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Critical Path Annual Report

Welcome

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2017


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Inside Cover Image


C ontents 4

Welcome Letter

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Association Information

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Responsible Entities

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Committee Members

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Organisational Structure and Key Responsibilities

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Staffing

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Principal Activities

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Operating Result

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2017 Artistic Program Funding

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Programs Result

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RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT

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RESPONSIVE PROGRAM

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LABS & RESIDENCIES

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OUT & ABOUT

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DEVELOPMENT LABS & WORKSHOPS

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CRITIQUE AND DISCOURSE

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STUDIO PRESENTATIONS

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ASSOCIATE ARTIST

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INTERCHANGE PROGRAM 2017

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Financial Report Contents

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Committee Members’ Report

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Auditor’s Independence Declaration

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Notes to the Financial Statements

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Committee Members Declaration

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Independent Audit Report

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Additional Financial Information Disclaimer

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Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit


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Welcome Letter Critical Path’s Annual Report 2017 sets out the activities of the organisation in the last year, demonstrating the breadth and depth

and different approaches through the body and the absence or shift from focus on the human body to objects.

of the work that nurtures and extends the practice of independent choreographers

Our program has been enhanced by

from our base in NSW across Australia and internationally.

multiple project funds, gained by ourselves directly (in particular from Australia Council for the Arts), and in partnership,

2017 was a big year for Critical Path with the extension of our Interchange program and the second Interchange Festival. In the second part of the year this project strand brought us connection and dialogue with International artists drawn from Canada, Japan, USA, France/UK and Taiwan. These artists came to Sydney but also ventured out to other parts of NSW and into other states, made possible by existing and new partnerships; The Mill in Adelaide, Tasdance, DIA Northern Rivers NSW,

and the continued support of Create NSW (formerly Arts NSW) as our main funder.

Ausdance QLD and QUT Brisbane, BMEC Bathurst NSW, Ainslie & Gorman Canberra, Mirramu Bungendore NSW.

importance of volunteers, primarily our Committee) and metaphorically.

We also saw Meredith Brooks step down as our Chairperson after five years in the role. Meredith has been a stalwart ally of Critical Path, a support to myself as the new Director / CEO since September 2015 and before me to Margie Medlin and Justine Shih Pearson. Her generosity, wisdom and calm have been a gift to the organization, literally (demonstrating the

As we came to the end of a period

The team worked tirelessly to ensure that artists and projects were well served, our

exploring the relationship of the body to choreography, our 2017 Question of Bodies program invited a number of artists to

existing team members Fabiana Serafim and Laura Osweiler being joined for Interchange by Margie Breen, and by Anna

consider the scope and diversity of ways that these interact; the significance of the

Grieg in a short-term trainee Co-ordinator role.

connection between land and body, the ways in which the body itself can act as a site for choreography, different bodies

Above all Critical Path has been invigorated by our artists. We had 656


Welcome

artist interactions over the year, ranging from one off workshops with International practitioners, to two-week labs and residencies for small groups, space ‘grants’ and research room time for individual or small sets of artists, alongside funded research projects and dialogue activities and the connection offered by longerterm visits from global choreographers. We continue to be a hub for creativity, innovation and knowledge exchange, a space that champions research and nurtures artists’ ongoing development.

Claire Hicks Director

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A ssociation Information Registered Office & Principal Place of Business The Drill 1C New Beach Road Rushcutters Bay NSW 2011

R esponsible Entities Auditors Mitchell & Partners, Chartered Accountants Public Officer Claire Hicks


Committee Members

C ommittee Members The Committee members of Critical Path Incorporated present their Report together with the financial statements for the year ending 31 December 2017 and the Independent Audit report, covering those financial statements. The following persons were committee members of Critical Path Incorporated during or since the end of the financial year. The number of meetings during the year and the number of meetings attended by each member are as follows: Date Appointed Date of Cessation A

B

Meredith Brooks (Chair)

22/11/2010

04/12/2017

6

6

Genia McCaffrey

01/02/2013

21/5/2017

2

2

Annabel Millet (Treasurer)

10/05/2016

Continuing

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5

Fenn Gordon

29/2/2014

Continuing

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4

Lesley Power (Secretary)

24/2/2014

Continuing

6

5

Noella Lopez

13/8/2012

09/10/2017

6

4

Shane Carroll /Batchelor

01/02/2017

Continuing

6

5

Susan Carroll

15/5/2017

Continuing

4

4

Thomas Kelly (Artist Representative)

8/08/2016

Continuing

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1

Raghav Handa (Artist Representative)

01/02/2017

Continuing

6

4

Sarah-Vyne Vassallo (Artist Representative)

15/2/2016

09/10/2017

5

0

A: Number of meetings the Committee Member was entitled to attend B: Number of meetings the Committee Member attended

Lesley Power has been the Association’s Secretary since February 2014. Claire Hicks has been the Association’s Public Officer since June 2016. Details of Committee Member’ qualifications, experience and special responsibilities can be found below.

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MEREDITH BROOKS CHAIR to December 2017

THOMAS E. S. KELLY ARTIST REPRESENTATIVE

Meredith is a non-executive Director of BT Investment Management Ltd,

Thomas is a performer, choreographer, and composer. He graduated from NAISDA Dance College in 2012. He is a proud

non-executive Director of General Reinsurance Australia Ltd and General Reinsurance Life Australia Ltd and a Council Member of Glaucoma Australia. She is an APMA Level 2 Pilates Instructor.

Wiradjuri and Bundjalung man from QLD and NSW.

FENN GORDON

Susan has a professional background

Fenn is an independent practitioner with her own company Tandem, working between Australia and New Zealand, specialising in strategic development,

across Government, Law and the Arts. With substantial Senior Executive experience across the Commonwealth

producing and international touring. She has worked as producer and strategic advisor with artists including the William

and high-level strategic advisory roles with the Department of Premier & Cabinet NSW, Susan has experience and expertise in strategic partnerships, policy development, government navigation and

Yang, Gavin Webber and Grayson Millwood (The Farm), Gravity & Other Myths, ILBIJERRI Theatre Company, and Nicola Gunn.

engagement.

RAGHAV HANDA ARTIST REPRESENTATIVE

SHANE CARROLL DEPUTY/ACTING CHAIR

Raghav is a performer and choreographer from Sydney.

SUSAN CARROLL CHAIR

Shane has worked in the arts sector as a performer, teacher, consultant, manager, researcher, advocate and advisor for around 40 years. Currently she supports artists through strategic initiatives to create viable careers, and contributes to arts advocacy, funding and policy development.

NOELLA LOPEZ Noella has extensive experience in strategy development, brand management, marketing and business development in both the private and government sectors. She is the Founding Director and Curator at Noella Lopez Gallery.


Committee Members

GENIA MCCAFFERY Genia was Mayor of North Sydney from 1995 to 2012. She was President of the Local Government Association (NSW) 2004 to 2010 and President of Australian Local Government Association 2010 to

LESLEY POWER SECRETARY Lesley is a media, entertainment and arts lawyer. She is General Counsel of SBS and a member of their senior executive team.

2012. She has extensive experience in working with Local, State and Federal Governments as well as with the

SARAH-VYNE VASSALLO ARTIST REPRESENTATIVE

community.

and teacher and has worked across commercial and contemporary dance, theatre, film, television and arts development spanning two decades. She is a recipient of a Winston Churchill Fellowship in the arts and a passionate leader in the field of integrated arts practice in Australia.

ANNABEL MILLET TREASURER Annabel is a UK qualified Chartered Accountant and a senior management consultant at PwC. She has extensive experience across the private and government sector, helping clients to manage their Finance functions through business design, strategy and transformation programs.

Sarah-Vyne is a director, choreographer

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Organisational Structure and Key Responsibilities COMMITTEE Goverance and strategic development

DIRECTOR Artistic vision, company management and strategic development

FINANCIAL CONSULTANT Financial advice and reporting

PROJECT MANAGER

GENERAL MANAGER

Management of Facilitated Program,

Management of Responsive Program,

communications and events

business administration and publications

PROJECT COORDINATOR Coordination of specific projects (2017 Interchange Project)


Staffing

S taffing In 2017, Claire Hicks continued in the role of Director (full time).

Governing Committee In 2017 changes to the Committee are as follows:

Fabiana Serafim continued Program Manager*

Shane Batchelor joined the committee on

Laura Osweiler continued as General

1 February. Susan Carroll also joined the committee on 15 May and subsequently became Chair on 4 December, when

Manager** Critical Path also continued to contract Karen Steains on a monthly basis as a financial consultant. Margie Breen was engaged for a period of 6 months as a temporary Project Coordinator (2017 Interchange projects).

Meredith Brooks stepped down. In addition, Genia McCaffrey and Noella Lopez resigned from the committee on 21 May and 9 October respectively. Raghav Handa joined the committee as an Artist Representative on 1 February. Sarah-Vyne Vassallo (Artist Representative) stepped down on 9 October.

Financial Consultant*** Karen Steains Director Claire Hicks Program Manager*

Activities Outside of Critical Path

Fabiana Serafim General Manager**

Internships

Laura Osweiler Project Coordinator Margie Breen* *part­–time (Three days per week) **part–time (Four days per week) ***contractor

Laura Osweiler co-produced the Austin Belly Dance Convention in the USA, June 2017.   In 2017 Critical Path had three interns: Natasha Almeida (BA in Dance, UNSW), twelve weeks part-time, from March to June. Kathleene Capararo and Lucy Kearney (BA Design in Visual Communications, UTS), each undertook an eight weeks part-time internship. Natasha assisted the Project Manager in Jonathan Burrows & Matteo Fargion (UK)’s

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residency with Critical Path, part of our Dancesites collaboration with Dancehouse and Strut.

Volunteers

Kathleene designed Critical Dialogues #7 “Claiming Spaces: Choreographers with Disabilities Redefining Dance� and designed Critical Path’s 2016 Annual

supporting public studio presentations. Anna Greig undertook a 10 week period as

In 2017, volunteers continued to support our activity, in particular working on the festival weekend of Interchange and

a volunteer supporting in the office 1 day a week.

Report. Lucy was designer for the Interchange Festival, creating a festival identity based on our brand, e-marketing and information signage.

Principal Activities Critical Path is a choreographic research and development centre based at the

experiments in our studio so that excellent new work can make it to our stages. We

Drill Hall, a large rehearsal space on the harbour in central Sydney, Australia. Our mission is to cultivate a program of

aim to nourish a genuinely independent dance company as they push the boundaries of existing practice in relation

research opportunities for choreographers and dance makers, nurturing diversity

to local and international fields, enhancing the vibrancy of the Australian dance sector.

and excellence in a supportive critical environment which fosters creative

We emphasise our role as a hub, a space

risk-taking.

for the independent artists to congregate,

With a distinct focus on research and

cross fertilise, debate, critique. A place connected into the broader arts sector

innovation, we support Australian choreographers to incubate new ideas and

through a host of partnerships.


Operating Result

O perating Result The net profit for the year amounted to $12635 (2016 deficit: $5,161). Critical Path has been serving the contemporary dance community for 12 years.

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2017 Artistic Program Funding

2016

Artistic Program Funding

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In 2017, we continued to be supported by Create NSW (formerly Arts NSW) with triennial funding 2016-2018 (our majority funding), $280,000 per annum to cover the period January through to December each year. Critical Path completed activities against a $149,043 artform development grant from the Australia Council for the Arts – Dance Board for a program of work that started in 2016 and ended in 2017. An ‘annual program’ grant focussed on A Question of Bodies, with Australia Council funds of $90,990. In addition the organisation embarked on its multi-year Interchange 2017-19 project; the total grant from Australia Council is $97,377. For the first time, Woollahra Municipal Council supported CP with a Cultural and Community Grant, for a small project ($5,000). Critical Path partnered with Mirramu Arts Centre (Bungendore) to secure a Regional Arts Fund NSW grant of $20,000 a year for 2 years to deliver regional residencies with Indigenous artists as well as a guest artist from Taiwan. Additional income was raised through partnerships with University of New South Wales ($5,000). Other partners provided in-kind support or spent cash directly on joint programs; Performance Space, Sydney Festival, and Metal UK. Many international artists were supported by self-administrated international grants. Total non-grant income came to Critical Path generated income through donations of $92,134 (consisting of individual donations, monies from foundations, partnership contributions cash and in-kind) and through casual hire of the Drill Hall raising $21,009. The hirers in 2017 included a mixture of larger rehearsal and development periods for subsidised artists/companies with independent makers and commercial arts activity. WMC also continue to offer CP the Research Room at no hire cost to support our artistic program. Critical Path auspiced projects for Mirramu Arts Centre (artistic partnership with Mirramu) and Now Project for Maggie Haertsch allowing a celebration performance with and by Eileen Kramer to mark her 103rd birthday.


2017 Artistic Program Funding

These combined funds allowed Critical Path to deliver:

656 857 5215

Total artist participation Total live audience at activities hosted by Critical Path in 2017 Online readership

Research 135 134

Artists participated in the RESEARCH Program Artists participated in the RESEARCH Program

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RESEARCH programs:

12 2 1 6 6 8

Funded research projects International funded research projects Intercultural lab Research Room residencies, 3 with International Artists Space supported projects, 4 open studio Research sharings

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Development 259 14 85

Artists participated in our DEVELOPMENT Program

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DEVELOPMENT programs: (not including Interchange Festival and Public)

4 6

Funded development programs Artist development labs (1 curated by our Associate Adelina Larsson Artist and 4 with international artists)

Artists contributed to Critical Dialogues (also above) Audience to DEVELOPMENT sharings

1 Week-long workshop with an international artist 9 Short workshops (less than 5 days) 7 with international artists 1 International residency projects for Australian artists 4 Archive residencies for Australian artists 1 Industry meeting (and related training) in partnership with Tasdance and Tracks 2 2

New editions of Critical Dialogues New commissions through the Barco Dance Collection project


2017 Artistic Program Funding

Public Programs 23 262

Public events*

638 1480 1451

Audience members across Public Program

6

International sharings/presentations

6

Sharings partnered with other organisations and/or artist -led

1

Sharing with Interstate artists

5 213

Public Talks Artists participated

Artists participated in our Public Program

Audience attended Critical Path partnership presentations at Liveworks. Digital – content driven digital audience

Interchange Festival:

5 49 204

Public Events (including 16 public activities) Artists participated Audience members

3

Artist-curated events

2

Talks

5 6

Forums Workshops

*including Interchange Festival

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Programs Result

Programs Result 2015

Participants

Responsive

21

Facilitated

14

Public events

9

Shared

6

61

Audience Live

671

Online

566

2016 Responsive

22

141

Facilitated

17

163

Public events

14

186

Shared

8

Audience Live Online

1588 1151

2017 RESEARCH

33

135

DEVELOPMENT

43

259

Public events

14

262

Audience Live

638 + 1480 Partnership presentations

Online

1451

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Research & Development Residencies Labs & Workshops Critique & Discourse Studio Presentations Independent choreographic artists are at the centre of all we do. Beside the more public development projects such as First Run (led by Brooke Stamp & Rhiannon Newton) or Dianne Busitill’s Nothing to buy, Nothing to sell, Nothing to lose, we have many artists working at the Drill throughout the year engaged in research on their own artistic practice. In the corner of the building (next to the kitchen), our Research Room artists work away exploring their ideas, reading, writing and inviting conversation. Artists come from far and near: Emily Johnson (USA), Eko Supriyanto (Indonesia), Margie Medlin (Germany/ Australia), Anna Konjetzky (Germany), Chloe Fournier, Stella Chen with Geraldine Balcazar and Rhiannon Newton.

EMILY JOHNSON EKO SUPRIYANTO MARGIE MEDLIN ANNA KONJETZKY

MAYA GAVISH ATLANTA EKE TAREE SANSBURY ANTHONY COXETER

CLOÉ FOURNIER

CARLY SHEPPARD

STELLA CHEN + GERALDINE BALCAZAR RHIANNON NEWTON

FIRST RUN NOTHING #DIANE BUSITTIL INDEPENDENT DANCE CLASS

ADAM WARBURTON RYUICHI FUJIMURA + KATE

JUSTIN SHOULDER (CP + PS) KATHRYN PUIE

SHERMAN CAROLINE GARCIA AMAARA RAHEEM (CP + UNSW)

CLOÉ FOURNIER PHILLIPE BLANCHARD REINA KIMURA + ANNA KURODA

TIMOTHY OHL (UNSW) LIZZIE THOMSON

I-CHIN LIN + LISA MARIS MCDONNELL


Research & Development

GEUMHYUNG JEONG

HAPPY HOUR (CP + READYMADE)

BILL SHANNON PHILLIPE BLANCHARD ROS CRISP

ANANDAVALLI BRANCH NEBULA FRANCES RINGS

ADELINA LARSSON FRANK VAN DE VEN

MARTIN DEL AMO INTERCHANGE FESTIVAL

Responsive Program RYUICHI FUJIMURA + KATE SHERMAN ‘We researched on ‘Wabi Sabi’, Japanese aesthetics as a source for choreography…. Every now and then, I felt uncertain whether these scores help to capture/embody the feeling of Wabi Sabi since the concept/ aesthetics of Wabi Sabi itself is so elusive. However, it wasn’t until the last day of our residency when we invited a small number of peers for our sharing that the moment of revelation arrived. I saw so many possibilities unfolding before my eyes including some answers and more questions when our scores were translated into other bodies. ‘It felt to me like a journey into an unknown destination.’ — Ryuchi Fujimura

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CAROLINE GARCIA ‘The main line of inquiry for this project was to question the idea of a choreographic interlude. The process of distilling and expanding on the choreographic interlude by employing the scaffolding of the Fly Girls’ dance routines has been successful in applying what an interlude is in this specific context, its significance and meaning in the wider framework of ‘In Living Color’, and therefore possible structures of how one can perform an interlude, before it is no longer considered to be an interlude...’ ‘I was able to deepen my understanding of the socio -political implications and historical context of the TV show, as well as its narrative in Australia.’ — Caroline Garcia AMAARA RAHEEM ‘My residency at Critical Path and UNSW has been in exchange with neurosurgeon and family friend, Dr Brindha Shivalingam. We’ve spent hours talking about movement, brain-surgery, life, death, love, and loss in relation to our pathways of migrating to Australia from Colombo, Sri Lanka in 1984 after the onset of the civil war. I’ve spent other hours in the studio processing these conversations, letting them meander in, through and across my own brain-body connectors allowing new, emergent understandings about neurons, muscles, wires to produce new ways of dancing and doing.’ TIMOTHY OHL ‘During the research residency [Alejandro Rolandi and I] explored three core questions: how can we create illusionary or ‘special’ effects in a live and performative context? How can we shift an audience’s perception with light and the body in space? How would these effects affect choreographic choices? [We] were... making new discoveries and developing methods for creating illusions that can be used in performance making. We experimented with... methods to shift the audience’s perception: transparency and reflection, saturated coloured light, depth perception and retina burn with an intense flash bulb.’ — Timothy Ohl


Labs & Residencies

Labs & Residencies ATLANTA EKE Atlanta was joined by composer Daniel Jenatsch and technologists Ready Steady Studio (Hana Miller and Jacob Perkins) to collaborate on a choreographic experiment that used a collection of programmed tennis ball machines. She utilised principles of game theory to structure the movements of the dancer, the machines and their relationship to one another and explore the fraught relationship between technological advancement and the growing obsolescence of the human body as a technology for movement production. JUSTIN SHOULDER Justin Shoulder was back at The Drill working on the final development of his new solo work ‘Carrion’ (premiere) before it was presented by Performance Space at Liveworks Festival. Justin’s development has been supported by Critical Path and Performance Space.

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DANCING SYDNEY Working with project partners Erin Brannigan (UNSW), Julie-Anne Long (Macquarie), Amanda Card (USYD), Critical Path has invited artists Anandavalli, Branch Nebula, Frances Rings, and Martin del Amo to consider their own archive/ing. This research project seeks to address ephemerality — its potentials and its problems — by finding, creating and reinvigorating old and new, public and private dance archives: not only the kind that exist in ephemera, text and objects, but also those that are produced and maintained within/through the body dancing. GEUMHYUNG JEONG Choreographer and performance artist Geumhyung Jeong (South Korea) returned to the Drill Hall to run a two week-long development laboratory. In her work, she constantly negotiates the relationship between the human body and the things surrounding it. Geumhyung explores the potential of the body - its sensuality, power to change its surroundings, and ability to undergo transformations through the power of desire. Her projects combine dance and puppetry and bring attention to technical aspects of theatre. BILL SHANNON ‘Translations’ was an intensive workshop facilitated by world-renowned multidisciplinary artist Bill Shannon (USA) for artists with physical disability. Bill invites participants to explore their individual movement patterns as the basis for a personal artistic language. In a second open workshop Bill invited participants to deconstruct his Shannon Technique, without the use of crutches. Bill also delivered workshops in Brisbane with Ausdance QLD & Queensland University of Technology, and with Dance Integrated Australia in Northern Rivers NSW, in partnership with Critical Path.


Out & About

Out & About Outside of the Drill Hall, artists undertake research and creative development projects in other locations; at our partners’ spaces across NSW, and internationally. At the beginning of 2017, Matt Shilcock undertook his residency with Dance4 in the UK. Taree Sansbury investigated the simplicity and implications of physically weaving materials at Campbelltown Arts Centre and at University of New South Wales. Katina Olsen was the selected artist for a two-week residency at Mirramu in Bungendore, NSW. Taiwanese artist I-Chin Lin also undertook a residency here in November, working alongside Lisa Maris McDonnell (part of Interchange 2017 program). Both artists explored their own enquiries but shared space, ideas and connected with the local artistic community.

TAREE SANSBURY AME HENDERSON KATINA OLSEN I-CHIN LIN

LISA MARIS MCDONELL MATTHEW SHILCOCK ALISON PLEVEY CHOREOGRAPHIC RESIDENCY

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TAREE SANSBURY Taree used her residency to investigate the simplicity and implications of physically weaving materials and what is revealed from the practice of a tradition passed on through thousands of years to this present day. Her work explored mi:wi as a concept; intertwining contemporary Indigenous dance techniques and the traditional practice of weaving from the Ngarrindjeri people of South Australia. Taree developed choreographic material for three performers, bringing together text, video, and movement. Her research explored how the temporalities of the weaving practice might be embodied in dance. MATTHEW SHILCOCK ‘I was fortunate enough to be hosted by Dance4 (Nottingham, UK) in a month long research and development residency, further developing and compiling my movement language ‘Osteogenuine’. The immersive period allowed me to deconstruct and compile 6 years of research into an articulately defined structure; categorising information and exercises in digestible and deliverable packages.’ — Matt Shilcock Matt returned to this material late in the year to rationalise and text this program with others. Research was divided and categorised in a system inspired by his studies in alchemy. HERE WE ARE Alison Plevey (Solo Practice Project ‘Body As Material 2016’), Matt Shilcock (Dance4 UK Residency 2017) and Amaara Raheem (Responsive Research Residency CP & Creative Practice Lab, UNSW) shared where their research has taken them and where they are now.


Development Labs & Workshops

Development Labs & Workshops The year kicked off with Critical Path hosting a workshop by Charles Koroneho. The week was offered in two different pathways: Movement & Hybrid Training only (mornings) or Full Week Performance Workshop, including Research & Movement Creation. By the end of September our Intercultural Lab had brought artists to undertake their own development processes and to engage with each others and that of guest workshop leaders. Adam Warburton with Elle Evangelista, Anandavalli with Vicki van Hout, Nick Power with Alejandro Rolandi were joined by guests Laura (Amara) Osweiler, Annalouise Paul and WeiZen Ho. The lab was facilitated by Raghav Handa.

CHARLES KORENHO SIONED HUWS + REINA KIMURA KATE MARSH TAKAO KAWAGUCHI ROSALIND CRISP JOSZEF TREFELI

JONATHAN BURROWS BRIANNA KELL + SARAH HOUBOLT DINIS MACHADO INTERCULTURAL LAB 2017

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CHARLES KORENHO ‘Charles Korenho (New Zealand) offered a week-long performance workshop for 30 choreographers, dancers, theatre directors, actors, performance artists, somatic practitioners, and Dance & Performance Studies researchers. Participants collectively explored content around death, grief, Maori cosmology, and approaching performance from community-driven and ceremonial perspectives. ... [it was] invaluable, life shifting ’ — lux eterna KATE MARSH In partnership with Metal (UK) and Accessible Arts (NSW), Kate Marsh and Welly O’Brien facilitated Luke Campbell, Matthew Massaria and William McBride with supporting artists Elle Evangelista, Bonnie Curtis, Sandi Sissel, Sarah-Vyne Vassallo, Kelly Drummond Cawthon and Anna Vaisanen. The three lab artists worked individually and collectively on their practices by defining and presenting a choreographic idea in progress and encouraging innovation within their craft. ‘Kate and Welly […] were attentive and hands-on when this was helpful, and they also encouraged and supported autonomy.’ — William McBride TAKAO KAWAGUCHI Takao Kawaguchi’s (Japan) ‘Body Sculpting’ workshop shared the creative process behind his performance: ‘About Kazuo Ohno’, including analysis of videos and images of the legendary Butoh dancer, Kazuo Ohno. This workshop was made possible through a partnership between Ausdance NSW and Critical Path. ‘Learning about Takao’s artistic process was great and gave me insights into how I might be able to apply this in exploring [my own] movement practice.’ — Kristina Tito


Critique & Discourse

Critique & Discourse Two editions of Critical Dialogues, 7.2 and 8, were released this year — Artists with Disability and Dance and the Environment respectively. As always these publications provideda rich array of perspectives from the local dance community, and those from further afield, around these themes. Multiple talks and forums also took place. Among these, three ‘Talking Dance’ events stemmed from Critical Path’s partnership with Sydney Festival. Kate Marsh hosted a talk at the Drill Hall during her residency, while Rosalind Crisp led a discussion in the space the following month. As well as Studio Presentations, Teita Iwabuchi and Kentaro!! held talks and forums during their time in Australia in partnership with the Japan Foundation, Sydney.

CRITICAL DIALOGUES #7.2 CRITICAL DIALOGUES #8

ROSALIND CRISP: DIRt CONVERSATION AT DANCE

SYDNEY FESTIVAL: TALKING DANCE KATE MARSH

MASSIVE TEITA IWABUCHI KENTARO!!

CRITICAL DIALOGUES 7.2 + 8 Critical Dialogues 7.2 was ‘Claiming Spaces: Artists with Disability Redefining Dance’. Following the impact and continuing to meet the needs of artists with disabilities, Critical Path produced this second volume ‘Claiming Spaces’. It takes a ‘danceaturgical’ approach; offering choreographers space to think, reflect and create. ‘Environmental Impact’, co-edited by Liz Lea and Kyle Page examined the profound ways in which environment shapes experience and output in the creative realm. This discourse spanned physical, psychological, changing and remote and regional environments, connection to place, disconnection from place, vastness, intimacy and non-traditional spaces.

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SYDNEY FESTIVAL: TALKING DANCE At Carriageworks, a series of three conversations between Sydney Festival artists explored ideas about their performance works and broader practice. These ‘Talking Dance’ events were: ‘Global Indigenous Peoples’ Knowledges & The Environment’, ‘Beyond the Choreographer’ and ‘Handle with Care’. Participating were Wesley Enoch, Frances Rings, Taree Sansbury, Eko Supriyanto, Latai Taumoepeau, Jala Adolphus, Juliette Barton, Amber Haines, Amrita Hepi, Miranda Wheen, Jacob Boehme, Future Fidel, Amit Lahav and Jodee Mundy. KATE MARSH This talk examined the position of disabled artists in both the UK and other geographical contexts. Drawing from her recent PhD research and ongoing shared practice with artist Welly O’Brien, Kate discussed how notions of ‘inclusion’ in dance have shifted, challenging pre-conceived ideas about access and participation. She explored how we use and disseminate the breadth of dance experience that exists in disabled artists and asking where the disabled leaders in dance are. Kate also undertook a 3-week residency with Critical Path as part of a collaboration with Metal (UK). ROSALIND CRISP Melbourne choreographer Rosalind Crisp and collaborating artists Andrew Morrish, Peter Fraser and Vic McKewan led a seminar at the Drill Hall at the end of their research week. They explored ideas and methods for developing dance practice in relation to place. Titled ‘Dance in the Anthropocene’, the focus of the seminar was developing a process and language for a dance practice that seeks to explore, embody, understand and connect to unfolding environmental devastation. Explorations and Showings from the DIRt artists laboratory in Orbost, Victoria also took place as part of the seminar.


Studio Presentations

Studio Presentations Critical Path hosted a number of public studio presentations by international artists from Japan, UK, Switzerland, Sweden/Portugal. The presentations run alongside or come out of research and development projects by these artists. ‘Aomori Aomori’, a project by Sioned Huws (UK/ Japan) with Reina Kimura (Japan) was developed with artists and the local community in February. The project was shadowed by artists Anna Kuroda and Ryuchi Fujimura who were part of the final presentation.

SIONED HUWS + REINA KIMURA JONATHAN BURROWS + MATTEO FARGION JOSZEF TREFELI + GARBOR

VARGA DINIS MACHADO TEITA IWABUCHI KENTARO!!

TEITA IWABUCHI + KENTARO!! PRESENTATIONS Teita Iwabuchi’s (Japan) 30-minute solo presentation focused on the ‘structure of the human body’ and the ‘interaction of space, music, and human body’. Earlier Teita had led a workshop for 10 artists exploring the connection between physical movement and mental awareness. Kentaro!! (Japan) also presented his technique based primarily in hip hop dance. Kentaro!! creates unique and innovative works that transcend the patterns of conventional styles of dance. Hosted at Dancekool’s studios in Sydney’s CBD, the day included a workshop for 16 professionals drawn from Western contemporary and street dance backgrounds. DINIS MACHADO Dinis Machado (Sweden/Portugal) invited local choreographers Dan Daw (UK/Australia) and Brooke Stamp (Australia) to each create a short piece to be part of his ongoing project — Barco Dance Collection. Barco is a research project that Dinis runs parallel to his activity as a choreographer to map and investigate the practices of others. Brooke and Dan were asked

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to think that the space where each dance happens is not in the room we are in but within the body itself. Dinis presented, for the first time, the entire collection of 16 pieces including the premiere of the two new Australian works at the Drill Hall. JONATHAN BURROWS + MATTEO FARGION Jonathan Burrows and Matteo Fargion presented three works at the Drill Hall, ‘Sitting Duet’, ‘Body Not Fit For Purpose’ and ‘Speaking Dance’ which showed their breadth of their work over the past ten years. Their duets mix the formality of classical music composition with an open and often anarchic approach to performance and audiences. Jonathan opened his process to twenty artists during a three-day workshop. He focused on particular questions of time, form and composition which underpin their work, as well as the strategies they use to disrupt what they do and connect with audiences. JOZSEF TREFELI + GARBOR VARGA József Trefeli and Garbor Varga presented a studio preview of ‘Creature’ which tackles ethnographic material to place his contemporary choreographic practices under the magnifying glass of its archaic heritage. Creature shows us the kinship between the language of contemporary dance and the exoticism of folk dances. The result is a surprising piece, crazy with energy, rich with self-deprecating humour and spiced by extravagant costumes. During an intensive research residency József Trefeli and collaborating artist, Gábor Varga, engaged with Anja Mujic, Carl Sciberras, Eliza Cooper, Ryuichi Fujimura and Fiona Gardner to research their next creation focusing on couple dances.


Studio Presentations

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36

Associate Artist ADELINA LARSSON As one of our initiatives to build leadership capacity within the dance sector, Critical Path invites an independent choreographer, with experience of supporting other artists and initiating sector development projects, to be Associate Artist for up to two years. Our 2017 Associate Artist, Adelina Larsson, is the founder and director of Strange Attractor, a choreographic development platform that offers infrastructure for independent artists to experiment and undertake artistic research. In 2017 she undertook her own research, as well as mentoring Brianna Kell and Sarah Houbolt during their Research Development Lab. Adelina also curated the Saturday evening of Critical Path’s Interchange Festival. Her next research residency is in late November.


Interchange Program 2017

Interchange Program 2017 Interchange is a five-year initiative that began in 2014 and which focuses Critical Path’s programming on the value of exchange opportunities. For 2017, this has meant residencies in Australia for international artists such as Phillipe Blanchard, I-Chin Lin and Reina Kimura, as well as workshops and labs by Bill Shannon, Ame Henderson and Geumhyung Jeong. The program also included our Interchange Festival, 10-12 November at The Drill Hall which included talks, workshops, sharings and presentations with a focus on process and practice. AME HENDERSON Critical Path sent Samantha Spurr, Ashley Dyer and Samantha Rochelle to the Mill, Adelaide, where Ame Henderson (Canada) engaged with artists on exploring how choreographic thinking – spatial, temporal and sensorial – can enhance a diverse range of artistic practices.

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38

At Critical Path, Ame engaged Ivey Wawn, Jessica Holman, Lisa Maris McDonnell, Nikki Heywood, Raynen O’Keefe and Wendy Morrow around her investigations of how, in re-performing text as gesture, the dancer elucidates historiography as a choreographic matter, and how dance can remember. REINA KIMURA + ANNA KURODA Reina (Japan) and Anna, a Sydney-based Japanese artist, collaborated on an exploration of their shared understanding of their practice in relation to their understanding of Japanese culture and the arts. Both emerging artists work in relation to place in their choreography. Therefore the project takes both artists from their home location (Tokyo and Sydney) to an ‘unknown’ Australian place – Launceston, Tasmania – to explore what their work means in a different place. The two artists worked together and in parallel to explore these relations and presented their ‘findings’ to audiences in Launceston and then Sydney. Critical Path partnered with Tasdance for this residency.


Interchange Program 2017

INTERCHANGE FESTIVAL The meeting and connection of different cultures was at the heart of Interchange Festival 2017— international and intercultural exchange as part of choreographic process, as part of artists’ practice. Each day had a different focus. On the Friday evening we were acknowledging Country, on Saturday we talked about the Political Body and on the Sunday we discussed the ‘start’ and ‘end’ of the body. The festival included workshops and talks by International artists. Over this weekend, diverse practitioners joined us to share their experiences of working across and between cultures. I-CHIN LIN LISA MARIS MCDONELL Our second residency at Mirramu in 2017 was with I-Chin Lin (Taiwan) and Lisa Maris McDonell (NSW). For two weeks, the artists worked alongside each other sharing the residency space, engaging with each other, with local artists and with the broader community as part of their process.

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40

Mirramu and Critical path are partnering to offer a two-year program (2017 and 2018) to support the development of connections between the local community around Lake George (Weereewa) and regional and international artists. BILL SHANNON In a high energy workshop in Sydney, participants were mentally and physically challenged to improvise ways of recreating Bill’s dance on crutches. In real time, without use of crutches, participants were asked to replicate Shannon’s style, offering able-bodied dancers the opportunity to experience physically translating an existing dance technique, that is not based on the assumption, or patterns of, an able body. Bill joined Dance Integrated Australia in the NSW Northern Rivers region to participate in the RACONTEURS project November 2017, part of ‘The Corner Residency Program’. This skills development project traversed art forms and was designed for cross-career artists. It provided access to journeying techniques, movement, physical theatre and interactive street workshops and performance. PHILLIPPE BLANCHARD Philippe (UK/France/Sweden) undertook research in NSW and ACT connecting with different place, communities, artists and organisations. In Sydney he invited individuals to join his studio research. He gave talks and entered into conversation as he travelled. ‘I choose to come to Australia because of its history, its geographical scale and spaces between the communities, which is extremely different than in Europe or perhaps not. My visit in Australia is based on studying on that topic and the place of the body in modern society.’ — Philippe Blanchard 


Interchange Program 2017

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42


43

Financial Report Contents 44

Committee Members’ Report

45

Auditor’s Independence Declaration

46

Statement of Surplus or Deficit or Other Comprehensive Income

47

Statement of Financial Position

48

Statement of Changes in Equity

49

Statement of Cash Flows

50

Notes to the Financial Statements

50

1. General information and statement of compliance

50

2. Changes in accounting policies

50

3. Summary of accounting policies

56

4. Revenue

60

5. Cash and cash equivalents

60

6. Trade and other receivables

61

7. Other assets

62

8. Property, plant and equipment

63

9. Intangible Assets

64

10. Trade and other payables

64

11. Employee remuneration

65

12. Grant liabilities

65

13. Other liabilities

66

14. Leases

66

15. Related party transactions

66

16. Contingent liabilities and Assets

67

17. Subsequent Events

67

18. Member’s guarantee – Contribution in winding up

67

19. Charitable fundraising

67

20. Company details

68

Committee Members’ Declaration

69

Declaration by Committee Member as required by the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 (NSW)

70

Auditor’s Independence Declaration

71

Independent Auditor’s Report

76

Additional Financial Information Disclaimer

78

Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit


44

C ommittee Member’s Report Contributions in winding up The Association is incorporated under the Associations Incorporation Act 2009. If the Association is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 towards meeting and outstanding obligations of the Company at 31 December 2017, the total amount that members of the Association are liable to contribute if the company is wound up is $80 (2016: $80). Auditor’s Independence declaration A copy of the Auditor’s Independence Declaration as required under s.60—40 of the Australian Charities and Not–for–profits Commission act 2012 is included in page 44 of this financial report and forms part of the Committee member’s report. Signed in accordance with the resolution of the Committee Members.


Auditor Independence Declaration

A uditor Independence Declaration To the Committee Members of Critical Path Incorporated: In accordance with the requirements of section 60—40 of the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, as the lead auditor for the audit of Critical Path Incorporated for the year ended 31 December 2016, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been:

(i) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the

Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012 in relation to

the audit; and

(ii) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit.

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46

S tatement of Surplus or Deficit or Other Comprehensive Income Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Revenue from ordinary activities

4

768,215

454,163

Other income

4

21,009

21,557

(111,690)

(96,926)

Administration and marketing expenses Amortisation expenses

9

(7,299)

(7,298)

Depreciation expenses

8

(10,907)

(12,667)

Employee benefits expense

11

(156,032)

(180,411)

(490,661)

(183,579)

12,635

(5,161)

-

-

12,635

(5,161)

-

-

12,635

(5,161)

Project expenses Deficit before income tax Income tax expense Surplus/Deficit for the year Other comprehensive income for the year, net of income tax Total comprehensive surplus/deficit for the year

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.


Statement of Financial Position

S tatement of Financial Position Note ASSETS

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Current Cash and cash equivalents

5

347,100

363,122

Trade and other receivables

6

9,275

30,126

Other current assets

7

3,310

6,853

359,685

400,101

Current assets Non-current Property, plant and equipment

8

10,473

21,380

Intangible assets

9

1,161

8,460

11,634

29,840

371,319

429,941

Non-current assets Total assets LIABILITIES Current Trade and other payables

10

88,597

45,307

Provisions

11

10,504

14,954

Grant liabilities

12

76,352

174,968

Income in advance

13

18,419

29,900

Current liabilities

193,872

265,129

Total liabilities

193,872

265,129

Net assets

177,447

164,812

General funds - unrestricted

177,447

164,812

Total equity

177,447

164,812

Equity

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.

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48

S tatement of Changes in Equity Unrestricted Funds ($)

Total equity ($)

169,973

169,973

(5,161)

(5,161)

-

-

(5,161)

(5,161)

Balance at 31 December 2016

164,812

164,812

Balance at 1 January 2017

164,812

164,812

12,635

12,635

-

-

12,635

12,635

177,447

177,447

Balance at 1 January 2016 Deficit for the year Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive loss for the year

Surplus / Deficit for the year Other comprehensive income Total comprehensive loss / gain for the year Balance at 31 December 2017

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.


Statement of Cash Flows

S tatement of Cash Flows Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

- Client contributions

270,906

121,100

- Government grants

426,226

375,515

2,846

4,367

Payments to employees

(160,482)

(174,869)

Payments to suppliers

(555,518)

(275,894)

(16,022)

50,219

OPERATING ACTIVITIES Receipts from:

- Interest income

Net cash provided by operating activities INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Purchases of plant and equipment

-

Purchases of intangible assets

-

Net cash used in investing activities

-

Net change in cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

(672)

5

(672)

(16,022)

49,547

363,122

313,575

347,100

363,122

This statement should be read in conjunction with the notes to the financial statements.

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50

Notes to the Financial Statements For the year ended 31 December 2017 Critical Path Incorporated

3. Summary of accounting policies 3.1

1. General information and statement of compliance The financial report includes the financial statements and notes of Critical Path Incorporated. These financial statements are general purpose financial statements that have been prepared in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards ­ Reduced Disclosure Requirements and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits

Overall considerations

The significant accounting policies that have been used in the preparation of these financial statements are summarised below. The financial statements have been prepared using the measurement bases specified by Australian Accounting Standards for each type of asset, liability, income and expense. The measurement bases are more fully described in the accounting policies below.

Commission Act 2012.

3.2

Critical Path Incorporated is a not-forprofit entity for the purposes of preparing the financial statements.

Revenue comprises revenue from the sale

The financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2017 were approved and authorised for issuance by the Committee members.

Revenue

of goods, services income, government grants, fundraising activities and client contributions. Revenue from major activities and services is shown in Note 4. Revenue is measured by reference to the fair value of consideration received or receivable by the Association for goods supplied and services provided, excluding

2. Changes in accounting policies

sales taxes, rebates, and trade discounts.

2.1 There are no new and revised standards that are effective for these financial statements

Revenue is recognised when the amount of revenue can be measured reliably, collection is probable, the costs incurred or to be incurred can be measured reliably,


Notes to the Financial Statements

and when the criteria for each of the Association’s different activities have

from a government or other party for no or nominal consideration, the

been met. Details of the activity-specific recognition criteria are described below.

asset is recognised at fair value and a corresponding amount of revenue is recognised.

Government grants A number of the Association’s programs

Donations and bequests

are supported by grants received from Federal, State and Local governments. If

Donations collected, including cash and goods for resale, are recognised as revenue

conditions are attached to a grant which must be satisfied before the Association is eligible to receive the contribution, recognition of the grant as revenue is deferred until those conditions are satisfied. Where a grant is received on the condition that specified services are delivered, to the grantor, this is considered a reciprocal transaction. Revenue is recognised as services are performed and at year–end until the service is delivered.

when the Association gains control, economic benefits are probable and the amount of the donation can be measured reliably.

Revenue from a non-reciprocal grant that is not subject to conditions is recognised

Interest income Interest income is recognised on an accrual

when the Association obtains control of the funds, economic benefits are probable and the amount can be measured

basis using the effective interest method.

reliably. Where a grant may be required to be repaid if certain conditions are not satisfied, a liability is recognised at year end to the extent that conditions remain unsatisfied.

Bequests are recognised when the legacy is received. Revenue from legacies comprising bequests of shares or other property are recognised at fair value, being the market value of the shares or property at the date the Association becomes legally entitled to the shares or property.

3.3

Operating expenses

Operating expenses are recognised in surplus or deficit upon utilisation of the service or at the date of their origin. 3.4

Intangible assets

Where the Association receives a non-reciprocal contribution of an asset

Recognition of other intangible assets:

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52

Acquired intangible assets Website construction costs as well as acquired computer software licences

3.5 Property, plant and equipment Leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment

are capitalised on the basis of the costs

Leasehold improvements, plant and other

incurred to acquire and install the specific website and software. Subsequent measurement

equipment (comprising office furniture and equipment) are initially recognised at acquisition cost or manufacturing cost, including any costs directly attributable

All intangible assets are accounted for

to bringing the assets to the location and

using the cost model whereby capitalised costs are amortised on a straight-line basis over their estimated useful lives, as these assets are considered finite. Residual values and useful lives are reviewed at each reporting date. In addition, they are

condition necessary for it to be capable of operating in the manner intended by the Association’ management.

subject to impairment testing as described in Note 3.14. The following useful lives are

using the cost model, cost less subsequent depreciation and impairment losses.

Leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment are subsequently measured

applied: - Database development: 25%

Depreciation is recognised on a straightline basis to write down the cost less

- Software: 25% - 33% - Website: 33%

estimated residual value of leasehold improvements, plant and other equipment. The following useful lives are applied:

Subsequent expenditures on the maintenance of computer software, brand

- Leasehold improvement:

20% - 25%

names and website are expensed as incurred.

- Plant and equipment:

15% - 33%

When an intangible asset is disposed of,

In the case of leasehold property, expected useful lives are determined by reference to

the gain or loss on disposal is determined

comparable owned assets or over the term

as the difference between the proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset, and

of the lease, if shorter.

is recognised in surplus or deficit within other income or other expenses.

Material residual value estimates and estimates of useful life are updated as required, but at least annually.


Notes to the Financial Statements

Gains or losses arising on the disposal of property, plant and equipment are

3.9

determined as the difference between the disposal proceeds and the carrying amount

Short-term employee benefits Short-term employee benefits are benefits,

of the assets and are recognised in surplus or deficit within other income or other expenses.

other than termination benefits, that are expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the

3.6 Leases

period in which the employees render the related service. Examples of such

Operating leases Where the Association is a lessee, payments on operating lease agreements are recognised as an expense on a straightline basis over the lease term. Associated costs, such as maintenance and insurance, are expensed as incurred.

Employee benefits

benefits include wages and salaries, nonmonetary benefits and accumulating sick leave. Short-term employee benefits are measured at the undiscounted amounts expected to be paid when the liabilities are settled.

No provision for income tax has been raised as the association is exempt from

Other long-term employee benefits The association’s liabilities for long service leave are included in other long-term benefits as they are not expected to be settled wholly within twelve (12) months after the end of the period in which the

income tax under Div 50 of the Income Tax Assessment Act 1997.

employees render the related service. They are measured at the present value

3.8

of the expected future payments to be made to employees. The expected future payments incorporate anticipated future

3.7

Income taxes

Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash on hand and demand deposits, together

wage and salary levels, experience of employee departures and periods of

with other short-term, highly liquid investments that are readily convertible into known amounts of cash and which are

service, and are discounted at rates determined by reference to market yields at the end of the reporting period on high

subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

quality corporate bonds that have maturity dates that approximate the timing of the estimated future cash outflows. Any

53


54

re-measurements arising from experience adjustments and changes in assumptions are recognised in profit or loss in the

obligation, based on the most reliable evidence available at the reporting date, including the risks and uncertainties

periods in which the changes occur.

associated with the present obligation.

The association presents employee benefit obligations as current liabilities in the statement of financial position if the

Where there are a number of similar obligations, the likelihood that an outflow will be required in settlement is determined by considering the class

association does not have an unconditional

of obligations as a whole. Provisions are

right to defer settlement for at least twelve (12) months after the reporting period, irrespective of when the actual settlement is expected to take place.

discounted to their present values, where the time value of money is material.

Post-employment benefits plans

Any reimbursement that the association can be virtually certain to collect from a third party with respect to the obligation is

The association provides post-employment benefits through defined contribution

recognised as a separate asset. However, this asset may not exceed the amount of

plans.

the related provision.

Defined contribution plans

No liability is recognised if an outflow of

The association pays fixed contributions into independent entities in relation to

economic resources as a result of present obligation is not probable. Such situations

several state plans and insurance for individual employees. The association

are disclosed as contingent liabilities, unless the outflow of resources is remote

has no legal or constructive obligations to

in which case no liability is recognised.

pay contributions in addition to its fixed contributions, which are recognised as

3.11

an expense in the period that relevant employee services are received.

The liability for deferred income is the

Deferred income

unutilised amounts of grants received 3.10 Provisions, contingent liabilities and contingent assets

on the condition that specified services are delivered or conditions are fulfilled.

Provisions are measured at the estimated

The services are usually provided or the conditions usually fulfilled within twelve

expenditure required to settle the present

(12) months of receipt of the grant. Where


Notes to the Financial Statements

the amount received is in respect of services to be provided over a period

Management has no reason to believe that this financial support will not continue.

that exceeds twelve (12) months after the reporting date or the conditions will only

3.14 Significant management

be satisfied more than twelve (12) months after the reporting date, the liability is discounted and presented as non-current. 3.12 Goods and Services Tax (GST) Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST, except where the amount of GST incurred is not recoverable from the Australian Taxation Office. In these circumstances the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of an item of the expense. Receivables and payables in the statement of financial position are shown inclusive of GST.

judgement in applying accounting policies When preparing the financial statements, management undertakes a number of judgements, estimates and assumptions about the recognition and measurement of assets, liabilities, income and expenses. Estimation uncertainty Information about estimates and assumptions that have the most significant effect on recognition and measurement of assets, liabilities, income and expenses is provided below. Actual results may be substantially different.

Cash flows are presented in the statement

Impairment

of cash flows on a gross basis, except for the GST components of investing and

In assessing impairment, management estimates the recoverable amount of each

financing activities, which are disclosed as operating cash flows.

asset or cash-generating unit based on expected future cash flows and uses an interest rate to discount them. Estimation

3.13 Economic dependence

uncertainty relates to assumptions about future operating results and the

The association is dependent upon the ongoing receipt of Federal and State Government grants and community

determination of a suitable discount rate.

and corporate donations to ensure the ongoing continuance of its programs and

Management reviews its estimate of the useful lives of depreciable assets at each

fundraising. At the date of this report

reporting date, based on the expected

Useful lives of depreciable assets

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56

utility of the assets. Uncertainties in these estimates relate to technical obsolescence that may change the utility of certain

recognised and measured at the present value of the estimated cash flows to be made in respect of all employees at the

assets.

reporting date. In determining the present

Long service leave The liability for long service leave is

value of the liability, estimates of attrition rates and pay increases through promotion and inflation have been taken into account.

4. Revenue The Association’s revenue may be analysed as follows for each major product and service category: Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

6,909

65,969

Net grant income

524,842

375,515

Projects income

232,538

8,312

2,846

4,367

767,135

454,163

REVENUE Donations

Investment income: - Interest

OTHER INCOME Rent received Sundry income

Balance at 31 December 2017

21,009

19,939

1,080

1,618

22,089

21,557

789,224

475,720


Notes to the Financial Statements

4.1

Net grant income

Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Grants in advance – 1 January

174,968

149,043

Grants received during the year

426,226

401,440

601,194

550,483

Less:

Grants in advance – 31 December

(59,383)

(119,990)

Unexpended grants – 31 December

(16,969)

(54,978)

(76,352)

(174,968)

524,842

375,515

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

-

-

-

149,043

0

149,043

Net grant income

4.2

Grants received in advance – 1 January

Note Arts NSW – Project funding Regional Arts NSW Australia Council – Core funding / Project Funding

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58

4.3

Grants received during the year

Note Arts NSW –

2017 ($)

Core Funding

2016 ($)

202,552

221,000

77,448

59,000

800

1,450

97,377

99,991

-

19,999

2017/18

6,988

-

City of Sydney Cultural Grant 2017/18

9,981

-

Austrade

15,080

-

Accessible Arts Grant

16,000

-

426,226

401,440

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Arts NSW – Project funding

-

-

Australia Council – project funding

-

99,991

Regional Arts NSW

-

19,999

Woollahra Council Community Grant 2017/18

6,988

-

City of Sydney Cultural Grant 2017/18

9,981

-

16,969

119,990

Project funding Australia Council – Core Funding Project funding Regional Arts NSW Woollahra Council Community Grant

Balance at 31 December 2017

4.4

Grants received in advance – 31 December

Note


Notes to the Financial Statements

4.5

Unexpended grants – 31 December

Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

4,143

7,428

53,033

47,550

2,207

-

Woollahra Council Community Grant 2017/18

-

-

City of Sydney Cultural Grant 2017/18

-

-

59,383

54,978

Arts NSW – Project funding Australia Council – Project funding Regional Arts NSW

Net grant income

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60

5. Cash and cash equivalents Cash and cash equivalents consist the following: Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

4,148

4,670

Short term deposits

342,952

358,452

Cash and cash equivalents

347,100

363,122

Cash at bank

Cash at the end of the financial year as shown in the statement of cash flows is reconciled in the statement of financial position as follows: Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

347,100

363,122

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Deposit paid

-

-

Net GST recoverable

-

934

9,275

29,192

9,275

30,126

Cash and cash equivalents

6. Trade and other receivables Trade and other receivables consist the following: Note CURRENT

Trade receivables


Notes to the Financial Statements

7. Other assets Other assets consist the following: Note CURRENT General prepayments Prepaid insurance Prepaid worker’s compensation Net grant income

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

-

3,579

3,310

3,274

-

-

3,310

6,853

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62

8. Property, plant and equipment Details of the company’s plant and equipment and their carrying amount are as follows: Leasehold improvements ($)

Gross carrying amount

Plant and equipment ($)

Total 2017 ($)

Balance 1 January 2017

73,271

34,504

107,775

Balance 31 December 2017

73,271

34,504

107,775

Depreciation and impairment

Balance 1 January 2017

(54,870)

(31,525)

(86,395)

Amortisation/depreciation

(8,855)

(2,052)

(10,907)

Balance 31 December 2017

(63,725)

(33,577)

(97,302)

Carrying amount 31 December 2017

9,546 Leasehold improvements ($)

Gross carrying amount

Balance 1 January 2016 Additions Balance 31 December 2016 Depreciation and impairment

927

10,473

Plant and equipment ($)

Total 2016 ($)

73,271

33,832

107,103

-

672

672

73,271

34,504

107,775

Balance 1 January 2016

(44,401)

(29,327)

(73,728)

Amortisation/depreciation

(10,469)

(2,198)

(12,667)

Balance 31 December 2016

(54,870)

(31,525)

(86,395)

18,401

927

Carrying amount 31 December 2016

21,380


Notes to the Financial Statements

9. Intangible assets Details of the company’s intangible assets and their carrying amounts are as follows: Database development ($)

Software ($)

Website ($)

Total 2017 ($)

7,000

4,811

26,916

38,727

4,811

26,916

38,727

Gross carrying amount Balance 1 January 2017 Addition

7,000

Balance 31 December 2017 Depreciation and impairment

(7,000)

(4,811)

(18,456)

Amortisation/depreciation

-

-

(7,299)

(7,299)

Balance 31 December 2017

(7,000)

(4,811)

(25,755)

(37,566)

-

-

1,161

1,161

Database development ($)

Software ($)

Website ($)

Total 2016 ($)

Balance 1 January 2016

7,000

4,811

26,916

38,727

Balance 31 December 2016

7,000

4,811

26,916

38,727

(7,000)

(4,811)

(11,158)

(22,969)

Amortisation/depreciation

-

-

(7,298)

(7,298)

Balance 31 December 2016

(7,000)

(4,811)

(18,456)

(30,267)

-

-

8,460

8,460

Balance 1 January 2017

Carrying amount 31 December 2017

Gross carrying amount

Depreciation and impairment Balance 1 January 2016

Carrying amount 31 December 2016

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64

10. Trade and other payables Trade and other payables recognised consist of the following: Note CURRENT

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Accrued expenses

64,187

30,335

Net GST payable

(5,053)

-

PAYG withholding

7,724

6,350

Refundable deposits

1,000

330

Superannuation payable

2,787

5,334

17,952

2,958

88,597

45,307

Trade payables

11. Employee remuneration 11.1

Employee benefits expense

Expenses recognised for employee benefits are analysed below: Note

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

Annual leave provided

(4,450)

5,541

Salaries and wages

143,553

156,855

Superannuation contributions

13,625

14,523

Workers compensation insurance

3,304

3,492

156,032

180,411

Employee benefits expense


Notes to the Financial Statements

11.2

Employee provisions

The liabilities recognised for employee benefits consist of the following amounts: Note CURRENT

2017 ($)

Annual leave

2016 ($)

10,504

14,954

10,504

14,954

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

76,352

174,968

76,352

174,968

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

18,419

29,900

18,419

29,900

12. Grants liabilities Grants liabilities can be summarised as follows: Note Grants in advance

13. Other liabilities Other liabilities can be summarised as follows: Note Income received in advance

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14. Leases Operating leases as lessee The Group’s future minimum operating lease payments are as follows: Minimum lease payments due Within 1 year ($)

1 to 5 years ($) After 5 years ($)

Total ($)

31 December 2016

2,949

33,655

-

36,604

31 December 2017

31440

0

-

31440

15. Related party transactions The association’s related parties include its key management personnel and related entities as described below. Unless otherwise stated, none of the transactions incorporate special terms and conditions and no guarantees were given or received. Outstanding balances are usually settled in cash. Transactions with related entities

Transactions with key management personnel Key management of the Association are the Executive Members of Critical Path Incorporated’s Committee and members of the Executive Council. Key management personnel remuneration includes the following expenses: Total key management personnel remuneration 2017: $78,280 2016: $76,154

No remuneration is paid to Committee member or their related parties for acting as Committee members. From time to time Committee members who are also independent artists may be engaged in our

16. Contingent Liabilities and Assets

Research and Development program and are renumerated under normal industry

No contingent liabilities and assets to report.

terms.


Notes to the Financial Statements

17. Subsequent Events

All funds raised from fundraising activities, net of direct costs, were applied to the

No significant events have occurred since the end of the reporting period which

association’s normal operations. The association did not conduct any appeals in

would impact on the financial position of the Company disclosed in the statement of financial position as at 31 December

which traders were engaged.

2017, or on the results and cash flow of the Company for the year ended on that date.

20. Company details

18....Members’ Guarantee - Contribution in winding up The Association is incorporated under the Associations Incorporation Act 2009. If the Association is wound up, the constitution states that each member is required to contribute a maximum of $10 each towards meeting any outstanding obligations of the Association. At 31 December 2017, the total amount that members of the Association are liable to contribute if the Association wound up is $110 (2017: $80).

19.....Charitable fundraising The association holds an authority to fundraise under the Charitable Fundraising Act, 1991 (NSW) and conducts fundraising appeals throughout the year. Additional information and declarations required to be furnished under the Act are as follows:

Critical Path Incorporated is a company limited by guarantee, incorporated and domiciled in Australia. The registered office and principal place of business is: The Drill, 1c New Beach Road, Darling Point NSW 2027

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C ommittee Members’ Declaration Critical Path Incorporated In the opinion of the Directors of Critical Path Incorporated (‘the association’) (a) Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Act 2012, including;

(i) giving a true and fair view of the Association’s financial position as at 31 December 2017 and of it’s performance, for the year ended on that date, and

(ii) complying with Australian Accounting Standards (including the Australian Accounting Interpretations) and the Australian Charities and Not-for-profits Commission Regulations 2013; and

(a) there are reasonable grounds to believe that the Critical Path Incorporated will be able to pay its debts as and when they become due and payable. (Refer Note 3.13) Signed in accordance with a resolution of the Directors:

Mitchell & Partners CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Shane Carroll COMMITTEE MEMBER

Sydney, 12 June 2018


Declaration by Chair, Finance & Risk Committee

Declaration by Chair, Finance & Risk Committee

in respect of fundraising appeals pursuant to the Charitable Fundraising (NSW) ACT 1991

Critical Path Incorporated I, Annabel Millet, Treasurer of Critical Path Incorporated, declare in my opinion: (a) the Annual financial report gives a true and fair view of all income and expenditure of Critical Path with respect to fundraising appeal activities for the financial year ended 31 December 2017; (b) the statement of financial position gives a true and fair view of the state of affairs with respect to fundraising appeal activities as at 31 December 2017; (c) the provisions of the Charitable Fundraising Act 1991 and Regulations and the conditions attached to the authority have been complied with for the financial year ended 31 December 2017; and (d) the internal controls exercised by Critical Path are appropriate and effective in accounting for all income received and applied from any fundraising appeals.

Annabel Millet TREASURER Sydney, 12 June 2018

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Auditor’s Independence Declaration Under Section 307C of the Corporations Act 2001 To the Committee of Critical Path Incorporated As lead auditor for the audit of Critical Path Incorporated (A.B.N. 12 049 903 261) for the year ended 31 December 2017, I declare that, to the best of my knowledge and belief, there have been: (a) no contraventions of the auditor independence requirements of the Corporations Act 2001 in relation to the audit; and (b) no contraventions of any applicable code of professional conduct in relation to the audit. This declaration is in respect of Critical Path Incorporated and any entities it controlled during the period.

Mitchell & Partners CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Glenn Merchant CA PARTNER

Sydney, NSW Dated this 12th day of June, 2018


Independent Auditor’s Report

Independent Auditor’s Report to the Members of Critical Path Incorporated A.B.N. 12 049 903 261 (an incorporated association) Report on the Financial Statements

Opinion We have audited the financial report of Critical Path Incorporated (the association), which comprises the statement of financial position as at 31 December 2017, the statement of comprehensive income, statement of changes in equity, statement of cash flows for the year ended on that date, a summary of significant accounting policies and other explanatory notes and the committees’ declaration. In our opinion, the accompanying financial report of Critical Path Incorporated is in accordance with Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Act 2012 and the Corporations Act 2001, including: • giving a true and fair view of the association’s financial position as at 31 December 2017, and of its performance for the year then ended ; and • complying with Australian Accounting Standards, Division 60 of the Australian Charities and Not for Profits Commission Regulation 2013, and the Corporations Act 2001.

Basis of Opinion We conducted our audit in accordance with Australian Auditing Standards. Our responsibilities under those standards are further described in the Auditor’s Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Report section of our report. We are independent of the association in accordance with the auditor independence

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Professional Accountants (the Code) that are relevant to our audit of the financial report in Australia. We have also fulfilled our other ethical responsibilities in accordance with the Code. We confirm that the independence declaration required by the Corporations Act 2001, which has been given to the committee of Critical Path Incorporated, would be in the same terms if given to the committee as at the time of this auditor’s report. We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion.

Key Audit Matters Information Other than the Financial Report and Auditor’s Report Thereon The committee members are responsible for the other information. The other information comprises the information included in the association’s annual report for the year ended 31 December 2017, but does not include the financial report and our auditor’s report thereon. Our opinion on the financial report does not cover the other information and accordingly we do not express any form of assurance conclusion thereon. In connection with our audit of the financial report, our responsibility is to read the other information and, in doing so, consider whether the other information is materially inconsistent with the financial report or our knowledge obtained in the audit or otherwise appears to be materially misstated. If, based on the work we have performed, we conclude that there is a material misstatement of this other information, we are required to report that fact. We have nothing to report in this regard.


Independent Auditor’s Report

The Responsibility of the Committee for the Financial Statements The committee members of the association are responsible for the preparation the financial report that gives a true and fair view in accordance with Australian Accounting Standards, the ACNC Act, and the Corporations Act 2001 and for such internal control as the committee members determine is necessary to enable the preparation of the financial report that gives a true and fair view and is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error. In preparing the financial report, the committee members are responsible for assessing the association’s ability to continue as a going concern, disclosing, as applicable, matters relating to going concern and using the going concern basis of accounting unless the committee members either intend to liquidate the association or to cease operations, or have no realistic alternatives but to do so.

Auditor’s Responsibility for the Audit of the Financial Report Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial report as a whole is free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance, but is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with the Australian Accounting Standards will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. Misstatements can arise from fraud or error and are considered material if, individually or in the aggregate, they could reasonably be expected to influence the economic decisions of users taken on the basis of this financial report.

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As part of an audit in accordance with the Australian Auditing Standards, we exercise professional judgement and maintain professional scepticism throughout the audit. We also: • Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial report, whether due to fraud or error, design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks, and obtain audit evidence that is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our opinion. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal controls. • Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purposes of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the association’s internal control. • Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of accounting estimates and related disclosures made by the committee. • Conclude on the appropriateness of the committee’ use of the going concern basis of accounting and, based on the audit evidence obtained, whether a material uncertainty exists related to events or conditions that may cast significant doubt on the registered entity’s ability to continue as a going concern. If we conclude that a material uncertainty exists, we are required to draw attention in our auditor’s report to the related disclosures in the financial report or, if such disclosures are inadequate, to modify our opinion. Our conclusions are based on the audit evidence obtained up to the date of our auditor’s report. However, future events or conditions may cause the registered entity to cease to continue as a going concern.

We communicate with the responsible entities regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit and significant audit findings, including any significant deficiencies in internal control that we identify during our audit.


Independent Auditor’s Report

We also provide the committee with a statement that we have complied with relevant ethical requirements requiring independence, and to communicate with them all relationships and other matters that may reasonably be thought to bear on our independence, and where applicable, related safeguards.

Mitchell & Partners CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Glenn Merchant CA PARTNER

Sydney, NSW Dated this 12th day of June, 2018

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Critical Path Incorporated A.B.N. 12 049 903 261 (an incorporated association)

Additional Information Disclaimer The additional financial data presented in the following pages is in accordance with the books and records of Critical Path Incorporated (“our client�) which have been subjected to the auditing procedures applied in our statutory audit of the association for the year ended 31 December 2017. It will be appreciated that our statutory audit did not cover all details of the additional financial data. Accordingly, we do not express an opinion on such financial data and no warranty to accuracy or reliability is given. Neither the firm nor any member or employee of the firm undertakes responsibility in any way whatsoever to any person (other than our client) in respect of such data, including any errors or omissions therein however caused.

Mitchell & Partners CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS

Glenn Merchant CA PARTNER

Sydney, NSW Dated this 12th day of June, 2018


Welcome

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Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit For the year ended 31 December 2017 Critical Path Incorporated SCHEDULE 1 – General Operations

Note Sch INCOME Donations

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

6,909

65,969

Net grant income

524,842

375,515

Projects income

232,538

8,312

2,846

4,367

21,009

19,939

1,080

1,618

789,224

475,720

(776,589)

(480,881)

12,635

(5,161)

Investment income: • Interest Rent received Sundry income TOTAL INCOME LESS: EXPENDITURE NET SURPLUS/DEFICIT

The above UNAUDITED detailed statement of surplus or deficit should be read in conjunction with the disclaimer.


Detailed Statements of Surplus or Deficit

SCHEDULE 2 – General Operations The liabilities recognised for employee benefits consist of the following amounts: Note EXPENSES Advertising and promotion

2017 ($)

2016 ($)

14,712

12,720

-4,450

5,541

3,965

7,594

192

189

1,252

2,440

18,205

19,965

Employment expenses

1,905

-

Entertainment

1,874

1,433

Financial contractor

9,518

6,260

Insurance

4,008

4,106

Legal fees

350

(2,500)

2,522

1,290

131

249

490,660

183,579

64,654

53,678

Staff training

354

502

Subscriptions

313

431

-

-

13,625

14,523

Telephone and internet charges

2,248

2,163

Travel expenses

3,694

6,371

Worker’s Compensation

3,304

3,492

Wages and salaries

143,553

156,855

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

776,589

480,881

Annual leave provided Accounting fees Bank charges Computer supplies Depreciation and amortisation

Office supplies Postage and stationery Project expenses Rent and overheads

Sundry expenses Superannuation

The above UNAUDITED detailed statement of surplus or deficit should be read in conjunction with the disclaimer.

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Welcome

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Profile for Critical Path

Critical Path Annual Report 2017  

Critical Path Annual Report 2017  

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