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SERVICE 2017 Annual Report

Unifying care, transforming communities.


MISSION Our mission is to create and implement sustainable community solutions to improve the healthcare infrastructure and strengthen healthcare delivery in rural Arkansas.

Vision To ensure access to quality and localized healthcare throughout rural Arkansas through collaborative efforts.

Core Values Trust, Collaboration, Creativity, Commitment, Responsibility, Productivity. Improve the delivery of healthcare services

Provide consumer assistance programs

Promote healthy lifestyles

Increase access to healthcare services and programs

Increase the utilization of telehealth and telemedicine technology

Provide healthcare provider education opportunities

Reduce service and operational costs for hospital members through collaborative negotiation and purchasing

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2017 Annual Report


TABLE OF CONTENTS ABOUT ARHP Mission, Vision, Core Values ................................................................................................. Map of ARHP members ......................................................................................................... Our Partnerships ................................................................................................................... Board of Directors ................................................................................................................. Letter from the President ..................................................................................................... Letter from the CEO .............................................................................................................. Organizational Histor y ..........................................................................................................

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CURRENT PROGRAMS Project Highlights ................................................................................................................. Task Force Initiatives ............................................................................................................ The Power of Outreach .........................................................................................................

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FINANCIALS Current Grant/Contract Funding .........................................................................................

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LOOKING BACK ARHP Staf f ............................................................................................................................. Our Challenges this Year ......................................................................................................

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MOVING FORWARD Expand Organizational C apacity ......................................................................................... Build a Regional Health Workforce Pipeline ....................................................................... Expand Healthcare Opportunities & Educational Opportunities ...................................... Increase Healthcare Ser vices in the Region ........................................................................

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ARHP PARTNER HOSPITALS & CLINICS CARROLL

BENTON

BAXTER

BOONE

FULTON

MARION

SHARP

IZARD MADISON

JOHNSON

SEARCY

POPE

STONE

VAN BUREN CONWAY

SEBASTIAN

WHITE

PERRY

PULASKI SALINE

GARLAND MONTGOMERY

HOT SPRING SEVIER

HOWARD

LITTLE RIVER

CLARK

CROSS

Clarendon 1 England MONROE 1 1 Stuttgart ARKANSAS 1 DeWitt

LINCOLN DALLAS Fordyce 1 CLEVELAND Dumas 2 DESHA McGehee 2 Warren 1 DREW CALHOUN BRADLEY

HEMPSTEAD NEVADA OUACHITA

3 Magnolia COLUMBIA LAFAYETTE

2017 Annual Report

Hamburg 1 Crossett 3 UNION ASHLEY

1 Lake Village CHICOT

MISSISSIPPI

POINSETT

WOODRUFF

PRAIRIE Brinkley 1 LONOKE

GRANT JEFFERSON Pine 3 Bluff

PIKE

MILLER

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JACKSON

FAULKNER

YELL

POLK

CRAIGHEAD

INDEPENDENCE

CLEBURNE

LOGAN

SCOTT

GREENE LAWRENCE

WASHINGTON Hospital-Owned Practices & Clinics NEWTON

CRAWFORD FRANKLIN

CLAY

RANDOLPH

CRITTENDEN

ST. FRANCIS LEE PHILLIPS


COLLABORATION

OUR FUNDERS Arkansas Department of Health Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Susan G. Komen Foundation - Arkansas Affiliate TMF Quality Innovation Network U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)

COMMUNITY PARTNERS ARcare University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) University of Arkansas College of Technology at McGehee Arkansas Coalition for Obesity Prevention (ArCOP) Arkansas Department of Health Arkansas Foundation for Medical Care Arkansas Hunger Relief Alliance Community Health Centers of Arkansas Daughters of Charity Dr. James Wright, D.O. Forrest City Medical Center Helena Regional Medical Center Medical Center of South Arkansas New Beginnings Ouachita Regional Medical Center Pillow Clinic Southeast Arkansas College (SEARK) CrossRidge Community Hospital arruralhealth.org

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BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Arkansas Rural Health Partnership (ARHP) is a non-profit, horizontal hospital network governed by the Chief Executive Officers of all hospitals in Arkansas, Ashley, Bradley, Columbia, Chicot, Dallas, Desha, Drew and Jefferson counties in the state of Arkansas. Our committed board of directors meet regularly on the first Friday of every month. Since 2008, member hospitals have successfully come together to positively impact the health needs of their individual communities and the south Arkansas Delta region.

Phillip Gilmore ARHP President

John E. Heard

ARHP Vice President

Steve Henson

CEO, Ashley County Medical Center

CEO, McGehee Medical Center

CEO, Bradley County Medical Center

ARHP Treasurer

Together, we are building healthier communities through collaboration and transformation. I’m excited about our future of us all working more as we serve our communities.” Phillip Gilmore ARHP President

Our board has recognized the importance of teamwork and has successfully navigated challenging situations over the years. Despite a lack of resources in the service area, ARHP members have built and maintained partnerships at the state and national level. ARHP leadership has prioritized professional development and networking opportunities among partners and program staff with the understanding that it is critical for the network to remain relevant and up-to-date with the changing healthcare landscape. Even while our small rural hospital partners have struggled financially, they have not stopped paying their membership dues. Instead, they are looking to cut costs by engaging with network partners in new cost-saving initiatives.

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2017 Annual Report


Ashley Anthony

Ken Sanders

Kevin Story

David Mantz

CEO, Delta Memorial Hospital

CEO, Dallas County Medical Center

CEO, Baptist Health Stuttgart

CEO, Chicot Memorial Medical Center

Jason McKewen

Rex Jones

Scott Barrileaux

Brian Thomas

CEO, DeWitt Hospital & Nursing Home

CEO, Magnolia Regional Medical Center

CEO, Drew Memorial Health System

CEO, Jefferson Regional Medical Center

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VISION ARHP: ON THE MOVE

Since 2007, the Arkansas Rural Health Partnership (formerly the Greater Delta Alliance for Health) has been steadily growing in membership and reach to create and implement sustainable solutions to improve the Southeast Arkansas rural healthcare infrastructure. This past year, our membership grew to reach across South Arkansas to include Magnolia Regional Medical Center to our organization. The healthcare industry continues to face many changes and challenges; all which have been significant to those of us in rural healthcare. Across the nation, we are witnessing the closure of small, rural hospitals while the larger healthcare systems continue to grow. Rural hospitals continue to struggle to recruit healthcare providers and maintain a quality workforce. Small rural hospitals face intense pressure to keep their doors open, despite the rising costs of care and frequent budget cuts coming from the Federal Government. ARHP recognizes that a single hospital closure would have a detrimental effect on residents, eliminating scarce jobs and leaving many without a healthcare provider within a 50-mile radius. We recognize that it is critical that rural hospitals offer locally available, high quality services that meet the needs of the community and we know that each member can’t accomplish this alone. It is together, as a collective group of hospitals, that we have the ability to improve and increase healthcare services, train and recruit healthcare providers, and have a stronger voice for rural healthcare in the state of Arkansas and across the country. ARHP’s outreach programs and services address the needs of our local communities and are a direct result from the voice of our communities and member organizations. Member hospital community health needs assessments function as a foundation for all ARHP programs and services. This report highlights ARHP’s 2017-2018 programs and services. As we look towards the future, ARHP will not only continue to bring needed resources to the service area, but also build its organizational infrastructure to enable members to reduce costs through economies of scale, service lines, payor contracts, and increase quality of care for all patients.

Phillip K. Gilmore, Ph.D., FACHE ARHP President

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2017 Annual Report

Photos courtesy of Ashley County Medical Center


A YEAR OF PROGRESS In 2007, I began the journey to build an organization that would make a difference in the lives of residents across Southeast Arkansas. At that time, I had no idea how much more learning I had to do and how much the Arkansas Rural Health Partnership’s mission and work would come to mean to me over the next ten years. Wow, ten years! Over the past decade, our organization has grown from five to eleven member hospitals, obtained nearly $10,000,000 in grant funding, and successfully implemented and sustained 52 grant-funded programs across the 8-county rural service area. ARHP has become a reference point and model for rural health innovation and collaboration across the state and nation. In the past year, we received two highly esteemed, federal recognition awards from HRSA/Federal Office of Rural Health to celebrate our collaboration efforts and work as rural health champions. I have always believed in the power of collaboration, that together we can do far more than one individual or organization can do alone. The success of the ARHP is the direct result of like-minded organizations coming together with a precision-like focus to see the health of area residents and the communities themselves improved. This dynamic partnership of engaged member hospitals, funders, and program staff translates into a powerful force of change, rather than competition, to truly make a lasting difference. The past year has been marked by progress and new beginnings for ARHP. We have continued to build our organizational infrastructure to increase capacity, established many new partnerships across the region and state, and began to venture out into new projects addressing mental and behavioral health. We have learned that our residents not only entrust their hospitals to save lives, but expect them to help provide the wrap around services and programs that support healthy lives and communities. It is a big task, but one that ARHP members are ready and willing to take on. Even in light of our organization’s exceptional growth over the past decade, I believe the best is yet to come. We are committed to continued development and expansion as an organization, including the development of a Clinically Integrated Network, and the creation of service lines for hospital members to reduce costs. In the days to come, we will devote our energies to enhance and grow the local healthcare workforce by partnering with our youth, as well as local and state educational institutions. We will continue to expand healthcare provider educational opportunities and address the mental and behavioral health needs of the region. The words of Ralph Waldo Emerson remind me daily, “No member of a crew is praised for the rugged individuality of his rowing.” It takes teamwork to be successful and make change, and I am thrilled to be among a crew of the most talented individuals that form Team ARHP.

Mellie Bridewell

ARHP Chief Executive Officer

ARHP CEO Mellie Bridewell (right) and Healthy Communities Project COO Lynn Hawkins, accept HRSA National Champion of Creative Partnerships award.

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ORGANIZATIONAL HISTORY Arkansas Rural Health Partnership (formerly known as the Greater Delta Alliance for Health) began when hospital administrators from five of the member hospitals convened to discuss how the region might collectively pull together to address the health disparities in the Southeast Delta region of Arkansas. This group identified the goals of the organization with the assistance of the HRSA Rural Health Network Planning grant funds in 2008. It was through a year of planning that the network identified its own resource capabilities as well as the need to create community involvement and buy-in in order to sustain their future projects. ARHP has maintained a closed board of directors and received its 501 (c) 3 status in September 2009. ARHP has continued to grow in membership over the past ten years to eleven hospital members serving over 20 counties in Arkansas.

Received a HRSA Network

Ashley County Medical

Drew Memorial Hospital

Changed name to Arkansas

Planning Grant

Center joined

joined

Rural Health Partnership

2008

2010

2013

2017

2007

2009

2011

2014

2018

Initial Meeting with 5 Hospital

Became a 501(c)3 non-profit

Bradley County Medical

Dallas County Medical Center

Magnolia Regional Medical

Administrators (CMMC, McGehee,

organization

Center joined; full-time ED

& Jefferson Regional Medical

Center joined

is hired

Center joined

DMH, Stuttgart, & DeWitt)

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GROWTH 2017 Annual Report

Photo courtesy of National Rural Health Resource Center


- Mellie Bridewell, ARHP CEO

OUTREACH

“

We’re pulling together a task force of providers, government officials, basically anyone who has a willingness to help us get important resources to the communities we serve.

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ARKANSAS DELTA HEALTHY COMMUNITIES PROJECT HRSA Federal Office of Rural Health

Other Services Offered Prescription Assistance

HRSA Delta States Rural Network Development Grant Online Healthcare Orientation, Education & Training

DCCs provide assistance with enrollment in

Provides member hospitals, clinics, and community health centers with free online education designed to

prescription assistance programs provided

assist healthcare organizations with orientation and assessment of skills required for accreditation.

by pharmaceutical companies to patients and residents throughout the service area.

Diabetes Education: Site Certification, Educator Certification, DEEP, DPP Assists hospitals, hospital clinics, and community health centers with becoming accredited AADE sites with certified educators.

ArCOP Community Grants Sub-grants are provided to communities that have been designated “Healthy Communities� by Arkansas Coalition for Obesity. These funds are available to Arkansas Delta communities to fund community gardens, worksite wellness, Cooking Matters, and other health initiatives.

Cooking Matters

Insurance & Medicare Enrollment Services DCCs are trained as Certified Assistance Counselors (CACs) and provide help and support with enrollment in the Health Insurance Marketplace and Medicare to patients and residents throughout the service area. For DCC locations.

The ARHP provides Cooking Matters classes empowering families with the skills to shop smarter, use nutrition information to make healthier choices and cook delicious, affordable meals at home. These classes are provided in Chicot, Desha, Lee, Monroe, Phillips and St. Francis counties.

Patient Navigation DCCs provide patients with navigation

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Delta Cares offers the following free services through Arkansas Rural Health Partnership Delta Cares

through the complicated maze of healthcare

Counselors (DCCs) and other healthcare workers. DCCs are trained and certified to work in ARHP

by assisting with finding resources for health

hospitals, rural health clinics and community health centers, and also travel to various sites to provide

services, prevention, information and local

these programs across the nineteen county service area.

programs.

2017 Annual Report


AR DELTA HEALTH EDUCATION FOR LOCAL PROVIDERS (HELP) United States Department of Agriculture Arkansas Department of Health ARHP is committed to improving the healthcare workforce in the Arkansas Delta by providing free, onsite trauma simulation training and certification for hospital teams, emergency department staff, and nursing students.  These trainings, provided by UAMS Centers for Simulation Education, include classroom instruction as well as expanded simulation-based training, which delivers an opportunity for learning that is both immersive and experiential. This enables participants to practice procedure-based skills as individual healthcare workers as well as practice communication, leadership and team working to improve system performance. ARHP’s mobile unit transports simulation training equipment, supplies, and UAMS certified physicians and staff to sites throughout the Arkansas Delta region to provide: Adult & Infant Trauma Training

Sepsis Training

Coding Training & Certification

Diabetic Ketoacidosis Training (DKA)

ASLS Training and Certification

Critical Nursing Skills

OB Trauma Training

Vernita Dore, U.S. Department of Agriculture deputy undersecretary of Rural Development, delivers a baby during a live birth demonstration using a simulation manikin. Margaret Glasgow, left assists her. Photo courtesy of University of Arkansas Medical Sciences.

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ACCESS PROJECT PINK/REACH EVERY WOMAN PROGRAM Susan G. Komen for the Cure - Arkansas Affiliate Communities Grant This project provides access to free breast exams, mammograms, ultrasounds, and biopsies to uninsured and underinsured women and men at Ashley County Medical Center, Baptist Health-Stuttgart, Bradley County Medical Center, Chicot Memorial Medical Center, Drew Memorial Health System, Delta Memorial Hospital, Jefferson Regional Medical Center, CrossRidge Community Hospital, and all rural hospitals in the Arkansas Delta. The program also assists patients with navigation to additional breast health services, treatment, and support programs throughout the state of Arkansas.

750+

WOMEN SERVED

Pictured, left to right, are Komen Project Director Wendy Talbot, Baptist Health Medical Center-Stuttgart CEO Kevin Storey and Komen Arkansas Mission Director Karolyn Taylor. The $76,704 grant check was awarded to the

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GDAH at the 23rd Annual Komen Luncheon in Little Rock on March 31, 2017

2017 Annual Report


AR RURAL MENTAL HEALTH OUTREACH HRSA Federal Office of Rural Health HRSA Rural Health Outreach Grant Although mental and behavioral health have long been a major concern across the nation, rural communities are particularly vulnerable due to extremely limited access to mental health professionals and treatment. The program expects to reduce morbidity and mortality due to mental or behavioral health conditions in adults (age 18-64) by 15% in rural southeast Arkansas Delta by April 2021. To meet this goal, mental health assessments will be provided via telehealth to all ARHP hospitals’ Emergency Departments (EDs). ARHP members include: Ashley County Medical Center in Crossett, Baptist Health Medical Center in Stuttgart, Bradley County Medical Center in Warren, Chicot Memorial Medical Center in Lake Village, Dallas County Medical Center in Fordyce, Delta Memorial Hospital in Dumas, DeWitt Hospital & Nursing Home, Drew Memorial Health System in Monticello, Jefferson Regional Medical Center in Pine Bluff, Magnolia Regional Medical Center, and McGehee Hospital. The ARHP-OP will make available 24-hour access to telemedicine counseling provided by a mental health professional to all partnering EDs. Services will include patient assessments and referrals to treatment, and also increase the ability of rural emergency departments and hospitals to provide relevant and timely mental health assistance within the local community and throughout ARHP’s 19-county service area.

Services Offered: Mental Health First Aid

Emergency Department

Training & Certification

Mental Health Assessments

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ARKANSAS RURAL OPIOID OUTREACH PROJECT HRSA Federal Office of Rural Health HRSA Rural Health Opioid Grant Arkansas Rural Health Partnership was one of ten organizations across

represents a community effort that puts all the pieces in place to address

the country to receive the HRSA Rural Health Opioid Grant this year. The

this issue.

Arkansas Delta Rural Health Opioid Project (AD-RHOP) was funded for $750,000 to address opioid use disorder (OUD) in Southeast Arkansas over

Drug abuse, specifically prescription drug abuse, was recognized as a

the next three years.

serious community problem in the mandatory IRS Community Health Needs Assessments conducted by member hospitals in 2016. According to

The Arkansas Delta RHOP will expand locally available screening, education,

ARHP executive director Mellie Bridewell, “Our hospitals are recognizing

outreach, case management and counseling services for those at-risk

that they must take a leadership role in addressing community health

or diagnosed with OUD in eight counties including Arkansas, Ashley,

issues. They also acknowledge that they can’t make a difference without

Bradley, Chicot, Dallas, Desha, Drew, and Jefferson counties. The project is

involving local organizations, officials, and professionals. This project brings

a collaborative effort between the ARHP and the 10th District Substance

Southeast Arkansas healthcare organizations, mental and behavioral health

Abuse Program New Beginnings, C.A.S.A. (Center for Alcohol and

organizations, the legal system, and social service organizations together to

Substance Abuse Treatment) which will provide behavioral health services

begin to address these issues we so desperately need to tackle.”

in the eight county region named in the grant. The joint RHOP is unique in that it begins in the clinical setting at the local clinic and navigates the patient to counseling services provided by local

SAMHSA’s SBIRT Training for Healthcare Providers

behavioral health experts. ARHP hospitals and participating clinics will

Medication Assistance Training (MAT) for Healthcare Providers

be able to provide and expand opioid use disorder counseling services by focusing on physician and community education and training to identify individuals at-risk and guide them to recovery by providing case management at the clinic site as well as counseling services via telehealth with a licensed counselor employed by New Beginnings. This project truly

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Services Offered:

2017 Annual Report

OUD Case Management & Counseling Services OUD Community Education & Awareness

C


COURAGE “

It’s not a lack of will power or a moral issue. It’s a disease.

- Dr. Jim Wright

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TASK FORCE INITIATIVES We believe that a special kind of magic happens when community members and organizations sit at the same table to tackle the most complicated and critical health concerns of a region. To this effect, in 2017 the ARHP formed two task force groups to support and extend the reach of the Rural Health Opioid & Mental Health Outreach Programs (FORHP/HRSA). Task force members meet on a regular basis to discuss ongoing project efforts, needed policy and organizational infrastructure change, and sustainability. Foundational principles of our task force initiatives include: Utilize and build upon existing resources and effective models, sharing whenever possible to expand reach without stressing limited infrastructure. Promote an open exchange of ideas, concerns, and facts to develop innovative, community-driven solutions. Find your community champions and get them involved. Local hospitals should take a leadership role in the overall health of the community. Never stop building relationships with local, state, and federal partners. Always aim to give more than you receive.

2017 HRSA Rural Health Community Champion Award: Creative Partnerships

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2017 Annual Report


THE POWER OF OUTREACH As we reflect on 2017, we look back at what we accomplished and the power of outreach. In 2017 - 2018...

$50K ARHP provided $50,000 of funding for community grants which assisted 5,862 Arkansas Delta residents.

ARHP provided diabetes education to 13,267 patients across the Arkansas Delta.

$1M SAVED ARHP provided prescription

532

Assissted

56,708 Training Courses

ARHP provided 56,708 health education and training courses to healthcare providers and workers throughout the Arkansas Delta.

ARHP received two federal grants to address behavioral and mental health needs of the region.

ARHP assisted 532 Arkansas residents with insurance and Medicare enrollment services.

assistance services for 899 patients in the Arkansas Delta and saved $1,009,000 in prescriptions for these patients.

2,109

Breast & Diagnostic Services

ARHP provided navigation and breast screening and diagnostic services to 2,109 women and men throughout the Arkansas Delta region.

ARHP provided tuition, books, and travel to 28 high school students and local firefighters to obtain an EMT certification.

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CURRENT GRANT/CONTRACT FUNDING HRSA Delta States Rural Network Grant ................................................................................... $2,565,000 USDA Delta Health Care Services Grant .......................................................................................... $752,832 HRSA Rural Health Opioid Program Grant .................................................................................... $750,000 HRSA Rural Health Outreach Grant ............................................................................................... $600,000 Susan G. Komen Arkansas Grant ......................................................................................................... $84,000 Arkansas Department of Health Cooperative Agreements ......................................................... $25,000 Since 2009, ARHP has obtained $9.2 million dollars in grant funds

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2017 Annual Report

Photo courtesy of Lt. Gov. Tim Griffin’s office


TEAM ARHP

ARHP STAFF

Mellie Bridewell

Lynn Hawkins

Heather Perry

Wendy Talbot

Chief Executive Officer

Chief Operating Officer

Project Director Mental Health Outreach

Komen Project Director Access Project Pink

Shessa Pieroni

Janet Pack

Cara Cox

Sonya Waldrup

Project Director Delta Healthy Communities

ARHP Resource Coordinator

Project Director Opioid Outreach Program

Delta Cares Counselor

This year we have had many staffing changes within Team ARHP. Lynn Hawkins moved into the COO position, a new position for ARHP.  Lynn now manages all of the ARHP federal grant projects and continues to build our partnerships throughout the state.  Heather Perry and Shessa Pieroni have shown us they not only have what it takes to be project directors, but they are talented and flexible enough to take all that we throw to them!  Lastly, we have welcomed some new talent this year as Cara Cox joined our staff to lead our new opioid initiative.

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MOVING

FORWARD

EXPAND ORGANIZATIONAL CAPACITY By increasing staff and organizational capacity, ARHP will be able to serve our membership through cost savings, shared learning, increased healthcare services, and improved quality of

BUILD A REGIONAL HEALTH WORKFORCE PIPELINE Maintaining a healthy community depends on the proper preparation of the rural health workforce. Grow-your-own programs help to address the shortage of healthcare workers in rural areas. They focus on encouraging individuals to consider choosing healthcare careers, cultivating their interest, and helping them develop skills that they can use professionally in their home communities.

service. ARHP will work together as an integrated network for quality improvement, staffing,

This approach recognizes and builds on the idea that health

recruiting, margin enhancement, and cost reduction.

professionals are more likely to consider serving in the community in which they were raised. It does not provide

ARHP initiatives will include: Combining member efforts for recruitment of healthcare providers and specialists.

healthcare workers who will enter the labor force immediately. Instead, it is a long-term strategy that moves people into the health workforce pipeline and enables rural communities to more effectively address their future healthcare workforce needs.

Pursuing shared insurance, employee benefits, revenue cycle management, business

ARHP initiatives will include:

office, equipment maintenance, coding, and various areas of consulting services.

• Providing health career exposure activities to junior high and high school students

Developing ARHP councils, comprised of representation from ARHP member hospitals

• Providing certification, training, and education opportunities

to address member priorities and challenges and an environment for stakeholders that

to high school seniors

encourages new ideas and thoughts, demonstrates creativity and program solving, and promotes business decisions and activities that are beneficial to all ARHP members. Developing ARHP agencies to support the needs of the member hospitals; including a Nurse Staffing Agency (that would work as a regional staffing agency to reduce the cost of outside nurse staffing agencies), a Centralized Business Office (that would offer billing, coding, purchasing, contract negotiations, & staff training), and an Employee Education agency (that would offer orientation, training, certification, and training to hospital staff).

• Working collaboratively with local colleges and universities to develop healthcare training tracks • Working collaboratively with local colleges and universities to increase the capacity of healthcare programs; specifically nursing programs • Providing financial assistance to students for healthcare education & training opportunities • Building a regional task force comprised of hospitals, high schools, and colleges • Providing mentorships, shadowing opportunities, and guidance through the educational and job placement process

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2017 Annual Report


EXPAND HEALTHCARE TRAINING & EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES ARHP recognizes the need to create and retain qualified and employable staff in the Arkansas Delta. These initiatives will equip these organizations with the capacity to increase points of service for their local communities by strengthening the healthcare and emergency workforce in the region.

Hosting professional

Expanding ARHP

Continuing to provide

roundtables for

healthcare professional

on-site simulation

healthcare professionals

training to address

training to hospitals and

to share best practices

mental and behavioral

healthcare partners

and provide support for

health issues in the

each other

region

INCREASE HEALTHCARE SERVICES IN THE REGION

Combining member efforts for recruitment and employment of healthcare providers and specialists

Collaborating with statewide colleges, universities, and medical schools to include localized training and education opportunities

ARHP initiatives will include:

Improving access to healthcare for patients in rural Arkansas, as well as across rural America, proves to be a tough chore. In 2017, ARHP began to identify strategies to overcome staffing issues, close geographical barriers, and meet the social and healthcare needs that affect our

Continuing to increase telehealth services in member hospitals and clinics.

rural patients.     Throughout 2017-2018, ARHP conducted an organizational and membership assessment to

Working collaboratively with member hospitals to determine specialty needs and how those needs might be provided to each other.

determine gaps in healthcare services in the region and to understand how to implement needed services. Healthcare service needs at member sites where identified through the process and each hospital asked to determine if they were capable of providing that service

Working collaboratively with statewide partners and stakeholders to increase telehealth services in the region.

to the other members of ARHP or if they would want to receive the service from a member ARHP hospital or outside source.  

Increasing access to behavioral and mental health through collaborative efforts.

Member hospitals learned a lot from this process and emerged from wanting more than ever to work together for the benefit of all the hospitals and the patients they serve.

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ARKANSAS RURAL HEALTH PARTNERSHIP 1969 Lakehall Road | Lake Village, AR 71653 (870) 632-7299 | info@arruralhealth.org arruralhealth.org

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