.

without words. An escape

DURING THIS PROCESS, ARE YOU MORE GUIDED

from reality.

BY INTUITION OR RATIONAL THOUGHT?

I experience

Definitely by intuition. Sometimes when I'm not satisfied with

that sense of

the result, I add something to it, or combine it with a collage.

tranquility the

Other times I have big plans and stop when it feels right. I really

most while

like that way of working, not knowing what will come out.

drawing. Even more so than

DO IDEAS FORM SPONTANEOUSLY OR FROM

when I see

THE PROCESS OF IN-DEPTH RESEARCH?

the result,

Well, I find it really hard to start working spontaneously.

but that's

But once I'm at work, I try to be as free as possible.

probably pure concentration.

DOES YOUR WORK CARRY AN INTENDED MEANING OR IS IT LEFT OPEN FOR INTERPRETATION?

YOU ARE MOST INSPIRED WHEN TRAVELING BY

All my work carries a hidden message; the word it represents.

TRAIN OR BIKE. WHAT IS IT ABOUT TRAVELING

But because the legibility is gone, the image becomes abstract

THAT TRIGGERS THAT INSPIRATION?

and therefore it is open for interpretation. My work is about

Sitting on the train or riding my bike just gives me the

form and composition, it's not a game about guessing words.

peace to think about my work and the development of it. I sometimes wonder if the horizons in my work reflect

IS YOUR WORK EVER INFLUENCED BY CURRENT

my train travels through the Dutch country side.

SOCIAL OR POLITICAL CIRCUMSTANCES? Not really. It's more about dreams and nightmares.

HOW DID THE IDEA OF USING VINTAGE BOOK PAGES DEVELOP? I guess [what intrigues me] is their imperfection. It's the same reason why I prefer analog- over digital photography, or my love for lo-fi music. When I was 15-years-old I had an obsession with the noise at the end of records. I didn't have a

“ M Y WO R K I S A B O U T F O R M A N D C O M P OS I T I O N , I T ’ S N OT A G A M E A B O U T G U E S S I N G WO R DS . ”

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1

“LEFT TO HIS OWN DEVICES HE COULDN’T BUILD A TOASTER. HE COULD JUST

2

ABOUT MAKE A SANDWICH AND THAT WAS IT.” THIS QUOTE FROM DOUGLAS

3

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4

ADAMS’ MOSTLY HARMLESS GOT ART STUDENT THOMAS THWAITES THINKING:

5

COULD HE MAKE A SIMPLE HOUSEHOLD OBJECT LIKE A TOASTER, FROM SCRATCH?

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8

9

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10

11

12

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CRUX I M A G E 1 3 / 1 4 B Y P H O T O G RA P H E R D A N I E L A L E X A N D E R

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INTERVIEW WITH THOMAS THWAITES BY EVE KESKINEN

tHOMAS AND HIS tOAS TER

The self-proclaimed designer “of a more speculative sort”, bought the cheapest, most simple apparatus he could find and disassembled it. The toaster’s friendly appearance fooled him – it turned out to consist of more than 400 parts. The mission to acquire the materials wasn’t simple either since building the machine involved Thwaites extracting steel from a mine and making plastic out of potato starch. So, was the not-so-innocent toaster, symbol of our reliance, a success? Thwaites managed to build it and get it to work, but only for an instant before it ironically melted into an unidentifiable blob it once began as, because of uninsulated wires that he was unable to produce. Even though the originally £3 now £1187.54 toaster didn’t function perfectly, Thwaites definitely got his point across.

DESCRIBE YOURSELF AS A DESIGNER IN THREE WORDS?

apart the toaster, I realized the soldering on the circuit

Aaahhmm.. that’s one. Exploratory, fringy, unsure.

board of this very cheap toaster had been done by hand. I used to imagine that there was a very high-tech

THE ARTS AND CRAFTS MOVEMENT ADVOCATED

factory with robots that would solder everything. On one

TRUTH TO MATERIAL AND CRAFTSMAN-LIKE

hand, I don’t think we can expect an honest product—it

QUALITY. IS THIS SOMETHING THAT YOU AIMED

wouldn’t necessarily be something we liked. But on

FOR WITH YOUR TOASTER PROJECT?

the other hand, if you eat meat you have to accept

Not initially. I didn’t start off my project with that aim in

that there is bloodshed involved. I suppose I prefer the

mind, but as I went through the project and actually had to

unclenching take on things rather than covering it up.

start dealing with materials in their rawest form, I started thinking about that truth in materials and craftsman-

DOES THIS EXTEND TO OTHER PARTS OF

like qualities. Certainly the look of the toaster is very

YOUR LIFE TOO? DO YOU EAT ORGANIC?

much determined by the process I went through. For

I have tried to be a vegetarian before and failed. I guess

example, carving a wooden mold by hand obviously gives

I’m a flawed person, but then again we all are. I prefer

a distinctly different appearance from a mass produced

to have something raw to decide, rather than to have

object. It is a case of tools determining the final look.

something brushed under the carpet. That is how I

I think there is real potential for this kind of craft versions

feel at this particular moment, but if you ask me again

of mass produced objects. It would be much more

on Monday, I probably will have changed my mind.

interesting. I think that is something we will see with 3D-printing, small manufacturing and stuff like that.

HOW IMPORTANT DO YOU THINK IT IS TO HAVE A PLAN? In the short term, it is very important. In the

DOES YOUR FASCINATION WITH THE “RAW”

long term, I don’t think you can have a plan.

REPRESENT AN APPRECIATION FOR HONESTY

You can have a vague plan that is flexible.

IN MATERIALS, PRODUCTS, IMAGES ETC.? Yes, that was definitely one of the points of the Toaster Project. To expose the stuff that is covered by these smooth plastic shells. You take apart any kind of electronic apparatus and there is a mass of solder. As I started taking

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WHY ARE YOU SO INTRIGUED BY TECHNOLOGY? YOU

in my imagination quite a few times before I actually

SPEAK ABOUT FLAWS WHICH YOU APPRECIATE. WHY

get around to making something. You can decide that

DO YOU CHOOSE TO WORK WITH TECHNOLOGY

something is rubbish in your head before trying it out.

SINCE IT’S BASED ON PRECISION AND PERFECTION? I don’t know. I suppose it is just something I’m into. I think

WHAT DID YOU LAST FAIL WITH? WHAT

it is something really important. I heard an argument the

WAS YOUR MOST RECENT FAILURE?

other day, saying that scientific knowledge is the only

PERSONAL OR PROFESSIONAL?

thing that is accumulative. Some people would like to

This is like a job interview; they always ask that sort

argue that there is progress in ethics and society but the

of question… I failed to get a job recently. They

speaker, a philosopher, who says it’s not true. That it is a

needed somebody to design something with mass

kind of Western myth, the progress towards a democratic

production but they said that they couldn’t see

goal. There is no intrinsic progress. But with science

evidence of that in my work. Which is fair enough.

and technology it is kind of accumulative, I’m not saying it’s a process towards a greater good, but I can say that

WHY DO WE FEAR FAILURE?

we do know more now than we did 200 years ago.

I suppose there is a divide in culture between Europe and America. If you are in this kind of business innovation

DID TECHNOLOGY AND HOW THINGS

world, it is good to fail. Americans are really good at

WORK INTEREST YOU AS A CHILD?

failing. They can start some kind of online start up and

Yes, I was very into computers and Technic Lego.

it can go bankrupt. That is seen as something really cool. At least they tried. In Europe, the saying goes

HOW DO YOU SEE THE WORLD IN 2040?

that we are more scared and disparaging at failure.

How many years is that?

I guess it is caused by our fear of embarrassment.

30 YEARS OR SO.

WHERE DO YOU LOOK FOR INSPIRATION?

I think the people living then won’t think of it as particularly

I went to the Victoria and Albert museum two days

futuristic. However when the world changes, it will be

ago. I think some of the objects in there are really

normal for those people living in that time. You never

inspiring. Just the amount of skill a person long dead

get to the future, which is something I realized the other

has put into making a cup is pretty inspiring.

day. No matter what kind of technological progress happens, by the time it actually filters through it is just subsumed by the rest of society. I remember thinking when I was little that when there are billboards with moving pictures on them, I will know I’m living in the future. Now that we have that, it is completely boring.

EVEN THOUGH YOU DIDN’T MANAGE TO BUILD A FUNCTIONAL TOASTER, IN THE END THE SUCCESS WAS ACTUALLY FOUND IN THE PROCESS OF DOING SO. LET’S TALK ABOUT FAILURE. HOW IMPORTANT DO YOU THINK TRIAL AND ERROR IS IN YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS? In that project obviously it was very important. In my other projects, I can’t say it is so essential. I try and fail

WATCH FOR THWAITES’ BOOK: THE TOASTER PROJECT PUBLISHED BY PRINCETON ARCHITECTUREAL PRESS IN FALL 2011.

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OUT CURATOR

INES VESELCIC

of the

blue OUT OF THE BLUE IS A CRUX PLATFORM THAT EXHIBITS CREATIVES IN A SPIRITED, EXCITING, AND CURIOUS WAY. LUCKILY WE WERE ABLE TO COLLABORATE WITH PHOTOGRAPHERS ISABELLE WENZEL AND MICHEL L. WITH COMPLETE CREATIVE FREEDOM THEY SURPRISE US AND OUR READERS

P H O T O G RA P H I S A B E L L E W E N Z E L / M I C H E L L

WITH THEIR VISION.

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DESCRIPTION BY: ISABELLE WENZEL. PLAY WITH ME: UNTIL NOW MICHEL WAS ASSISTING ME AND STANDING MODESTLY IN THE BACKGROUND OF MY WORK. IN THE PROJECT PLAY WITH ME, WE PICKUP THE TOPIC OF WHAT IT MEANS TO BE IN A PARTNERSHIP. FOR CRUX MAGAZINE WE DECIDED TO DISPLAY OURSELVES IN ONE OF OUR FAVORITE FANCY DRESSES.

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I N T E RV I E W B Y E V E K E S K I N E N A N D M A RT I J N N E KO U I

LOSE

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the

medium “ S O M E T I M E S YO U A R E B L I N D E D B Y YO U R OW N E Y E S . ”

HANNES WALLRAFEN IS AN EXTRAORDINARY DUTCH PHOTOGRAPHER WHO LOST HIS EYESIGHT BECAUSE OF AN ILLNESS IN 2004. LOSING HIS MEDIUM CHALLENGED HIM TO THINK ABOUT THE IMPORTANCE OF EYESIGHT IN ACTUALLY CREATING SOMETHING THAT STIMULATES IMAGINATION AND THE VISION. HE CALLS THIS VISUALIZATION “SEEING WITH YOUR EARS” WHICH HE BELIEVES CAN CREATE STRONG VISUAL INTENSITY BY THE MEANS OF SOUND.

WHAT IS THE CONNECTION BETWEEN YOUR

When I was a photographer I was not including myself

PHOTOGRAPHY AND YOUR SOUND PIECES?

in my creations, it was more about observation. Now

Dealing with reality was important in my photography,

in my soundscapes I’m more present. I put more

the world in which I exist and the way I reacted on

of myself into the sound pieces by, for example,

that through my photos. You are able to make your

using my own voice. With photography it was about

own dream world with photography, but I’m always

the absence of the maker, and now [with this new

searching for the connection with reality. When I switched

medium] it’s about involving [the maker].

to sound installations that focus didn’t change.


H A N N E S

W A L L R A F E N

feels that the senses are more strongly connected with each other than we think. By exploring the world

location has a sound piece of five minutes, which

of hearing and touch, he came to discover how the

for people nowadays is quite a long time. It is a

interconnected senses can form an aesthetic without

challenge to get people in the right mood, to keep

actually seeing anything. Like Aristotle, Wallrafen

them engaged and wanting to listen. This is the

uses perception or sensitivity to produce beauty that

distinction between the two mediums: an image

is intuitive and not foremost observable by the eyes.

usually makes the viewer reflect on it after seeing it,

Wallrafen, unlike other photographers, proves the

while with sound the reaction is more immediate.

meaning of ‘visual’ is not only achieved by sight but also encompasses other definitions such as mental

TIME IS OBVIOUSLY SOMETHING IMPORTANT IN

images that can be more vivid than any physical image.

YOUR WORK. DO YOU THINK OUR SOCIETY’S PERCEPTION OF TIME IS TWISTED? Yes, in a way I do. A good example is when you look at the fiction movies from the 40’s. Most people nowadays start yawning because the time they used for a movie

HOW DO YOU CAPTURE A DECISIVE MOMENT

was much slower; it was more parallel to real time.

IN SOUND, LIKE YOU DID IN PHOTOGRAPHY?

Today, the kind of film language is faster and more

I don’t necessarily look for that moment anymore

rushed. We changed in our way of listening and seeing.

but I create it instead. The approach you take must

Time seems to be going at an accelerated speed.

be different because of the nature of the medium. If you look at a picture, you can receive information

THE WORK YOU DID WITH VPRO (DUTCH PUBLIC

quickly. With sound it is different — you make a deal

RADIO) WAS ABOUT MAKING STORIES IN ONE

with the listener. Getting someone to listen is tricky:

MINUTE. YOU WORKED WITH TRYING TO MAKE

it demands a lot of concentration from the listener.

THE DURATION OF ONE MINUTE FEEL LONGER. Yes, that is a good example of how you change time into

The difference in photography is that you put parallel

the opposite again. How you deal with the limitations

elements into the photograph itself. You can put

of one minute, but the time you use you stretch.

time into a picture, portraying what came before, and what will come after it. In sound you work

IN THESE ONE-MINUTE PIECES THERE IS ALWAYS AN

directly within that time, but then the art of creating

EDGE, A STRANGE TWIST, A KIND OF ANTI-CLIMAX.

sound starts and you start compressing time.

THEY POSSESS A CERTAIN AWKWARDNESS. WHY DO YOU PUT THESE TWISTS INTO YOUR WORK?

WHAT IS THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN HEARING

You take somebody with you on a journey and you play

AND SEEING FOR THE SPECTATOR?

with the phenomenon of expectation. The story is going

I believe that people live in a faster pace. Currently,

a certain direction, and then suddenly it turns around.

I’m working on a project in Groningen (city in North

It takes a while for the listener to take that in and they

Holland) called Theresias, in which I’m trying to change

are left with a kind of question mark. So at the end,

the city into the city of the blind. I turned locations

they stay with a story that they keep in their mind.

into sound and called it “seeing with your ears” which

Sometimes, people tell me that they heard an audio

connected the city by an active sound walk. Each

story of mine a year ago and they can still reproduce it.

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L O S E

T H E

M E D I U M

Most would name eyesight as their most valued sense and would be devastated if they were to lose it. Architect

TELLING STORIES WITH SOUND, IS THIS HOW

Peter Eisenmann agrees on the importance of vision in

YOU DESCRIBE YOUR WORK NOW?

current times: “What I’m trying to do is to question the

Space is crucial for me; the moment I leave a building

dominance of vision and this is a difficult thing because

space starts to act as a kind of warning signal.

most people judge by the visual image.” Industries that

Like traffic noise becomes crucial to survive.

use the visual medium are extremely popular: fine arts, fashion, graphic design, photography and film engage

I listen to how the echos bounce off the walls to get an

an increasing amount of people. But rarely does the

impression of the space. From that point of departure,

designer or artist think about his essential tool: eyesight.

I work with sounds and soundscapes that deal with that

In an age where we are confronted with hundreds of

kind of experiencing space. It allows me to experiment

images every day, we also make countless aesthetic

with the distortion that our senses sometimes create.

judgments. We take for granted that we are able to use our vision to distinguish good from bad, harmonious

I READ A BEAUTIFUL QUOTE OF YOURS:

from unbalanced, yellow from blue etc. What happens

“SOMETIMES YOU ARE BLINDED BY YOUR OWN

when you lose the medium?

EYES.” WHAT DID YOU MEAN BY THIS?

Beauty and aesthetics are inescapably linked, but if

Your eyes are an instrument that you are very

seeing isn’t the most important sense for a person

much influenced by. When I can’t see you, I’m not

working in the visual field, what then determines

misguided by your appearance. What is left for me,

beauty? Many philosophers and thinkers alike have

are your voices are what we are talking about.

investigated beauty and aesthetics. The famous 19th century philosopher Bosanquet described aesthetics

HOW HAS CHANGING YOUR FOCUS FROM SEEING

as “the philosophy of the beautiful”. Plato’s Philebus

TO HEARING CHANGED YOU AS AN ARTIST?

defines beauty as existing beyond time and space, it

Changing mediums obviously affected my work, which

being structured, symmetrical and exact. Aristotle argued

is evident when I look back to my photography. Back

beauty to be based on perception and he believed that

then I was 100 percent visually oriented. Even though I

there was no absolute beauty. Traditionally, beauty in the

incorporate some different mediums, like sound in my

Western culture is based on Pythagoras’ golden ratio of

photography, they always acted as supporting factors

1.618. Forms and shapes characterized by the golden ratio

of the image. After I lost my sight, I realized how many

are regarded as beautiful, mirroring nature’s balance of

qualities exist in those other senses. The sense of

symmetry and asymmetry.

hearing, touch, smell, taste and the sense of presence.

Although we don’t necessarily set out to create something commonly regarded as beautiful, people in the visual field are still concerned with making something that is pleasing to the eye. For a blind creative

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this requirement no longer matters, which can lead to fascinating solutions. Other senses that are often neglected become more important than eyesight. This turns passive looking into engaging, interactive use of other senses such as hearing and touch.


HOW DO YOU THINK FASHION CAN BENEFIT

TALKING ABOUT AESTHETIC AND THE

FROM INTEGRATING OTHER SENSES, INSTEAD

AESTHETIC OF SOUND: WHAT DO YOU

OF RELYING SO MUCH ON THE VISUAL?

CONSIDER THE MOST BEAUTIFUL SOUND?

For me fashion is about the touch and the

It is a crow, which I used in many of my sound

material. I love to touch different textures. I

pieces. It creates such beautiful distance for me:

always wear fabrics with an interesting feel.

the high frequency sound starts far, far away, eventually reaching you, and then soon disappearing

WHAT WOULD YOU DESCRIBE IS THE SIXTH SENSE?

again. It is not the fact that it is a crow, but the fact

It is the sense of being aware of presence. Being aware

that there is something creating that space.

of actually being. You can feel your surroundings if you are well concentrated. At times you can describe

ARE YOU OR YOUR WORK INFLUENCED FROM THE

it. Like when somebody is standing behind you.

DAYS WHEN YOU WERE STILL ABLE TO SEE? There are images inside my head. All the images and

WHAT DO YOU THINK IS IMPORTANT IN A SPACE?

experiences are from when I was living strongly from

As I’m entering a building, my first interest goes into

my sight experience still affect my work. My dreams

the kind of acoustic of the interior. I hate spaces

are every night filled with sighted worlds which I can

that are made out of marble or stone, because the

really describe like photographs, like little films. But

space becomes like a swimming pool when lots of

when I sit here now awake, I cannot imagine it as a

people sit together. It is an example of architecture

picture. I imagine it as a description of the picture.

with too less attention on sound and the acoustic.

That is the difference for someone who is born blind: they are not able to tell how something looks like. They

I READ SOMEWHERE THAT PEOPLE WHO

can still visualize but from a different starting point.

LIVE IN WINDY COUNTRIES ARE MUCH

MORE IRRITATED THAN OTHER PEOPLE. That is an interest of mine: how people deal with space and the sounds they hold. I’m anxious of buildings that I don’t know from my seeing times. I have this anxiousness to experience, not only the technical aspects of the space

S O U N D

O F

T H E

C R O W

(like square meters), but the aesthetic of the building.

“IT IS NOT THE FACT THAT IT IS A CROW, BUT THE FACT THAT THERE IS SOMETHING CREATING THAT SPACE.”

41


SUSPEND

REMOVING

CRUX

L E AV E S

ONE

THE

BOUNDARIES

LY I N G

STAGNANT,

OF

TIME,

SPACE,

SUSPENDED

AND

BETWEEN

GENDER,

THE

LINES.

S T Y L I N G A N D A R T D I R E C T I O N E LY S E M O L A N D / I N E S V E S E LC I C P H O T O G RA P H Y

M A LO U

TAN

MAKE-UP

/

HAIR

ELBER

L E O N T I N E / F R E S H M O D E L M A N A G E M E N T A M S T E R DA M +

SANDER

G.

/

SKIN

MODEL

MANAGEMENT

FA RO

MAURICE

AMSTERDAM


43


CRUX


45

DRESS ELLIS BIEMANS

SHOES EPISODE


CRUX


47

D R E S S S H I RT / C H A RC OA L T R E N C H S A M A N T H A W I J S M A N

HEAD PIECE ELLIS BIEMANS


CRUX


49

J A C K E T N A D I N E WA G N E R

PA N T S S A M A N T H A W I J S M A N


CRUX B O D Y S U I T / S H O R T S D A P H N E VA N D E N H E U V E L

PA N T S S A M A N T H A W I J S M A N


51

B O L E R O D A P H N E VA N D E N H E U V E L

SHOES JEFFREY CAMPBELL


CRUX C LO T H E S D A P H N E VA N D E N H E U V E L

PA N T S A M E R I C A N A P PA R E L


53


3

3 X I S A N E X P E R I M E N T D E V E L O P E D T O A N A LY Z E T H E M U LT I P L E W AY S I N W H I C H A C O M M O N I N S P I R AT I O N CAN BE INTERPRETED.

CRUX

HUSSEIN CHALAYAN COLLABORATION / EXPERIMENT

THREE X


I M A G E H U S S E I N C H A L AYA N T RA N S F O R M E R D R E S S

Three creative individuals are asked by CRUX to interpret one fashion masterpiece. Using the skills of their own domain they have come up with innovative and surprising outcomes. The chosen masterpiece is Hussein Chalayan’s Transformer dress, which represents a fascinating fusion of fashion and technology. The dress is gathered, shortened and finally transformed without any human assitance.

55


I N T E RV I E W B Y E V E K E S K I N E N

MARTIN C DE WAAL WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST IMPRESSION OF HUSSEIN

mass media use it as a commodity.

CHALAYAN’S MASTERPIECE?

Sexuality, gender and race - and most often the forms of

First thing that came to mind is a song and

media between all of these things- feature in my work.

dance one man band (one person strapped with musical instruments to his body).

WHAT DESIGN ELEMENTS ARE INTERGRATED

What did you find inspiring in the dress?

IN THIS PIECE?

What inspired me was the Jules Verne aspect of

Combining the pop-culture icons Debbie Harry and

this particular piece. Technology that is ‘kind’ and

Blondie with fabric, curtains and dress tailoring from

almost romantic. I would call it old school future.

a different era makes the work backwards futuristic. Normally the image enhancement can’t  be traced in my

IS THERE A COMMON TIE BETWEEN THE WAY YOU WORK

work, here I wanted to show two elements -in the dress

AND THE CHALAYAN DRESS?

and the squares painted on the wall- that  are clearly

I photograph with film, play music with vinyl and

worked on by a computer: a computer from the 1800’s.

VJ with videotapes which is so outdated that I have to bring my own equipment to the venues where

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE CONCEPT BEHIND

I perform. Yet my work deals with the here and now.

YOUR INTERPRETATION? I bring you one of my usual preoccupations: the beautiful

CRUX

YOUR OTHER WORK ALSO DEALS WITH FASHION.

people. Narcissistic and perversely desirable. this strange

WHAT IS IT IN FASHION THAT INTERESTS YOU?

current creature is artificially poised and concocted as

The models in my photographs are typecasted to fit a

any ego-massaging representation of 18th or 19th century

certain idea that I want to portray. I frequently engage in

courtesan there she is at play against the backdrop of the

the notion of ‘identity’ and the way in which fashion and

lands she holds sway.


DEBBIE HARRY DOES THE PIANO

PHOTO & DRESS: MARTIN C DE WAAL / COMPUTER MANIPULATIONS: MENNO BARTELSE / MAKE-UP & HAIR: CIM AUGUST

“ I F R E Q U E N T LY E N G AG E I N T H E N OT I O N O F ‘ I D E N T I T Y ’ A N D T H E WAY I N W H I C H FA S H I O N A N D M A S S M E D I A US E I T A S A C O M M O D I T Y. ”

57


CRUX

TRANSFORM 4

PHOTOGRAPHY MACRO VAN RIJT


I N T E RV I E W B Y E LY S E M O L A N D A N D M A RT I J N N E KO U I

MARCO VAN RIJT WHAT WAS YOUR STARTING POINT WITH THIS PROJECT?

uncommon beauty. I search for perfection which is never

My starting point was a feeling created by

too perfect. On the other hand, I still want it to stay natural

the dress, not the actual garment.

and maintain an authentic feeling. I always work with

I was very inspired by Francis Bacon’s movie

unique models, which is true also in this project. There

Love is the Devil. The way in which Bacon depicts

is something fascinating about him and I always look

emotions and their dualities is fascinating. I wanted

for models who give that feeling to me. This model can

to combine this way of experiencing an emotion

really move, he knows what to do with his body. He can

with expressing emotion through body language.

express himself through his body without sound or music.

YOUR CRUX MOMENT?

WHAT IS FASHION TO YOU?

I would have to say the emotion. I made photographs

What is fashion? This [experiment] can also be

portraying different expressions. My idea was a person

fashion, it is just the way how you see it. I think the

screaming and being calm at the same time.

way I photographed this guy, for me that’s fashion. People need to understand, that everything can be

ONE EMOTION IS CLEARLY DOMINATING

fashion. Fashion doesn’t require a piece of clothing.

THE OTHER. WHY IS THAT? I want to show the image with the calm expression clearer as that is what shows on the outside. The transparent layer is the internal feeling – the repressed emotion.

“ FA S H I O N I S A B O U T C A P T U R I N G A M O M E N T FA S H I O N R E P R E S E N T S T H AT. ”

WHAT DO YOU WANT TO ACHIEVE WITH YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY? I’m always searching for a specific feeling of beauty,

_

59


I N T E RV I E W B Y E LY S E M O L A N D

THOMAS ANFIELD IN YOUR WORDS, HOW DID YOU TRANSLATE THE

uniqueness no matter what it is. Even things you

CHALAYAN DRESS INTO THIS FINAL CREATION?

might see as negative, sloppiness for example may

I think the idea of transformation was the key, at first I

be your biggest blessing, got to go with the flow.

thought about something very modern almost futurist but then I thought “how can this old technology of painting

HOW DO YOU APPROACH A NEW PIECE?

express the idea of transformation?” I thought about

Usually with trepidation and fear, but with

the magic of taking base ingredients and transforming

undying faith, I don’t know in what however.

them into something beautiful so I decided to recreate the piece out of an old cardboard box fashioned on

WAS IT DIFFICULT BEING ASKED TO COMBINE YOUR

my ever faithful studio assistant - the dummy.

USUAL CREATIVE PROCESS WITH THIS CHOSEN MASTERPIECE?

DID YOU FIND IT DIFFICULT COMING FROM A

Yes, the work is already a piece of art about

NON-FASHION DESIGN BACKGROUND INTERPRETING

fashion, and I think it is very hard to make art

FASHION INTO YOUR MEDIUM?

about art, it took me many drawings and a few

Hmmm, no I’ve been painting dresses for years

sleepless nights to figure out a direction.

and art like fashion is part of all our lives it’s integral whether we know it or not.

DO YOU FEEL THAT PAINTING AND FASHION INFLUENCE EACH OTHER?

HAS THIS EXPERIENCE CHANGED YOUR OPINION

I hope so. When talking with some artists, it is weird

TOWARDS FASHION? DO YOU SEE IT IN A DIFFERENT

to notice that they are ignorant of art world stars that

LIGHT?

appear in fashion magazines. These magazines are a

No just one more experience where you stop and

very good place to learn of contemporary trends.

say “what a great idea, wish I thought of that.”

CRUX

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE VISION YOU HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR CREATIVE PROCESS?

FOUND IN THE CHALAYAN DRESS AND THE

Painful, frustrating, underpaid, self doubting, foolhardy,

VISION YOU PORTRAYED IN THIS PIECE?

selfish, irresponsible and I wouldn’t change a thing. It

I think the previous answer fits here too! I did try

has taken me many years to realize your gift is your

to get at the idea of it at the end of the day it’s all smoke and mirrors, not false but an act of will.


DUMMY IN CARDBOARD CHALAYAN

PAINTING BY THOMAS ANFIELD

YOU STRIVE TO LET THE PAINTING’S

say “do more of those” so it has jump started a

OWN INNER LOGIC, ITS OWN INNER FORM, COME TO

new series of dummy paintings, Thanks Crux!

LIFE. HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE THE LOGIC AND

Least enjoyable? What kind of a way

FORM OF THIS FINAL PIECE?

to think about life is that?

I went for a very traditional method where I recreated the piece in my studio and then I could paint

CAN YOU DESCRIBE WHAT THE CRUX

directly from life without photography etc so in that

MOMENT WAS FOR YOU DURING THIS COLLABORATION?

way it’s a very direct lived experience of form.

WHAT WAS THE MOST AND LEAST ENJOYABLE MOMENTS DURING THIS COLLABORATION WITH CRUX? Just being asked was great , I don’t usually do commissions so it was a little nudge out of my comfort zone. It also caused my dealers to get excited and

“ T H E R E I S O N LY O N E M O M E N T A N D T H AT M O M E N T I S N OW. ”

61


T E X T T I F FA N N I T R E N C H / E LY S E M O L A N D

C

A M O U F L

A G E

The coastal town of Turku Finland, is host to the stunning Logomo cafeteria designed by conceptual artist Tobias Rehberger and furniture company Artek. Logomo café takes interior design to new levels by blending the boundaries of art with a functional social environment. This collaboration utilizes dazzle paints, geometric patterns and strong features depicting an experiment with dimensions and colour. This exciting collaboration called Nothing Happens For a Reason plays with the conceptual side of Tobias’ art merging it with the furniture designed by Artek to create a sense of direction. The neon orange guides the eye from one side to another, making it an attractive feature throughout. The design aesthetic creates a continual flow, which connects the décor and space like pieces of a puzzle. By combining striking lines and contrasting colors with the airy vibe, this place has more edge than just the normal art gallery. T h i s i s n ’ t t h e f i r s t c o l l a b o r a t i o n b e t we e n Re h b e r g e r a n d A r t e k . T h e i r l a s t ve n t u r e w o n R e h b e r g e r a G o l d e n L i o n f o r b e s t a r t i s t a t t h e Ve n i c e B i e n n a l e i n 2 0 0 9 .

“I like the idea of creating a visual art project which is about not seeing something”. The painting method of battle ships in the WWI and WWII, called dazzle painting, in a way, perfectly represents this paradox. The sculpture I created for Turku is based on the same concept as the one in Venice. It applies a completely different pattern to the space, but despite its very different look, it should have the same dazzling effect.” says Rehberger. Dazzle painting seems to be a fixture for Tobias. As seen in Logomo and the retro inspired cafeteria in Venice, Tobias likes to challenge his audience with the things that can’t be seen. The impact of this collaboration is instantly felt by visiting customers. Logomo provokes a dynamic sensation that is not commonly experienced in other cafeterias. Experimentation with these design elements shifts the way similar spaces are executed and opens the mind to numerous possibilities. Not only do collaborations like this influence interior design but also integrate accessible art into the daily lives of the public.

CRUX

CAMOUFLAGE


63

^ P H O T O S B O S T RA N D E N


FRENCH

ARTIST

JR

HAS

BIG

PLANS

FOR

THE

GLOBAL

S T R E E T- A R T

SCENE:

S U P E R - S I Z E D P E R S O N A L E X P R E S S I O N . Y O U M AY N O T PAY AT T E N T I O N T O T H E H U N D R E D S O F F A C E S A N D S T R A N G E R S Y O U PA S S O N T H E S T R E E T, B U T M AY B E

T E X T B Y: B RO N T I E N AY LO R- J O N E S P H OTO G RA P H Y B Y E LY S E M O L A N D

Y O U W O U L D S T O P A N D L O O K I F T H E I R FA C E W E R E P L A S T E R E D O N A B I L L B O A R D .

CRUX

Thought to be one of the biggest global art

Other previous projects that have had a profound

movements ever created, JR and the Inside

aim and message include Face2Face in 2007, when

Out project are seeking the help of numerous

JR took pictures of Palestinians and Israelis with

collaborators to expand the movement to a truly

the same occupations and posted them along the

monumental scale. Anyone across the globe,

wall that divides Israel from the West Bank. JR also

artistically inclined or otherwise, can upload a

visited places that have been affected by crime.

photograph, which will be returned to them as a

By taking photos of people who live there, he told a

billboard-size poster. The collaborator is free to

story that wouldn’t have been otherwise covered by

paste it anywhere: on the sides of buildings, roofs or

mainstream media outlets. By doing this, JR and his

fences, for example. JR believes this is a chance for

supporters attract media back to the site and allow

people to show a piece of who they are, or post a

the communities to reclaim their towns and start

picture of someone they care about and share them

afresh.

with the world. Now, at age twenty-eight, JR is the youngest The Inside Out project does not mark JR’s first

person to receive a TED.com prize, an award

foray into changing the world’s landscape. Prior

which has been presented to the likes of Jamie

to the creation of the project the self-proclaimed

Oliver, Bill Clinton and Bono. The grand prize is

“photograffeur” - a title that combines his passion

$100,000 and “one wish to change the world”.

for photography with a past filled with illegally

JR’s wish is “for people to take a stand and show

covering many of France’s empty surfaces with

what you care about by participating in a global

graffiti portraits – had covered Kenyan shanty

art project, and together we’ll turn the world inside

towns’ rooftops with photos of the faces of

out.” Upon getting the call from TED to inform

women who lived there and plastered eyes along

him he would be receiving the prize, JR thought

the river Seine. However, JR wanted his artistic

it was initially a hoax. He has since embraced

endeavours to reach out and involve a much

the honour and will be using the prize money

wider audience. The artist’s dream is to have “as

to help Inside Out expand its reach and make it

many different people as possible, in as many

bigger and more successful than his previous

different locations to post pictures in as many

projects. Following the prestigious award, JR has

countries as they are able.” Though the scope

gained help from sponsors such as the Sundance

of his idea is grand, his end goal is not: “I don’t

Film Festival founders to make a film about the

want to change the world, art isn’t meant to

project, and Google to publish the photos online.

change the world,” he says, “but rather change perceptions and, in turn, change energy, which is

With all these new-found resources and assistance,

what will allow people to change

JR’s dreams of making Inside Out and global street

the world themselves.”

art a phenomenon are closer than ever.


ELYSE MOLAND ART DIRECTOR TIFFANNI TRENCH EDITOR

INES VESELCIC EDITOR EVE KESKINEN EDITOR IN CHIEF

CRUX TURNS

INSIDE

OUT

“ W H E R E W I L L YO U R P H OTO B E S E E N ? W W W. I N S I D E O U T P RO J E C T. N E T

65


HANAH CHUNG is a multi-talented fashion photographer from Vancouver, Canada. She loves finding intriguing ways to capture the ordinary and the extraordinary. In this issue, Hanah experimented with the uncontrollable element of water to create a haunting atmosphere. opheliasfuneral.blogspot.com Canadian based oil painter THOMAS

MARTIN C. DE WAAL

ANFIELD started his

is a Dutch artist known

career as a graffiti artist before communicating his work through visual and performance art. Not one normally to do commissions, Crux’s 3X gave Thomas a little push to come out of his comfort zone.

for his controversial

CONTRI BUTORS

work which often involves the artist himself. Hot topics serve as attention grabbers for the underlying motivation behind his work: to make people less quick to judge. For this issue

thomasanfield.com

of Crux, De Waal reinterpreted Hussein Chalayan’s Transformer Dress with an installation. mcdewaal.com Fashion photographer MARCO VAN

RIJT has produced photo shoots for many online magazines including Glamcult and U+Mag. His photography style has a sharp edge which gives his images a crisp, clean look. Marco believes that “pleasure in the job puts perfection in the work.”

CRUX

marcovanrijt.com


S TO C K L I S T ACNE ACNESTUDIOS.COM AMERICAN APPAREL AMERICANAPPAREL.NET EMPORIO ARMANI EMPORIOARMANI.COM COS COSSTORES.COM DAPHNE VAN DEN HEUVEL DAPHNEVANDENHEUVEL.NL ELLIS BIEMANS

C O N TA C T

ELLISBIEMANS.COM EVE KESKINEN EPISODE

EDITOR IN CHIEF / TEXT EDITOR

EPISODE.EU

KESKINEN.EVE@GMAIL.COM

FILIPPA K

ELYSE MOLAND

FILIPPA-K.COM

ART DIRECTOR / TEXT EDITOR EMOLAND@RYERSON.CA

NADINE WAGNER ENIDANDINI21@YAHOO.DE

INES VESELCIC EDITOR

SAMANTHA WIJSMAN

IVY_INES@HOTMAIL.COM

SAMANTHAWIJSMAN.COM TIFFANNI TRENCH TENUE DE NÎMES - AMS, NL

EDITOR

TENUEDENIMES.COM

TIFFANNITRENCH@GMAIL.COM

67


CRUX


Crux Magazine  

Crux Magazine is an independent student produced, experimental fashion platform. We aim to highlight the process of creativity, and portray...

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