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the lost art of type

The art of hand-drawn type has faded in the past years. For those who still practice, it’s an art that will never disappear.

$3.50 MARCH ‘12

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issue number one

THE TYPE ISSUE

OUR TURN (practice your handwritten type here)

YOUR TURN (practice your handwritten type here)


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MEET VALERIE 10

THE TEAM up&COMING

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HOUSE&HOME

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Meet new and rare typographers who are making an impact.

Find fresh new ways to decorate your home with type.

THE LOST ART OF TYPE

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HERE&THERE

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Awe&INSPIRE

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Student typographer shares his process of creating his font, Dodo.

The art of hand-drawn type has faded in the past years. For those who still practice, it’s an art that will never disappear.

See how typography is affecting the world, from Brazil to the Middle East.

PHILIP JOHNSON

Be inspired by fellow readers. Here’s your chance to send us what you’ve learned.

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& THE TEAM

CHELSEA KARDOKUS

KATELIN CARTER

ALBERTO PIMIENTA

EMILY THEIS

SARAH PHINNEY Inspiration

ANNA KAISER

ADAM BAUMGARTNER

EMMA KATE FITZ

Everything

Writer

JEFFREY HOLIDAY Producer

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Photographer

Writer

Motivator

Inspiration

Writer


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SOURCES

designworklife.com

Photos

Emma Kate Fitz

Katelin Carter, www.mrnedselby.blogspot.com behance.net

Photos TEXT 18, 19

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2012.ampersandconf.com

Adam Baumgardner

Photos TEXT

Photos

8, 9

flikr.com

8, 9

jessicahische.is.com

TEXT

TEXT

Photos TEXT

14, 15

Photos

Katelin Carter

Photos

Emily Theis

TEXT

36, 37

kasheeda.com

Emma Kate Fitz

Crate and Barell Lori Lowery

34, 35

thailandqa.com

kasheeda.com

Photos

Katelin Carter Chelsea Kardokus

TEXT 32, 33

Photos

Photos TEXT

thenextweb.com

thenextweb.com

Chelsea Kardokus

Katelin Carter workplaydesign.tumblr.com

Emily Theis

TEXT 22, 29

TEXT

Chelsea Kardokus Lettercult.com

ILLUSTRATIONS

TEXT 36, 41

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text, photos 43, 47

David Downham

Emma Kate Fitz

& is a monthly designers handbook that highlights new trends, people and updates in the evolving world of design. It serves a cultured reader full of creativity and passion for the field of design not only in their hometown but around the world.

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UP COMING people making a difference.

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Veronica love Prague-born designer spreads talent

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orn in Prague, got her first degree in Industrial Design in Munich, Germany, before she moved on to Austria and Italy to work as a mix between a product and graphic designer. Discovering her true passion for type, she graduated with distinction from the MA in Typeface Design in Reading, UK, in 2003 and started to work as full-time type designer at DaltonMaag in London until 2007. After staying for some years in Boulder, Colorado, she is currently living and working in Prague and dedicates her

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& fully to TypeTogether, an independent type-label that she co-founded with JosĂŠ Scaglione. She also continues to give lectures and workshops at international conferences and universities. Her typeface Maiola received, amongst others, the TDC Certificate of Excellence in Type Design 2004. Several other typefaces by TypeTogether have also been recognised by international competitions, including ED-Awards and ISTD.

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eet Jennifer Prandato. A 21-yearold designer from Ball State University. After being born in New York, growing up in a small town in Idaho and now living in Indiana she has a passion for travel and culture. She loves typography, color, design and pays attention to the small things. One of her favorite things she owns is her Jonathan Adler planner. Each page is full of design inspiration that she can’t get enough of. Jennifer is always busy and has a hunger for learning. After graduation she wants to move back to her roots of New York City and take on the world of design. She recently started drawing type for things such birthday cards,

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American girl finds her love for typography thank you cards and anything her family may need. She started to sell her prints online and after a while became one of the most popular typographers on etsy. Since then, Jennifer has been focusing on making

more prints, her classes and finding a job when she graduates in a few months. She’s planning a backpacking trip through London for this summer to try and inspire her and find new ways to use her talent.

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VALERIE CARNEVALE Swiss designer brings texture

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Valerie Carnevale is a letterer, illustrator, and self-described “avid internetter�. After graduating with a degree in Graphic and Interactive Design from Tyler School of Art (Temple University) in 2006, she worked for Headcase Design in Philadelphia before taking a position as Senior Designer at Louise Fili Ltd. While working for Louise, she learned most of her skills as a letterer and


& Valerie Carnevale is a letterer, illustrator, and self-described “avid internetter�. After graduating with a degree in Graphic and Interactive Design from Tyler School of Art (Temple University) in 2006, she worked for Headcase Design in Philadelphia before taking a position as Senior Designer at Louise Fili Ltd. While working for Louise, she learned most of her skills as a letterer and spent upwards of 16 hours every day working (9 for Louise, 7+ for freelance clients). After two and a half years, Jessica left to further her freelance career and embark on several fun personal projects. Valerie began Daily Drop Cap, a project in which every day she created a new illustrative letter, working through the alphabet a total of twelve times.

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www.starbuckscoffee.com


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HOUSE HOME update your look.

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JUST MY TYPE Bringing type to your walls makes it pop

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esign should’t stop with what’s on the floor. Walls are a blank slate perfect for incorporating design throughout the etire space. An easy way to express individual taste and make to most of walls is to use words. Framed photographs, mirrors and shelves can get redundant, but the graphic quality of type allows the accent to stand out and become a focal point in the space. The words transcend much more than what they literally mean, creating an atmosphere and visual appeal. The options are endless, and differences in typeface as well as color can create any desirable mood. This is not the standard quote wall papered above grandma’s kitchen counter.


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pillow love Bring your pillows to life with type

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itting on the couch, ready to watch a movie, popcorn on the table, what is missing? That pillow, perfect for cuddling with. But a pillow doesn’t have to function only for comfort. Type can take your reliable pillow from a crocched mess to a chic style statement. Whenever you have that ich to change life up, pillows are an easy and affordable way to change the feeling of the entire room. Typface accentuates this easy transition because bolding a word, picking a different font or simply choosing a different letter can make a large dfference. The versatility makes it worth the little money they cost.

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WALL ART Give your walls a little life

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neglected wall looks bare, but an overdecorated wall looks cluttered. Finding the perfect balance can be difficult, but it is possible. The key is in what you put on the wall, as well as how much of it. Any good thing turns bad when over used. Framed photos can make a great statement while showcasing loved ones, but too many can turn the wall into a tacky scrapbook. When approaching this problem make sure to choose only a few faorites and mix and match textures. Remember that simplicity and clean lines are key to achieving a polished look.

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Joy Sobey remembers practicing her handwriting in class as a child. She recalls sliding her pen along the page, leaving a silky trail of ink. Sobey is now a freshman journalism-graphics major at Ball State University, and she spends her free time studying the arts of design and typography. “I’ve always loved words and language,” Sobey said, “but until I got to college, I hadn’t thought about words as an art.” Sobey began her experience at Ball State undecided about her major. While trying to choose a field of study, her explorations led her to the university’s student newspaper, the Daily News. “I first realized how important type is when I learned about the hierarchy of stories in a newspaper. We used fonts with different weights and from different races to demonstrate the importance of the stories,” Sobey said. It wasn’t until she began designing more creatively that she considered typography to be an art within itself. “I was just toying with a headline and trying to make it more interesting when I thought about the importance of the words and how I was arranging them,” she said. “From that point, I began learning more about typography and the different parts of fonts.” Now, Sobey dabbles in creating handwritten typefaces. “It combines the sincerity of handwritten letters with computer graphics and typography. It adds emotion to the information age,” she said. As computers and design technology become more widely available to the public, the public becomes increasingly interested in typography and design. People are becoming aware of text in their everyday lives, from advertisements to business logos. Typographers work constantly to recreate fonts for public use and generate new fonts for new situations. Thus, typefaces have become crucial in a world of competing media, messages and markets. To people such as Sobey, typefaces are also crucial as a form of self-expression.

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“I can go online and look for fonts, or I can try to create my own,” she said. “The things I find online just don’t look how I want them to or create the feeling I want.” Though Sobey hasn’t completed her own font alphabet yet, she enjoys recreating her favorite characters. “Usually I sketch them out first with pen and paper, and then I use Adobe Illustrator to reproduce them digitally. Sometimes I scan my sketches onto the computer so I can visually incorporate my own handwriting in a more obvious way,” she said. Sobey’s interest in typography has even inspired her to take a calligraphy class this summer at an art studio in her hometown. She feels that even though typography is a digital art form, pen and paper offer creative freedoms that sometimes computers can’t. “It’s like sketching out a painting,” Sobey said, “and illustrating it on the computer is like applying the paint.” Sobey feels she has come a long way since her days of learning how to write. “I never thought -- when I was six or seven, probably holding a juice box – that I would try to study writing or make a career of typographical design. I don’t think I even knew it was an option.” Yet Sobey has grown from a little girl to a young adult, and she happily pursues her passion for design while practicing for the professional world. “I don’t think I’ll design the next Helvetica,” Sobey said, “but I hopefully other people will see my hobby and appreciate the work I do. As long as I can express myself, I’ll be happy.”

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HERE THERE trends around the world.

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BRAZIL BRINGS TYPE TO SLUMS Bringing life to Brazillian slums

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id you know that graffiti could be used to do good? The Spanish art collective BoaMistura does, and its recent project in Brazil is both beautiful and meaningful. Spotted by VisualNews, the project took place in a Brazilian slum near S찾o Paulo, the favela of Vila Brasil창ndia. While it only took a short period of time to complete, it had longlasting effects on the local community, starting with its visual impact. As you can see on the pictures below, the collective used perspective typography to give narrow streets a stunning makeover.

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THAI TYPE

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Thailand type styles popular

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he evolution of Thai printing and typography, hardly contained to the details of choosing words and fonts, uniquely conveys Thai history over the last 160 years. For more than 25 years, Pracha Suveeranont has been fascinated with the graceful yet unadorned look of Thai letters, and the myriad ways in which the Thai language can appear in printed form. He has observed the transition of both the technology used in typesetting - from metal types to dry transfer letters to digital technology - as well as the evolution of Thai typefaces. From the simpler fonts of the political posters of the 1970s, to the arty word fragments used in modern advertising, this professional graphic designer has seen it all.

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FIRST 3D TYPEFACE Freedom of Creation changes typography history

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reedom Of Creation has just launched the production and distribution of the world’s first 3D printed typeface and made one further step towards its dream of totally customized industrial production available to a global public. Kashidaarabic and Kashida-latin are the two versions of the three-dimensional font, developed by Yara Khoury and Melle Hammer in collaboration with Freedom Of Creation and upon invitation by the Khatt foundation for Arabic typography and design research. With the innovative Kashida-arabic and Kashidalatin 3D fonts, the customer can type his personal text, word or acronym on the computer and order his sculptural text directly from the 3D printers of Freedom Of Creation. This means 100% customization: the very first opportunity to have a standardized basis product personalized to every single one’s needs, fabricated just in time in an industrial way and distributed all over the world. The rapid manufacturing dream is becoming reality and Freedom Of Creation once more is the pioneer. Kashida-arabic and Kashida-latin font have been developed by Yara Khoury and Melle Hammer on invitation by the Khatt foundation, an Amsterdam based Center for Arabic Typography aiming at building cultural bridges and advancing design in the Middle East and North Africa.

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Tall and thin, modernist with an antiquated air, subtle yet almost dripping with potential -- DODO sans whispers cues to its creator. Phillip Johnson is a new breeze in the tornado of typefaces, but at only 21, his work is already picking up notice and use in a world where young type design rules. Johnson is a senior Visual Communications major at Ball State University who says his work always has an air of time and its role in how eyes and hearts connect. “I love to look back at different design movements to understand them better,” Johnson said. “But I guess the most important part of that looking back is taking it forward. Like, how will people understand my work? How can each generation understand it, and why? I guess I’m a little bit of a history buff, but not in the traditional sense. Creativity is all about understanding that sort of thing. Time, its implications, its effects.” For DODO sans, Johnson’s first effort in type design, he took cues from Modernist appeals as well as his current typographic heroes, Christian Schwartz and Greg Meadows. DODO took him about five months to develop and is focused on consistent, even forms. He introduced and uses the thin, condensed glyphs in wideopen tracking and cool color palettes, which he says have been reminiscent of a calming sense that has existed in his work for the past year or so. And the theme hasn’t just emerged in type – Johnson also is also a songwriter and lead singer for indie band Mid-American and a photographer who focuses in portraits and old-world human appeal. When asked if his creativity ever runs dry with so many interests, Johnson pauses and simply replies, “It’s all part of the process.” Process is key in his design development, and he references as the most important facet of his work. Johnson believes he can’t just sit down and create something.

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“I am not content with recreating. I have a need to innovate.�

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new from font fabric

REXREXREX BOLDINLINELIGHT

three weights

ABCDEFGHIJKLM� NOPQRSTUVWXYZ

caps letter

abcdefghijklmn opqrstuvwxyz

small letter


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AWE INSPIRE let your life be inspired


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David downham Reader uses type to decorate apartment

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ew job, new city, & new apartment. After living primarily in a dorm room the past four years, I was starting from scratch when furnishing my place in Nashville, minus the four-year-old futon. I had a large, empty wall to work with & after seeing the Olunda poster at Ikea with the alphabet in Akzidenz Grotesk, I knew what I wanted to do. Favorite fonts. Alphabet art.

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I spent downtime at work looking up historically significant typefaces for each letter & information about them. Most letters were easy, some obvious. Bodoni for “B” or Futura for “F”. But there’s not a lot of options for the letter “Y.” I nearly forgot Ziggurat, almost printing Zapfino. Gross. Clean and simple is my choice in design and decor, so black letters were obvious, but I wanted the vowels to pop & match some red accent pieces in my living room. Luckily, the vowels are scattered nicely throughout the wall in the end product. Next, I had to get some cheap frames (back to Ikea) & get the panels printed. Unwrapping the 27 frames -- I added an ampersand for three rows of nine -- was the worst part, followed closely by trying to hang the letters sans leveling tool. All together I spent about $50 on the project, only ten dollars more than the original poster from Ikea. It makes me want to do another type-art project, maybe a huge ampersand at the top of my stairs. David Downham lives in Nashville, Tennessee and is a designer for the Gannett Nashville Design Studio. He graduated from Ball State University in the journalism graphics program in May 2011. His favorite thing about typography is finding new ways to create with something that’s already been used.

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www.artindustry.com


www.madewell.com


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