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Royal jelly

Royal jelly is a honey bee secretion used to feed larvae and adult queen bees. It is secreted by worker bees while in their nurse phase; up to 500g per hive per season can be produced. The copious feeding of royal jelly to selected larvae produces new queens. Royal jelly is used in naturopathy, particularly in Asia, for lowering cholesterol, as an antiinflammatory, and as an antibiotic agent. However, there is no conclusive scientific proof of its effectiveness.

Venom

A bee sting delivers the toxic compound bee venom (apitoxin). A bee sting is rather painful, but normally not dangerous, but a bee sting may be deadly if the respiratory ducts are targeted (in which case there is a substantial risk of asphyxia), or when a victim has a severe allergic reaction to the toxin. Honey bees will usually only sting in self-defence or in defence of their hive. The barbed end of the honey bee stinger often becomes embedded in thick skin following a sting. In such cases the honey bee will lose its stinger and a portion of its lower abdomen of size sufficient to kill the bee. Apitoxin is used a treatment for rheumatism and as a desensitiser to manage insect sting allergies.

A spoonful of harvested pollen pellets.

Pollinators and agriculture 

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Profile for ECPA

Pollinators & Agriculture  

Agricultural productivity and pollinator protection - Around 70% of the world’s most produced crop species rely to some extent on insect pol...

Pollinators & Agriculture  

Agricultural productivity and pollinator protection - Around 70% of the world’s most produced crop species rely to some extent on insect pol...